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Sota Volume 45 Issue No. 47

Anpetu Iyamni, November 26, 2014

Inside this Edition –

Multiple homicides shock the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate; Community is grieving

SWO grassroots solutions holds meeting last Monday; Goals for presentation at Winter General Council

Annual SWO Akicita Wacipi, part II

Oyate health information: The Affordable Health Care Act and You

Highlights of SWC Traditional Bow-Making Workshop

2nd Annual “Giving Thanks Meal” Thursday, Nov. 27 at First Baptist Church, Sisseton; Call 268-6974 for delivery

Note: The Sota edition following Thanksgiving will be printed and distributed on Tuesday, Dec. 2nd; Please submit copy accordingly

Tragedy in Sisseton: Young Oyate lives lost in shooting

By CD Floro

Sota Editor

Gunfire broke the quiet of Sisseton’s east side shortly after 3:00 o’clock this past Saturday morning, November 22. Gunshots, lots of them, were fired inside the home of Colter Arbach.

Neighbors’ lights came on, and in a few moments people were calling and texting one another and police sirens screamed up and down the streets.

Sisseton city officers arrived to find four persons deceased and one person in critical condition, who was taken by ambulance to Coteau hospital. She was soon airlifted to Sanford Hospital in Fargo, ND, where she has been listed in stable condition. The sound of the medical helicopter could be heard throughout the city; more community members became alarmed.

Other law enforcement agencies got involved, and officers with assault rifles patrolled several blocks around the Arbach home. The assumption, reported on TV stations throughout the morning, was that the suspect was armed and to be considered dangerous.

Agencies responding include Sisseton Police, SWO Tribal Law Enforcement, Roberts County Sheriff’s, South Dakota Highway Patrol, South Dakota Game Fish and Parks, and the Division of Criminal Investigation.

That was later discovered to be false, when Colter was identified among the four deceased in his house.

Authorities had not released names of the victims but because of the close kinship ties among our Oyate it was soon known to those of us whose hearts were hurting and breaking, the names.

The suspect in the shooting, already reported by authorities, was Colter Arbach, 22. Colter had been working as a security guard at Dakota Magic and expressed a desire to go into law enforcement work. It is believed he died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

Victims of the multiple homicide, who are all about the same age and three attended Sisseton Wahpeton College together, are:

*Vernon Renville Jr., known as Vernon Redday. Vernon was a gentle giant of a young man, physically large and with an equally big heart. He was known for a sense of humor. And he’d volunteer for any walk or campaign to bring awareness to some of the most important problems on the Lake Traverse Reservation. Whether it was awareness of domestic violence, child abuse, drug and alcohol abuse, prejudice/racism, you-name-it. And he was a strong voice for the LGBT community. His brothers and sisters of the Two Spirit movement are mourning along with Vernon’s family and lots of other friends. We remember him during last winter’s Idle No More walk through snow-covered streets of Sisseton.

*Angela Adams.

*Candace LaBelle.

We have learned from family members that the person who survived is Karissa DogEagle.

We have not been acquainted with Angela, Amber and Candace, or with Karissa, but we know their families. And Angela leaves behind three children; Candace leaves behind eight children.

This was a big loss for so many family members, tiospaye, the Tribal community, and many, many friends.

After meeting at Cahill Funeral Home, families gathered with friends at St. Catherine’s Hall to share their shock and grief.

A candlelight vigil was held there in the evening in memory of these young people’s lives.

Here is what Dustina Gill wrote on Sunday about that vigil: “Yesterday was incomprehensible. Families and friends were being held up or falling to their knees in insurmountable shock and grief. Last night over 300 people came to hold a candle in the darkness and to share prayers, hugs or just be there to hold a hand for comfort. The mothers of the fallen were wrapped with a blanket as a symbol of the comfort from the community that wrapping their arms around them in this horrific time. Last night I came home and kissed my bebe and cried for the mothers who weren't able to and the little ones who wouldn't feel their mothers kiss again. So many prayers are needed and so much love is needed in the days to come for the families.”

Here are remarks from Bryan Grimmer, on Sunday:

“I woke up this morning, first thing I did was jump on Facebook hoping that I would see Vernon Redday post something. It still hasn't hit me yet, it’s too surreal. I hope that we all learn from this that life is too short. If you’re mad at someone, talk to them and figure out a solution. I went to the candlelight vigil last night, and it was pretty seeing all those candles lit for those we lost. But in the same sense, it shouldn't take a tragedy like this for all of us, no matter the race, ethnicity, color, religion to come together and stand as one. We need to forgive those, turn hate into love and we all need to start acting like adults and quit with all the BS against each other. We need to start standing as one. You guys are all loved, pray for each other and think about what could happen if we all stood up together.”

On Sunday evening, beginning at 7:00, a memorial service was planned at Sisseton Wahpeton College for Vernon and Angela.

Here is information available on Sunday about services. Watch for updates on our website and on Facebook and complete obituaries in next week’s Sota.

Here is information available about services. Complete obituaries will be published next week in the Sota.

*Vernon Renville Jr. of Sisseton, SD, and Angela Adams. Wake services are being held Sunday evening beginning at 7:00 p.m., Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday beginning at 6:00 p.m. each night at the SWC omniciye tipi, where funeral services for Vernon and Angela will be held at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, November 27, 2014. Chilson Funeral Home, Winsted, Minn. is serving the families.

*Candace LaBelle 29, of Sisseton, SD. Wake service Monday, November 24, at 7:00 p.m. and all-night Tuesday beginning at 7:00 p.m. at the SWO Community Center, Agency Village, SD. Funeral service will be Wednesday, November 27 at 2:00 p.m. at the Community Center. Arrangements are by Cahill Funeral Home.

*Colter Arbach 22, of Sisseton, SD. Arrangements are pending with Chilson Funeral Home, Winsted, Minn.

Aliive Roberts County has provided public service announcements concerning how families and the community can cope with a tragedy such as this.

Please read the following notices, and please make use of the toll-free number for counseling. Also, know that there are many in our community who are available to talk in confidence if you are struggling with grief.

What we see is how friends and neighbors sitting with the loved ones – the mothers, dads, sisters, brothers and many cousins – helps with the shock and hurt.

Sometimes all you can do is hold someone’s hand, or put an arm around their shoulder. Hug them and simply listen to them. Being there is the best gift.

We cannot talk about this tragedy as an incident isolated from other things going on in our Reservation community and elsewhere.

First, these losses are personal for mitakodas and myself. And many of our families here have just grieved for their dads, their sisters, and others – taken by illness, by cancer, taken by car accident.

It has been a difficult season for grief.

Many have been sent on their spirit journey, and now these four young people travel away.

Second, it doesn’t seem possible to reflect on how much this tragedy appears similar to what happened on the Tulalip Indian Reservation on Puget Sound in Washington state. There, a young man opened fire on classmates and cousins. He along with four others died at his school and afterwards in the hospital.

In that case, the shooter’s actions appear to have come from several frustration over a relationship with a girl.

But here, in Sisseton, we have no idea what prompted this shooting. Only Colter could tell what happened, and that’s not possible now. A neighbor told a reporter he believed Colter was having problems with a love relationship.

Third, even though we don’t know what caused or provoked our tragedy on Saturday, we still want to mention how it could relate to our SWO grassroots solutions meetings. Even if it does not have anything to do with drugs or alcohol, our community needs to get behind this movement. That’s the best way we see to take on our biggest challenges.

Fourth, the US has more gun violence than so many other countries do. And extremists on both sides of the issue of guns chanting slogans is no way to prevent more shootings. These killings are tragic. How can they be prevented?

Rest in peace our beautiful young Oyate.

It is our hope that this tragedy will unite our community, make it stronger and lessen a chance that this might happen again to others.

Official statement from SWO Tribal Chairman Robert Shepherd

Agency Village, SD – November 22, 2014 – On behalf the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation I want to express our deepest condolences to all the families who have lost loved ones after the shooting which occurred early this morning. When I learned four young members passed away and one was in critical condition, I knew a great sadness had descended upon our community.

I am asking the community stand together during this difficult time. We are never stronger than when tested with great loss and as Dakota people we look to the Creator and one another for strength and comfort for the difficult days ahead.

As with such tragedies many will want to ask questions regarding the events. I ask that we allow our families time to mourn and that we respect them during this time.

Again, on behalf of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate our thoughts and prayers are with the families, friends and community of this tragic event.

Candlelight vigil brings out community to share grief

By Sierra Wolcott

Last Saturday evening at eight o’clock the families and friends of the shooting victims gathered with community members and clergy at St. Catherine's hall in Sisseton, SD for a candlelight vigil.

Approximately 300 were in attendance as candles were lit and prayers and songs were offered for the families of the victims.

Several clergy of different denominations as well as a Dakota spiritual man offered words and prayers of comfort.

Following the vigil a feed was held. Many clergy and mental health professionals were in attendance to assist those in need of support.

As Dakotas, the community feels they will get through this time with love and support. They face this trauma as a community, praying for all the families who are suffering.

Respectfully Submitted.

See accompanying photos by Kateri Bird.

Updated information about the case

Darrell DeCoteau Jr., uncle to two of the victims, provided additional information to reporters on Sunday.

He said that Karissa, who is in stable condition in Sanford Hospital-Fargo, had been dating Colter Arbach. They were also co-workers at Dakota Magic.

Darrell had learned that the two got into an altercation at work Friday afternoon.

"I had heard that Colter had texted somebody saying he was breaking up with Karissa that night," he said.

All the victims and alleged shooter were close friends.

"They touched so many lives, it's so senseless and we have 11 children without a mother now because of this act," DeCoteau Jr. said.

"As a family and as a community this is gut wrenching, but one way we're going to get through this is the people of Sisseton," he added.

About the vigil, Darrell said "It was so amazing to see how much people cared. I can't say thank you to everybody, but it was amazing."

Darrell also thanked law enforcement for being respectful and helpful during this time, "We had people from all over the state come to work this crime, but they also showed compassion to us and they worked with us."

SD Attorney General Marty Jackley said, “We need to be respectful and people mourn or handle things in a different way so we continue to do what we need to do."

Jackley said the Department of Criminal Investigation is conducting autopsies on the victims and is still conducting interviews of anyone with information about this shooting. The South Dakota Crime Lab is working on ballistic testing and a shooting reconstruction.

Jackley confirmed that the shooter used multiple firearms during the shooting.

Provided by Aliive Roberts County –

Advice for families coping with children’s reaction to trauma

Practicing self-care after trauma

Exposure to traumatic events can have a major impact on our emotions, behaviors, cognitive functioning, and physical well-being. People experience a range of reactions. It is common for them to report being more fearful, withdrawing from friends and family, feeling easily distracted or even frustrated by memory lapses, or failing to complete simple tasks.

The most common reaction people exposed to trauma or extreme stress report is the powerful impact on our bodies. Initially we may feel anxious, sense our hearts racing, or experience an adrenaline rush. After a few days, we may feel exhausted but have difficulty sleeping, notice that we startle easily, be more hyper vigilant,or feel numb or detached. Often people report they cannot stop thinking about the traumatic event, watching it on television, or reading about it in the news.

The good news is humans are resilient and most everyone will recover in a short amount of time – usually afew weeks. To speed our recovery, we need to remember self-care is important and find ways to take care of ourselves on a daily basis. Here are a few things you can do to promote a return to normalcy:

1) Maintain social connections: When we experience a loss or a tragedy, it is easy to isolate or withdraw from our network of friends and family. But in a middle of crisis, these support networks are more important than ever. Reach out to those who can support you. Make plans to see friends and stay connected in-person or on the phone. You may decide you want to temporarily avoid people who are not being supportive. And remember, that it is okay to take me out for yourself to rest and recharge.

2) Engage in health-promoting behaviors: Exercise several times a week and try and maintain a healthy diet. Our healthy routines and good eating habits disappear during emergencies, so we need to find ways to carve out me to go for a walk, swim, or whatever exercise you enjoy. Do not overdo it. If you are pressed for time, a short walk is fine. Do not be hard on yourself. Right now may not be the time to start a diet or quit smoking. Stay hydrated. When we are stressed we tend to use up more water than normal, and our bodies do not always give us the signals that we are thirsty, so it is important to drink a lot of water.

3) Maintain good sleep hygiene: Traumatic events often disrupt our sleep. Some people report nightmares or find that nights are harder for them. Try to maintain regular sleep routines and get eight hours of sleep a night. Stay away from caffeine in the evening. Recent studies support turning off all electronics – televisions, phones, and computers – at least one hour before bedtime.

4) Find balance in your life: During a crisis people often report excessive behaviors – working too much, eating too much, sleeping too much, and even drinking too much. Avoid excessively watching television reports of the event. Set limits for yourself on activities and make sure you are taking care of yourself in all areas – social, behavioral, and spiritual. Our assumptions about the world being a safe place are shattered and anything we can do that gives our life meaning or gives us a plan of action will help speed our recovery.

(Information from www.riversidetraumacenter.org)

Children and Trauma

Children respond to traumatic violence in a variety of ways; however there are several typical responses. These responses vary, depending on numerous factors, some of which are: the child’s age, whether the child knew the individuals involved, and how “graphic” the violence was. Some common responses to trauma include:

Concerns about fearing that the person (people) suffered

Repeatedly visualizing the crime/incident in their minds

Constant attempts to tell and retell the story of the crime/incident

Need to reenact the crime/incident through play

A desire to seek revenge (for those who knew the victim(s))

Feelings of guilt for not having intervened or prevented the crime

For some children, particularly those who knew the victim(s), signals of grief after a violent crime/incident include:

Fear of death

Fear of being left alone or sleeping alone

A need to be with people who have been through the same experience

Difficulty concentrating

Drop in grades (during the school year)

Physical complaints (headaches/stomachaches)

Bedwetting

Nightmares

Fear of sleep

Clingy behavior (wanting to be with and around parents more often)

What you can do to help children who have witnessed violence:

Allow your child to talk about what he/she experienced or heard about

Know that younger children may prefer to “draw” about their experiences

Ask them what they saw and heard and what they think about the experience. Help them to label feelings and normalize their reactions (“That must have been pretty scary. It wouldn’t surprise me if you keep thinking about it.”)

