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Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate: Want to re-read the Self-Governance articles from recent issues of our Sota Iya Ye Yapi?

Whether or not the Tribe assumes administrative authority over your health services is a BIG DEAL. What do you know about it?

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Self-Governance Articles from past Sotas

  Obituaries Editorials Editor's column Education
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Vol. 48 Issue No. 2

Anpetu Iyamni, Wednesday, Jan. 17, 2017

Inside this Edition –

Formal 2017 SWST Inauguration ceremony held last Tuesday, Jan. 10th

Chairman's Corner: Updating the Oyate

Oyate horse owners: Watch for symptoms of Equine Strangler

Winter General Council reports resume: Part III

This week's Sota being mailed on Tuesday due to Martin Luther King Jr. holiday

October 2016 Tribal Council proceedings in this Sota

Deadline for receipt of copy is Friday noon

Chairman's Corner –

Updating the Oyate

My friends and relatives:

The past few weeks have been interesting to say the least. There are a variety of events that have happened since the Christmas Blizzard and I will try my best to share this wide variety of information in a concise manner. We have started the recovery process of Operation Christmas Blizzard and have deadlines we need to meet per FEMA rules of recovery. We had phone conferences with FEMA Region VIII officials and with their assistance we are working our way through the recovery process. As of now, we are working government to government with FEMA and I will make sure that each of your councilmembers has a full report to share at their February district meetings.

On behalf of all those that suffered and struggled during the storm, I want to publicly thank the following for their service during this tribal state of emergency: Tribal council, (previous and current), Jim Pearson Emergency Management, SWHA, LTUC, Planning, Facilities maintenance, SWC, Dakota Nation Gaming, KXSW, UVA, DCA, Tribal Chairman's staff members, all the volunteers and all the different program staff members that contributed; (if I missed anyone I apologize). You all deserve commendation for your willingness to cooperate and you also displayed compassion of our Dakota people and I am thankful for all your long hours of work; Wopida Tanka! I want to publicly say "thank you" to the SWFCU and their staff for taking on an extra workload during our week of subsidy assistance. Finally, "thank you" to those of you that opened your homes to those that had no electricity; that is a true characteristic of being Dakota (our Dakota ways are alive and you have proved that through your actions during a state of emergency).

The following concerns need to be absorbed with an open mind and not misconstrued. In 2016, after I took office in the interim term as Chairman I asked everyone to be very cautious of Facebook; and I only said it one time. As I begin a new term in office as Chairman, I will only say this one time: be very cautious of what you see and read on Facebook. I have seen screen shots of misleading claims and deceptive statements against me and other members of Council that are false and it has caused an atmosphere of chaos and confusion. It is extremely important that Tribal leadership build a trust relationship with one another so that we can continue to move in a positive direction. Misleading statements and false accusations do not help our leadership, rather they divide us and put the entire Tribe into a state of dysfunction and we will not get anything accomplished. So, I humbly and respectfully ask that all our Tribal members be cautious of political slander you see and read on Facebook. I promised I would work with all our Tribal leadership and I will continue to do my best to bring tribal leadership together. We need time to get adjusted to each other's goals and objectives and come together as a team to accomplish great things for the Tribe.

This week, Tribal Council and Executives will meet alone to get updates on legal issues, economic issues, and work on goals and objectives to strengthen our nation. Two years is not a very long time and it is important we get started right away addressing our Tribal needs and concerns.

I want to thank all the families, friends and visitors that attended the inauguration dinner last week; it was interesting. Also, I want to thank Wahpekute, Sandman Honor Guard, Legion Post 314 and Desert Era veteran's groups for their participation during the opening ceremonies. Most importantly, I want to make a public apology to Ava; I have no excuse why I did not recognize you during the opening ceremonies. Ava is a Tribal royalty princess, champion dancer and I am sincerely sorry I forgot to mention you during the presentation of colors. I have sent a request to Ava via her auntie Geri Opsal that I would like her and her parents to stop by my office, I have something I would like to give to you as a token of my sincerest apologies and my appreciation of your attendance. (If Megan and or Wambdi would bring Ava, sometime after the end of a school day, around 4-430) I would greatly appreciate it.)

We should start seeing construction at the Dakota Crossings grocery store by the end of the month. The precast walls will be here very soon and we will see them being set up. There is still a lot of work to complete between now and the grand opening. I am optimistic that job openings for accounting, clerks, management and other types of jobs will be advertised soon and once we get more details we will post these in the Sota.

We have made some sizeable methamphetamine drug busts over the past month and I want to say, "Great job" to our Tribal police department and our canine units. People are always talking about my administration not doing anything to combat the meth but on the contrary we have made significant busts and will continue to do everything we can with the resources we have available to combat and drive out methamphetamines from our nation. I will be proposing additional tactics to strengthen our police force and their efforts of hammering down on meth dealers and users. Also, the Corrective Action Support Team sent a hard copy of their findings; I made copies for each of your Council representatives and they can share their copy with whoever wants to read the CAST report.

We will be honoring our 1867 Treaty that established the Lake Traverse Reservation. The honoring will include a buffalo feed, small wacipi and moccasin. Although our Treaty day is February 19th, we will celebrate our 150 year sesquicentennial on February 24-26. We have relatives from Canada that are requesting to attend and share oral history of our existence and it is important that we teach our younger generation the kinships we share with Sioux Valley, Standing Buffalo and other reserves in Canada. There are many of you that already know Fort Totten was established from the same Treaty and we want to give them time to make arrangements to participate. Once the event is finalized we will put a poster out calling for the singers, dancers and moccasin players; tentatively this event will be held at Dakota Magic Convention center.

Two weeks ago, my good koda from the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, Tribal Chairman Harold Fraizer, reached out to me and asked for our assistance. To share briefly, a bad winter storm hit his reservation and caused roads to be impassable. These impassable roads entrapped cars and unfortunately some of his Tribal members died. On behalf of our Tribe (Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe), I shared our deepest condolences. We also sent some of our Tribal Roads crew with three pieces of equipment to assist our sister tribe; I shared this request with the Council and all but one Executive concurred with sending help to our sister tribe. I am proud of our Tribal Roads taking on this dangerous task to help our sister tribe. I will share more information in the next two weeks.

I also have concern with the amount of work we have missed over the past three weeks. When the schools start late or they close it is the Tribe's policy to follow the schools. To my understanding, some of the reasons the Tribe does this is because there is nobody home to watch the small children that have no school. Another reason is because some of our Tribal workers live in areas where travel can be dangerous. Although work had either a late start or was called off I personally went to the Tribe and worked every single day and put in six to eight hours every single day. (I commend the other employees and Executives I saw working on a day that we were closed due to the schools being closed.) I drive from Lake Traverse, about a 22 mile drive, my personal morals are that if I can make then I should not take advantage of a "snow day." Also, when school is called off for a day or two days they make it up on the end of their school year, however, the Tribe does not make those hours up at any point during the fiscal year. Therefore, a couple of Tribal leaders and I are proposing some new ideas to fix this problem. The following are just some ideas to consider: If the Tribe closes as the schools close, those that choose to stay home can make up hours working on weekends during the summer; the amount of time they miss work will be made up cleaning ditches, painting elders homes, scraping and painting some of our local Tribal churches, or some other type of work to make up the admin hours they were paid because the Tribe was closed. Regardless, there are ideas to propose to make it fair to everyone else that works when the schools close; the casino workers still have to work, our grocery store workers will still have to work and so on and so forth. It is not right that Tribal government employees get a day off when schools close and I am confident the Vice-Chairman and Secretary will assist me in finding a new policy to implement.

Finally, I just want to say publicly that I am thankful for the opportunity to serve as your Tribal Chairman. I have not wavered from what I campaigned on, honesty, transparency and accountability. I am not going to let anyone deter me from moving forward; during my campaign hundreds of you told me, "Do not change what you are doing." I have not changed, I still help people when they ask for help, I do the best I can to work with other departments to help those that are in need and ask for different types of assistance, I still hold people accountable for their actions. If you hear gossip about your leadership and are unsure what to believe, just come see me; my door is always open and I will tell you the truth. I would like to leave everyone with something my dad shared with me many years ago and it is a quote from Eleanor Roosevelt: Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people.

Chairman Dave Flute, Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe.

2017 SWST Inauguration Ceremony

Photo highlights by John Heminger

By CD Floro

Sota Editor

The 2017-18 Tribal Executives and Council members took the oath of office with little fanfare on Tuesday, January 3rd. Tribal Court Judge Michael Swallow conducted the swearing-in. But this inauguration ceremony was postponed due to Operation Christmas Blizzard.

Electricity had been restored across the Lake Traverse Reservation, but weather and road conditions remained hazardous, and on-going emergency services were still underway.

Last week we informed Oyate of a $300 benefit provided for heads of households who had power outages of 24 hours or more. (Some homes were without electricity for up to six days.) Eligible persons were given instructions on how to apply, and applications were to be submitted to the SWST Emergency Management for approval and Credit Union for payment by this Wednesday, Jan. 18. Anyone who thinks they may be eligible and have not filled out an application, contact your District Council member or Executives immediately for more information.

Weather on inauguration day, Tuesday, January 10th, was not ideal. Motorists had to contend with icy roadways and high wind gusts.

But still attendance was pretty good. We don't have an official count, but there were people seated at most of the tables set up in the rotunda for the ceremony and community meal provided at noon by Dakota Magic Casino.

The first observation upon walking into the rotunda was, "What is this?"

Seating for Council and Executives was located on the south side of the rotunda.

"Unusual," I thought, as always Council had been seated on the west side.

But not today. Today the Council was going to be seated on the south side, along with the speaker's podium.

We joked, asking Chairman Flute if this meant the Tribe "is going south" (okay, perhaps a bit of inappropriate humor).

He replied, explaining the culturally appropriate meaning behind the change.

Later in the ceremony, the Tribal Chairman explained from the podium for all to hear and understand.

This opening ceremony by the 2017-18 Tribal Council is being held in the south direction.

As Dakota culture honors all four directions, he envisions moving through all four during the term of this leadership body.

The June 2017 general council, he announced, will be held in the east direction.

Second general council of the year, in December, will take place in the north.

First 2018 general council will move to the west. And the December 2018 general council will return to the south.

Therefore, all four directions will be recognized in these important gatherings with Tribal members.

I just had a thought. This is good, but what happens if Council calls a special general council?

Could happen.

Suppose we will keep moving from point to point.

Gathered for the ceremonial inauguration were the 2017-18 Executives and Council: Dave Flute, Tribal Chairman; Donovan White, Tribal Vice-Chairman; Crystal Heminger, Tribal Secretary; Eddie Johnson, Old Agency; Lois Owens, Enemy Swim; Winfield "JR" Rondell III, Heipa; Arnold White Jr., Buffalo Lake; Alvah Quinn Sr., Big Coulee; Justin Chanku, Long Hollow; and Francis Crawford, Lake Traverse.

The drum was Red Leaf.

Desert Era and Woodrow W. Keeble Memorial American Legion Post 314 veterans provided the honor guard.

Before the flag song, Chairman Dave Flute talked about the meaning its meaning, that it had been created to honor the Dakota presence at the Battle of the Little Bighorn ("Battle of the Greasy Grass").

An opening prayer was given by Rev. Vern Donnell.

Former Tribal Chairman Jerry Flute gave remarks and provided a traditional Dakota prayer. Joe Circle Bear had been on the agenda to give the traditional prayer, but he was unable to attend due to the weather conditions. So Dave Flute asked his father up to the podium.

In his opening remarks, Tribal Chairman Dave Flute expressed gratitude for both outgoing and incoming Tribal Council members for stepping up and helping respond to the Christmas blizzard.

Keynote speaker was Frank White Bull, member of the Standing Rock Sioux sister tribe.

Frank has represented his home district of Kenel on the SRST Council since 2000. He said he was motivated to run for office to help bring about new vision for his tribe.

Not necessarily, he said, in protest of what previous Council members were doing, but to improve on the direction for Standing Rock's future.

"It was good leadership," he explained, "but we could do better."

And he has been taking a strong leadership role ever since, working today with current Standing Rock Tribal Chairman Dave Archambault II.

Frank talked about his association with several Sisseton-Wahpeton Tribal Chairmen, including Chairman Flute.

He has gotten to know them personally with shared work on the United Tribes Technical College (UTTC) Board, and in cooperative work among the regional tribes.

 "And we are related," he said.

He traced his ancestry back to Chief Joseph White Bull and relatives in the Thunderhawk tiospaye at Rosebud.

Frank said, "On my dad's side I could have relatives right here in the Sisseton-Wahpeton."

He said that he had been instructed to "always know your relatives."

And "Never forget where you come from … your families."

Traditionally, he explained, "Tribal leaders were chosen by elders."

"They were tested, and selected."

He said he believes in standing up for traditional values.

"In this new period of leadership," he said, "never forget about the people."

"As leaders, we never put ourselves above the people."

"Don't take advantage."

The SRST Councilman expressed thanks for the Sisseton-Wahpeton support for resisting the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) on their homelands.

Thank you, he said to Chairman Flute, for coming and providing assistance.

Frank had greeted the Chairman and a delegation of SWST members when they caravanned to Standing Rock on August 15th. He gave them a tour of the reservation, water treatment plant located downstream of the proposed pipeline crossing under Lake Oahe, and of the mni wiconi defenders' camp.

He expressed thanks for everyone's prayers, and for those who have maintained the sacred fire at the SWST camp within the Oceti Sakowin encampment.

He asked for continued prayers.

Frank White Bull congratulated the new SWST Council members and Executives.

After his talk, Chairman Flute, with assistance of Tribal Secretary Crystal Heminger and Old Agency District Councilman Eddie Johnson, presented Frank with a star quilt.

The Chairman also presented the guest with a medal engraved with four traditional Dakota values.

This is the second medal awarded; the first went to Bryan Akipa.

After the keynote address, each of the incoming Executives and Council members took a turn at the microphone.

Each expressed gratitude for support in the election.

Tribal Vice-Chairman Donovan White made it clear that he has come into office to fulfill campaign promises.