Spend some extra time with your child: have dinner together, make sure to keep bedtime routines Remind your child of things he/she likes to do to help feel better when upset (playing, reading, etc.)

Children count on routines and structure. Keep routines as much the same as possible in the aftermath of an unpleasant event.

If you have concerns that your child may be having serious responses to trauma, you should speak to a counselor.

(Information from www.riversidetraumacenter.org)

9 Things Every Parent with an Anxious Child Should Try

By Renee Jain, MAPP

As all the kids line up to go to school, your son, Timmy, turns to you and says, “I don’t want to take the bus. My stomach hurts. Please don’t make me go.” You cringe and think, Here we go again. What should be a simple morning routine explodes into a daunting challenge.

You look at Timmy and see genuine terror. You want to comfort him. You want to ease the excessive worry that’s become part and parcel of his everyday life. First, you try logic. “Timmy, we walk an extra four blocks to catch this bus because this driver has an accident-free driving record!” He doesn’t budge.

You provide reassurance. “I promise you’ll be OK. Timmy, look at me… you trust me, right?” Timmy nods. A few seconds later he whispers, “Please don’t make me go.”

You resort to anger: “Timothy Christopher, you will get on this bus RIGHT NOW, or there will be serious consequences. No iPad for one week!” He looks at you as if you’re making him walk the plank. He climbs onto the bus, defeated. You feel terrible.

If any of this sounds familiar, know you are not alone. Most parents would move mountains to ease their child’s pain. Parents of kids with anxiety would move planets and stars as well. It hurts to watch your child worry over situations that, frankly, don’t seem that scary. Here’s the thing: To your child’s mind, these situations are genuinely threatening. And even perceived threats can create a real nervous system response. We call this response anxiety and I know it well.

I’d spent the better part of my childhood covering up a persistent, overwhelming feeling of worry until, finally, in my early twenties, I decided to seek out a solution. What I’ve learned over the last two decades is that many people suffer from debilitating worry. In fact, 40 million American adults, as well as 1 in 8 children, suffer from anxiety. Many kids miss school, social activities and a good night’s rest just from the worried thoughts in their head. Many parents suffer from frustration and a feeling of helplessness when they witness their child in this state day in, day out.

What I also learned is that while there is no one-size-fits-all solution for anxiety, there are a plethora of great research-based techniques that can help manage it — many of which are simple to learn. WAIT! Why didn’t my parents know about this? Why didn’t I know about it? Why don’t they teach these skills in school?

I wish I could go back in time and teach the younger version of myself how to cope, but of course, that’s not possible. What is possible is to try to reach as many kids and parents as possible with these coping skills. What is possible is to teach kids how to go beyond just surviving to really finding meaning, purpose and happiness in their lives. To this end, I created an anxiety relief program for kids called GoZen. Here are 9 ideas straight from GoZen that parents of anxious children can try right away:

1. Stop Reassuring Your Child. Your child worries. You know there is nothing to worry about, so you say, “Trust me. There’s nothing to worry about.” Done and done, right? We all wish it were that simple. Why does your reassurance fall on deaf ears? It’s actually not the ears causing the issue. Your anxious child desperately wants to listen to you, but the brain won’t let it happen. During periods of anxiety, there is a rapid dump of chemicals and mental transitions executed in your body for survival. One by-product is that the prefrontal cortex — or more logical part of the brain — gets put on hold while the more automated emotional brain takes over. In other words, it is really hard for your child to think clearly, use logic or even remember how to complete basic tasks. What should you do instead of trying to rationalize the worry away? Try something I call the FEEL method:

• Freeze — pause and take some deep breaths with your child. Deep breathing can help reverse the nervous system response.

• Empathize — anxiety is scary. Your child wants to know that you get it.

• Evaluate — once your child is calm, it’s time to figure out possible solutions.

• Let Go – Let go of your guilt; you are an amazing parent giving your child the tools to manage their worry.

2. Highlight Why Worrying is Good. Remember, anxiety is tough enough without a child believing that Something is wrong with me. Many kids even develop anxiety about having anxiety. Teach your kids that worrying does, in fact, have a purpose.

When our ancestors were hunting and gathering food there was danger in the environment, and being worried helped them avoid attacks from the saber-toothed cat lurking in the bush. In modern times, we don’t have a need to run from predators, but we are left with an evolutionary imprint that protects us: worry.

Worry is a protection mechanism. Worry rings an alarm in our system and helps us survive danger. Teach your kids that worry is perfectly normal, it can help protect us, and everyone experiences it from time to time. Sometimes our system sets off false alarms, but this type of worry (anxiety) can be put in check with some simple techniques.

3. Bring Your Child’s Worry to Life. As you probably know, ignoring anxiety doesn’t help. But bringing worry to life and talking about it like a real person can. Create a worry character for your child. In GoZen we created Widdle the Worrier. Widdle personifies anxiety. Widdle lives in the old brain that is responsible for protecting us when we’re in danger. Of course, sometimes Widdle gets a little out of control and when that happens, we have to talk some sense into Widdle. You can use this same idea with a stuffed animal or even role-playing at home.

Personifying worry or creating a character has multiple benefits. It can help demystify this scary physical response children experience when they worry. It can reactivate the logical brain, and it’s a tool your children can use on their own at any time.

4. Teach Your Child to Be a Thought Detective. Remember, worry is the brain’s way of protecting us from danger. To make sure we’re really paying attention, the mind often exaggerates the object of the worry (e.g., mistaking a stick for a snake). You may have heard that teaching your children to think more positively could calm their worries. But the best remedy for distorted thinking is not positive thinking; it’s accurate thinking. Try a method we call the 3Cs:

• Catch your thoughts: Imagine every thought you have floats above your head in a bubble (like what you see in comic strips). Now, catch one of the worried thoughts like “No one at school likes me.”

• Collect evidence: Next, collect evidence to support or negate this thought. Teach your child not to make judgments about what to worry about based only on feelings. Feelings are not facts. (Supporting evidence: “I had a hard time finding someone to sit with at lunch yesterday.” Negating evidence: “Sherry and I do homework together–she’s a friend of mine.”)

• Challenge your thoughts: The best (and most entertaining) way to do this is to teach your children to have a debate within themselves.

5. Allow Them to Worry. As you know, telling your children not to worry won’t prevent them from doing so. If your children could simply shove their feelings away, they would. But allowing your children to worry openly, in limited doses, can be helpful. Create a daily ritual called “Worry Time” that lasts 10 to 15 minutes. During this ritual encourage your children to release all their worries in writing. You can make the activity fun by decorating a worry box. During worry time there are no rules on what constitutes a valid worry — anything goes. When the time is up, close the box and say good-bye to the worries for the day.

6. Help Them Go from What If to What Is. You may not know this, but humans are capable of time travel. In fact, mentally we spend a lot of time in the future. For someone experiencing anxiety, this type of mental time travel can exacerbate the worry. A typical time traveler asks what-if questions: “What if I can’t open my locker and I miss class?” “What if Suzy doesn’t talk to me today?”

Research shows that coming back to the present can help alleviate this tendency. One effective method of doing this is to practice mindfulness exercises. Mindfulness brings a child from what if to what is. To do this, help your child simply focus on their breath for a few minutes.

7. Avoiding Everything that Causes Anxiety. Do your children want to avoid social events, dogs, school, planes or basically any situation that causes anxiety? As a parent, do you help them do so? Of course! This is natural. The flight part of the flight-fight-freeze response urges your children to escape the threatening situation. Unfortunately, in the long run, avoidance makes anxiety worse.

So what’s the alternative? Try a method we call laddering. Kids who are able to manage their worry break it down into manageable chunks. Laddering uses this chunking concept and gradual exposure to reach a goal.

Let’s say your child is afraid of sitting on the swings in the park. Instead of avoiding this activity, create mini-goals to get closer to the bigger goal (e.g., go to the edge of the park, then walk into the park, go to the swings, and, finally, get on a swing). You can use each step until the exposure becomes too easy; that’s when you know it’s time to move to the next rung on the ladder.

8. Help Them Work Through a Checklist. What do trained pilots do when they face an emergency? They don’t wing it (no pun intended!); they refer to their emergency checklists. Even with years of training, every pilot works through a checklist because, when in danger, sometimes it’s hard to think clearly.

When kids face anxiety they feel the same way. Why not create a checklist so they have a step-by-step method to calm down? What do you want them to do when they first feel anxiety coming on? If breathing helps them, then the first step is to pause and breathe. Next, they can evaluate the situation. In the end, you can create a hard copy checklist for your child to refer to when they feel anxious.

9. Practice Self-Compassion. Watching your child suffer from anxiety can be painful, frustrating, and confusing. There is not one parent that hasn’t wondered at one time or another if they are the cause of their child’s anxiety. Here’s the thing, research shows that anxiety is often the result of multiple factors (i.e., genes, brain physiology, temperament, environmental factors, past traumatic events, etc.). Please keep in mind, you did not cause your child’s anxiety, but you can help them overcome it.

Toward the goal of a healthier life for the whole family, practice self-compassion. Remember, you’re not alone, and you’re not to blame. It’s time to let go of debilitating self-criticism and forgive yourself. Love yourself. You are your child’s champion.

Ten things grieving children want you to know

Moyer Foundation & New York Life Foundation join hundreds of organizations nationwide in support of grieving children on Nov. 20, 2014

New York, NY – November 12, 2014 – One in 20 children will lose a parent by the age of 18. Most Americans will experience the death of someone close to them before graduating high school.

Death is a part of life, and loss is difficult for everyone, but children and teens grieve differently than adults. And when a child’s grief goes unnoticed or isn?t properly addressed, the hurt can last a lifetime. Data indicates that without support, grieving children are at a much greater risk for depression, suicide, poverty and substance abuse.

“As a society we tend to overlook how grief affects children, despite the tremendous impact it can have on their lives,” said Karen Moyer, co-founder and vice president of The Moyer Foundation. “But when we can provide the support they need, it’s truly amazing to watch them start to heal and learn to hope again.”

The Moyer Foundation’s Camp Erin® program is the nation?s largest network of free bereavement camps for kids, serving more than 2,600 children and teens annually in 46 locations.

Observed this year on Thursday, Nov. 20, Children’s Grief Awareness Day was established to draw attention to the unique needs and perspective of grieving children. Grief support organizations and families across the country mark the day each year as a way to remember loved ones and to raise awareness.

“We have been focused on leading a national discussion about childhood bereavement since 2008,” said Heather Nesle, president of the New York Life Foundation, a primary supporter of The Moyer Foundation. “We have made great progress, but this issue needs more attention, and we need to reach more grieving children across the country,” said Ms. Nesle.

For those who have a grieving child in their life, here are a few insights into what they might be thinking and feeling, and how you can help, courtesy of The National Alliance for Grieving Children.

10 Things Grieving Children Want You to Know

#1 - I want to be told the truth.

Tell grieving children the truth, keeping in mind the child’s age and maturity level and the circumstances surrounding the death.

#2 - I want to know that there will always be someone to take care of me.

Grieving children spend a lot of time worrying about another person in their life who might die. To help alleviate this fear, it’s important to reassure them that there will always be someone in their life who will take care of them.

#3 -My grief is long lasting.

Children will grieve the person who died for the rest of their life - they don’t “just get over it.” As a result, they will often be bewildered when other people in their life have seemed to move on.

#4 - I often cope with grief and loss through play.

Typically, children cannot sustain prolonged grief, so they use play as a way to cope with and to take a break.

#5 - I will always miss the person who died.

Love doesn’t die - grieving children will miss the person they lost for as long as they live.

#6 - I probably want to share my story and talk about the person who died.

Telling their story often helps a child heal. Grieving children don’t want to forget the person who died. They also worry that others will forget their person, so it’s important to share memories about the person who died.

#7 - I might grieve differently from other kids.

Some children might be more expressive with their grief; some might keep it all in. Even siblings grieve differently, and it is important to honor each child’s story, even if it differs from their sibling’s.

#8 - I probably feel guilty.

Grieving children will often feel pangs of guilt, even if it is not justified and has no basis in reality

#9 - If I’m acting out, I’m probably feeling intense emotions of grief.

Grieving children frequently feel sad, angry, confused, or scared. Because they might not know how to express these emotions, they often end up acting out instead.

#10 - If you’re not sure what I want or what I’m feeling, just ask me!

When in doubt, ask a grieving child how you can help. They want to talk about the person who died, or maybe not. They may want to write about their grief or do some other activity to express their feelings.

Be a part of Children’s Grief Awareness Day

Below are a few ways to help raise awareness and support grieving children on Nov. 20. For a full list, visit www.childrensgriefawarenessday.org

Post on the National Memory Board Project: To give children a place to share their story and honor their loved ones, The Moyer Foundation and The New York Life Foundation have created the National Memory Board Project.

Childhood Bereavement Resources

Moyer Foundation: www.moyerfoundation.org

New York Life Foundation - A Child in Grief: http://www.newyorklife.com/achildingrief

National Alliance for Grieving Children: http://www.nationalallianceforgrievingchildren.org/

HBO’s Emmy Award winning documentary ?One Last Hug: Three Days at Grief Camp?:

http://www.hbo.com/documentaries/one-last-hug-three-days-at-grief-camp#/

About The Moyer Foundation

The Moyer Foundation is a public, 501(c)(3) non-profit organization with a mission to provide comfort, hope and healing to children affected by loss and family addiction. Founded in 2000 by World Series champion pitcher Jamie Moyer and his wife Karen, The Foundation created and supports two signature programs. Camp Erin® is the nation?s largest network of free bereavement camps for grieving children and teens ages 6 ? 17. Camp Mariposa® is a free, first-of-its-kind program for children ages 9-12 impacted by a family member?s addiction. For more information on The Moyer Foundation and its programs, please visit http://www.moyerfoundation.org

About The New York Life Foundation

Inspired by New York Life’s tradition of service and humanity, the New York Life Foundation has, since its founding in 1979, provided $185 million in charitable contributions to national and local nonprofit organizations. The Foundation supports programs that benefit young people, particularly in the areas of educational enhancement and childhood bereavement. The Foundation also encourages and facilitates the community involvement of employees, agents, and retirees of New York Life through its Volunteers for Good program. To learn more, please visit www.newyorklifefoundation.org/.

From SWO Grassroots solutions meetings –

Objectives outlined, surveys planned, report coming to Winter General Council

By CD Floro

Sota Editor

We had come to this most recent in the series of SWO grassroots solutions meetings, last Monday, November 17th, hoping to at least see the turnout equal to the first or second meeting. Our hopes were certainly not met. Few of the programs directly involved in housing, health, social, law enforcement or the court even bothered sending a representative. And there was no one from Tribal Council. The Chairman’s office was represented by Dustina Gill.

Meth Prevention Coordinator Crystal Owen, responsible for calling together these solutions meetings, maintained her upbeat mantra, “Those who are supposed to be here, are here.” And she is correct, everyone who came brought with them a passion to bring solutions to the problems associated with drug abuse and those with a criminal justice system that is broken.

And more and more people entered the discussion throughout the morning. The numbers reached about twenty people.

Instead of being held in Tribal Council chambers, the meeting took place in meeting room 108 on the north side of the rotunda.

Participants agreed to the following objectives or solutions:

1. Nine-month treatment center (for adults and youth).

2. Update Tribal and Housing codes and ordinances to reflect no dealers or users allowed in the Housing sites (drug-free zones).

3. Adolescent/Children’s Home and a Home for babies.

4. Neighborhood Watch in all the Housing sites and communities to help report crimes.

5. Mandatory reporting of child neglect and abuse, including to unborn, be followed according to Tribal codes and to include follow-up by the appropriate programs.

6. Turn Rehab Center and area into the “Rehab Village” as was originally intended years ago.

7. Increase support services for addicts and families (Ala-Non, etc.) in the communities.

8. Identify all existing resources available so it is known who to work with and what is needed.

9. Allocate a percentage of gaming revenue to fund these solutions.

10. Quit pointing fingers and work together because as long as we do that nothing gets accomplished and the crimes and abuse continue.

While these steps were agreed upon, there was a lot of discussion.

Kateri Bird spoke to the heart of what is needed here, calling it “restorative justice.”

Rather than sending Oyate away to prison, or to distant treatment centers for help for addiction, Kateri talked about flexible treatment options at home, and treatment in lieu of incarceration or detention in a facility equipped with rehab services.

This was a point echoed by many.

Glen Anderson came and called attention to the way local courts have “abused” the mandatory minimum sentence guidelines.

He is one of a growing list of people whose adult children are behind bars, for five-year, ten-year, fifteen-year and longer sentences. All for crimes related to as he said “ingesting” illegal substances.

“Our children are going to court,” he said, “because of addiction … ingesting … and being given mandatory sentences.”

“It doesn’t make any sense,” said Glen.

He explained how these laws were passed in the 1980s with Reagan’s War on Drugs, and the purpose was to make sure that major drug dealers were handed substantial prison terms.

It was never intended, he argued, to put away those who are addicts.

“How many drug kings were sentenced last year across the whole country under these mandatory guidelines?” he asked. “Seven? Seven is all.”

And yet, he argued, children of our Oyate are being handed the long sentences.

He and others have retained legal counsel and are preparing to challenge use of these guidelines in court.

Recalling our initial meeting U.S. Attorney Brendan Johnson tacitly agreed with what Glen is talking about.

Johnson, when asked for federal help in ridding the Lake Traverse Reservation of drug-related crime, specifically agreed with participants at that meeting he (and the federal justice system) is interested in “cutting off the head of the snake.” In other words, prosecuting those drug dealers who have come from off the Reservation to take advantage of our Oyate girls and families for their criminal purposes.

And while the US Attorney made those statements, Glen and his group are wise to pursue a suit against the county and district court system.

Just look over the court news in the Courier, and see how many of our Oyate are given long prison sentences.

Etta Jo Marks asked sharp questions about how to move people and programs, to get the ball rolling.

“What about Planning?” she asked.

“What about the Reservation Planning Commission?”

She helped bring the discussion around to gathering data to document the needs for “a strategic plan.”

At that point, we called in Nicolette Knudson to the meeting.

Nicolette is the Tribe’s new Data Research Office Coordinator, in the Tribal Education Program.

Her duties include overseeing research data-gathering for grants and programs inside and outside the Tribe.

She was receptive to working with the grassroots solutions group to conduct surveys to help in planning how to meet these objectives.

Nicolette is devising those surveys to be used at upcoming District days and General Council.

Also, watch for an update on efforts of this solutions group to be given at the Winter 2014 General Council next month.

Lorraine Rousseau made some critical comments.

“We need to utilize people with experience … with know-how.”

She spoke of past efforts to provide detox and “transition house” here on the Lake Traverse Reservation.

These were not government programs. she explained, these were people who understood addiction simply working with Tribal members suffering with drug and alcohol addiction.

And she asked about how well the current system of justice and rehabilitation are doing.

“What is being done now?” she asked.

“Is it working?”

She added, “Unless we all work together, collaborate, we will continue have racial profiling and (problems with the criminal justice system).”

A final comment by Crystal, was “We must continue working forward . . . ask in the community how well people think our programs are accomplishing their mission . . . how well they are doing what they say they are doing.”

And that opportunity is expected to come with the surveys being conducted.

Watch for updates and especially a report at General Council. The second General Council of the year is planned for Thursday and Friday, December 18 and 19. The grassroots solutions report is tentatively planned to be given shortly before noon on Thursday.

Part II of annual Akicita Wacipi coverage –

Photo highlights of SWO 2014 Akicita Wacipi

Photos by Sota photographer John Heminger

Here is the second in a series of highlights from the 2014 annual Akicita Wacipi, held November 7-9 at the Tiospa Zina Tribal School gym, with wacipi results provided by Danielle DeCoteau, Commander, Desert Era Veterans.

Thank You

SWO Veterans Day Wacipi

The SWO United Veterans Association would like to thank all of our SWO Tribal Executives, Tribal Council, the Oyate, TIospa Zina Tribal School Board, Staff and students, CHR, SWO Law Enforcement, Dakota Language Department, Sota, all the powwow staff, singers/dancers, volunteers and of course All Veterans who worked together and helped make the SWO Veterans Day Wacipi a huge success. The veterans did not have a whole lot of time to plan (4 weeks) but it turned out to be a huge success and the dancers and vendors all thank us for showing such great hospitality, people came from faraway places to participate in our community event honoring all veterans. It was a great turn out with over 200 dancers and 17 registered drums.

On behalf of the SWO UVA we would like to Thank All Veterans for your service. Being a veteran is something that no one can ever take away from us because we have earned that right to call ourselves veterans. We all signed our names on that line to serve and protect and defend the Constitution of the United States of America. We all had a job during our time of service and no matter what during our time whether you knew the man or woman next to you it is our job to stick together, not just anyone can earn that right to be a veteran. A Veteran is a hero in some eyes, a mother, a father, a son, a daughter in others but no matter what we are ALL VETERANS and WE STICK TOGETHER, UNITED WE STAND! Some veterans may have seen WAR some may have not, some may have served during a time of WAR and some may have not, but no matter what we all had a job and that was to always protect. Protect your brothers and sisters.

"From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer"

GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov

Phone 605-698-3388

Today's thought for the day: "Don't let one cloud obliterate the whole sky." -- Unknown

*Veterans Choice Card Update: VA implemented the second phase of the Veterans Choice Card Program and began mailing Veterans Choice Cards on Nov. 17 to Veterans who are currently waiting more than 30-days from their preferred date or the date that is medically determined by their provider for an appointment at a VA. The Choice Program is a new, temporary benefit that allows some Veterans to receive health care in their communities rather than waiting for a VA appointment or traveling to a VA facility. The first round of cards and a letter explaining the program were issued on November 5 to Veterans eligible based on their place of residence. Now, the second round of cards is being sent to Veterans waiting more than 30 days from their preferred date to be seen or considered medically necessary by their providers. For more information about the Choice Program, call 1-866-606-8198 or visit http://www/va/gov/choiceact/.

*This is National American Indian and Alaskan Native Heritage Month. Did you know three VA hospitals are named after American Indian Veterans: Muskogee, OK - First VA named for an American Indian Veteran June 15, 2006 (Jack C. Montgomery VA Medical Center). Mr. Montgomery is a Cherokee, WWII Veteran and Medal of Honor recipient; Tulsa, OK - Second facility named for an American Indian on November 15, 2007 (Ernest Childers VA Outpatient Clinic). Mr. Childers is Creek, WWII Veteran, and the first American Indian Medal of Honor recipient of WWII; Asheville, NC - Third VA facility named after an American Indian on December 26, 2007 (Charles George VA Medical Center). Mr. George is a Cherokee Korean War Veteran who also received the Medal of Honor (info courtesy of Darlene Richardson, VA historian).

*Women Veterans & Military Women Meet 'n Greet November 25, 2014: Women of all eras and branches of the service are invited to the VFW at 3601 S. Minnesota Ave. from 5:30-7:00 PM. Supper is available but optional.

*TAPS - to the family of Raymond Dumarce, USMC Veteran who made his journey on 11/16/2014. Gone but not forgotten!

*The Government of Tribal Relations out of Washington, DC has a great website that you may want to check out. Their website address is: http://www.va.gov/TRIBALGOVERNMENT/resources.asp/. This is the office that Obama created for Native American Veterans located in DC. The Director is Stephanie Birdwell. Go to the site you will be amazed at the wealth of information in different categories.

*Remember Veterans stop by our Office which is located in the Post Office building next to job service Office. The address is 205 East Oak Street Suite # 121. Our telephone is 698-3388. Thank you to Gilbert Robertson, Korean War Airborne Veteran who dropped more military books by! Stop by and check them out!

*The best way for find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others. (Ghandi)

*WOMEN VETERANS CALL CENTER: 1-855-VA-WOMEN. Crisis Help Line: 1-800-273-8255, available 24/7, and tell them you are a veteran. All calls are confidential.

*American Legion Post #314- Delano Renville, Commander Cell:# 268-0354 / Vietnam Veterans Kit Fox Society - Commander post to be filled / Desert Era Veterans - Danielle DeCoteau, Commander Cell#: 268-1765. For GAS ASSISTANCE: Geri Opsal 698-3388

Have a good week.

Geri Opsal, Tribal VSO.

We must look for the opportunity in every difficulty instead of being paralyzed at the thought of the difficulty in every opportunity." -Walter E. Cole, Korean War Veteran.

NCAI response to Report on American Indian/Alaska Native Children Exposed to Violence

Washington, DC – November 18, 2014 – Today, the National Congress of American Indians called for a national mobilization of government and civil society resources to address high rates of violence experienced by American Indian and Alaska Native children. The organization’s swift response comes on the heels of the release of the report - Ending Violence So Children Can Thrive – authored by the Attorney General’s Advisory Committee on American Indian/Alaska Native Children Exposed to Violence. Former NCAI President Jefferson Keel, Lt. Governor of the Chickasaw Nation, served as a member of the committee, along with a diverse group of nine tribal leaders and scholars, and chair of the Committee, former Senator Byron Dorgan (ND).

NCAI’s current President Brian Cladoosby released the following statement:

“The report provides a very strong set of recommendations for action by the Obama Administration and by Congress. This grabs the heart. We call on the federal government, and tribal governments, as well as civil society to ensure that we are putting our children’s needs first.

“NCAI calls on Congress to hold hearings in early 2015 to address the Report’s recommendations. Additionally, the challenges and opportunities facing our Native youth should be a central focus during the President’s upcoming Tribal Nations Conference this December.

“Without action, our Native youth will remain vulnerable and they will continue to be exposed to harm. We must address this severe problem as an American family of governments – federal governments, state and local governments, and tribal governments. Even more importantly, we must address this as communities, families, parents and grandparents, and as adults, who know all too well the challenges of growing up in difficult environments. “

Over the past two years, the Attorney General and the Advisory Committee on American Indian and Alaska Native Children Exposed to Violence examined the current epidemic of violence facing Indian Country and in their report advanced recommendations to heal and protect American Indian and Alaska Native children—to create environments where they can thrive and reach their full potential. At the core of the matter is the need to reduce the barriers that restrict tribal sovereignty in the protection of Native children.

The Advisory Committee has identified the following areas of need:

A Permanent Voice for Native Children

- The Committee recommends that no later than May 2015 that a permanent fully staffed Native American Affairs Office within the White House Domestic Policy Council, including a staff person focused on Native youth.

Supporting Tribal Self-Determination in Combating Violence

- Tribal self-government must form the foundation for protecting Native children. The Advisory Committee recommends that Congress should restore the inherent authority of tribal governments to assert full criminal jurisdiction over all persons who commit crimes against children in Indian Country. It is important to build on the success of the Violence Against Women Act, and extend the law to protect Native children.

Intergovernmental Cooperation in Child Welfare Provision

- Encourage tribal-state ICWA collaborations- ICWA provisions seek to keep Native children safely in their homes and provide AI/AN children with civil protections as members of their respective tribes.

Building Legal Infrastructure in Indian Country

- Tribal courts must be enhanced and sustained; where absent, they must be developed.

- There is an identified need to fund tribal criminal and civil justice systems. This is a crucial investment for our children.

Funding for public safety projects in Indian country

Washington, DC – November 20, 2014 – The Department of Justice today announced the opening of the grant solicitation period for comprehensive funding to support public safety, victim services and crime prevention improvements in American Indian and Alaska Native communities. The department’s Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 Coordinated Tribal Assistance Solicitation (CTAS) was posted today at www.justice.gov/tribal/open-sol.html. The solicitation closes on Feb. 24, 2015.

“The Department of Justice is making a concerted effort – one that we are building on every year – to expand our reach to tribes and make resources more widely available to our partners in Indian country,” said Assistant Attorney General Karol V. Mason for the Office of Justice Programs. “This solicitation addresses an array of tribal justice system issues and will give tribes access to the support they need to keep their communities safe and ensure a just, fair, and effective system for fighting crime.”