"Being Dakota … I don't see it here," he said.

He talked about "wasicu structure," and "how we have our way upside down. We've lost our way."

"I am proud to be Dakota too, but not proud (of money issues)."

Donovan talked about establishing a long-term treatment facility at Dakotah Pride to treat meth addiction, and aftercare.

"We have money to do these things," he said.

"We need to give back to the people."

Enemy Swim District Councilwoman Lois Owens said, "We are here for the people, to make informed decisions."

Winfield JR Rondell III, Heipa District Councilman, said "This is the fourth time (elected to Tribal office)."

"Each time I have come on board (knowing) … it's up to us. All of us."

He spoke of changes by "all working together."

There is "evidence we have," he said," of a lot of problems."

JR called for everyone to help "get through those challenges."

"The whole purpose is to try to improve the lives of our Tribal members," he said.

Buffalo Lake District Councilman Arnold White Jr. said "It's time to move forward."

Justin Chanku, Long Hollow District Councilman, said "It is time for change."

"I firmly believe in taking matters back to the Districts. That's the Dakota way."

White Red Leaf played an honor song, Tribal members and guests came up and greeted the new Tribal Council and Executives, wishing them well as they take some big challenges.

Since last November's general election, there is a lot of anxiety about what will happen across Indian country with a Trump presidency and a Republican-controlled Congress.

Already, there are many signs pointing to backsliding on environmental issues and erosion of tribal sovereignty.

Please read information elsewhere in this edition about what's at stake for healthcare.

Among those who walked through the line to congratulate the Council members was Alma Renville, perhaps the oldest member of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe at 100 years of age.

From Kunsi Alma, to the toddlers and infants in the rotunda, you could see and feel the connection between generations.

Please pray for your leaders.

Dakota Magic Casino catered the meal, and Tiospa Zina Tribal School students helped serve.

After sharing stories, which is always a big part of any gathering of the people – from long ago through today – people left Agency Village to drive home on icy roads in windy conditions. Reminders too of what has always been here on these homelands.

The only break with tradition obvious at this inauguration ceremony was that outgoing Tribal leaders were not present. Usually, outgoing Council members and Executives attend so the Oyate can thank them for their service. There were gifts prepared by the Chairman's office to be presented.

Watch for symptoms, take precautions –

Equine Strangler discovered in tribal horses

Equine Strangler, a form of Distemper that effects horses, has been discovered in horses belonging to Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribal members.

The infection is believed to have come from an infected horse or herd at Standing Rock, and that animals exposed to the disease were used on the Wokiksuye Ride this December to Mankato, Minnesota.

The word is being shared with riders from other communities and reservations who had had their horses at Standing Rock or on the ride.

Horse owners are advised to isolate animals that exhibit symptoms immediately, and to take other precautions against the spread of the disease.

Ella Mae Greybuffalo, SWST horse raiser, has some practical advise: "Once the infection takes over the lymphnodes this is when owners need to keep a keen eye on them as overnight things change fast! One can only pray the nodes blow on their own vs having a vet come to lance them open or in worst cases die from the swelling around their throat. With the colds temps it's a bit easier as the puss somewhat isolates to the hair under the chin but once it warms up that's when the bacteria comes alive a spreads faster. All humans need to take special precautions not to cross contaminate from horse to horse change gloves dip boots n bleach water solution wash clothes."

Here is more information about symptoms, how the disease is spread, and treatment options.

Equine Strangler

Limiting the spread of strangles around the yard will benefit the individual horse but will also reduce the costs and time involved in the 'clean up' procedure after an outbreak.

Symptoms and Diagnosis

Typical signs of strangles include:

•   Depression

•   Loss of appetite or difficulty eating

•   Raised temperature

•   Cough

•   Nasal discharge

•   Swollen glands in the throat region

•   Rupture of glands with abscess material/pus

In addition, more severe strangles signs include difficulty breathing.

Horses can show all or some of these symptoms and the severity of the symptoms shown can vary widely. Sometimes your vet will be able to make a diagnosis on clinical signs alone but often they will need to take a swab from the throat (via the nose) or from abscesses to confirm a clinical diagnosis. There is a blood test available to help identify infected horses, carriers and those horses that have been previously exposed.

If your horse shows any of these symptoms it is important that you contact your vet to diagnose and treat your horse as soon as possible.

If symptoms are mild they may be mistaken for other respiratory diseases such as a dust allergy or a 'common cold'. Infected horses showing a mild nasal discharge with no other obvious clinical signs are still just as hazardous as more severe cases in spreading the disease and developing complications.

Complications of the disease

Complications are frequent with up to 10% of recovered horses becoming carriers of the disease. The bacteria sit in the guttural pouch (sacs at the back of the throat) and the horse will continue to pass the bacteria on to other horses for months or even years. Carrier horses can be difficult to diagnose as typically they show no signs but once diagnosed they can be treated and resolved of the underlying infection.

Strangles can be fatal in 1% of cases when abscesses develop in other body organs which grow and rupture, a form known as 'bastard strangles'. Another life threatening complication is Purpura hemorrhagica. This is widespread small bleeding along with fluid accumulation (oedema) of the limbs, eye lids and gums. The peripheral accumulation of fluid can be so extreme that circulatory failure and death ensue.

Contagious

Unlike equine flu, strangles is not airborne, but it can spread quickly through direct contact between horses or via indirect contact, e.g.

•   tack and equipment

•   shared drinking water and feed

•   clothing

•   hands

•   yard dogs and cats. They will not develop disease itself but will help transmit infection in a similar way that humans do on their hands and clothing

The incubation period (time from infection to showing clinical signs) is from 3-14 days with abscesses forming up to 2 weeks later.

Treatment

There is no one treatment plan that is suitable for every case of strangles. Treatment often revolves around supportive care, good stable management and hygiene. Antibiotics may rarely be used and your veterinary surgeon will give you guidance based on your horse's individual circumstances.

Supportive Therapy

Feeding wet sloppy feed from the floor makes it easier for infected horses to swallow and encourages drainage of pus from the throat area. Hot compresses applied to the abscesses will help bring them to the surface to enable spontaneous rupture or surgical lancing by the veterinary surgeon. Once an abscess has ruptured it will need to be drained and flushed daily with a suitable antiseptic solution.

Isolation

Potentially infected horses should be isolated as soon as possible to help limit the spread of disease.

Management of Strangles

What to do in an outbreak:

Once the first case of strangles on a yard has been diagnosed, all other horses are at risk.

•   The affected horse needs to be isolated from the other horses.

•   The yard should be closed to horses from outside the yard and horses should not be moved from the yard - even if they seem healthy.

•   All healthy animals on the yard should be monitored closely to pick up new cases of strangles as early as possible. Monitoring rectal temperatures twice daily is a useful exercise.

•   It is useful to move horses into three distinct groups:

1. Red group - signs of strangles or raised temperature

2. Orange group - been in contact with a horse in red group

3. Green group - no known exposure to red or orange group

Equipment and staff should not move between groups and groups should be kept out of contact with each other. Horses showing signs of disease or a raised temperature should be moved into the red group. The idea is to try and limit the spread of strangles so that it does not pass around the whole yard. This obviously has welfare benefits for the individual horses but will also reduce the costs and time involved in the 'clean up' procedure after an outbreak.

Wear protective clothing and gloves when handling infected horses and wear waterproof footwear that can be easily cleaned in a suitable disinfectant. It is a good idea to have foot dips available for each group of horses.

Ensure everyone on the yard has been informed and behaves appropriately.

People who are in regular contact with horses from outside the yard should stay away from the infected yard as much as possible.

Effectively, an outbreak could mean that a yard will be closed down.

Unfortunately, this situation can last for months.

Part III of a series –

SWST 2016 winter general council

By CD Floro

Sota Editor

This is a continuation of our report on the SWST 2016 winter general council. This year's winter session was held on Thursday, Dec. 15, and continued on Tuesday, Dec. 20. Due to the breaking news concerning the Republican-controlled US Congress apparent repeal of the Affordable Healthcare Act (aka "Obamacare") and the potential devastating impact on tribes, we are jumping ahead to the Health Administration report.

Tribal Health Coordinator Sara DeCoteau gave a brief oral report on Tuesday, Dec. 20th, but Tribal members will benefit by reading the entire report in the 2016 winter general council book (available from the Tribal Chairman's office) or the summary here.

Sara began her report by attempting to explain what the Tribe's Health Administration is, and does.

Tribal members seem to have difficulty understanding the difference between Health Administration and the Community Health Education programs.

They are separate, and annual reports from both programs will be shared here in the Sota.

There were a couple of questions from the audience.

Tim LaBatte asked what the Tribe is doing to address suicide.

In response, Sara said she was glad he asked that question, because it gave her an opportunity to report on two valuable grants SWST had recently been awarded.

The first is the SAMHSA Native Connection grant, which is to address suicidal behavior in youth up to age 24, and SWO has hired Dr. Gail Mason, PH.D., MS, Licensed Professional Counselor to lead the efforts. (The Sota shared a feature article by Katy Heinecke in the Sisseton Courier about the program and Dr. Mason.)

The second grant, she explained, is the Generation Indigenous (Gen-I) grant from the Indian Health Service, which had just been awarded that week!

Its purpose is to promote resilience and protective factors in youth up to age 24 to prevent suicidal behavior and drug abuse. The Tribe will be hiring a Behavioral Health Prevention Specialist to staff the Gen-I project.

Chairman Flute then explained the background for the Native Connection grant, how he and the Tribal officials who had gone to Washington, DC last Spring had learned of it then and been strongly advised to apply, and how he had followed up to make sure that an application was submitted.

He acknowledged grant writer Lee Ann TallBear, and also Health Coordinator Sara DeCoteau, for writing the grant and getting it into place.

"It's one thing to issue a directive but someone needs to follow-up and do the work," the Chairman said.

Sota readers will note that for the past several weeks the Gen-I project has been featured in notices on these pages of a variety of activities that have begun on the Lake Traverse Reservation in December and January.

FY 2016 Annual Program Report

Health Services Administration

Staff: Sara DeCoteau, Health Services Coordinator; and Peggy Peters, Prevention Coordinator (PC).

Program Summary and Responsibilities:

1.  Coordinate SWO's Indian Health Service Comprehensive Health Care Services Contract No. HHS-I-241-2015-00008 (the IHS Master Contract, also known as Indian Self-Determination and Educational Assistance Act or "638" contract).

2.  Implement health initiatives and grants.

3.  Participate in interagency coordination activities.

4.  Plan and develop services that will improve health status, quality, and access to care (primarily implementation of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Health Plan).

Accomplishments for FY2016:

1. Coordinated SWO's P.L. 93-638 contract with the Indian Health Service , including preparation of budget modifications, end-of-the year carry-over adjustments, incorporating recurring and non-recurring increases, maintaining contract compliance and renewal. Results: We processed 9 budget modifications this year. The recurring base of SWO's IHS Master contract was $2,596,845. Plus, non-recurring funds totaled $5,098,362.24 (of which $882,064.66 was Indirect Costs and $4,216,297.60 was carried over to continue non-recurring initiatives). The recurring base increased by $13,623 for Pay Costs appropriated by Congress. In FY/2016 the IHS Master Contract had 20 accounts - 8 recurring and 12 non-recurring. HC arranges for employee background checks, prepares contract continuation materials, and serves as Fair and Uniform Services (FUS) Coordinator to address concerns from program participants.

2   Coordinated access to orthodontic treatment for eligible children with the greatest clinical need through a partnership between the IHS Dental Clinic, Delta Dental of South Dakota, and participating orthodontist providers. Results: Twenty children completed orthodontic treatment this year, bringing the grand total to 201 since the program began in 2010. Currently, we have $821,512 obligated for the 116 children who are in some phase of treatment or waiting to start treatment. This year, we referred 43 new children, obligating $304,526 for their treatment over the next several years. The total cost for the 20 children who completed was $121,999.76. We have 27 children who are referred and ready to start. We processed 34 first payments for children starting treatment and 32 second payments for children mid-way through treatment. Due to carry-over funding over-and-above our recurring base, we we able to continue to refer children with severity scores <65. However, in preparation for the future when there will be no carry-over, the Orthodontics Team developed revisions to its standard operating procedures. The updated procedures document how decisions for clinical priority and admission to the Orthodontics Program (related to Purchased and Referred Care eligibility) are made. The draft SOP is presently still under review and not yet approved.

3   Reimbursed the Tribal Elderly Affairs Program for non-emergency medical transportation payments to Tribal members referred through the IHS Purchased and Referred Care Program. Results: Reimbursements this year totaled $137,638.33 for 1,954 patients. Program is operated pursuant to the IHS Manual, Part 2, Chapter 3, Purchased and Referred Care, §2-3.18 Fiscal Intermediary, 21.85 Patient and Escort Travel. Includes travel and related costs, e.g., lodging, meals, etc.

4   Promoted a holistic approach for the first one thousand days of life by working collaboratively with other programs and agencies to develop and implement community based health prevention services and activities in community, school, home, and clinical settings and by performing the Pregnancy Health Survey for Parents of Newborns on the Lake Traverse Reservation to understand why some babies are born healthier than others and use the information gained to improve health programming. Results: Fieldwork for the Pregnancy Health Survey was completed June 30, 2016. Our response rates were 61.1% for mothers (n=91) and 50.8% for fathers (n=64). The goal was to achieve a 60% or higher response rate, which we achieved for mothers. Our survey was the first ever of its kind that included fathers. There were 149 births in our sample. The datasets for both the mother's and father's surveys have been finalized by our partners at South Dakota State University and analyses have begun. HC managed the Survey, and PC performed outreach. The HC submitted a no cost extension to Sanford Research grant to complete the project in Year 2 (Aug 2016 - July 2017). During FY16, 122 gift cards were issued to parents completing the survey. The PC documented 12 paid media promotions, 110 public / social media promotions, 10 presentations, 39 promotional contacts, and 12 survey team huddles while implementing the survey. The PC also provided oral health education for children ages 0-5 through 10 activities and 8 events, totaling 535 contacts this year. Oral health preventive outreach and case-management services to children included 30 case-management contracts, 61 sight screenings, 37 referrals, and 28 collaborative contacts. In addition, the PC participated in 70 First 1,000 Days Initiative Interagency Forum, Community Safety Team, SWO Health Plan work Group, and health event planning meetings, documenting 636 contacts and 9 collaborative activities or events.