CTAS is administered by the Justice Department’s Office of Justice Programs (OJP), Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), and Office on Violence Against Women (OVW). The funding can be used to enhance law enforcement; bolster adult and juvenile justice systems; prevent and control juvenile delinquency; serve sexual assault, domestic violence and elder victims; and support other efforts to combat crime. To view the FY 2015 CTAS, visit www.justice.gov/sites/default/files/tribal/pages/attachments/2014/11/19/ctas_fy-2015_solicitation.pdf.

Applications for CTAS are submitted through the Justice Department’s Grants Management System (GMS) which enables grantees to register and apply for CTAS online. Applicants must register with GMS prior to submitting an application. An applicant will not be able to submit an application without registering in GMS before the application deadline of 9:00 p.m. Eastern Time (ET), Feb. 24, 2015.

The FY 2015 CTAS reflects improvements and refinements from earlier versions. Feedback was provided to the department during tribal consultations and listening sessions, and includes tribal leaders’ request to improve and simplify the DOJ grant-making process. Changes to DOJ grant programs, enacted with the passage of the Tribal Law and Order Act, are incorporated into the CTAS solicitation and in the appropriate purpose areas. For more information about changes to the CTAS Solicitation from last year, read the FY 2015 CTAS fact sheet.

For the FY2015 CTAS, a tribe or tribal consortium may submit a single application and select from nine competitive grant programs referred to as Purpose Areas. This approach allows the department’s grant-making components to consider the totality of a tribal nation’s overall public safety needs.

The nine purpose areas are: Comprehensive Tribal Justice Systems Strategic Planning (OJP/COPS/OVW) Public Safety and Community Policing (COPS) Justice Systems, and Alcohol and Substance Abuse (BJA) Corrections and Correctional Alternatives (BJA) Violence Against Women Tribal Governments Program (OVW) Children’s Justice Act Partnerships for Indian Communities (OVC) Comprehensive Tribal Victim Assistance Program (OVC) Juvenile Justice Wellness Courts (OJJDP) Tribal Youth Program (OJJDP)

Tribes or tribal consortia may also be eligible for non-tribal government-specific federal grant programs and are encouraged to explore other funding opportunities for which they may be eligible. Additional funding information may be found at www.grants.gov or the websites of individual agencies.

Today’s announcement is part of the Justice Department’s ongoing initiative to increase engagement, coordination and action on public safety in tribal communities.

CAP President Neera Tanden reacts to President’s Executive action on Immigration

Washington, D.C. – November 20, 2014 – Following President Barack Obama’s announcement today about his plans to take executive actions on immigration that will provide relief to a portion of the country’s undocumented immigrant population, Neera Tanden, President of the Center for American Progress, issued the following statement:

Today, parents who have lived here for years and had to constantly worry that they could be torn away from their children will no longer have to look over their shoulders. With House Republicans continuing to block immigration reform legislation in Congress, the president is taking a bold step that is fully within his authority to begin fixing the system. A bipartisan group of 11 presidents have taken executive action on immigration 39 times over the past 60 years, and President Obama is joining them.

This action will make the nation safer by focusing enforcement resources on felons instead of families, will generate new tax revenue as immigrants get on the books and earn higher wages, and will mean that 5 million people get a chance to live their lives without the fear of deportation hanging over their heads. As the president has made clear, only Congress can pass immigration reform that fixes a system that we all know is broken, but while it delays, this is the right move to get on the path to a better, stronger nation.

Next tribal locations for Land Buy-Back program

Washington, DC – November 20, 2014 – Deputy Secretary of the Interior Mike Connor today announced that the Department’s Land Buy-Back Program for Tribal Nations (Buy-Back Program) has paid more than $225 million to individual American Indians for restoring the equivalent of 375,000 acres to tribal governments during the Program’s first year of sending offers. Connor also announced 21 additional locations where the Program will begin implementation through the middle of 2017, bringing the total number of locations actively engaged in the Program to 42.

“We have turned the words of the Cobell Settlement into actions this year, taking significant and lasting steps toward our goal of making sure every available dollar is invested in land for tribal communities,” said Deputy Secretary Connor, who chairs the oversight board of the Program, created to ensure the highest level of accountability within the Interior Department. “The Program is an exceptional opportunity that cannot be taken for granted. That is why we are committed to learning from every sale, and every location, to make adjustments where necessary that are transparent and fair to ensure that landowners are given every opportunity to make informed decisions about the potential sale of their land at fair market value.”

The Buy-Back Program embodies the priorities set forth by the Obama Administration’s goal to build effective partnerships with American Indian communities, promote sustainable economic development and tribal culture and protect tribal lands. The Program generates new opportunities to work more efficiently, stimulate community dialogue and facilitate land use planning, while ensuring that lands stay in trust for the benefit of tribal nations.

The 2014 Status Report includes critical observations that have been made during this year’s implementation and details opportunities for increased feedback and input from tribal communities, including a scheduled March 2015 Listening Session to be hosted by Deputy Secretary Connor. Through experiences at initial locations and collaboration with tribes to date, the Program has also identified and outlined opportunities for improvement in all phases of its implementation.

The Buy-Back Program has also expanded its schedule of American Indian communities (in alphabetical order below) where land consolidation activities – such as planning, outreach, mapping, mineral evaluations, appraisals or acquisitions – are expected to take place through the middle of 2017:

Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians of the Agua Caliente Indian Reservation, California

Arapaho Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming and Shoshone Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming

Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin

Blackfeet Tribe of the Blackfeet Indian Reservation of Montana

Cabazon Band of Mission Indians, California

Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation

Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation

Crow Creek Sioux Tribe of the Crow Creek Reservation, South Dakota

Fond du Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota

Lower Brule Sioux Tribe of the Lower Brule Reservation, South Dakota

Nez Perce Tribe Ponca Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma

Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian Reservation, California & Arizona

Round Valley Indian Tribes, Round Valley Reservation, California

Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona

Shoshone-Bannock Tribes of the Fort Hall Reservation

The Osage Nation

Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota

Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota

Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska

Yankton Sioux Tribe of South Dakota

“In addition to the important momentum the Program has developed thus far, today’s announcement of 21 additional locations for implementation demonstrates our commitment to moving as swiftly as possible to ensure that the program has the widest possible impact across Indian country over the life of the program,” said Assistant Secretary – Indian Affairs Kevin Washburn. “I am confident that lessons learned by the Program staff so far, will be swiftly adapted, increasing flexibility and ensuring the Program’s ability to succeed across a diverse range of tribal communities, each presenting different challenges.”

The Cobell Settlement provided $1.9 billion to purchase fractional interests in trust or restricted land from willing sellers at fair market value within a 10-year period. Individuals who choose to sell their interests will receive payments directly in their Individual Indian Money accounts. Consolidated interests are immediately restored to tribal trust ownership for uses benefiting the reservation community and tribal members.

There are approximately 245,000 owners of nearly three million fractional interests, spanning 150 Indian reservations, who are eligible to participate in the Buy-Back Program. This new total of 42 locations represents 83 percent of all outstanding fractional interests.

Sales of land interests will also result in up to $60 million in contributions to the Cobell Education Scholarship Fund. This is in addition to the amounts paid to individual sellers, so it does not reduce the amount landowners receive for their interests. Already, Interior has transferred more than $4.5 million to the Denver-based American Indian College Fund which administers the fund with 20 percent directed to the American Indian Graduate Center in Albuquerque, N.M. The scholarship fund is overseen by a five-member Board of Trustees. Initial scholarships are expected to be awarded in 2015.

For more information, go to: http://www.doi.gov/buybackprogram/.

Committee report on American Indian/Alaska Native children exposed to violence: Recommendations to Justice Department

Recommends increased funding, coordination, training to address Violence, Health and Welfare issues

Washington, DC – November 18, 2014 – The Advisory Committee of the Attorney General’s Task Force on American Indian and Alaska Native Children Exposed to Violence released policy recommendations to the Justice Department today.

The report recommends a significant rebuilding of the current services provided to Indian Country, through increased partnering and coordination with tribes, and increased funding for programs to support American Indian and Alaska Native children. Each of the five chapters discusses the Advisory Committee’s findings and recommendations. The report provides the Advisory Committee’s vision for the development of effective, trauma informed, and culturally appropriate programs and services to protect American Indian and Alaska Native children exposed to violence.

“American Indian and Alaska Native children represent the future, and they face unprecedented challenges, including an unacceptable level of exposure to violence, which we know can have lasting and traumatic effects on body and mind,” said Attorney General Eric Holder. “We must understand these impacts well so we can pursue policies that bring meaningful change. That’s why I am deeply grateful for the work of this advisory committee and the continuing mission of this task force.”

Attorney General Eric Holder created the task force in 2013. It is composed of a federal working group that includes U.S. Attorneys and officials from the Interior and Justice Departments and a federal advisory committee of experts on American Indian studies, child health and trauma, victim services and child welfare. Former U.S. Sen. Byron Dorgan and Iroquois composer, singer and child advocate Joanne Shenandoah co-chaired the 13-member committee.

These recommendations are a culmination of the research and information gathered through four public hearings held between December 2013 and June 2014 in Bismarck, North Dakota; Scottsdale, Arizona; Fort Lauderdale, Florida; and Anchorage, Alaska, and five listening sessions in Arizona, Minneapolis and Alaska where over 600 people participated from over 62 Tribes and 15 States from across the nation. More than 70 experts and 60 community members testified at the hearings, addressing domestic and community violence in Indian Country; the pathway from victimization to the juvenile justice system; the roles of juvenile courts, detention facilities and the child welfare system; gang violence; and child sex trafficking.

The Task Force on American Indian and Alaska Native Children Exposed to Violence is part of the Attorney General’s Defending Childhood initiative. The task force is also a component of the Justice Department’s ongoing collaboration with leaders in American Indian and Alaska Native communities to improve public safety.

To read the entire report and for more information about the advisory committee and public hearings, please visit www.justice.gov/defendingchildhood.

White House Blog Post –

Responding to Sexual Violence in Indian Country

By Attorney General Eric Holder

Washington, DC – November 18, 2014 – Sexual violence is a devastating and pervasive problem throughout the nation, and its shocking prevalence on tribal lands is especially troubling.

Particularly in recent years, the Department of Justice has made it a top priority to put an end to that unacceptable status quo – from our work to secure and pass important new protections for women in Indian Country, as part of last year’s reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, to the creation of an American Indian/Alaska Native Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner-Sexual Assault Response Team Initiative through the Department’s Office for Victims of Crime.

Bringing together diverse federal offices, as well as tribal nations and organizations, this Initiative’s critical mission is to strengthen the federal response to sexual violence in tribal nations. On Friday, I had the privilege of meeting with the Initiative’s Coordination Committee to discuss ways to take this work to a new level – and to receive the Committee’s formal report and concrete recommendations on improving federal agency response to sexual violence in tribal nations.

Every member of the Committee has done a remarkable job in capturing the challenges that far too many Native women face – and devising specific ways to overcome them. In their report, and in last week’s meeting, they detailed possible strategies for coordinating across federal offices and collaborating at the local level. They shared ideas for recruiting, rewarding, and supporting the federal employees who are performing this difficult work. And they spoke about the need to break the culture of shame that prevents far too many victims from coming forward and seeking the help that they need and deserve.

My pledge to these dedicated leaders was that their report, and the insights they offered, will not merely go on a shelf – they will provide a solid basis for the Justice Department to take robust action. In the days ahead, they will guide our efforts to take practical steps to implement – and to institutionalize – the changes we need to gain the trust of survivors, to transform attitudes surrounding these heinous crimes, and to strengthen existing tribal values that women must be respected. And they will inform our broad-based efforts to keep supporting and building upon the exemplary work that law enforcement leaders, victim advocates, and tribal authorities across the country are doing every day to help us turn the tide.

Like my colleagues throughout the Justice Department, I feel a tremendous sense of urgency on this issue. So, as we move forward with this critical work, the Department will continue to look to leaders like our Coordination Committee members – and those who serve on the front lines of this struggle – to drive our daily efforts. We will keep striving to bolster the enduring trust relationship between the United States and sovereign tribes. And we will remain committed to using every tool at our disposal to prevent sexual assault and help all victims get access to the assistance and support they need.

Statement from U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan –

Statement on the President’s Immigration Accountability Executive Actions

“Absent congressional action, President Obama has taken a number of common-sense steps to address our broken immigration system that will, among other things, keep families together and expand educational opportunity for so many currently living in the shadows. These executive actions will not only help our nation’s immigrant families to succeed, they also will help sustain America’s economic competitiveness into the future. Like the President, I also believe our neighbors, our classmates, our friends came here to work and study, and above all, contribute to America’s success. The U.S. Department of Education has provided a number of resources to support immigrant students and families navigate the educational system, such as guidance on the Plyler decision, and is committed to continuing its efforts in this area.”

Compliance Checks completed in Roberts County

Alcohol underage compliance checks were conducted on November 7th, 2014. Four businesses licensed to sell alcoholic beverages were checked. Working with uniformed officers, underage buyers entered these businesses and attempted to illegally purchase alcoholic beverages. One business refused to sell to the underage buyer. The efforts of these responsible business people are commended. The business that passed the checks was Lancers Bar in Wilmot.

Regrettably, Cheetah's Bar, Summit Bar and Grill and Peever Liquor failed to comply with the law and sold to the underage buyer. These cases have been referred for appropriate action.

Illegal alcohol use by underage persons contributes to crime, car crashes, injuries, and deaths. Law enforcement officers find that alcohol also has a role in many of the more frequent minor crimes and nuisances that degrade the quality of life in our community. Many noise complaints, vandalism, littering, and similar nuisances involve young people who have been drinking. Alcohol use and abuse is also connected with teenage pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, and other health problems. We have learned that the community and our youth are safer and healthier when they do not start using alcohol until after age 21.

Please help us keep the next generation safe, keep alcohol out of the hands of our young community members. Everyone has a role in this.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

Tribute to Oyate on their spirit journeys

River of red running down the street

we inhale the spilled dreams

of our sisters, our brothers

spreading into an invisible sea

sailing toward ancestors

another place, another home

 

River of red running down our face

streaking the skin and falling on boots

oh remember sounds of laughter

as they grew on us, floated on backs

light sacks of squirrely kids

loveliest hope on the reservation

 

River of red running down our hearts

intersection of Dakota blood with ours

is the drumskin turning color as singers

chant Dakota-iyapi prayers

carrying grief of our tiospaye

these are ours, carry the bundles

 

River of red running across the land

reaching far as the wind blows

carrying these voices, no longer

familiar in bodies, crying

desperation, but hope also

for healing, even for this

 

River of red running into the sky

upward from these plains

where its fingers join the planets,

stars perhaps to the constellation

the storytellers speak of

in the creation

 

River of red running onto the rocks

of inipi, flowing into those who

follow that path, steaming

into other spirits of those

who remain to do battle

here, the wars are not over, no

 

No, the wars are not over,

not by miles and years, no

the wars are not over, and

so we prepare

as warriors

to carry on

wiping our faces

with streaks

of red

river of red

running down

down

on

us

 

-- CDF

Brief editorial comments from the editor’s desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

When we learn about a tragic event happening somewhere else in the world, if we have compassion, we are moved by others’ suffering. It could be a natural disaster, a storm, or manmade – perhaps an act of violence.

When it happens in our home, where we live, to our relatives, our oyate, it shakes our very roots.

How can we even begin to understand any reasons why these good young people died, and why one is hospitalized fighting to recover from her wounds?

Colter is gone along with those of his family and friends he shot, so we have no way of knowing what drove him to the point where he picked up the gun.

Rest in peace all our dear Oyate, and blessings to those who are left to grieve and to go on with life without you.

*****

Not only our Oyate but people everywhere who stand with Mother Earth and her resources against corporate greed can declare victory over last week’s defeat in the US Senate of the bill to fast-track the Keystone XL pipeline project.

This was a clear battle between forces calling for protection and cleanup of our environment and those perpetuating the myths being sold by the corporate energy lobby.

Pidamiya Greg Gray Cloud for singing your honor song in the Senate chambers after the votes were cast. Your song was a prayer that many, many others appreciate your singing.

We are so disappointed by our Congressional delegates – with the exception of Senator Tim Johnson, whom we will certainly miss in the Senate.

Other than Tim, all choose to perpetuate the myth that thousands of jobs will come of this damn pipeline and somehow it’s going to add millions to our economy.

*****

Here are some of the myths coming directly from their press releases . . .

Senate Democrats choose obstruction over jobs

Washington, DC – November 18, 2014 – U.S. Senator John Thune (R-South Dakota) today issued the following statement on the Senate Democrats’ latest blockade of the Keystone XL pipeline:

“While Senate Republicans have spent the last six years working to get the job-creating Keystone XL pipeline approved, Senate Democrats have done all they can to block it. It’s disappointing that not until the job of one of their own was on the line did they finally lift their objection to voting on the pipeline. Even after all of the theatrics, a majority of Democrats still voted to block this common-sense, job-creating project.

“This fight is far from over. One of the first priorities of the new Republican majority next Congress will be to send the president a bill that approves the Keystone XL pipeline. Approving this project is a no-brainer. It would invest billions of dollars in the U.S. economy and would put thousands of Americans back to work, all at zero expense to the American taxpayer.”

And later, excerpt from a column about how the Republican majority will “prioritize the economy and jobs” . . .

The Keystone XL pipeline is a no-brainer. It would invest billions of dollars in the U.S. economy and would put thousands of Americans back to work, all at zero expense to the American taxpayer. The Obama State Department estimates that in South Dakota alone, the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline will bring 3,000-4,000 jobs. These jobs will range from construction jobs for welders, pipefitters and laborers, to spin-off jobs at local hotels, restaurants, and gas stations. This will generate well over $100 million in earnings and some $20 million in annual property taxes to local counties. That represents funding for a lot of schools, roads, bridges, and law enforcement personnel in our state.

In addition to the economic boom, the Department of Energy concluded in 2011 that Keystone XL oil will be refined in the U.S. and will offset imports from Venezuela. Another benefit of the pipeline is that it would transport 100,000 barrels of U.S. oil per day from the Bakken oil fields in North Dakota and Montana, which would relieve over one unit train per day and help to alleviate the rail bottleneck preventing farmers and other shippers from reaching markets. Farmers in South Dakota have piled harvested grain on the ground because much of the rail capacity they depend on is tied up moving Bakken oil – the very oil that could be moved in the Keystone XL pipeline.

And from ND Democratic Senator Heidi Heitkamp:

Washington, DC – November 18, 2014 – “It’s disappointing that we couldn’t pass the Keystone XL pipeline today. Passing this bill would have sent a message to the American people that we are listening to them – that they want the Senate to end gridlock, vote on, and pass bipartisan legislation. And we need to look to vote on – and hopefully pass – other bipartisan legislation as well. We came so close today, and I’m committed to getting this project done in the new Congress in a few months. I’ve talked for a long time about how the Keystone XL pipeline is a key piece of energy transportation infrastructure that is in our economic, national security, and energy interests, and I’m proud to have helped in this effort by rallying support among many Democrats for this project. This process has been going on for far too long – six years – and we still don’t have an answer. That’s unbelievable. We need a true all-of-the-above energy strategy – which includes Keystone as one piece of it – to help build North American energy independence. This project is just common sense, and I’ll keep up the fight to get it done.”

Heitkamp has long been a fierce advocate for the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline and has worked to move the project forward. Heitkamp, one of the key Democratic proponents of the project, played a central role in crafting a bipartisan bill to approve construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. In April, she recruited 10 other Democratic Senators to join her efforts to put pressure on the President to make a decision on the pipeline. She then worked to get all of those Senators to sign on to the proposal that could have been considered if the energy efficiency proposal went forward.

*****

The lines have been drawn; the lines are clear.

And remember, Keystone XL is only one project out of many the corporate-invested lawmakers want to push through Congress.

We stand with others urging President Obama to veto any similar bill that comes to his desk from the Republican-controlled Congress.

*****

Our 147th annual SWO Wacipi photo gallery is online.

Check it out on our website:

http://www.earthskyweb.com/news.htm

*****

Also online now is a photo gallery of John Heminger’s coverage of the anti-racist mascot rally in Minneapolis two weeks ago.

John’s pictures tell a great story of what happened, and how much our own Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate participated in this major event.

Please note that besides his Native crafts John has prints and cards available of his pictures.

Watch for more information about how to place an order in future issues of the Sota.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"We're sitting on our blessed Mother Earth from which we get our strength and determination, love and humility, all the beautiful attributes that we've been given. So turn to one another; love one another; respect one another; respect Mother Earth; respect the waters-because that's life itself!" -- Phil Lane, Sr. YANKTON SIOUX

Our entire point of view can be altered by making one change to align with the principles of the Great Spirit. Let's say we decide to become respectful. As we become respectful, our attitude will change. We will automatically draw into our lives knowledge about the other principles of the Great Spirit such as love, appreciation, trust, beauty, and peace of mind. By focusing on these principles, we will let go of selfishness, self centeredness, self pity, dishonesty, and fear. You focus on respect, you get respect; you focus on love, you get love; you focus on the Red Road, you get peace of mind. Great Spirit, let me learn the lessons of respect.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

Fortune does not change men, it unmasks them. Suzanne Necker (1739 - 1794)

Knowledge is power, if you know it about the right person. Ethel Mumford

Lack of money is no obstacle. Lack of an idea is an obstacle. Ken Hakuta

I like nonsense, it wakes up the brain cells. Fantasy is a necessary ingredient in living, It's a way of looking at life through the wrong end of a telescope. Which is what I do, And that enables you to laugh at life's realities. Dr. Seuss (1904 - 1991)

Civilization is the process of reducing the infinite to the finite. Oliver Wendell Holmes (1809 - 1894)

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Funeral services for Raymond DuMarce

Funeral service for Raymond Edward DuMarce “Cheska”, 73, of Sisseton, South Dakota was held last Wednesday afternoon, November 19, 2014 at the Tribal Community Center, Agency Village, South Dakota with Fillmore Simon CLP officiating.

Drum was Short Foot Creek.

Pallbearers were Bryce Roberts, Isaiah Lahm, Elijah Lahm, Marcelle DuMarce, Parker Raffety, BearShield Wolfe, Isaiah LaBelle, and Gerald Wolfe.

Honorary Pallbearers were Nicki Woods, Sampson DuMarce, Bernard Two Hearts, Colin Raffety, Bruce Lahm, Conrad DuMarce, Ethan DuMarce, Buffalo DuMarce, Jeremiah Wilkie, Loren Flatland, Bryan Lawrence and Tony Ross.

An all-night wake service was held Tuesday at the Community Center.

Military rites were provided the Eddie Robertson American Legion Post #76.

Interment is in the Sisseton Cemetery, Sisseton, South Dakota.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel of Sisseton, South Dakota was in charge of arrangements.

Raymond was born July 2nd, 1941 in Sisseton, SD to parents Mitchell A. DuMarce and Gertrude (Esau) DuMarce.

Raymond joined the Marine Corps receiving his GED and training as an Anti-tank assault rifleman. He was very proud of his military career and being a veteran.

He did carpentry work with Sisseton Housing, Security and odd jobs.

Raymond journeyed to the spirit world Sunday, November 16, 2014 peacefully at home with his daughters at his side.

Raymond is survived by six children, Linda (Baker) Karty of Lawton, IA, Marla (DuMarce) Raffety of Ortonville, MN, Marlys “Renee” (DuMarce) Lahm of Lincoln, NE, Marcus DuMarce of Ortonville, MN, Arlys Keoke of Watertown, SD, and Jennifer P. DuMarce of Sisseton, SD; two brothers, Gerald Wolfe of Macy, NE, and DuWayne DuMarce of Sacramento, CA; four sisters, Agnes Lovejoy of Macy, NE, Evelyn DuMarce of Omaha NE, Melvina DuMarce and Elnora (DuMarce) LaBelle of Sisseton, SD; sixteen grandchildren Londan Karty, Donnetta Karty, Grace Robinson, Lucas Robinson, Dion “Sonny” Robinson, Chantel LaBelle, Desiree Raffety, Parker Raffety, Elijah Lahm, Isaiah Lahm, Natasha DuMarce, Marcelle DuMarce, Chrissy DuMarce, Sheldon Robertson, Violet Rose Seaboy, and Tabitha Alani Schoenrock and fifteen great-grandchildren.

Raymond was preceded in death by his parents Mitchell A DuMarce Sr. and Gertrude (Esau) Wolfe, two brothers, Sylvester DuMarce and Mitchell A. DuMarce Jr., and one sister Darlene Morris; Mothers of his children Dolly Baker of Winnebago, NE, Thelma Bird Lawrence of Sisseton, SD and Cleo Sherman of Macy, NE.

For Raymond’s obituary and on-line registry please visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com/.

Services pending for Martha Canku-Flores

The Sota received news on Sunday evening that Martha Canku-Flores has passed away.

She had been battling cancer.

Watch for an obituary in next week’s Sota.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor’s note: The following comes from the editor’s column and the Sota “deadlines and policies” statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Johnson recognizes National Native American Heritage Month

Senator Tim Johnson submitted the following statement into the Congressional Record in recognition of November as National Native American Heritage Month.

Mr. President, each November, we recognize National Native American Heritage Month to celebrate the heritage and culture of the great nations that originally inhabited this country. During this month, we should reflect on the numerous achievements made over the previous year. Each day, individuals and organizations across Indian Country continually tackle tough issues and strive to make significant impacts for their people and tribes. It is these efforts that show the strength and vitality of Indian Country.

This year, across the nation, Native American movements have unified and rallied the Native voice on several important issues to Indian County. Thousands of individuals have come together on the steps of the U.S. Capitol to share their views on environmental protections, treaty rights and the use of a racial slur by a professional sports league. A grassroots movement in South Dakota also spurred voters living on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation to get out the vote and approve the change of their county name from Shannon County to Oglala Lakota County. These actions reflect a positive drive in the Native community; a drive that tribal, local, state and federal governments cannot simply ignore.

As sovereign nations, tribes have the ability to empower and govern their own people. Native American leaders in South Dakota and across the country have recognized that preserving their culture is vital to future growth and success. Native languages are being revitalized and tribal cultures are being infused into programs. With its treaty and trust responsibility, the federal government must support this continued progress. I have always fully believed that the best ideas come from tribal governments and leaders, and not from Washington, D.C. We must continue to work together to understand and implement successful approaches.

South Dakota is home to nine treaty tribes, each with its own distinct culture and heritage. Throughout my years of service, I have had the opportunity work closely with many leaders from each reservation. I would like to personally honor each of the South Dakota tribes: Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe, the Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe, the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe, the Oglala Sioux Tribe, the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, and the Yankton Sioux Tribe.

With the commencement of the National Native American Heritage Month, I encourage everyone to join in commemorating the unique culture of the indigenous peoples of the United States. Throughout the country, numerous tribes and organizations are coordinating educational events and celebrations. While the month of November is in tribute of traditions and accomplishments of tribal nations, it is important to contemplate the many more undertakings that must be addressed. We must all continue to work together to find positive solutions for Indian Country.

Mayan People’s Movement defeats Monsanto Law in Guatemala

By Christin Sandberg

Guatemala – UpsideDownWorld.org – September 15, 2014 –On September 4th, after ten days of widespread street protests against the biotech giant Monsanto’s expansion into Guatemalan territory, groups of indigenous people joined by social movements, trade unions and farmer and women’s organizations won a victory when congress finally repealed the legislation that had been approved in June.

The demonstrations were concentrated outside the Congress and Constitutional Court in Guatemala City during more than a week, and coincided with several Mayan communities and organizations defending food sovereignty through court injunctions in order to stop the Congress and the President, Otto Perez Molina, from letting the new law on protection of plant varieties, known as the “Monsanto Law”, take effect.

On September 2, the Mayan communities of Sololá, a mountainous region 125 kilometers west from the capital, took to the streets and blocked several main roads. At this time a list of how individual congressmen had voted on the approval of the legislation in June was circulating.

When Congress convened on September 4, Mayan people were waiting outside for a response in favor of their movement, demanding a complete cancellation of the law –something very rarely seen in Guatemala. But this time they proved not to have marched in vain. After some battles between the presidential Patriotic Party (PP) and the Renewed Democratic Liberty Party (LIDER), the Congress finally decided not to review the legislation, but cancel it.