5   Coordinated First 1,000 Days Initiative Interagency Forum meetings to collaborate and use collective impact strategies to prevent and mitigate toxic stress in pregnancy, infancy and early childhood. Results: Accomplishments included a resource mapping directory, website, and organizational charter. Informational roundtables and program overviews were held at monthly meetings, which were facilitated by the HC, co-facilitated by the Community Health Education Program Manager, and recorded by the PC. The Forum assisted in planning and implementing a Maternal Child Health Resilience conference held in June, as well as a follow-up session in September. Beginning in July, the Team has been holding trauma-informed learning sessions: "(1) To raise awareness about evidence-based, trauma informed systems of care and roles of community health workers. (2) To better understand what the principles of trauma informed care are and how to apply them in our work." We completed the third and final year of a collaborative with the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's Health Board, in which our Reservation was the implementation site for a Health Resources and Services Administration Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems grant. The HC presented at the Tribal Action Plan training in Aberdeen during July to share project outcomes. The HC managed a subaward that provided financial support for conferences, printing, educational supplies, and telecommunications.

6   Coordinated SWO's request to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for an Epi-Aid to quantify the scope of Maternal Substance Use during Pregnancy among Mothers of American Indian Infants. Results: SWO and one other Tribe requested the Epi-Aid. Fieldwork was completed by an abstraction team that came to South Dakota for three weeks during August and abstracted 1,035 birth records at six private hospitals plus other sites via remote access. Qualitative interviews were conducted with five SIHS subject matter experts. HC serves as the Principal Investigator with the SWO Local Research Review Board. Software failed in the field, so data was abstracted onto paper and now must be entered. Therefore, results are expected by year-end. Data will belong to the participating Tribes and used to establish policy and programming.

7   Participated with Interagency Inhome Care Team for interagency case-collaboration aimed at assisting elderly and disabled Tribal members to maintain the most independent and highest possible quality of life. Results: HC attended monthly meetings, served as Recorder, and scheduled monthly meetings. HC managed the account where non-recurring, year-end funds are budgeted to assist interagency inhome clients with assistive devices. During the year, assistive devices and supplies were provided to 136 clients at a cost of $20,598.51. These must be ordered by an IHS physician and arranged by IHS case-manager when there is no other payor. HC pays the invoices. The Team operates pursuant to Collaborative Agreement SD-CA-09-0021.

8   Represented SWO on South Dakota Health Care Solutions Coalition, which is studying Medicaid Expansion under the Affordable Care Act in South Dakota. Results: HC was assigned by the Tribal Chairman and provided input on the Governor's proposal and recommendations to the Legislature on Medicaid expansion. HC drafted Resolution No. SWO-15-129 (adopted on 12/2/15) to support it. However, the matter was not put to a vote by the SD Legislature during the 2016 session. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services issued a significant policy change on 2/26/16 that states services to American Indian people enrolled in the Medicaid program provided through facilities of the IHS, whether operated by IHS or by Tribes, will be paid 100% by the Federal Government with no State match. This update in payment policy is a big deal and is intended to help increase access to care, strengthen continuity of care, and improve population health for Indian people.

9   Participated in other interagency partnerships to establish a common agenda and collective impact on various initiatives. Results: a) HC is facilitator for Community Safety Team, which meets monthly. Collaborative Agreement SD-CA-10-0021 was updated and approved by Tribal Council Resolution SWO-16-041, but is still pending action by the IHS Area Office. SWO-16-041 also authorized use of Protocol for Assessing Community Excellence in Environmental Health (PACE EH) to identify our top three public safety priorities and develop action plans. The team identified Motor Vehicle Safety, Elder Safety & Home Safety as priorities. b) Behavioral Health Interagency Team met monthly for information sharing and has started to update its collaborative agreement (SD-CA-09-0006). c) Attended other meetings, including Dept. of Health & Human Services, Partnerships in Improving Community Health, Service Unit Executive Staff, and Partnerships in Improving Community Health (PICH).

10 Coordinated Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Health Planning to build consensus between stakeholders on a common agenda and achieve collective impact on 15 priority initiatives over the next five years. Results: a) Final Report for Health Plan 2011-2015 was completed in March. b) Health Plan 2016-2020 was completed and approved 7/5/16 via Tribal Council Resolution No. SWO-16-081. c) Assisted with Self-Governance Planning Phase authorized by Tribal Council Resolution No. SWO-15-105 by staffing work group meetings; coordinating advertising/selection of expert consultants and contract development; coordinating three onsite consultant team visits; requesting, archiving, and disseminating large quantity of information requested and subsequently received from IHS; submitting 23 informational articles to the Sota, now on the website; developing educational materials (including a brochure); developing and presenting PowerPoint to 3 stakeholder groups; and providing feedback to the consultants on final report, draft compact, and draft funding agreement. d) Four grant writer contracts were paid by Health Administration. Two of the four grants were funded (Meth and Suicide Prevention Initiative-Year 2 and SAMHSA Native Connection [NC] youth suicide prevention grant.) HC drafted authorizing resolutions, furnished information, and provided administrative follow-up. e) SWO Grantwriter consultant Request for Proposals was developed and is being advertised. Contractor will write grants to implement Health Plan. f) HC was assigned by the Tribal Chairman to be the Community Justice and Rehabilitation Center planning project point of contact. SWO was able to advertise for and then re-engage the same architectural and engineering firm that worked on the project previously. To date the Master Plan and Pre-Architectural Plan have been updated. Work on the Schematic Design, Staffing Plan, and estimated cost are underway with mid-November estimated date of completion -- although the no-cost extension on the grant is March 2017. g) HC is the Lead for three initiatives: First 1,000 Days Initiative, Data Collection / Surveillance, and Grantwriter. PC is Lead for Early Childhood Tooth Cavities initiative.

Program Needs & Identified Issues:

1   Unmet Needs: Ready-to-use office space for new grants. Recommendations: Renovate and maintain spaces. Have an inventory available for Project Development Team, along with rental rates.

2   Ongoing Issues or Struggles: Infrastructure, teamwork, clear standard operating procedures for internal processes, and consistent communications. Recommendations: Staff meetings with management-oriented agendas. Identify key processes that are not clear and develop protocols and SOPs to address and communicate these to users. Delegate authority (to go along with responsibility).

Looking ahead: goals and objectives for FY2017:

1   Coordinate SWO's IHS Master Contract. Results: Get Orthodontics Policy and Procedures approved. Amend scope of work to include SAMHSA Native Connection Activities. Prepare three-year contract renewal process, due in Summer 2017. Follow-up with any compacting / contracting activity authorized by Tribal Council per Self-Governance initiative.

2   Implement health initiatives and grants. Results: Launch SAMHSA Native Connection cooperative agreement and mentor Project Director when hired. Complete Pregnancy Health Survey and Epi-Aid and use data to develop/improve health programming.

3   Participate in interagency coordination activities.  Results: Continue to participate in teams. Work with Area Office to get clarification regarding collaborative agreements. If this is still a working process, finalize the amendment for Community Safety Team and then process the amendment for the BHIT. Complete PACE-EH for Community Safety Team and integrate.

4   Implement SWO Health Plan 2016-2020. Results: Coordinate and assist in implementation of 15 initiatives. Serve as Lead for 4 of them. Operationalize Grant Writer contract and Project Development Team. Complete initial planning project for Community Justice and Rehabilitation Center (which includes SUD treatment) and assist with next steps.

FY 2016 Annual Program Report

Office of Transportation

Cliff Eberhart gave the Transportation report to general council on Thursday afternoon.

A major point Cliff made is that this office means that the Tribe's "transportation system, Tribal Roads, is all under one roof."

Construction projects, maintenance, all of it now falls under the Office of Transportation.

He talked about the Office creating "new jobs."

Chairman Flute added to the discussion, speaking of "taking action to lock in contracts which are rising and expected to rise (in cost) … for the sake of being proactive in meeting needs of the roads on the Lake Traverse Reservation."

The Chairman said they are coordinating with the Districts and with the BIA.

Staff: Cliff Eberhardt, Transportation Coordinator; and Toni Heminger, Office Manager.

Program Summary and Responsibilities:

*The Transportation office is designed to oversee the Tribal Transportation Program TTP Federal funding. This funding is used for planning, design engineering, contracting, construction and construction engineering of all BIA public routes.

*With Tribal Transportation Program (TTP) Federal Transportation funding levels low and the cost of construction high the Transportation office is always looking for creative ways to stretch the Federal transportation construction dollar.

*The Transportation office has always kept transportation safety in very high regard while building our BIA roads. Building the public BIA routes to today's federal construction and safety standards.

FY2016 accomplishments:

1   BIA Route 7. -   This project has been completed with the exception of clearing out some erosion control devises from the ditches in the spring of 2017, we have gotten all the water drainage issues and miscellaneous construction items taken care of. 90% complete. Results: With all the safety we did take the time to research and add into the construction of this BIA. 7 construction project; rumble strips, new signage, delineators, 8 foot shoulders this will be a road that will meet standards for years to come.

2   Agency Village Pathways Project.- This project is substantially complete. - Approximately 1.2 miles of concrete sidewalks. - Over 3200 sq.yds. of concrete. - Crosswalk beacons installed at TZ crossing. Results: This project has created separation of pedestrian traffic from vehicle traffic on some of our more popular routes around the Agency Village. Giving people a place to walk other than in the road with traffic, creating safety for all community members.

3   Multi Route Re-Surfacing project. - 4.5 miles of gravel re-surfacing. - .5 miles of asphalt paving. - Replaced all traffic signage on the three BIA routes 706, 701, 4. Results: These three BIA routes were in very bad disrepair before the construction project. Two of these routes 706 and 701 were being utilized as detour routes during the Route 7 construction project. This increase in traffic made these routes nearly impassable. Warranting the 2016 construction project.

Program needs and identified issues:

1   BIA routes 15, 2, 12, 11, 8 and housing streets. There are still over 50 miles of BIA public routes in need of upgrade/construction. Recommendations: There are factors that come into play when choosing our BIA road construction projects such as Average Daily Traffic (ADT) Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT).

2   Federal Funding levels are not adequate to meet the needs of the Federal BIA road construction projects. With the average cost of an asphalt road construction project being 1 million dollars a mile and the annual Federal Tribal Transportation Program (TTP) funding level at 2.9 million dollars we have to create strategic ways of stretching the Federal dollar. Recommendations: The Transportation office has been in attendance at the regional and national tribal levels to argue the point of low funding levels and inadequate roads and infrastructure on all Reservation lands. These arguments have produced extra funding in the new Fast-Act Federal Highway Bill, however not enough for today's high cost to construct.

Goals and objectives for FY2017:

1   Continue to build safety into our construction projects as funds become available. Results: This will create safer driving conditions for all Traveling Public.

2   Update our Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan (TTIP) and Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP). Recommendations: TTIP - This is an annual 5 year plan and submitted federally for the upcoming construction season. LRTP - 20 year plan also submitted federally.

3   The Transportation Office has taken a step in creating the Tribes first Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Department of Transportation SWO-DOT. Recommendations: With Tribal Council and Executives support the Transportation office has drafted Chapter 77, Transportation code of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate. The first steps to the Department of Transportation.

Winter 2016 General Council Reports

To be Continued

Letter from Chairman Flute to Senator Rounds –

Chairman Flute requests support for IHCIA if Affordable Health Care Act is repealed

December 29, 2016

The Honorable Mike Rounds United States Senator

Hart Senate Office Bldg., Suite 502

Washington, DC 20510

SUBJECT: In response to your December 12, 2016 Letter to Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's Health Board Regarding proposed Repeal & Replacement of Affordable Care Act

Dear Senator Rounds:

We respectfully request your assistance in protecting the Indian Health Care Improvement Act (Indian Health Care Improvement Act), which was permanently reauthorized in Section 10221 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). It is so unfortunate this legislation, which is of paramount importance to Indian people, is now at risk of being repealed and replaced along with the overarching legislation through which it was reauthorized. Please be our advocate to ensure this does not happen!

The IHCIA had actually expired in Year 2000. Despite the best efforts of many, there was not sufficient political impetus and support to muster reauthorization of this cornerstone legislation FOR TEN YEARS. Year after year it was introduced, and year after year it "died on the vine." Then, it was included in the Affordable Care Act and permanently reauthorized as part of a very complex and interwoven legislation package. During the ten year period the IHCIA languished, Indian Health programs operated somewhat in limbo, as the appropriation authorities were extended year-by-year.

As you know, the Indian Health Care Improvement Act (IHCIA) enhanced the legislative authority enacted through the Snyder Act of 1921, 25 U.S.C. §13 by affirming that the United States has legal responsibility to provide all the resources necessary to ensure the highest possible health status for Indians. The IHCIA states that the federal government's "responsibility to provide health services to American Indians . . . derives from the nation-to-nation relationship between the federal and tribal governments." These are paramount policy statements we would like to see protected! In addition, many important new authorities were established through the permanent reauthorization that we trust you will agree are essential policies to retain. These new authorities include:

* North and South Dakota established as a single Contract Health Service Delivery Area

* Expansion of Community Health Aides and Dental Health Aides to the "Lower 48" states

* Establishment of a new Title VII for Behavioral Health

* Expanding the scope of the Indian Health Service to include long-term care options, such as home health, skilled care, and assisted living

* Expansion of health facilities construction methodologies to include "specialized facilities"

* Interagency Agreements with the Department of Veterans Affairs to share resources and improve access and services for Indian veterans

* Third party billing authorities that are critical to the survival of Indian Health facilities that rely on them for approximately half of their operating incomes, sometimes more

Each of these authorities were hard-fought and represent important policies that should be retained in the future. It is important to point out that the Indian Health Service has not implemented many of these authorities, yet, due to lack of Congressional appropriations. However, we feel that their inclusion in the IHCIA is a powerful and significant statement of Federal policy and should be preserved! Please note there are many intricate and technical cross-references between the IHCIA and the ACA that authorize and affect third party billing. These and other annotated citations are provided in the comprehensive comments submitted in behalf of our constituent Tribes by Jerilyn Church, Chief Executive Officer of the Great Plains Tribal Chairman's Health Board. We commend Mrs. Church and her staff for all of the detail articulated in that letter. We are not going to repeat here, but please know that we support the important points raised and join GPTCHB and other Tribes in requesting your careful consideration to the recommendations. We very much look forward to hearing more about the market-based, consumer-driven plan that is being developed by the new Administration to replace the Affordable Care Act and how it will improve access and quality of care to all Americans, including Indian people. Your efforts to preserve the Indian Health Care Improvement Act in the process and to assure that the Federal trust responsibility for health care to American Indian people is protected and strengthened (not diminished) will be very much appreciated. Sincerely,

Dave Flute, Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribal Chairman.