Lolita Chávez from the Mayan People’s Council summarized the essence of what has been at stake these last weeks of peaceful protests as follows: “Corn taught us Mayan people about community life and its diversity, because when one cultivates corn one realizes that there is a variety of crops such as herbs and medical plants depending on the corn plant as well. We see that in this coexistence the corn is not selfish, the corn shows us how to resist and how to relate with the surrounding world.”

Controversies surrounded law

The Monsanto Law would have given exclusivity on patented seeds to a handful of transnational companies. Mayan people and social organizations claimed that the new law violated the Constitution and the Mayan people’s right to traditional cultivation of their land in their ancestral territories.

Antonio González from the National Network in Defense of Food Sovereignty and Biodiversity commented in a press conference August 21: “This law is an attack on a traditional Mayan cultivation system which is based on the corn plant but which also includes black beans and herbs; these foods are a substantial part of the staple diet of rural people.”

The new legislation would have opened up the market for genetically modified seeds which would have threatened to displace natural seeds and end their diversity. It would have created an imbalance between transnational companies and local producers in Guatemala where about 70 per cent of the population dedicate their life to small-scale agricultural activities. That is a serious threat in a country where many people live below the poverty line and in extreme poverty and where children suffer from chronic malnutrition and often starve to death.

The law was approved in June without prior discussion, information and participation from the most affected. It was a direct consequence of the free trade agreement with the US, ratified in 2005. However, recently the protests started to grow and peaked a couple of weeks ago with a lot of discussions, statements and demonstrations.

At first the government ignored the protests and appeared to be more interested in engaging in superficial forms of charity like provision of food aid while ignoring the wider and structural factors that cause and perpetuate poverty in Guatemala such as unequal land distribution, deep rooted inequalities, racism, to name but a few.

But soon enough they decided to act. Even though politicians claimed not to act on social demands, it is without doubt a decision taken after enormous pressure from different social groups in society.

Criminalizing the Mayan people - again

There was a great risk that the Monsanto Law would have made criminals of already repressed small farmers who are just trying to make ends meet and doing what they have done for generations – cultivating corn and black beans for their own consumption. The Monsanto Law meant that they would not have been able to grow and harvest anything that originates from natural seeds. Farmers would be breaking the laws if these natural seeds had been mixed with patented seeds from other crops as a result of pollination or wind, unless they had had a license for the patented seed from a transnational corporation like Monsanto.

Photo by Josue Navarro Photo by Josue Navarro Another risk expressed by ecologists was the fear that the costs for the patented seeds would have caused an increase in prices and as consequence caused a worsened food crisis for those families who could not afford to buy a license to sow.

Academics, together with the Mayan people, also feared that the law would have intensified already existing fierce social conflicts between local Mayan communities and transnational companies in a country historically and violently torn apart.

Mayan people and Mother Earth

Currently international companies are very interested in gaining control of the abundant and rich natural assets that Guatemala possesses. There is just one problem: the Mayan people - or actually most people - in Guatemala do not agree with a policy of treating nature like a commodity to be sold off piece by piece, especially when they receive nothing in return. It is very difficult to argue that it is a rentable business for Guatemalan society as a whole, and less the local communities, when it is a rather small but powerful economic elite which benefits on behalf of the environment, nature and society.

So what happens when the people organize in defense of their territory? The international companies call the government and have them use whatever means necessary to remove those standing in their way so they can construct megaprojects like mines or hydroelectric dams or extend monocultures in any region they see fit without much concern for those who might be affected.

Last month three men were killed when police used violent force to evict a community whose population had organized itself to protest against a hydroelectric megaproject in their community in Alta Verapaz. Hundreds of police officers were sent to the area on orders from the Ministry of Home Affairs, Mauricio López Bonilla. It was not an exceptional case by any means.

Ongoing conflict

As for the Monsanto Law, for a chilling reminder of where this was most likely headed, one need look no further than the USA: according to information from Food Democracy Now, a grassroots community for sustainable food system, Monsanto’s GMO Roundup Ready soybeans, the world’s leading chemical and biotech seed company, admits to filing 150 lawsuits against America’s family farmers, while settling another 700 out of court for undisclosed amounts. This has caused fear and resentment in rural America and driven dozens of farmers into bankruptcy.

It is impossible to predict how this controversy might unfold, but the reality in Guatemala today is one marked by an ongoing conflict between the government and the Mayan people, who constitute over half of the population.

Nim Sanik, Maya Kaqchikel from Chimaltenango comments on the victory over the Monsanto Law: “The fight to preserve collective property of Mayan communities such as vegetable seeds, which historically have served as a source of development and survival for the Mayan civilization, is a way to confront the open doors that the neoliberal governments have widely open in favor of national and transnational corporations that genetically modify and commercialize the feeding of mankind. We have just taken the first step on a long journey in our struggle to conquer the sovereignty of the people in Guatemala.”

(Editor’s note: The Mayan People’s Movement should ignite us to fight against the GMO lobby force-feeding the North American people its unhealthy diet. This is another cause, which like the corporate energy lobby plundering our environment, needs protestors!)

Poem by Harry O

The Wonder of Wonders

Before time began Father, You knew what I would become

Today with Your gifts my Lord, may they at least reach some

You've given them to be used and not just stashed away

My theme is to glorify Your wonders and works today

My closest kin might think it a wonder to have changed me,

Anything is possible with You now I'm sure they see

If only those still bound would just put their trust in You

They would have the freedom from addictions that they seek too

But we're not supermen we'll make wrong choices now and then

When we do sin we'll confess it and get back up again

We must pray for the ailing that God will strengthen them too

And to you whom prayed for me, not giving up 1 thank you

Now I speak of a few of the wonders God has done

But of course they are too numerous to name every one

In the beginning God created the earth and all within

At first it was a clean place then man defiled it with sin

All the heavens He made too and elements above

There's not one thing God hasn't made not one thing I can think of

So God chose eight righteous souls to save from the flood to come

As they built the ark there were scoffers as today there some

Till the rain came perverse practices went on as before

They and all their ways were lost when Noah closed the arks door

Idols they worshipped and prayed to did not save them that day

They and all their wicked practices were washed away

After the flood Noah sent out birds to seek out dry land

A dove returned with an olive branch to Noah's hand

God then set his bow in the sky which can be seen today

Showing that earth will never be flooded again that way

On the contrary we as believers know what will be

If all would turn to His word they too will know what we see

The earth, stars, moon and sun even listen when god says obey

For the earth even backed up back in Hezekiah's day

Because of the pharaoh plagues of frogs and locusts were sent

But then his heart was hardened so he wouldn't relent

Not until their first born died and darkness covered the land

Then Your chosen were freed to flee across the desert sand

A pillar of fire led them by night and smoke by day

Then there was the Jordan but again You showed them a way

You, Lord of wonders held back the waters until they had crossed

The Egyptians pursuing them through the Jordan were lost

 Your Wonder of wonders you sent 2000 years ago

Your only begotten son yet You sent him to die though

Your once clean righteous world had become defiled with sin once more

To bear the sins of the world this is what Christ was sent for

Your Wonder of wonders was You coming to earth below

You were fully God and fully man to walk amongst men though

The lame walked, deaf heard, lepers were cleansed you even raised the dead

Yes the blind saw and now whoever believes by Christ we are led

You came to Your own but they turned their backs on You too

Letting a murderer go free they chose to murder You

Yet your Father was with you, you were never alone

And no one took Your life from You; You gave it on Your own

On the third day You rose from the dead showing more wonders then

After forty days you went on high, one day to return again

No my father I could never number every one

But I thank You so much for the wonders in my life You've done

You know my every thought and hear who I pray for each day

I can do nothing without You knowing You're the only way

May I continue to use Your gifts till the day You come

Pidamiyado and today may we have reached some

Harry Renville - November 2014

New Republican majority will prioritize Jobs, Energy

By Senator John Thune

For more than six years, the Keystone XL pipeline has been at the bottom of the Democrats’ list of priorities. Yet, less than a month after the voters soundly rejected the Obama agenda at the polls on Election Day, the Democrat leadership in the Senate was suddenly willing to vote on the Keystone XL pipeline. Unfortunately, the vote wasn’t due to the tens of thousands of jobs it would create for the American people, but instead was used as a bargaining chip to help save the job of one senator who’s facing a tough run-off election.

It’s disappointing that they finally lifted their objection to voting on the pipeline when the job of one of their own was on the line. Regrettably, even after all of the theatrics, a majority of Democrats still voted to block this common-sense, job-creating project, which failed by a single vote.

The Keystone XL pipeline is a no-brainer. It would invest billions of dollars in the U.S. economy and would put thousands of Americans back to work, all at zero expense to the American taxpayer. The Obama State Department estimates that in South Dakota alone, the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline will bring 3,000-4,000 jobs. These jobs will range from construction jobs for welders, pipefitters and laborers, to spin-off jobs at local hotels, restaurants, and gas stations. This will generate well over $100 million in earnings and some $20 million in annual property taxes to local counties. That represents funding for a lot of schools, roads, bridges, and law enforcement personnel in our state.

In addition to the economic boom, the Department of Energy concluded in 2011 that Keystone XL oil will be refined in the U.S. and will offset imports from Venezuela. Another benefit of the pipeline is that it would transport 100,000 barrels of U.S. oil per day from the Bakken oil fields in North Dakota and Montana, which would relieve over one unit train per day and help to alleviate the rail bottleneck preventing farmers and other shippers from reaching markets. Farmers in South Dakota have piled harvested grain on the ground because much of the rail capacity they depend on is tied up moving Bakken oil – the very oil that could be moved in the Keystone XL pipeline.

While opponents of the pipeline like to cite environmental concerns as their reason for opposing the pipeline and its jobs, five separate environmental reviews from the president’s own State Department found that the pipeline poses no meaningful risk to the environment. In fact, the State Department admits that the Keystone pipeline is the safest way of transporting the oil. Pipelines also produce fewer emissions than other modes of transport.

This fight is far from over. One of the first priorities of the new Republican majority next Congress will be to send the president a bill that approves the Keystone XL pipeline. It’s time for the president and Democrats to put the interests of hard-working Americans ahead of the extreme environmental wing of his party. Let’s get this passed and put Americans to work.

(Editor’s note: Not what we need for Ina Makoce or our Oyate.)

Heitkamp calls on EPA to implement Policies that Support Farmers, Producers & Energy

Washington, DC – November 21, 2014 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today welcomed news that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will not implement its proposed rules that would have hurt North Dakota’s farmers, producers, and biodiesel production, and hindered the country’s ability to become North American energy independent. Heitkamp also called on EPA to implement policies that better support North Dakota farmers and give them the certainty they need to do their jobs.

The announcement comes after Heitkamp has been fighting against the EPA’s proposed Renewable Fuel Standard rules since they were introduced last fall. To push back on the policies, Heitkamp brought EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy to North Dakota in February to hear firsthand from farmers and producers about how reducing the required amount of biofuels produced in the U.S. would severely damage North Dakota’s vibrant agricultural and renewable fuels industry. Heitkamp called on McCarthy to instead implement rules that promote certainty for farmers and biofuels producers, and that continue to provide a path forward for increased production and use of renewable fuels.

“Farmers in North Dakota know how the biofuels industry isn’t just boosting our rural economies or supporting good jobs across the country – but it’s also helping pave the way toward North American energy independence,” said Heitkamp. “As the EPA considers its policies in the coming years, I’ll continue to press the agency not to just delay its rules, but make a decision – and a good decision that supports our farmers and gives them the certainty they need to do their jobs, while showing a commitment to a true all-of-the-above energy strategy. When I brought EPA Administrator McCarthy to North Dakota earlier this year, she heard the serious concerns of our farmers and renewable fuels producers. I’ll keep up the fight to make sure the EPA implements policies that don’t tear at the fabric of our communities, but instead support our farmers, their communities, and the important work they do for our country.”

Earlier this year, joined by third generation farmer from Mantador, Terry Georger, Heitkamp announced a study showing that the lack of certainty of federal policies is already hurting farmers and producers that help our country become more energy independent. According to the findings, nearly 80 percent of U.S. biodiesel producers have scaled back production this year and almost 6 in 10 have idled production altogether. Additionally, two-thirds of producers said they have already reduced or anticipate reducing their workforce as a result of the downturn.

Immediately after the EPA first released its proposed Renewable Fuel Standard rule, Heitkamp met with Administrator Gina McCarthy in December 2013 to stress how reductions in American produced biofuels would damage North Dakota’s agriculture and renewable fuels industry. She followed this discussion by calling on McCarthy to push for rules that keep biofuel projections on target with those already in law, and has continued to press the EPA and Administration – both in meetings with top White House officials and through calls from a bipartisan group of Senators – to reverse the current Renewable Fuel Standard reduction decision, and to instead put forward a new proposal that would promote investment in the next generation of biofuels.

The EPA’s proposed Renewable Fuel Standard rule would establish a biodiesel standard of 1.28 billion gallons this year, forcing many farmers and producers to shut their doors. But last year, biodiesel producers – using products grown on farms in North Dakota and throughout the country, like canola and soybeans – generated a record of nearly 1.8 billion gallons, with plants in almost every state in the U.S. supporting about 62,200 jobs. And biodiesel reduces greenhouse gas emissions by 57 percent to 86 percent compared to petroleum diesel.

(Editor’s note: Not what we need for Ina Makoce or our Oyate.)

Social “helper” column dedicated to young generation Oyate –

Wawokiyape

By Sherielle “Shay” DuMarce

Dear Shay:

For the past few months I have been living with my boyfriend, our kids and his mother.

Lately, it’s been getting tough to deal with for me because his mom is constantly complaining about everything.

I work all night and when I get home I get the kids up and ready for school plus cook her and my boyfriend breakfast, clean up afterwards and then go to sleep.

But I hear her on the phone saying all I do is sleep and that I don’t do what I’m supposed to as a girlfriend and mother. How can she say that when she doesn’t even work and the reason we moved in with her is cause she couldn’t take care of herself or her bills.

I want us to move but how do I tell my boyfriend this without him thinking he's "abandoning" his mother?

P.S. He is quite the mama’s boy too. Any suggestions?

Signed, Frustrated Daughter In-Law.

Dear Frustrated Daughter-In-Law:

Personally, I understand completely what you were talking about. And I think any girl that has been in a relationship with somebody they have kids with has at one point in time lived with their significant others parents. For me it is very difficult because I moved all the way to New Mexico when I lived with in laws and it was very difficult it was not easy at all. It's tough to deal with when you don't get along with your significant other's parents and especially to have her gossiping about you. I would say to talk to her first, voice your concerns to her and tell her that you do not appreciate being talked about behind your back when you are the one working and taking care of kids and the house. To me it's more important to fix the situation at hand and converse with the person you are having issues with. If that doesn't work then talk to your boyfriend and tell them that you need to conduct a family meeting to let her know that if she's going to continue treating you this way then it may be time for you guys to cut off all support. It's a tough thing to do because like you said he is a mama's boy and Mamas boys tend to choose their mother side over anyone else’s so this is a delicate situation. But he also has to remember that he is a father, a boyfriend and he has a family to take care of instead of catering to his mother's needs.

In addition, if you do decide to stay and continue helping his mother in law then he needs to talk to his mother and let him know that this is the woman he is going to be with, you’re the mother of his children and she has to be respectful regardless of what issues she has with you. In closing, remember that you can't change what people say about you but you can change the way you react to things. But if it bugs you enough to make you feel so uncomfortable that you want to leave then it is time to talk about it and bring it out in the open but if not then just let it go in one ear and out the other. I hope this has helped you and God bless!

Respectfully, Shay.

Bill to preserve rural access to therapy services

Washington, DC – November 21, 2014 – Senator John Thune (R-S.D.) praised last night’s Senate passage of bipartisan legislation led by Senators Thune, Jerry Moran (R-Kan.), and Jon Tester (D-Mont.) that prohibits the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) from enforcing a regulation that harms access to therapy services in rural areas for calendar year 2014.

The extension of the prohibition on enforcement provides additional time for Thune, Tester, and Moran to advance their Protecting Access to Rural Therapy Services (PARTS) Act (S. 1143), which clarifies that general supervision of outpatient therapeutic services by a physician or non-physician practitioner is sufficient for payment of therapeutic hospital outpatient services.

“Requiring supervising physicians to be present for some outpatient therapy services places an unnecessary strain on the already overextended staff of rural health care facilities,” said Thune. “I applaud my colleagues in the Senate for supporting this legislation that will provide rural health care facilities in states like South Dakota with the flexibility needed to continue to deliver quality outpatient therapy services without being subjected to budget-busting workforce regulations as we seek a long-term solution beyond 2014.”

Outpatient therapeutic services include services such as drug infusions, blood transfusions, and cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation services. These health care services have always been administered by licensed, skilled medical professionals in hospitals under the overall direction of a physician. However, in its attempt to clarify existing regulations in 2009, the CMS retroactively interpreted existing policy in place since 2001 to require a supervising physician be physically present in the department at all times when Medicare beneficiaries receive outpatient therapy services, the majority of which are low risk.

In response to perennial concerns raised by hospitals and lawmakers, including Senator Thune, CMS delayed enforcement of its direct supervision policy from 2009 through 2013 for Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs) and other small, rural hospitals. Recognizing that CMS would be enforcing the regulation in 2014, Senator Thune offered the PARTS Act as an amendment to the Senate Finance Committee’s SGR and Medicare Beneficiary Access Improvement Act, which passed by voice vote out of committee on December 13, 2013. The language included in the SGR and Medicare Beneficiary Access Improvement Act would permanently prohibit enforcement of this regulation for CAHs. However, until Congress enacts a permanent fix, the legislation passed by the Senate last night would provide for an additional year of relief from the regulation.

The legislation passed by the Senate last night will now be sent to the President for his consideration.

Sanford USD Medical Center SD’s Designated Ebola Hospital

Pierre, SD – November 21. 2014; -- The Department of Health announced today that Sanford USD Medical Center in Sioux Falls will serve as the state’s designated facility to receive and potentially treat a suspect Ebola patient.

“In a state the size of South Dakota, it makes sense to designate a single facility to be ready to care for an Ebola patient,” said Doneen Hollingsworth, Secretary of Health. “We’re very appreciative that Sanford has volunteered to fill that critical role and they should be commended for their leadership.”

“Sanford USD Medical Center, along with the entire Sanford Health system, began preparing to handle a potential Ebola patient months ago, and we are confident in our preparations and expertise,” said Paul Hanson, president of Sanford USD Medical Center. “Our efforts are led by highly trained physicians including Wendell Hoffman, MD and Allison Suttle, MD. Our skilled health care providers will safely manage any potential Ebola patient in accordance with CDC protocols to ensure we are protecting our staff and other patients while caring for an individual in need.”

Hollingsworth said designation of Sanford USD Medical Center as an Ebola treatment facility is just one of many steps in a much larger effort to prepare for the possibility of the disease in South Dakota. The first component of that response is the front line health care providers – every hospital and clinic across the state.

“Every clinic and hospital in the state needs to be prepared to identify a possible case based on travel history and symptoms, appropriately isolate the individual and contact the state Department of Health for further evaluation,” said Hollingsworth. “We know providers are taking this responsibility seriously and working hard to prepare and drill for how to handle such patients.”

For any such individual, the department will consult with CDC. If the individual is determined to be a potential case, the department will contact Sanford so it can prepare to receive the individual. Two ambulance services, Rural Metro in Sioux Falls and Rapid City Fire in Rapid City, have received specialized training and equipment from the department and agreed to transport patients to Sanford.

Hollingsworth said the department’s public health laboratory is also working to add the capability to test for Ebola. In the meantime, it has an agreement in place with the University of Nebraska Medical Center to handle testing.

The department also continues to monitor travelers coming into South Dakota from the West African countries at the center of the outbreak. That monitoring includes twice-daily contact with the individuals for the 21-day incubation period of the disease to check temperatures and any symptoms. The department is currently monitoring one such low-risk individual and two more have completed their 21-day monitoring period without developing symptoms.

“From front line health care facilities to patient transport, from designating a receiving hospital to setting up a lab testing protocol, South Dakota is working hard to put a system in place to deal with Ebola,” said Hollingsworth. “Even if we never have an Ebola case these partnerships and the work we’ve done will leave us better prepared to deal with other infectious diseases in our state.”

For more information about Ebola virus disease see the department’s website at http://doh.sd.gov/diseases/ebola.aspx.

Efforts to combat Human Trafficking worldwide at McCain Institute event

Washington, DC – November 19, 2014 – Building on her leadership in Congress to combat human trafficking in North Dakota and around the world, U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp participated in a discussion on the current state of human trafficking in the United States and what work needs to be done to help eradicate this growing threat.

Heitkamp joined Yiota Souras, Senior Vice President and General Counsel for the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, for a discussion hosted by the McCain Institute for International Leadership and moderated by Cindy McCain – co-chair of the Arizona Governor’s task force on human trafficking and a leader in combating the problem worldwide. During their conversation – entitled “In Our Backyard,” as a part of the McCain Institute’s Human Trafficking Conversation Series – Heitkamp spoke about the tragic impact the crime has had on women, children, families, and entire communities in North Dakota and across the United States, and what steps need to be taken to more effectively combat human trafficking today and in the future.

“When we hear about human trafficking on television or read a story about it in the paper, oftentimes we assume it’s a terrible problem happening far away. But as the title of this event points out, it’s been happening in our own backyards – whether we realized it or not,” said Heitkamp. “This conversation with Ms. Souras and Cindy McCain was another important step in a series of actions we, as a society, need to take together to fight this heinous and serious crime. The oil boom has created some unique challenges in North Dakota, and I continue to look for ways to address the rise in human trafficking in my state. Specifically, Indian Country and Native women and children have also faced the devastating impacts of this awful form of modern day slavery, and I’m determined to get them the help they need. Through my work in the Senate, I will continue to be a strong voice for victims and a leader for communities because we have to remain relentless and vigilant to truly stamp out human trafficking wherever it exists.”

Heitkamp has been a leader in Congress in working to combat human trafficking. In September, Heitkamp launched her Strong and Safe Communities Initiative to help address some of the emerging challenges facing the state, including crimes such as human trafficking. Last fall, she led a Senate hearing where she heard firsthand what the federal, state, and local levels of government were doing to combat human trafficking and how to begin to address it as a law enforcement issue. And since May, Heitkamp has helped lead three training sessions in North Dakota with U.S. Department of Homeland Security officials to train North Dakotans, women leaders in the state, and law enforcement and victims service providers on how to identify, report, and investigate incidents of human trafficking.

This past spring, Heitkamp visited Mexico with McCain and Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), where they met with local officials and advocates to learn about the actions Mexico is taking to stop human trafficking and what help they could provide as the U.S. looks to develop an institutional resistance to trafficking. And following the trip to Mexico, McCain invited Heitkamp and Klobuchar to participate in the McCain Institute’s annual Sedona Forum in Arizona, which brings together world leaders to talk about global issues, to discuss human trafficking, and examine ways to combat the problem.

Impacts of Traumatic Stress on Native American children

Washington, DC – November 20, 2014 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp, a member of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, today brought together some of the nation’s leading experts, policy makers, federal agencies, and advocates to identify ways to reduce the effects of traumatic stress Native American children experience.

Heitkamp led a group of top experts, key policymakers, and select federal agency representatives in developing strategies to prevent and treat the dire impact of traumatic stress on children living in Indian Country. Dr. Tami DeCoteau, a licensed clinical psychologist in Bismarck, moderated the discussion.

Reinforcing the need to address trauma among Native kids, a new U.S. Justice Department report released this week revealed that violence, including intentional injuries, homicide, and suicide, accounts for 75 percent of deaths of American Indian and Alaska Native kids between 12-20 years old. Long an advocate for Native American kids, Heitkamp has fought for decades to reduce poverty, domestic violence, child abuse, and unemployment in Indian Country, and this discussion continues those efforts.

“The scars of exposure to violence and traumatic events run deep in our tribal communities, particularly for our Native American children,” said Heitkamp. “These wounds hinder our children’s ability to thrive, and they reverberate throughout communities – manifesting in cyclical abuse, addiction, poverty and crime. Thanks to a growing body of research, we are beginning to decipher ways to treat this trauma, and more importantly, how to prevent it from happening in the first place. That’s what today’s discussion is all about – how we can get to the root of the problem to help these kids build better lives. For years I’ve been fighting for better protections for our children – my first bill in the Senate would create a Commission on Native Children to confront adversity kids in Indian Country face, and I’ve worked closely with the Justice Department’s Task Force on violence against Native kids. We’ve come a long way – but we still have much work to do. Our Native kids are counting on us for a brighter future – and we can’t let them down.”

Today’s roundtable is part of Heitkamp’s weeklong push to highlight the immediate need for proactive measures to improve and protect the mental health of Native children. After working closely for the past year with the U.S. Department of Justice Attorney General’s Task Force on American Indian/Alaskan Native Children Exposed to Violence, including testifying at the Task Force’s first hearing in Bismarck last December, the Task Force on Tuesday issued sweeping recommendations – many of which Heitkamp has pushed for – to improve the lives of children living in Indian Country. Yesterday, Heitkamp heard firsthand from key leaders and experts at a Committee on Indian Affairs hearing on this issue. During the hearing, Heitkamp voiced concern for the generational impact mental health issues have on tribal communities, and the need to put forward proactive measures to address it.

In addition to facing extreme rates of violence, other conditions for young people in Indian Country are also tragic. For example:

· 37 percent of Native children live in poverty;

· Suicide rates are 2.5 times the national average for children 15-24 years old;

· High school graduation rate for Native students is around 50 percent, compared to more than 75 percent for white students; and

· While the overall rate of child mortality in the U.S. has decreased since 2000, the rate for Native children has increased 15 percent.

Since her time as North Dakota’s Attorney General, Heitkamp has been a strong proponent of resources and policies that better serve for North Dakota’s tribes. The first bill she introduced in the Senate would create a Commission on Native Children to conduct an intensive study into issues facing children living in Indian Country, and make recommendations on how to make sure these children are better taken care of and given the opportunities to thrive. The bill passed unanimously in the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs in May – the final step before it goes to the Senate floor for a vote. The bill has 34 bipartisan cosponsors, and the strong support of all five North Dakota tribes and many national Native American organizations.

The first bill she co-sponsored in the Senate was the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, and she worked to include a key provision in the bill to address the continuing crisis of violence against women in tribal communities. The provision strengthens the existing programs and provides tribal governments the force they need to prosecute non-Indian perpetrators who commit these crimes on tribal land.

Affordable Care Act Open Enrollment

Brookings, SD – November 15, 2014 marked the start of 2015 Marketplace open enrollment for Affordable Care Act, Qualified Health Plan. The enrollment will go until February 15, 2015.

To enroll, visit www.healthcare.gov.

"Remember, if you have an employer-sponsored health plan and it is affordable, which means it is not greater than 9.5 percent of your household income, you are eligible to purchase a plan in the Marketplace but not eligible for any premium tax credits," said Carrie Johnson, SDSU Extension Assistant Professor & Family Resource Management Specialist.

Johnson reminds South Dakotans, that if they have not enrolled by Feb. 15, they will not be able to purchase a plan through the Marketplace until the next year's enrollment period unless they are eligible for a Special Enrollment Period.

Special Enrollment Qualifiers include:

* Marriage or divorce;

* Having a baby, adopting a child, or placing a child for adoption or foster care;

* Moving your residence, gaining citizenship, leaving incarceration;

* Losing other health coverage due to losing job-based coverage, the end of an individual policy plan year in 2014, COBRA expiration, aging off a parent's plan, losing eligibility for Medicaid or CHIP, and similar circumstances (voluntarily ending coverage does not qualify);

* For people already enrolled in Marketplace coverage: Having a change in income or household status that affects eligibility for premium tax credits or cost-sharing reductions;

* Gaining status as member of a federally recognized tribe or shareholder in an Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) Corporation (members of federally recognized Indian tribes can enroll in or change plans once a month throughout the year.

What if I'm already enrolled? For individuals enrolled during the 2014 period, Johnson said their coverage will end on Dec. 31, 2014. To continue coverage in 2015, they can renew their current health plan or choose a new one.