Update: SWO Self-Governance planning phase

(Editor's note: Here is a summary of planning undertaken by the SWST during the past year concerning how the Tribe might assume self-governance of the health services currently being administered under Indian Health Service [IHS]. Thank you to Tribal Health Coordinator Sara DeCoteau for summarizing the planning phase.)

In February 2016 the Tribal Council contracted Sonosky, Chambers, Sachse, Endreson & Perry, LLP, a national tribal rights law firm, to provide expert consulting services.

Sonosky-Chambers also engaged a partner, Advocates for Native Issues, LLC (or ANI), a Native-owned firm with expertise in self-determination matters and tribal health management, as part of their team in working with the SWST.

They came onsite three times (March, May & June 2016).

The contract was scheduled to end in October.

In December, a no-cost extension was signed.

The proposed next step to wrap up the consultant contract – if not the planning phase – is for Tribal Council, Executives, and Work Group to meet to review and discuss the report compiled by the consultants, the draft (sample) compact, and the draft (sample) funding agreement.

Although the consultant contract is depleted of travel monies for them to come back onsite, they are still available by phone.

The intent of the wrap-up meeting would be to decide whether there is interest in pursuing the planning phase further and to identify next steps.

Depending on outcomes, this Spring the Tribe could apply for a Self-Governance Planning Cooperative Agreement, Self-Governance Negotiation Cooperative Agreement, and/or a Tribal Management Grant to prepare systems for contracting.

"From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer"

GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov

Phone 605-698-3388

*Housing and Urban Development (HUD) annual Homeless Point in Time Count is scheduled for January 24, 2017. To assure we have an accurate count, and more importantly, the opportunity to provide immediate assistance to any Veteran who may be homeless please stop by the office or contact me at 698-3388.

*The United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has published regulations to establish presumptions for the service connection of eight diseases associated with exposure to contaminants in the water supply at Camp Lejeune, N.C. The presumption of service connection applies to active duty, reserve and National Guard members who served at Camp Lejeune for a minimum of 30 days (cumulative) between August 1, 1953 and December 31, 1987, and are diagnosed with any of the following conditions: adult leukemia, aplastic anemia and other myelodysplastic syndromes, bladder cancer, kidney cancer, liver cancer, multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and Parkinson's disease. Environmental health experts in the VA's Technical Workgroup conducted comprehensive re-views of scientific evidence, which included analysis and research done by the Department of Health and Human Service's Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), the Environmental Protection Agency, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, the National Toxicology Program, and the National Academies of Science. Veterans with 30 or more cumulative days of active duty service, at Camp Lejeune during the contamination period are already eligible for certain medical benefits, following passage of the Honoring America's Veterans and Caring for Camp Lejeune Families Act of 2012. In the early 1980s, volatile organic compounds, trichloroethylene (TCE), a metal degreaser, and perchloroethylene (PCE), a dry cleaning agent, as well as benzene and vinyl chloride, were discovered in two on-base water supply systems at Camp Lejeune. The contaminated wells supplying the water systems were shut down in February 1985. The area included in this presumption is all of Camp Lejeune and MCAS New River, including satellite camps and housing areas. The rule will be effective either 60 days after publication in the Federal Register.

*The South Dakota Department of Labor and Regulation will host Job Search Assistance Programs (JSAP). JSAP is a workshop for people recovering from job loss or enhancing their job search skills. Trained instructors speak on modern-day techniques used to successfully find employment. Topics covered are: resume and cover letter writing, interviewing etiquette, networking effectively, using social media and much more. JSAP will be offered at the following locations: Wednesday, Jan. 18, 9:30 a.m. - 3 p.m. CST, Sisseton - at 10 E. Hickory St. Suite 3. For more information, call 605-698-3964 or visit www.sdjobs.org.

*Fargo VA to host Veterans Creative Arts Festival, Feb. 15-FARGO, N.D. - The Fargo VA Medical Center will host a Veterans Creative Arts Festival on Feb. 15, 2017, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., in the 3rd floor auditorium. The purpose of the festival is to showcase the artistic talents of area Veterans. All Veterans enrolled for VA health care with the Fargo VA Medical Center and its clinics are invited to submit artwork. The festival is open to the general public. To submit artwork to the festival or to learn more about submission guidelines, call the Fargo VA's Recreational Therapy department at (701) 239-3700 extension 92094 or extension 93260. The submission deadline is Feb. 6, 2017. "VA health care systems often use the creative arts as a form of rehabilitative treatment to help Veterans recover from and cope with physical and emotional disabilities," said Lavonne Liversage, Fargo VA Health Care System Director. "This festival will not only provide area Veterans an opportunity to be acknowledged for their incredible artistic abilities - it will also serve as a venue for them to share their unique experiences both as a service member and a Veteran." The festival features a competition with several categories of art. A panel of judges from the local art community will name category winners whose work will then be submitted to the National Veterans Creative Arts Festival in Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 23-29, 2017. Once submitted to the national festival, judges there will select works to be shown. Veterans whose work is selected will be invited to attend the national festival. Some of the many categories open for submission include: painting, sculpture, carving, graphics, pastels, pottery, mosaic, collage, metalwork, glasswork, drawing, photography, woodworking, jewelry, and leatherwork.

*FAMILIES of Veterans no matter what ERA from WWI , WWII, Korean, Vietnam Veteran, Gulf on to present the ones that are currently on active duty please contact our office as we want to make sure each and every one of our TRIBAL MEMBERS have an existing file in our office. I know sometimes we have had calls and we didn't have any information on your loved ones and we need your assistance to help us continue to build up our files in the office. We honor each of our Veterans and with your help some day we will have complete files!!! And unless you call and check to see if you're on the roster when we file for medals or badges for difference campaigns we will not know if you're loved ones or yourself are on the list.

*VETERANS: PLEASE CALL OUR OFFICE IF YOU NEED ASSITANCE; WE ARE HERE TO SERVE! We are asking that you get your appointment slips turned in as soon as you get your slip - do not wait the day before or 2 days before. We have other avenues that we can utilize and if we have at least 4-5 days in advance that will give us plenty of time. Thank you.

*WOMEN VETERANS CALL CENTER: 1-855-VA-WOMEN. Crisis Help Line: 1-800-273-8255, available 24/7, and tell them you are a veteran. All calls are confidential.

Woodrow W. Keeble Memorial American Legion Post 314 - Delano Renville, Commander Cell # 268-0354; Vietnam Veterans Kit Fox Society - Doc Wanna, Commander Phone # 698-3299; Desert Era Veterans - Justin Chanku, 268-0977 Commander Cell# 467-9714; for GAS ASSISTANCE Geri Opsal 698-3388.

Have a great and safe week.

Geri Opsal, TVSO.

Yankton Sioux tribal chairman encourages mutual understanding

Pierre, SD – AP – Jan. 12, 2017 – The Yankton Sioux tribal chairman used his address to South Dakota lawmakers Thursday to encourage mutual understanding between Native American people and non-tribal members.

Chairman Robert Flying Hawk gave the second State of the Tribes address, a speech from a leader from one of the nine Native American tribes in South Dakota similar to the governor's State of the State. Gov. Dennis Daugaard watched the speech from the state House gallery.

Flying Hawk said that the state's reservations are facing challenges including methamphetamine use, poor life expectancy and high educational dropout rates.

Life expectancy for Native Americans in South Dakota is 68.2 years compared to 80.4 years for whites, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

He said that there needs to be collaboration to combat meth. The tribe's headquarters is in Wagner on the Yankton Reservation in southern South Dakota.

"We have a very negative energy that is powerful, but it can be overcome if we can work together as a people," Flying Hawk said.

Republican Rep. Don Haggar, who invited Flying Hawk to give the speech, said there will be "unity" between the tribes and the state on dealing with meth abuse.

Democratic Sen. Troy Heinert, a Rosebud Sioux member, said that Native Americans and non-tribal members need to find similarities and work together.

"We're not going to agree on everything, but that doesn't mean that everything is bad," Heinert said.

Last legislative session, Cheyenne River Sioux Chairman Harold Frazier gave the first address to a joint session of the Legislature from a South Dakota tribal leader.

Tribe, Corps side against Dakota Access in court claim

By Lauren Donovan

Bismarck Tribune –  Jan. 9, 2017 – A lawsuit that originally pitted the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe against the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for improperly authorizing the Dakota Access Pipeline, now has both parties on the same side: They both are refuting the pipeline's claim that it has all the necessary permission to bore under the Missouri River/Lake Oahe near the tribe's reservation boundary.

The tribe and the corps filed briefs Friday in U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., asking the judge to dismiss the pipeline's suit against the corps, in which Dakota Access claims the agency had issued all the necessary permissions and permits to allow the company to proceed with the critical river crossing, which has been stalled for months at a huge expense to the company in undelivered crude oil contracts.

Meanwhile, the company has staged drilling equipment within sight of the Oceti Sakowin encampment, where 700 to 1,000 anti-pipeline protesters remain despite Tribal Chairman Dave Archambault II's request that they should leave.

Archambault made the request following the corps' announcement Dec. 4 that it will not provide the easement while it recommended a complete environmental impact statement and a review of alternate routes, including one originally proposed 10 miles north of Bismarck. The chairman said the protest against the pipeline will be settled in court and protesters should leave for their safety given harsh winter conditions.

In its brief to the court, the corps says the pipeline's claim should be dismissed.

"There is no signed document conveying to Dakota Access an easement to construct a pipeline under corps-managed land. The army is still considering (the) easement application," the corps told federal Judge James Boasberg.

The pipeline company says it has the necessary permission and cites various communications from the corps, including permission under its Section 408 authority and in the corps' finding of no significant impact for the project in July.

The tribe's attorney, Jan Hasselman, of Earth Justice, said Dakota Access is in a mess of its own making.

"Its own choices — including building a significant portion of the pipeline before it had any permits and refusing to voluntarily cease construction in the disputed area around Lake Oahe, as the government repeatedly requested — are responsible for its current predicament," Hasselman told the court.

He concurred with the corps statement that it has not provided an easement under the Mineral Leasing Act, which is separate from its Section 408 authority.

Archambault said the Dakota Access suit is a bully tactic intended to violate the tribe's rights in the matter.

"It will not succeed. We look forward to working with the corps on an EIS that fully takes into account our history and our rights and are confident that the easement at Lake Oahe will ultimately be denied," he said.

The tribe is still awaiting publication of a notice of intent to prepare an EIS to be published in the Federal Register.

Boasberg stayed any action on the original lawsuit between the tribe and corps, pending the outcome of the cross claim filed by Dakota Access.

Big Oil cheers as Trump plans to open National Parks for drilling

By Lorraine Chow

EcoWatch – Jan. 12, 2017 – America's national parks are already under threat, but will our beloved public lands survive Donald Trump's incoming presidency?

The president-elect plans to open up federal lands for more energy development and, according to Reuters, energy companies and industry lobbyists are already expecting a flurry of new federal drilling and mining leases with the incoming administration.

"This opportunity is unique, maybe once in a lifetime," Jack Gerard, president of the Washington DC-based American Petroleum Institute lobby group, told the news service in regards to increased access to federal leases.

Vast quantities of oil, natural gas, coal and uranium are tucked away in government-owned national parks and forests, wildlife refuges and tribal territories from the Arctic to the Gulf of Mexico.

As Reuters noted, under the Obama administration, oil output on federal land made up about a fifth of the national total in 2015, down from more than a third in 2010. Onshore drilling leases also fell about 15 percent.

However, Trump campaigned on a promise to "unleash America's $50 trillion in untapped shale, oil, and natural gas reserves, plus hundreds of years in clean coal reserves." He has accused Obama of "denying millions of Americans access to the energy wealth sitting under our feet" by restricting leasing and banning new coal extraction.

The U.S. government owns roughly 640 million acres of land, and the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) manages most of it. In December, Trump nominated U.S. Rep. Ryan Zinke of Montana, a climate change skeptic and coal mining advocate as head of the department.

As it happens, The Wilderness Society calculated that 90 percent of the lands held by the Bureau of Land Management, a bureau of the DOI, is already open to oil and gas development. Most of these lands are in the West and Alaska.

At the same time, with crude oil prices above $50 a barrel, a drilling boom is in sight. As Bloomberg reported, U.S. shale producers are starting to hire back workers after sharp cutbacks in recent years and have added rigs to the shale patch in North America.

Even though Trump has previously said that he wants to keep public lands "great" and is "not looking to sell off land," that doesn't mean the leasing of public lands and waters for energy production is off the table.

Trump's own Energy Independence website states, "Rather than continuing the current path to undermine and block America's fossil fuel producers, the Trump Administration will encourage the production of these resources by opening onshore and offshore leasing on federal lands and waters." He also plans to end the "war on coal" and intends to scrap emissions regulations issued by the Obama Administration, such as the Clean Power Plan.

Trump's advisors are also seeking to privatize Native American reservations, which sit on an estimated 20 percent of the nation's oil and gas, along with large amounts of coal reserves. These resources are worth nearly $1.5 trillion.

In an effort to safeguard the environment, President Obama recently designated about 1.6 million acres in Utah and Nevada as national monuments. He also banned new drilling in federal waters in parts of the Atlantic and Arctic Oceans.

Republican lawmakers, however, have vowed to undo the measures. For now, it looks like the Right's "Drill, Baby, Drill" ethos is back on.

Here's a new way to fight the DAPL

By Jake Tracy

Grist – Jan. 13, 2017 – The Dakota Access Pipeline is not dead, despite what you may have heard. Fortunately, there will soon be a new way you can fight it.

On Dec. 4, Native Americans and environmental activists achieved a major victory in the months-long battle against the oil pipeline, known as DAPL, yet it wasn't as decisive as many media outlets reported. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers declined to grant a permit for the pipeline to be built under Lake Oahe, near the Standing Rock reservation in North Dakota. But the wording of the official announcement rendered its real message unintelligible to all but those familiar with federal government permitting processes. This led to widespread reports, found everywhere from CNN to Fox News to NPR, touting misleading and/or false information that the permit had been "denied" or that the company building it would be required to use an alternate route.

A closer look at the statement from the Army Corps of Engineers reveals that it did not, in fact, deny the permit, nor did it require the pipeline's relocation. What the statement does say is that the Corps "will not approve an easement … to cross under Lake Oahe," and that it will now "explore alternate routes … through an Environmental Impact Statement." Translated into layman's terms, the Army Corps will not approve the pipeline at this time, and is now requiring additional environmental review of the proposal, which will include evaluating alternative routes, via an environmental impact statement, or EIS.

This means that direct action convinced decision-makers within the Army Corps that its initial call that the DAPL would have "no significant environmental impact" was mistaken.

Activists now have a chance to put the nails in the coffin of the DAPL through official government channels. It's a long shot — especially with the Trump administration taking the reins — but targeted action through the EIS process is one possible way to kill the pipeline. And such an effort could have a lasting impact on how other fossil fuel projects are reviewed in the future.

What is an EIS and how can it stop the pipeline?

The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), passed in 1970, requires federal agencies to assess the potential environmental impacts of their projects and of proposed actions that require a government permit, such as construction of the DAPL.

The NEPA process begins with an environmental assessment, which is a preliminary analysis of potential environmental impacts and discussion of possible alternatives to the proposal. If a federal agency determines from this document that a project is not likely to have significant environmental impacts, it issues a (humorously named) FONSI, or Finding of No Significant Impact. This is what originally happened with the DAPL; you can read its environmental assessment here.

On the other hand, if the agency determines that the project will have significant environmental impacts, like the Army Corps did when it reversed its FONSI on Dec. 4, an environmental impact statement must be completed. An EIS requires a full analysis of a project's environmental impacts, as well as public input and engagement during each step of the process. An EIS also requires analysis of alternatives to the project as proposed. So the report will typically assess the "preferred alternative," a "no action" alternative, and at least one other alternative that would achieve the project's overall goal. A draft EIS is circulated for public comment, after which a final EIS is recorded in the federal register. Once the EIS is complete, the NEPA process ends.

It's important to understand what the NEPA process can and can't do. The in-depth analysis required by an EIS is so expensive and time-consuming that the threat of it is often enough to convince a project's backers to change the project in order to reduce impacts to a level that will earn them a FONSI and not require an EIS. But if the project backers have the time and money to spend to complete an EIS, there is nothing within the NEPA law itself that would force them to mitigate their impacts or change their original plans, regardless of how severe those impacts might be. In other words, there isn't a way to "fail" the NEPA process.

However, in the particular case of the Dakota Access Pipeline, the information gathered during the EIS process could trigger another regulation that would cause the Army Corps to deny the permit to build the pipeline under Lake Oahe. Section 408 of the U.S. Code stipulates that the Army Corps can approve all requests for easements over the property it manages as long as they 1) do not interfere with the Army Corps' use of the land, and 2) are not "injurious to the public interest." The Army Corps' internal guidance lists damage to the environment and cultural resources among a number of things that could qualify as "injurious to the public interest." Negative impacts alone aren't enough for permit denial; the negatives must outweigh the positive impacts of the project, such as short-term profits and pipeline jobs.

Therefore, if the information and public comment gathered during the EIS process can clearly show that the project's environmental and cultural impacts outweigh any positive effects, this might give the Army Corps cause to deny the permit and prevent completion of the DAPL.

What can you do?

If the DAPL's (reportedly tenuous) funding holds, and the Trump administration doesn't try to do something unprecedented (more on that in a bit), the EIS process will likely proceed as follows:

After publishing a Notice of Intent to conduct an EIS, the Army Corps will begin the "scoping" phase, in which it determines which potential impacts it should study. This is the first opportunity for public comment, and a critical one. Commenters should tell the Corps not only to study the impacts on water quality, wildlife, and tribal lands, but also to analyze the greenhouse gas emissions and climate change impacts of the eventual burning of the oil carried in the pipeline in the U.S. and abroad.

No EIS has ever included this full scope of climate change impacts. (Washington state once came close in its own environmental process, but the project was denied for other reasons before we got to see how it would have played out.) Getting the Army Corps to include climate change impacts in the EIS would be a major coup, and make it all the more difficult for the Corps to find that the pipeline is not "injurious to the public interest." It would also set an excellent precedent for assessing future fossil fuel projects.

Once scoping is complete, the Army Corps will draw up a draft EIS, which will be published and opened up for public comment, typically for 45 days. To have the greatest impact at this point, commenters should use fact-based arguments that directly respond to statements in the EIS, not emotional arguments. If you don't have the time or inclination to make detailed comments, it's still helpful to submit a comment along these lines: "This project's negative impact on the environment will greatly outweigh any benefit. I support the 'no action' alternative and denial of the easement."

After public comment on the draft closes, it will be updated based on comments received, a final EIS will be published, and there may be one more comment period. Once the EIS is recorded in the federal register, the Army Corps will have to make the decision on whether or not the project is "injurious to the public interest."

The Trump effect

While it's theoretically possible that the incoming Trump administration or Congress could attempt to cancel the EIS or restrict public input in the process, as some have suggested, that could be an unprecedented move. Given Trump's track record, unprecedented doesn't mean unlikely, but even if he or Congress were to try something like this, a decision to cancel or curtail the EIS process would be challenged in court and might not hold up.

A more plausible scenario is that Trump waits to act until the very end of the process, by trying to influence that "injurious" decision. Jo-Ellen Darcy, the Obama appointee who currently directs the Army Corps and made the decision to call for an EIS, plans to retire this month, so the person overseeing the final "injurious" decision will be a Trump appointee. Although the president-elect has not yet nominated anyone for the position (assistant secretary of the Army for civil works), it's likely that the person he appoints would be eager to approve a project that Trump supports and is financially invested in.

Especially after considering the Trump factor, it may seem that taking action through the regulatory process is a waste of time, that the Army Corps will make whatever decision it wants regardless of the evidence and public comments received on the EIS. To be sure, there is no guarantee that such action will be effective — but there was also no guarantee that the water protectors at Standing Rock would achieve any kind of success. If we want to stop this and other pipelines from being built, we should use all the tools at our disposal. Every project has a different Achilles' heel, so it's important to push on every possible weak point.

Regardless of the Army Corps' final decision, if public comment persuades the agency to evaluate the DAPL's full climate change impacts, the precedent will be yet another tool we can use to fight fossil fuel projects. Additionally, when other fossil fuel companies see that they will likely be pushed into this long and arduous environmental process, it will force them to include the potential time and cost of an EIS when evaluating the feasibility of their projects. This extra cost could be enough to dissuade them from building.

So don't write off the impact you can have on the government's decisions. Direct action has caught their attention. Now let's do everything we can to keep the pressure on.

2017 SD Legislative repots

Senator Jason Frerichs

Week 1

Our 2017 Legislative Session is underway and I am proud to represent northeast South Dakota in the State Senate. I serve on the Senate Agriculture/Natural Resources, Taxation, and Transportation Committees along with Retirement Laws and Legislative Procedures joint legislative committees. I live near Wilmot, SD and farm and raise cattle with my family. This Legislative Session proves to be interesting with various issues affecting all of us as fellow South Dakotans. The budget constraints, along with lower than expected sales tax revenues, are major issues that we will have to work through as we look for strategic investments to move our state forward.

This first week of session is mostly organizing our committees and getting started with briefings from various state agencies. The Governor delivered his State of the State Address laying out his priorities for this year and his final two years in office. I appreciate the Governor's work to establish Main Street fairness regarding sales tax collection with the announcement that Amazon will start remitting sales taxes. However, I'm disappointed the Governor didn't discuss Building South Dakota, which as part of this economic development program has a successful housing program that has benefited over 300 people since we as a Legislature created the program in 2013. We all need to work hard to find more state dollars to fund the renovation of the Animal Research and Diagnostic Lab. We also need to find a way to support our mental health and frontline care workers who are not state employees, which is another area the Governor has ignored.

I enjoyed hearing the State of the Judiciary from Chief Justice David Gilbertson who highlighted the successful alternative sentencing programs with drug and alcohol courts. We all need to work together to tackle the terrible problems of meth addiction and opioid abuse that is happening across our state. We also enjoyed hearing from Yankton Sioux Tribal Chairman Flying Hawk who delivered the State of the Tribes address. The Chairman reminded us that we need to work together as fellow South Dakotans with a positive attitude towards taking care of Mother Earth.

Our River Basin Task Force has submitted two bills for discussion this Session. Senate Bill 9 defines the specific boundaries of the nine river basin districts that cover the entire state. Each district is evenly divided into three subdistricts so their elected board members will be geographically located near their voters. Senate Bill 10 is of the utmost importance to northeast South Dakota because the Red/Minnesota District will be the first district to have board elections in 2018. Coupled with Senate Bill 10 is a plan to remove portions of Grant, Deuel, Codington and Brookings counties that currently are located in the East Dakota Water Development District because we don't want any water issues to be duplicated. I have enjoyed being a part of all of the work to move towards watershed/river basin management of surface water in our state and look forward to the discussion.

I plan to be involved and bring legislation if necessary to put our state fleet of vehicles on premium E30 fuel. Thirty percent ethanol has proven to be the most efficient way to achieve the best cost per mile along with using more of our home-grown product that provides more octane and is cleaner burning.

I support the Governor's proposal to allow voluntary buffer strips around streams and lakes by giving them a special property tax category. My good friend former, Senator Jim Peterson, brought this issue forward last year and the Governor vetoed his bill. The version we are working with this year is improved and will provide more options for landowners and county officials.

Please keep in touch on issues important to you and feel free to email me at jason.frerichs@sdlegislature.gov or call me at 949-2204.

Representative Steven McCleerey

Week 1

Week one of the Legislative Session is underway in Pierre. We have heard the Governor's State of the State address, Chief Justice Gilbertson's State of the Judiciary, and Chairman of the Tribes Robert Flying Hawk's State of the Tribes.

The State of the State left me a bit disappointed. Governor Daugaard has announced that he will not be pushing for the expansion of Medicaid. As we approach a time in our nation when the Affordable Care Act is jeopardized, we need to fight for healthcare for all South Dakotans. Another component missing was the discussion on funding for pre-school programs. Early childhood education is imperative and we need to focus on improving and expanding the programs in South Dakota.

Some of the positives from the address were the improvements made to the railways and the resurrection of the riparian buffer bill. This bill would allow for tax breaks for the buffers, the pieces of land between farmland and waterways that help prevent the pesticides and fertilizers from contaminating the water. Governor Daugaard vetoed this bill last year, so I am excited to see his support.

Daugaard also announced that Amazon has agreed to start charging and remitting a sales tax on all online items sold. This will be a great source of revenue for our state, and I hope that other online distributors will follow suit. Another important issue addressed by Governor Daugaard, Chief Justice Gilbertson, and Chairman Flying Hawk is the meth epidemic in our state. Justice Gilbertson noted that we would see an increase in the utilization of the drug and alcohol court program this year.

This session I am excited to serve on the following committees: Health and Human Services, Commerce and Energy, and Retirement Law. I am honored to serve as your representative, and I look forward to communicating with you throughout the session.

Please feel free to contact me at Steven.Mccleerey@gmail.com

GOP legislative leadership optimistic

By Ryan Budmayr

Executive Director

SD Republican Party

Pierre, SD – January 13, 2017 – As the first week of the 92nd Legislative Session comes to a close, Leadership in both the House and Senate are optimistic about the rest of session. With 89 of 105 legislative seats in Republican control, the conservative legislature has started discussions on the State's Budget, Initiated Measure 22, and solutions to the state's increased methamphetamine trafficking.

"There is a growing concern with the increase in methamphetamine trafficking in South Dakota. Moreover, opioid abuse is becoming another debilitating and deadly problem of epidemic proportion," said Senate President Pro Tempore Brock Greenfield. "To the extent the legislature can stop this unfortunate trend, we're open to exploring and adopting the proper policies," added Senator Greenfield.

All Legislators were sworn in earlier this week and heard from Governor Daugaard as he addressed both Chambers during his State of the State Address. With sales tax revenues lower than expected, there may not be a lot of new money to allocate this session.

"The Governor provided a good starting point with his budget and legislative proposals," said new House Majority Leader Lee Qualm. "Our job is to make sure that when we leave Pierre in March, we've done no harm and have provided the citizens of our state with a responsible budget and common sense solutions to any problems that exist in South Dakota," added Leader Qualm

The Legislature will also discuss options regarding Initiated Measure 22. In December, a South Dakota Judge enjoined IM22, citing serious concerns with the measures constitutionality.

Senate Majority Leader Blake Curd said, "South Dakotans are hesitant of any influence from dark money, outside groups trying to change how we do things. Our state is great because of our people and our ideas and I feel confident this legislature will address these issues the right way."

The first day of the 92nd Legislative Session was Tuesday, January 10th and the final day of session will be Monday, March 27th.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

A conversation about possible healthcare changes

(Editor's note: We are grateful to Tribal Health Coordinator Sara DeCoteau for sharing these insightful observations about a topic on many people's minds today, including our Oyate.)

Right now the health care future is too fluid to predict what is going to happen, in general, much less how it will affect Indian Health programs and Indian people. It is a complicated topic. Here are a few of my thoughts about what is to come.

1. Through the Budget Reconciliation bill that was debated this week in the Senate and is currently (or soon will be in the House [already being taken up in the House of Representatives]), the approach is to de-fund many of the provisions in the Affordable Care Act, such as the Federal match (with participating States) for Medicaid expansion, as well as subsidies and tax credits for people who obtained health insurance through the marketplace. Since South Dakota did not participate in Medicaid expansion, there will be no effect. In other States that did expand, people are going to lose their coverage and the IHS will have to absorb the additional financial burden. Some Indian people (particularly those living off-Reservation who are self-employed or whose employer does not provide health insurance benefits) could be affected in a year or so. There will likely be a transition period, giving people time to find other insurance. In South Dakota, 24,000 people have subsidized health insurance through the Affordable Care Act marketplace, but we don't know how many of those are Indian people. Insurance provides choices for care outside of the IHS, as well as improved access to Priority 2 and 3 specialty care.

2. The Budget Reconciliation bill was passed by the Senate 51 to 48. If it also passes in the House, it will contain instructions to several Congressional committees for EACH to reduce spending by $1 billion over the next 10 years. The committees have until January 27th to report how they will achieve those spending reductions.

3. The emerging policy is to promote privatization of health care. This includes allowing private insurance companies to develop insurance products that are affordable to employers and individuals. In South Dakota, only two insurance companies are still able to meet the Federal requirements to be ACA-approved plans. There were many requirements, and one was that the insurance had to provide 10 essential benefits.

1) Outpatient care—the kind you get without being admitted to a hospital

2) Trips to the emergency room

3) Treatment in the hospital for inpatient care

4) Care before and after your baby is born

5) Mental health and substance use disorder services: This includes behavioral health treatment, counseling, and psychotherapy

6) Your prescription drugs

7) Services and devices to help you recover if you are injured, or have a disability or chronic condition. This includes physical and occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, psychiatric rehabilitation, and more.

8) Your lab tests

9) Preventive services including counseling, screenings, and vaccines to keep you healthy and care for managing a chronic disease

10) Pediatric services: This includes dental care and vision care for kids

The premiums for this type of comprehensive health insurance are expensive, and the Republicans are saying it's "not sustainable." They are encouraging the private sector to develop lower cost products. Maybe a plan that only includes hospitalization, for example, so as to be affordable to a young healthy person who can pay for any outpatient services or prescription drugs out-of-pocket. Why does an older person, as another example, need a plan that includes maternity or pediatric services?

4. State Medicaid plans will govern the scope of services offered within each State in the future. This is because States are expected to match Federal dollars for health care provided to Medicaid recipients. In South Dakota, the amount is about half and half – for each dollar of health care cost, the Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP) is 52 cents and State Government pays 48 cents. An exception to this is health care for Indian people. Services provided to Indian people in or through an Indian Health program (IHS or 638) is 100% Federal FMAP. South Dakota is a fiscally conservative state that did not participate in Medicaid expansion because of the potential cost. If the amount of funding available from the Federal Government dwindles through Budget Reconciliation implementation, then the scope of services available to Medicaid recipients may also be reduced. IHS will no longer be able to bill for those services and would need to absorb the cost instead. There were some new Medicaid funded programs being considered by the State prior to repeal of the Affordable Care Act. For example, third party reimbursement from Medicaid for "community health workers." Community health workers would be folks like CHRs who are working as part of the patient's care team to implement a treatment plan or lifestyle coaches, helping a patient with a chronic disease quit smoking or lower their blood sugars through exercise and diet.

5. Watch for news about Medicaid reform, which is part of this change, too. Again, this reform involves the way Medicaid is funded. A couple of proposals are a block grant to each state that is based on population or a per capita amount for each individual enrolled on Medicaid. Governor Daugaard is evaluating these scenarios and is revamping the South Dakota Health Care Solutions Coalition to study Medicaid reform, now that Medicaid expansion is off the table. The per capita type option would allow for more flexibility than a block grant because, due to fluctuating economics, people go on and off Medicaid. Also, one State may have more poor people than another, so the per capita type plans seems more flexible and fair.

6. Both the Indian Self-Determination and Educational Assistance Act and the Indian Health Care Improvement Act were passed during a Republican Administration during the Reagan years. In keeping with the theme of privatization, the ISDEAA provides opportunities for Tribes to assume operation of IHS programs and to run them as businesses. Among other things, the IHCIA provides IHS and Tribal programs with the authority to bill Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance like a private health care facility – and also to meet the same quality of care standards that the private sector does. We can expect that this is the lens through which the incoming Administration may view and engage tribes in upcoming months and years.

Submitted by Sara DeCoteau, SWST Health Coordinator.

Brief editorial comments from the editor's desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

Readers, please note that this week's Sota is being printed and distributed to local counter sales sites on Monday.

This is the federal Martin Luther King Jr. holiday, however, so the newspapers are being mailed on Tuesday.

The news is available online on our website effective when the paper is sent to the printing plant:

www.earthskyweb.com/sota.htm

*****

Please read Chairman Flute's column on page one this week. We also have coverage of last week's inauguration ceremony.

Please join in praying for your Tribal leaders, who as we must all be aware, are facing enormous challenges.

Our reports from the 2016 winter general council continue this week.

Because of the importance of healthcare, and an uncertain future concerning existing laws, we are "jumping ahead" in the general council agenda. This is to feature the report of Tribal Health Coordinator Sara DeCoteau.

We are also featuring Sara's commentary on what might happen with the repeal of the Affordable Healthcare Act and changes to Medicaid.

Keep in mind she is giving us perspective, but there are many "unknowns."

We need to be watchful to see what comes from the US Congress and Trump administration, as well as what happens in the state legislatures.

*****

We have been trying to "catch up" with publication of Tribal Council proceedings, which should be published monthly soon as they are approved.

Hopefully, we can accomplish this in a matter of a week or two.

This issue includes proceedings from October 2016.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"It is a native tradition to sit in a circle and talk-to share what is in your heart." – John Peters (Slow Turtle), WAMPANOAG

The talking circle is also a listening circle. The talking circle allows one person to talk at a time for as long as they need to talk. So much can be gained by listening. Is it a coincidence that the Creator gave us one mouth and two ears? The power of the circle allows the heart to be shared with each other. What we share with each other also heals each other. When we talk about our pain in the circle, it is distributed to the circle, and we are free of the pain. The talking circle works because when the people form a circle, the Great Mystery is in the center.

My Creator, give me the courage to share, and the courage to listen.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

Laws are like sausages. It's better not to see them being made. Otto von Bismarck (1815 - 1898)

An intelligence test sometimes shows a man how smart he would have been not to have taken it. Laurence J. Peter (1919 - 1988)

In these matters the only certainty is that nothing is certain. Pliny the Elder (23 AD - 79 AD)

He who hesitates is not only lost, but miles from the next exit. Unknown

Have the courage to be ignorant of a great number of things, in order to avoid the calamity of being ignorant of everything. Sydney Smith (1771 - 1845)

Blessed is the man who, having nothing to say, abstains from giving wordy evidence of the fact. George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

The idea of all-out nuclear war is unsettling. Walter Goodman

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Note –

There are no obituaries are reported in this week's Sota.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Spiritual Massacre? Commentary on Jeffers Petroglyphs

By Betty Ann Owen

I enjoyed the article by Joe Williams on the Jeffers Petroglyphs and the comments on the Minnesota Historical Society's site pertaining to the petroglyphs.

We all have our own ideas and perspectives of what the Great Mystery, spirit and ghost worlds mean to us. The different interpretations of why these Jeffers Petroglyphs exist arise from our own inner rapture with the spirit world and communications with the ancestral spirits.

The human spirit within is knowledge and the ability to reason and grasp that which we search for in the petroglyphs is out of our reach, for now.

When we acknowledge in all sacredness the Great Mystery, spirit and ghost world, each and every carving will be deciphered.

Our spirits lack the ability to move forward with these petroglyphs for the Great Mystery has not bestowed his blessings upon humans, yet.

Spiritual Massacre – seen through han-mdo'-hda-ka.

Is there such a warfare? A spiritual battle that creates and causes chaos in the spiritual realm that leads to a spiritual death or massacre?

Yes.

In my own reasoning and understanding of such things; I believe that the one we call the Great Mystery gathered all the ones he appointed as the Holy Ones from these sites and led them into another spiritual world of sacredness. They say this to me.

This message then leads into why the Great Mystery gathered up the people along with the Holy Ones.

Such as what happened at Blood Run now called Good Earth State Park where thousands of people vanished overnight. Gone. No reason given just vanished, leaving behind clues of their existence.

The spiritual massacre of these sacred gathering sites and its inhabitants was created when in a state of perpetual unpreparedness our ancestors let in the ones we call the Outsiders.

Great wars were fought over these sacred lands and petroglyphs, mounds and burial sites.

These lands that fell into the hands of non-ancestral blood lines, were treated with great dishonor and disrespect along with the messages of the Holy Men or Holy Ones.

The sacred writings, drawings and significance of each one within the sacred sites were trampled, disregarded as heathen and turned into grazing land, farm land and nearly destroyed.

The Great Mystery (through (han-mdo'-hda-ka) we see) ascended just as was with Enoch and had mercy on.

They say (through (han-mdo'-hda-ka) we see) at one time only sacred men were allowed onto these red rocks to share with the people what the Great Mystery and others up there (pointing to the sky) blessed them with.

The chain of sacred communication somehow broke or snapped and that link has long disappeared from earth. It is up there with them and some ancestral spirits left behind.

They say again the missing generation when found, the Great Mystery himself will return to us and bring the sacred knowledge of the Holy Ones or Holy Men untouched by sin, back to us.

And He will bless only a certain few men to begin deciphering the sacred messages of the petroglyphs.

One man has been chosen already they say this and he doesn't know what the Great Mystery has blessed him with. He walks on earth. But for now just as the wandering stars up there (pointing up) mysterious ones, they dwell there and upon certain lands we have yet to acknowledge.

Once in awhile these gathered ones do attempt to communicate with humans, but we fear them, don't we?

No man carries the flame of knowledge to these ancient writings or their meanings; for reasons known only to ourselves and the life we live.

Understand that in order to communicate with the Holy Men or Holy Ones taken we must acknowledge within ourselves the boundaries we have limited our own minds to.

The Great Mystery is ready to return to our tribal lands, but not before another spiritual massacre occurs, they say this.

Ce-ya, ce-ya they say, (through (han-mdo'-hda-ka) for some of the ancient dwellers who were left behind by the Great Mystery follow these tears in search of sacred-ness. They desire to communicate with each and everyone of us, to help and guide us back to the ancient Holy Ones or Holy Men.

The ravines, coulees, waters, trees, the universe around is where they hide in plain sight.

The petroglyphs and sacred prayer rocks not only in Jeffers, Minnesota but right on the Sisseton and Wahpeton lands wait with the spirits of the ancestors, to help heal our people from all afflictions.

They wait, but no one sees them.

Only until the Great Mystery reveals to all of us this one Dakota man and his followers will the land give up the knowledge we seek as Dakota people.

There will be times of han-mdo'-hdag-i-a and then the spirit of knowledge within the red rocks will be revealed.

How sacred is the Great Mystery to honor us with his heavens and land and for us to seek the blessed truth through guidance and love of Him only.

How blessed our we as Dakota people to seek out the sacred words and to be bless with the ability to walk in and through the spirit world.

When we do this, there will be no more mysteries to bind us, we walk with the Great Mystery.

Blessings to the chosen young Dakota man who will lead us through these petroglyphs and spirit rocks.

Betty Ann Owen Sioux Falls, SD.

Weekly weather round-up

By Ken Siyaka

Ken, a SWST member, enlisted in 1988, after graduating observing school at Chanute AFB, spent 4 years at Hill AFB observing and honing weather techniques. Graduated forecasting school at Keesler AFB, 1996.

Assigned to Minot AFB, where his forecast area of responsibility consisted of the NE sector of the US, ( North and East of Omaha, NE), Southern California and trans- Atlantic and Pacific flights.

After a tour on the Korean Peninsula, he was assigned to HQ Air Force Weather Agency, Offutt, AFB, NE where he was assigned to forecast for locations worldwide and to classify and tracking tropical storms, identifying geophysical events such as dust storms and volcanic eruptions.

Other placed forecasted for; Panama and South America, Kosovo, Iraq.

Ken also was assigned to Learmonth Solar Observatory, Learmonth, Western Australia to monitor solar events that could potentially disrupt global communications, shuttle flights and for the protection of astronauts on the International Space Station.

After his retirement Ken also spent 2 seasons at McMurdo Station, Antarctica forecasting for the National Science Foundation supporting United States Antarctic Program.

Current and Long Range Forecast

Looks like a mid January, mid winter thaw will be occurring as above normal temperatures are expected for the next 3 weeks. However, expect slightly above normal precipitation.

Night Sky: Just after sunset, Venus and Mars in the southwest sky. Pre-dawn on Thursday morning the Moon is just left of Jupiter

NESD:

16 Mon, Partly Cloudy, Temp 18F/05F, Wind SW05-10mph, Lowest windchill -05F, SR0804/SS1712

17 Tues, Partly Cloudy, Temp 23F/10F, Wind SW10-15G20mph, Lowest windchill 0F, SR0804/SS1714

18 Wed, Partly Cloudy, Flurries, Temp 31F/20F, Wind SW08-12mph, Lowest windchill, 10F, SR0803/SS1715

19 Thu, Partly Cloudy, Temp 31F/25F, Wind S08-12mph, Lowest windchill, 15F, SR0802/SS1717

20 Fri, Mostly Cloudy, Temp 30F/23F, Wind S05-10mph, Lowest windchill 15F, SR0801/SS1718

21 Sat, Cloudy, Mix Flurries/Rain, Temp 29F/23F, Wind E05-10mph, Lowest windchill 20F, SR0801/ SS1719

22 Sun, Cloudy, Chance of snow, Temp 32F/28F, Wind SE05-10mph, Lowest windchill 20F, SR0800/SS1720

OCETI SAKOWIN Camp:

16 Mon, Partly Cloudy, Temp 18F/05F, Wind SW08-12mph, Lowest windchill 05F, SR0821/SS1724

17 Tues, Partly Cloudy, Temp 25F/12F, Wind SW08-12G18mph, Lowest windchill 08F, SR0820/SS1726

18 Wed, Partly Cloudy, Temp 34F/20F, Wind SW08-12mph, Lowest windchill, 15F, SR0819/SS1727

19 Thu, Partly Cloudy, Temp 35F/23F, Wind SW05-10mph, Lowest windchill, 20F, SR0819/SS1728

20 Fri, Mostly Cloudy, Temp 38F/25F, Wind W08-12mph, Lowest windchill 20F, SR0818/SS1730

21 Sat, Cloudy, Flurries, Temp 35F/25F, Wind NE08-12mph, Lowest windchill 20F, SR08175/ SS1731

Sisseton Winter Show set for January 20-21

You can take a break from the cold winter weather this month by taking in the activities and entertainment at the 2017 Sisseton Winter Show to be held Jan.20-21 at the Sisseton High School Athletic Practice Facility.

The two-day event, sponsored by the Sisseton Area Chamber of Commerce and the Glacial Lakes 4-H Rodeo Club, will include stage entertainment and educational programs. Hours for this year's show are 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 20, and 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 21. All events and demonstrations are open to the public. No admission will be charged.

Vendor Area Entertainment

More than 60 exhibitors will be on display around the practice facility gymnasium. While browsing through the various booths and displays, Winter Show visitors will be treated to entertainment and educational programs on the stage in the northwest corner of the gym. Main stage entertainment and programs are sponsored by Dacotah Bank and Coteau des Prairies Health Care System.

The schedule of entertainment and educational programs will be as follows:

Friday, January 20

10:30 a.m.: Coffee & Coloring hosted by Sisseton Memorial Library

1:00 p.m.: Protecting Your Identity presented by the SD Dept. of Consumer Protection

2:00 p.m. "How the Affordable Care Act Health Insurance Affects You" presented by Carla Burns from GROW SD & SBDC, a certified "Navigator" for the Affordable Care Act.

3:00 p.m.: Using Smart Phones for Seniors presented by Nikki German, Design Electronics/Verizon, Sisseton

4:30 p.m.: Self Defense Workshop presented by Fallout Shelter Ministries from Watertown

6:00 p.m.: Phil Baker from Sioux Falls performing fun, family music

Saturday, January 21

10:00 a.m.: Kids' "Show Us Your Talent" Contest finalists perform. Winners' prizes provided by Hannasch Seed of Sisseton.

11:00 a.m.: Animal Encounter, up close and personal with animals from the Bramble Park Zoo in Watertown, SD

12:00 p.m.: Pie Auction to raise funds for Sisseton's 125th celebration in 2017

12:30 p.m.: Story Time presented by Sisseton Memorial Library

12:45 p.m.: Animal Encounter returns to the stage for Part 2

1:45 p.m.: Announcement of Door Prize Winners

(Note: All scheduled entertainment and educational programs may be subject to change.)

Legislative Crackerbarrel

Legislators from Dist. 1 will be available on Saturday, Jan. 21 at 9:00 a.m. for a "crackerbarrel session" in the concourse area.

Free 4-H Pancake Feed

The annual 4-H Pancake Feed will once again be provided FREE thanks to the support of Venture Communications Cooperative. Roberts County 4-H leaders and members will be cooking and serving pancakes and sausages in the SHS cafeteria from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 20. Freewill donations for 4-H activities in the county will be accepted.

Kids' Play Land

On Friday, from 3:00-6:00 p.m., children can enjoy a special Kids Play Land sponsored by Fisher Seeds. This year's theme is "Underwater World" and will be located in the Girls Locker Room in the Practice Facility.

Community Transit Rides

Community Transit will provide rides to and from the Winter Show on Friday (within Sisseton city limits only). Call 698-7511 to reserve a ride that day. Roberts County National Bank is sponsoring the service so there will be no charge for individuals transported to and from the event by Community Transit.

For more information on any of these activities, call 605-698-7261 or email sissetonwintershow@gmail.com.

Young at Heart weight management program

Adding healthy habits to your daily routine can help keep you young at heart. As you age your metabolism starts to slow down and muscle mass decreases as body fat increases. Maintaining a healthy weight is vital to healthy aging and can help you feel and look good in the years to come.

Coteau des Prairies Health Care System will sponsor an 8 week weight management program for Medicare enrollees. Classes will be held Wednesday afternoons from 2-3 pm in a CDP Conference Room beginning February 1st and ending March 22nd. If you are Medicare eligible with a BMI 30 or over, classes are offered at no charge.

Questions may be directed to DeLaine Rasmussen, Registered Dietitian at 605-698-7647.

Preregistration is preferred as class size is limited.

Votes against repealing Health Reform Law without a replacement

Washington, DC – Jan. 12, 2017 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today issued the following statement after she voted against a bill that will enable Congress to repeal the health care reform law without having a replacement plan in place – which would rip away affordable health coverage from tens of thousands of North Dakotans who rely on it.

"I've long said there are good pieces of the health reform law and pieces that need to be fixed. Almost three years ago, I proposed many reasonable reforms to the law, and have offered many others since then," said Heitkamp. "But just taking an axe to North Dakotans' health care without having a replacement in place is reckless and would rip away affordable health coverage from so many who already have it, including thousands of North Dakotans and those across rural America who signed up for Medicaid under the law. It also would mean North Dakotans with life-threatening diseases like cancer could lose care, support for treatment for those abusing opioids would go away, and funds would disappear for rural hospitals and community health clinics that enable them to offer their services to more families.

"With any major legislation, there are improvements that need to be made so that it works as well as possible, just as Congress has done for Medicare and Social Security for decades. That's also the case for the health reform law. It's well past time to stop politics and do policy – that's what I'm trying to accomplish."

Last night, Heitkamp offered an amendment that would prevent taking away support in the health reform law for rural communities and rural hospitals. Unfortunately, the amendment did not pass.

In March 2014, Heitkamp and five other senators introduced a series of commonsense proposals that would make the health reform law work better for individuals, families, and small businesses across North Dakota and the country. Additionally, in the past three and a half years, Heitkamp has also introduced and supported other legislation to improve the law by helping make over-the-counter medications more affordable, enabling employers to offer health care reimbursement accounts to their employees, and making sure businesses employing up to 100 employees qualify as small businesses to receive the flexibility they need, among other bills. Since 2013, Heitkamp has also met regularly with her health care advisory board – comprised of health care leaders across North Dakota -- to talk with them about health care in the state and improving the health reform law.

· More than 275,000 North Dakotans who have a pre-existing health condition could be denied coverage or charged exorbitant prices.

· More than 20,000 North Dakotans covered through the individual marketplace would likely lose coverage.

· 18,000 North Dakotans who gained coverage through the Medicaid ex­pansion would lose health coverage.

· Nearly 18,000 middle class North Dakotans would likely lose tax credits that help pay for health care averaging $262 per month.

· Nearly 12,000 North Dakota seniors who saved $11 million on prescription drugs in 2015 alone would see their prescription drug costs go up.

· 7,000 North Dakota young adults would be kicked off their parents' health care plans.

· Thousands with a mental illness or substance abuse disorder would lose Medicaid access, exacerbating the state's opioid epidemic.

· Tribal health care facilities would lose federal resources that strength­en their health care services, and provisions expanding coverage specifically for Native Americans would be eliminated – harming health outcomes for families across Indian Country.

· Community Health Centers, which more than 36,000 North Dako­tans rely on for care, would lose 70 percent of their federal funding, according to the National Association of Community Health Centers.

· North Dakota hospitals and doctors would lose $68 million annually as Medicare reimbursement in rural states would drastically drop, according to the North Dakota Medical Association.

(Editor's note: No matter! The U.S. Senate repealed the Affordable Care Act in a late-night session last week. In the early hours of Thursday the Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare, was repealed on a party-line vote by the Republicans.)

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

Introducing new TZTS high school math teacher

Ellie Helgeson

I am from Ortonville, Minnesota, and I am married to Harley Helgeson, and we have 4 children. My oldest son, Adam, teaches instrumental music at Willmar Middle School; my daughter, Kaylee, teaches high school mathematics at Willmar Senior High School; my daughter Kara is pursuing her coaching certificate and a teaching license in Biology; my youngest son, Jason, is a sophomore at Ortonville High School.

I received my B.S. degree in instrumental music education from Minnesota State University, Moorhead, my elementary education major from the University of Minnesota, Morris, my Master's degree from the College of St. Scholastica, Duluth, and my Education Specialist degree from the University of Sioux Falls. I have been in education many years, and I have worked with all ages of students, preschool through high school, and also worked as a principal and superintendent for 6 years in South Dakota. Most recently, I taught undergraduate elementary education courses at the University of Minnesota, Morris, and was a course evaluator for the Master's program in special education at Augustana University in Sioux Falls, SD. Prior to that, I taught high school special education with the Southwest/West Central Service Cooperative, and Willmar Senior High School in Willmar, MN.

I am excited to be working at Tiospa Zina Tribal School, and look forward to getting to know my students and their families!

ESDS plans for National School Choice Week

Enemy Swim Day School participates in nation's largest-ever celebration of educational opportunity

Enemy Swim Day School will hold a special event on Monday, January 23, 2017 at 10:00 a.m. to celebrate National School Choice Week.

This event will feature classroom mural painting with a focus on our culture and traditions. Interview with a "preschooler" by and 8th grader. What our "school family" looks like, photo booth and Tea is for Teachers!

Enemy Swim Day School is an Independent school serving grades Pre-K-8 with a student enrollment of 200.

ESDS is one of more than 13,000 schools participating in National School Choice Week (January 22 -28, 2017). The goal of the Week is to shine a positive spotlight on all types of education options for children-from traditional public schools to public charter schools, magnet schools, private schools, online learning and homeschooling. The event will be held at our school.

"We are thrilled to have ESDS participate in National School Choice Week by holding this special event," said Andrew Campanella, National School Choice Week president. "The Week provides an opportunity for families in communities across America to discover more about the education options available to children. We salute the students, teachers and staff at ESDS for their dedication to providing a quality education for children, and for their involvement in this nationwide celebration."

For more information about the event, visit http://esds.us

For more information about National School Choice Week, visit schoolchoiceweek.com

ESDS honors students of the month

By Rebecca Dargatz

School Community Director

Enemy Swim Day School honors one student from each grade for each full month that school is in session.

The Students of the Month are chosen because they demonstrate the four school wide expectations consistently or have shown great progress toward them.

The school wide expectations are…

Awanicihdka: Be Safe

Waokihi: Be Responsible

Waunsida: Be Caring

Woohoda: Be Respectful.

Home room teachers choose the Students of the Month in collaboration with the paras and other teachers who serve a particular candidate.

Students of the Month are honored during opening ceremony on the first Monday following each full month of school. Students of the Month attend dinner with two guests on the Wednesday evening following each Students of the Month honoring.

The December 2016 Students of the Month are: Kindergarten - Nicolas Gil, 1st Grade - Melody Bernard, 2nd Grade - Zitkana Zetina, 3rd Grade - Del Frenier, 4th Grade - Isabelle Herrick, 5th Grade - Kenzie Marks, 6th Grade - Gavin Bourelle, 7th Grade - Jaydean DuMarce, and 8th Grade - Storm Aguirre.

ESDS students learn about keeping healthy

By Rebecca Dargatz

School Community Director

Students attending the Enemy Swim Day School program learn how to help keep our school family healthy in many ways.

Students were recently helping Ellen to dry apples for future use.

Afterschool craft activities

By Rebecca Dargatz

School Community Director

Students at the Afterschool Program have a variety of craft activities to choose from.

Group Leader Roxi helped the students to make teddy bears out of fleece!

4-H Archery News

 

By Tracey Lehrke

Roberts County 4-H Advisor

The 4-H Archery Program Roberts County 4-H Archery Program will begin Monday, January 30th at 6:30 p.m.

A parent/guardian must attend with their youth to complete the paperwork.

ALL YOUTH ages 8-18 as of January 1st are welcomed to be part of the 4-H Archery program.

This signup night will be held at the 4-H building in Sisseton.

Youth do not have to bring a bow and arrows as the 4-H Shooting Sports program has equipment to use. Everyone is welcome to come and see what the 4-H archery program is about.

If you have any questions, contact Tracey Lehrke, 4-H Youth Program Advisor in the Roberts County Extension Office at 605-698-7627 or email at tracey.lehrke@sdstate.edu

Citizenship and Community Service scholarships available

Venture Communications Cooperative, a Highmore based telecommunications provider, announces the availability of 12--$500 Citizenship and Community Service Scholarships to High School Seniors.

The local telecommunications company will be awarding scholarships throughout the telephone exchanges operated by Venture Communications. "We hope that the scholarships will assist the students in achieving their higher education goals", says Venture Communications General Manager Randy Houdek.

Judging of the applications will be based on local community involvement and citizenship with credit also being given for academics and leadership skills. Only student's whose parents or guardians are members' of Venture Cooperative are eligible for the scholarship program. "The scholarship program takes a high priority with the Venture Communications Board of Directors", says Houdek.

This is the nineteenth year for the scholarship program. The scholarship application deadline is March 6, 2017. Applications are available online at www.venturecomm.net. For more information contact the local high school counselor's office or Venture communications at 852-2224.

Foundation for Rural Service to award scholarships

The Foundation for Rural Services (FRS) will be awarding numerous scholarships in the year 2017, one in each National Telephone Cooperative Association region and one made available to NTCA's Associate membership. The remaining awards will be distributed proportionate to the number of applications received from each NTCA region.

Venture Communications Cooperative, as your local communications service provider, is pleased to participate in this scholarship program. Should a student from the Venture's service area be selected to receive one of the 30 national scholarships ($2000 each) Venture Communications will make a $500 matching contribution to the scholarship. Preference will be given to individuals expressing an interest to return to work in a rural area following graduation. This scholarship is not based on GPA. It is geared toward seniors who are good students but who may not qualify for scholarships based solely upon GPA.

Students may also be eligible for four FRS Staurulakis Family scholarships valued at $5,000 each. Students who are majoring in math, science, engineering, or medicine are given preference for the FRS Staurulakis Family Scholarships. Also available to students is the TMS Scholarship for $1500 and the Everett Kneece Return to Rural America Scholarship valued at $7000.

The Foundation for Rural Services (FRS), the philanthropic arm of the National Telephone Cooperative Association, was established in 1994 with its mission being to promote and enhance the quality of life in rural America - with education being one of its main focuses. The Foundation for Rural Service is a national non-profit organization that helps educate the public on the telecommunications industry.

Venture Communications is proud of this effort to promote higher education in rural America.

Scholarship applications may be obtained by visiting www.venturecomm.net or by contacting your local high school counselor. Completed applications should be sent to Venture Communications, PO Box 157, Highmore, SD 57345, postmarked no later than February 15, 2017.

SD Dept. of Game, Fish & Parks 2017 seasonal job positions

Looking for a summer job that takes you out of the ordinary and lands you in the middle of South Dakota's natural resources? Consider a seasonal job with Game, Fish, and Parks. There are a variety of opportunities that offer life experiences working hand-in-hand with parks and wildlife.

The normal summer season is mid-May through Labor Day. Some employees may work earlier or later. Most positions involve outdoor work and physical labor.

The closing date for the GFP Seasonal positions is February 28, 2017.

GFP Supervisors will contact those applicants they wish to interview. Interviews will begin in February. Not all applicants will receive an interview, but all applicants will be notified in writing of the outcome of their application.

These popular positions fill quickly, so please check out the following instructions and get your application submitted as soon as you can. Come and enjoy South Dakota's great outdoors with us!

General Requirements:

Housing is the responsibility of the employee, unless otherwise noted Transportation to and from work and associated costs is the responsibility of the employee Positions may require employees to work holidays, weekends and irregular or rotating shifts Some positions require specific licenses or certification as listed on the job description

Application/Hiring Procedures:

Use a "State of South Dakota Seasonal Application" form located at: http://bhr.sd.gov/workforus/seasonal.aspx.

Applications are also available at any SD Department of Labor and Regulation Employment Services Office and any job site listed. Photocopies are acceptable.

A separate application is required for each requisition number (location) in which you are interested All applications must be sent to the address or e-mail address listed on that announcement.

Be specific in completing the application form. List any relevant licenses or certificates (e.g. driver's license, CDL, CPR, pesticide/herbicide applicator certification, etc.) as well as any equipment or office equipment you are able to operate. Please include both the beginning and ending dates you are available for employment. It is essential that your mailing address is complete including apartment number, box number, lot number, as well as street, lane, avenue, etc. if applicable.

Applicants requiring application materials in an alternate format or assistance with the application process may contact the Bureau of Human Resources at 605.773.3148 (VOICE/TYY).

Equal opportunity employer.

Legals

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 16-173

SWOCSE/ Danette Kirk, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TRESSA BISSONETTE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of November, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 16-089

SWOCSE/ WI/Melissa Coon, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CORNELIUS KIRK, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of November, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-021

SWOCSE/ WI/Mary Merrill, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CORNELIUS KIRK, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of November, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 06-086

SWOCSE/ Sylvana Flute, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CORNELIUS KIRK, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of November, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 17-013

SWOCSE/ Lila Uses Arrow, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BENJAMIN GOODBIRD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Recognize a Foreign Order and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of November, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 15-035

SWOCSE/ Danette Kirk, PLAINTIFF

VS.

EMILY LAFONTAIN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of November, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 09-018

SWOCSE/ Colleen Eastman, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CODI NECONISH, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of November, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 16-165

SWOCSE/ Shawnda Bernard, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TRAVIS TRACK, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Paternity & Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of November, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 16-177

SWOCSE/ Candace Brown, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MICHAEL LAWRENCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of November, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 15-045

SWOCSE/ Sharon Nelson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MICHAEL LAWRENCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of November, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 10-045

SWOCSE/ Rhiannon Hill, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ROBERT ENOCH, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of November, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 15-100

SWOCSE/ Caroline Bird, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ROBERT ENOCH, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of November, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-010

SWOCSE/ Mary Goette, PLAINTIFF

VS.

KENDALL SHORTMAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of November, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-016

SWOCSE/ Sandra Redday, PLAINTIFF

VS.

WARREN REDDAY, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of November, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-070

SWOCSE/ Jacqueline Franzen, PLAINTIFF

VS.

RICHARD SIMON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of November, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 09-117

SWOCSE/ Linda Thompson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

Luonda Stevens, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of November, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-048

SWOCSE/ Micheal Farmer, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JOSEPH ADAMS II, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 10-078

SWOCSE/ TANF, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JONAH BLUE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 07-100

SWOCSE/ TANF, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JONAH BLUE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 07-097

SWOCSE/ Lesley Buckelk, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TYLER SULLIVAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 08-021

SWOCSE/TANF, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TYLER SULLIVAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 08-336

SWOCSE/TANF/Nicole Labelle, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TYLER SULLIVAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 12-121

SWOCSE/TANF/Ursula Eagle, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TYLER SULLIVAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 04-329

SWOCSE/TANF/Ione Eagle, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TYLER SULLIVAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I:14-035

SWOCSE/ MN/Verzella Grey, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DAMIEN CADOTTE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 13-117

SWOCSE/ ND/Joni Cadotte, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DAMIEN CADOTTE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017.

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 07-141

SWOCSE/ Sara Runnels, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DAMIEN CADOTTE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017.

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 17-033

SWOCSE/SD/ Adelia Godfrey, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LYDIA GODFREY, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Recognize a Foreign Order and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-127

SWOCSE/ Valerie Paul, PLAINTIFF

VS.

HEATHER PAUL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 17-031

SWOCSE/ Hope Dumarce, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TIHDONICA GILL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Recognize a Foreign Order and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 16-107

SWOCSE/SD/ Gabrielle Blue, PLAINTIFF

VS.

GARRETT WHITE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-067

SWOCSE/SD/Candace Hill, PLAINTIFF

VS.

HAZEN DUMARCE JR, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 15-085

SWOCSE/SD/Brittney Lafontaine, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MARLO WHITE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-030

SWOCSE/ AMANDA QUINN, PLAINTIFF

VS.

NICHOLAS RONDELL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-034

SWOCSE/ROCHELLE RENVILLE, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DARREN SHEPHERD SR., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-026

SWOCSE/Flora Eagle, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DWAYNE PRICE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-028

SWOCSE/Chantel Eagle, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JASON SMOKEY SR., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-044

SWOCSE/Loretta Kohl, PLAINTIFF

VS.

THOMAS ANDERSON JR., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-046

SWOCSE/Micheal Farmer, PLAINTIFF

VS.

NATASHA RODLUND, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 10-039

SWOCSE/Wellington Abraham Sr., PLAINTIFF

VS.

LEEANNE ABRAHAM, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of January, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 3rd day of January, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

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The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Bus Driver (part-time), Head Start

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Process Server (part-time), Office of Child Support

Early Childhood Specialist, Education Department

Peer Tutor (Waubay), JOM

Peer Tutor (Sisseton), JOM

Peer Tutor (Wilmot), JOM

Closing Date: January 20th, 2017 @ 04:30 PM

Tracking Paraprofessional, Early Childhood Intervention

Teacher Aide, Head Start

EDA Planner, Planning

Van Driver/Janitor, Tribal Elderly

Closing Date: January 27th, 2017 @ 04:30 PM

Application and job description information can be seen at SWO Human Resources Office or http://www.swo-nsn.gov/contact/employment. Application can be downloaded from "Apply Now" and emailed to ArnoldW@SWO-NSN.GOV or DeniseH@SWO-NSN.GOV. Contact can also be at Arnold Williams 698-8238 or Denise Hill 698-8251 with questions. (Tribal preference will apply).

 

Enemy Swim District Youth

Job Opening:

Part-Time Youth Worker

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

Application and job description info can be seen at ESD or TNYC.

Must be alcohol/drug free and pass a background check.

Contact for more info: Chelsea Hopkins-Enemy Swim Youth Coordinator (605) 265-1250

Address: Enemy Swim Youth P.O. Box 15 Waubay, SD 57273

Office: (605) 947-4319 ext. 107/109

Fax: (605) 947-4873

Email: enemyswimyouth@itctel.com

Closing Date: Friday, January 27th, 2017 @ 4 pm

 

Sisseton Wahpeton College

Has the following vacancies:

Accountant

The Business Office has an opening for an Accountant. This position will assist in the daily operations of the Business Office, participate with monthly closings and distribution of reports, prepare monthly journal entries, prepare reconciliations of bank accounts and general ledger accounts, and assist the Comptroller in other financial and internal control procedures. Requirements for this position are: Bachelor's degree in accounting or finance; three years' related work experience; knowledge of computerized accounting systems with strong Excel capabilities; and knowledge of Jenzabar accounting system preferred. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118. Position closes at 4:30 p.m. January 27, 2017.

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Current Vacancies:

Substitutes needed for custodial, kitchen, teaching, and transportation - starting at $10/hr, varies per position Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma (please contact the HR office for more information) Applications are accepted on an on-going basis

2016-2017 School Year Vacancies:

Vacancy: High School Science Teacher ($2,000.00 Sign-on Bonus) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School Science Teacher Opening Date: January 29, 2016 Closing Date: open until filled

Vacancy: Career and Technical Education Teacher ($2,000.00 Sign-on Bonus) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Career and Technical Education Teacher Opening Date: March 11, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Middle School Social Studies Teacher ($2,000.00 Sign-on Bonus) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Middle School Social Studies Teacher Opening Date: April 22, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Gear-Up School Based Coordinator Qualifications: Current South Dakota Teaching Certificate and possess a valid South Dakota drivers license Opening Date: May 23, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Special Education Paraprofessional (2) Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma and either 461+ on the Para Praxis or 48+ college credits, and 2 years directly related experience. Opening Date: January 5, 2017

Closing Date: January 19, 2017

2016-2017 Coaching Vacancies- Closing Date: Open until filled

Proof of all SDHSAA coaching requirements at the time application is submitted. Requirements are to complete the following courses through the National Federation of High School Sports (NFHS): Fundamentals of Coaching, and First Aid and Safety for Coaches. Must also submit a letter of intent that answers the questions found on form Athletics Coaching Questionnaire. **Do not need SDHSAA/NFHS Coaching Requirements.

Jr. High/Assistant Track Coach Assistant Track Coach

2016-2017 Extra-Curricular Vacancies-Closing Date: Open until filled

Science Club Adviser Destination Imagination Coach Drum Adviser Military Club Adviser

If you would like to apply to be a part of the TZ tiwahe you may pick up an application and background check form from the TZTS HR office located at #2 Tiospa Zina Dr. Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications may also be printed off the HR web page. Completed applications may be sent to PO Box 719, Agency Village, SD 57262. Faxed to: 605-698-7686. For further information call 605-698-3953 ext. 208. Indian Preference employer. At will employer. All applicants are subject to a Background Check and Pre-Employment Drug Test, pursuant to SWSB policy and United States Code Title 25 Chapter 34 - Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention.

 

Browns Valley Public School

Browns Valley School is seeking a paraprofessional for the remainder of the 2016-2017 school year. Application forms may be requested from the district office, 320-695-2103.

Please submit applications to Denise Pikarski, Principal Browns Valley School Box N 118 Church Street Browns Valley, MN 56219.

3-1tc

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Foods Department:

Bus Persons (Full-Time or Part-Time) as needed

Cashiers (Full-Time & Part-Time) as needed

Dishwashers (Full-Time or Part-Time) as needed

Wait Staffs (Full-Time or Part-Time) as needed

Hotel Department:

Room/Laundry Attendant (Full-Time or Part-Time) as needed

Housekeeping Department:

Porter (Full-Time or Part-Time) as needed

Human Resources Department:

Seamstress (Full-Time or Part-Time) Day

Security Department:

Officers (Full-Time or Part-Time) as needed

Table Games Department:

Dealer (2 Full-Time or Part-Time) Rotating

Closing Date: January 20, 2017 at 4:00 p.m.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions.

Two identifications documents required upon hire.

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE, Hankinson ND 58041.For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO. (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment). Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

The Foods Department Is Now Accepting Applications For

Position: Executive Chef.

Job Description: Responsible for food production, quality and cost. Responsible for adherence to all sanitary guidelines for food preparation and storage areas. Supervises all culinary kitchen staff.

Starting Wage: Negotiable ($41,000.00-$68,000.00)

Required: Bachelors Degree in Culinary or related field and 4 years Sous Chef experience Or Associates Degree in Culinary and 6 years Sous Chef experience Please refer to the Job Description for further requirements.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions.

Two identifications documents required upon hire.

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE, Hankinson ND 58041.For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO. (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment). Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

HOTEL: HOUSEKEEPER (1 Full-Time) GENERAL FUNCTION: Clean rooms, halls, restrooms, elevators and stairways according to standards. REQUIREMENTS: 1-3 months related experience. Must have the ability to move or lift up to 25 lbs. Non-Gaming License is required

Closing Date: January 18, 2017 at 4:00 pm

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

C-Store Department:

Clerk/Cashier (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Excellent customer service skills; math skills essential; ability to operate necessary equipment; physical ability to lift moderate amounts of weight; previous experience working with money preferred; strong organizational skills managing various functions; dependable & available to work any & all shifts. Must be at least 21 years old & have a High School diploma or GED.

Deli Attendant (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Ability to operate necessary equipment. Physical ability to stand for long hours, clean, lift heavy objects up to 30 lbs., and restock inventory; 6 mos. Previous cooking experience preferred, 6 mos. working with the public. Knowledge of food preparation safety requirements. Must be dependable & available to work any and all shifts. Must be at least 18 years old and have a High School Diploma or GED.

Opening date: Thursday, January 12, 2017

Closing date: Wednesday, January 18, 2017 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 

 
 

 

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