"If you had a plan in 2014, your insurance company may automatically enroll you for 2015 but they will need to notify you of this," she said.

She explained that if you do not have health insurance during 2015, you may have to pay a fee of 2 percent of you income OR $325/adult and $162.50/child; whichever is more. The 2015 fees are a significant increase over the 2014 fee schedule.

During the Open Enrollment Period, if you enroll: * If you enroll between the first and the fifteenth of the month, your coverage starts the first day of the next month example: You sign up and pay the first month's premium on December 5 - your coverage will begin January 1.

* Between the sixteenth and the last day of the month, your coverage starts the first day of the second following month example: You sign up and pay the first month's premium on December 17 - your coverage will begin February 1.

For more information regarding the Affordable Care Act and how it may affect you visit www.healthcare.gov.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

SWC holds traditional Dakota art forms workshop: Bow-making

Submitted by Erin Griffin

This is the second in a series of workshops at SWC aimed at reviving traditional Dakota art forms. Participants are making bows from ash staves and arrows from cedar shafts.

Sisseton Wahpeton College held the Traditional Lakota/Dakota Bow Making Workshop November 15th-19th.

Joe Giago taught 13 participants the history and cultural context of the Bow, methods and techniques of making a bow, and methods and techniques of making arrows.

This was incredibly strenuous work, but every participant completed a working bow.

The Traditional Lakota/Dakota Bow Making Workshop was made possible through funding from the American Indian College Fund "Restoration and Preservation of Traditional Native Art Forms and Knowledge Grant."

The workshop is part of a larger series aimed at restoring traditional Dakota art forms within the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate. Watch for more traditional Dakota arts workshops at Sisseton Wahpeton College in the future!

Thank you to Joe Giago, Randilynn Boucher, Bridget Skenadore, and the American Indian College Fund for making this workshop possible.

(For more information, please contact Erin Griffin at 698-3966 ext. 1293 or egriffin@swc.tc/.)

See accompanying photo highlights of the workshop.

Part of the statewide “Hunger is Not a Game” drive –

Tiospa Zina students collect food for the hungry

Students at Tiospa Zina collected over 2400 pounds of food to donate to the Old Agency and Sisseton food pantries.

The winning class was the Freshman with 1102 pounds!

The project was sponsored by the SD High School Student Council Association statewide program promoting the concept that 'Hunger is Not a Game.'

Thank you to all of the families who participated in this project!

Here are photos of the front office where the food was collected.

Angela “Two Stars” Papenfuss-Star Quilt Design presentation

Artist Angela Papenfuss gave a presentation to the Browns Valley Afterschool Program last Tuesday, November 18th.

Mrs. Papenfuss, Maria Roark or Title VII and Loren Thompson of the Browns Valley Johnson O’Malley Program assisted students in creating their own star quilt designs.

There were 26 students that participated in this Johnson O’Malley Afterschool event.

UMM AISES wins Outreach and Community Service award

Morris's American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) Chapter accepted the award at the 2014 AISES National Conference

Morris, MN – November 21, 2014 – The University of Minnesota, Morris American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) Chapter received the Outstanding Community Service Award at the 2014 AISES National Conference, held November 13-15 in Orlando, Florida. UMM AISES advisor Joe Alia, associate professor of chemistry, was named Advisor of the Year.

Eighteen Morris students attended the conference. Seven presented their research, and two earned Certificate of Achievement awards: Sayge Wooldridge '16, Hill City, South Dakota, (fifth place in oral presentations) and Dalia Whiting '16, White River, South Dakota, (first place in poster presentations).

"Our AISES chapter has grown in strength over the last nine years, and these awards are a symbol of its success within the national AISES community," says Sandra Olson-Loy, vice chancellor for student affairs. "We are very proud of our talented students and their dedicated faculty and staff mentors in the sciences and across the campus."

UMM AISES aims to substantially increase the representation of American Indians and Alaskan Natives in engineering, science, and other related technology disciplines. The chapter is comprised of 20 students representing nine American Indian tribes/Alaskan Native villages and Canadian First Nations. Student officers include co-chairs Wooldridge and Ernest Lafferty '16, Eagle Butte, South Dakota; secretary Natasha Myhal '15, Parma Heights, Ohio; treasurer Alle Bowman '15, Bemidji; travel liaison Chelsea Tarbell '15, Greentown, Pennsylvania; outreach liaison Mike Davis '16, Minneapolis; Morris Campus Student Association representative Francis Reed '16, Shoreview; and public representative Whiting. Staff support has been provided by Tracy Peterson, former associate director, Multi-Ethnic Student Program; Hilda Ladner, assistant to the chancellor for equity and diversity; director of equity, diversity and intercultural programs; and Dave Israels-Swenson, director of student activities.

Held annually since 1978, the AISES National Conference convenes all members of the "AISES family" and honors exemplary chapters. At the 2012 conference, the Morris chapter received both the Stelvio J. Zanin Distinguished Chapter of the Year and Outreach & Community Service Awards.

Additional information on UMM AISES is available at studentorgs.morris.umn.edu/aises.

Through personal and academic discovery, the University of Minnesota, Morris provides opportunities for students to grow intellectually, engage in community, experience environmental stewardship and celebrate diversity. A renewable and sustainable educational experience, Morris prepares graduates for careers, for advanced degrees, for lifelong learning, for work world flexibility in the future, and for global citizenship. Learn more about Morris at morris.umn.edu or call 888-866-3382.

Federal funding to support Student Research at UTTC

Washington, DC – November 19, 2014 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced $200,000 in federal funding for United Tribes Technical College (UTTC) in Bismarck to help support science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) research, recruit and retain Native American students, and help students gain comprehensive research experience and knowledge as they prepare for careers.

Specifically, the funds will help three UTTC students learn how to do scientific research through one-on-one field training, access to better equipment for the research, and create a community outreach seminar encouraging future students to participate in similar research programs.

“North Dakota’s students have the capacity to do anything they put their minds to, but they need the right resources and opportunities to help make it happen,” said Heitkamp. “These funds will enable Native students at UTTC to broaden their educational experience and gather the research skills they will need to prepare for technical, high-skilled jobs we see growing in demand every day across our state. I will continue to support investments like this because supporting educational research will help our state remain competitive and enable our future leaders to be successful.”

The funds are made available by the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture, through the Tribal Colleges Research Grants Program.

Winter climate outlook: Likelihood of El Nino now at 60 percent

Brookings, SD – The winter climate outlook, released today, no longer shows increased likelihood of above average temperatures in South Dakota for the coming season, said Laura Edwards, SDSU Extension Climate Field Specialist.

"The outlook, issued by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Climate Prediction Center, describes the temperature and precipitation forecast for December and the remainder of the winter season," Edwards said.

Edwards explained that one of the most significant indicators of winter season climate can be El Nino or La Nina conditions. "Climatologists look to the ocean waters and atmosphere near the equatorial region of the Pacific Ocean for clues of what may occur over North America," she said.

The most recent forecast continues to indicate El Nino will develop this winter, but is now just 60 percent likely, as compared to about 70 percent just a couple of months ago. "There remains a fair amount of uncertainty, as a result, in the climate outlook for this coming winter, with a 40 percent chance of remaining in neutral conditions, neither El Nino nor La Nina," she said.

The December forecast and seasonal outlook through February, no longer shows warmer than average temperatures more likely in South Dakota and the northern Plains. "This is a change from the last outlook that was released a month ago. In addition to a weak El Nino event, the current long-range forecast shows the possibility of another cold outbreak affecting our region at the end of November into early December. In combination with existing snow cover, this forecast of a cold outbreak would minimize any chance of above average temperatures for the coming month," Edwards said. "Even if we reach El Nino conditions they will be weak and likely would have minimal impact on winter conditions here."

Precipitation outlooks continue to show equal chances of above average, near average, and below average precipitation for the coming three months.

The eastern part of the state was very dry over the fall season, with development of moderate drought in the far northeast. The months of December through February are generally the driest of the year, so the current areas of drought are expected to remain through the next few months.

Even though there is a relatively uncertain climate outlook, there is still a possibility for significant snowfall or severe winter weather. Always be prepared with supplies in your vehicles and homes in the event of being stranded in a vehicle or extended power outage.

Legals

 SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

IN TRIBAL COURT

CASE NO: D-15-022-599

In the matter of Rhonda Bear, Plaintiff

vs.

Bernard W. Provancial, Sr., Defendant

NOTICE OF HEARING

To: Bernard W. Provancial., Sr.

Take notice that a hearing will be held at the above named Court, Agency Village, outside the city of Sisseton, County of Roberts, South Dakota, on the 26th day of November 2014 at the hour of 11:00 a.m. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of October, 2014.

By order of the Court:

/s/

B.J. Jones. Tribal Court Judge

Attest:

Eileen Pfeiffer, Clerk of Courts

46-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-189

SWOCSE/SD/ Carlisa Heminger, PLAINTIFF

VS.

GARY MONTREAL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Recognize a Foreign Order has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 19th day of November, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of October, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

45-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-191

SWOCSE/SD/ Betty High Elk, PLAINTIFF

VS.

GARY MONTREAL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Recognize a Foreign Order has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 19th day of November, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of October, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

45-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-193

 

SWOCSE/SD/ Twila High Elk, PLAINTIFF

VS.

GARY MONTREAL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Recognize a Foreign Order has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 19th day of November, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of October, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

45-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-195

SWOCSE/SD/ Rosanna LaBelle, PLAINTIFF

VS.

GARY MONTREAL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Recognize a Foreign Order has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 19th day of November, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of October, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

45-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-197

SWOCSE/SD/Gary Montreal, Sr., PLAINTIFF

VS.

GARY MONTREAL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Recognize a Foreign Order has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 19th day of November, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of October, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

45-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-199

SWOCSE/SD/Lanise Montreal, PLAINTIFF

VS.

GARY MONTREAL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Recognize a Foreign Order has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 19th day of November, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of October, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

45-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-215

SWOCSE/Sonni Heminger, PLAINTIFF

VS.

RHONDA WHITE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 20th day of November, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of October, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

45-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-213

SWOCSE/Nicole Kirk, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CHRISTI BRAVEBULL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 20th day of November, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of October, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

45-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 13-097

SWOCSE/Cynthia Knudsen, PLAINTIFF

VS.

NANCY ANTELOPE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 20th day of November, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of October, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

45-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 13-151

SWOCSE/Sherri Genia, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JOANN FIRECLOUD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 20th day of November, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of October, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

45-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-153

SWOCSE/Germaine Redday, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BERNARD MIREAU, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Paternity has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 20th day of November, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of October, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

45-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 13-125

SWOCSE/ Leslie Orteaga, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SKYLER GENIA, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 20th day of November, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of October, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

45-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 09-108

SWOCSE/Billie Redearth, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LESLIE NECONSIH, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 20th day of November, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of October, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

45-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-001

SWOCSE/Heather Paul, PLAINTIFF

VS.

GIOVANNI MARQUEZ, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Paternity and/or Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 20th day of November, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of October, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

45-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 13-159

SWOCSE/Lorraine Amos, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JAMES MEDFORD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Paternity has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 20th day of November, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of October, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

45-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 12-166

SWOCSE/ Geri Good House, PLAINTIFF

VS.

RICHARD DUBOISE, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 20th day of November, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of October, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

45-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 08-052

SWOCSE/ Darlena Jones, PLAINTIFF

VS.

KIP RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 20th day of November, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of October, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

45-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 11-055

SWOCSE/Misty Langdeaux, PLAINTIFF

VS.

EDWARD KIRK, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support Arrears has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of November, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 31st day of October, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

45-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-224

SWOCSE/Seneca Rockwood, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ANDREW GREY, III, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of November, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 31st day of October, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

45-3tc

 SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 13-044

SWOCSE/ Michelle Blue, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ALLEN OWEN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of November, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 31st day of October, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

45-3tc

Trading Post ads

Employment Opportunity: GROW South Dakota is seeking a full-time Program/Loan Associate to be based in Sisseton, SD. Applications will be taken until Friday, Dec. 12. To request a job application and job description, contact GROW SD, 104 Ash St. E., Sisseton, SD 57262 or call (605)-698-7654 or 1-888-202-4855. EOE.

47-2tc

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Job Openings

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Child Care Worker, Little Steps Day Care

Meth & Suicide Prevention Specialist, Dakotah Pride

Closing Date: December 08, 2014 @ 04:30 PM

All interested applicants may obtain application and job description information at the Human Resource Department, of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate or contact Arnold Williams at (605) 698-8238 or Denise Hill at (605) 698-8362. (Tribal preference will apply)

 

OLD AGENCY

DISTRICT MEMBERS

JOB OPENING

DISTRICT COORDINATOR

APPLY AT THE OAD CENTER.

CLOSING DATE: 12/04/14 @ NOON NO EXCEPTIONS.

A job description is available at the OAD Center.

 

Sisseton Wahpeton College

Job Opening

Library Assistant (Part-time) AA Degree Closing date: November 19th, 2014 at 8:00 AM. Please visit our website at www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application.

45-2tc

 

Sisseton Wahpeton College

Job Opening

Accounts Receivable Position. Closing date: 12/10/2014.

Nursing Instructor. Open until filled

Indian Preference will apply/

Please visit our website at www.swc.tc

Human Resources for a complete job description and application.

47-2tc

 

Sisseton Wahpeton College

Job Opening

Assistant Financial Aid Director AA Degree in Business or Accounting Closing date: November 19th, 2014 at 8:00 AM. Please visit our website at www.swt.tc for a complete job description and application.

45-2tc

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Employment Opportunities

2014-2015 School Year Vacancies:

Substitutes needed for custodial, kitchen, teaching, and transportation - starting at $10/hr, varies per position Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma (please contact the HR office for more information) Applications are accepted on an on-going basis

Vacancy: Special Education Teacher (High School) Sign-on Bonus Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Special Education Teacher Opening Date: March 7, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Art Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a K-12 Art Teacher Opening Date: July 1, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Alternative Learning Center Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Secondary Teacher Opening Date: July 1, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: School Counselor Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a School Service Specialist School Counselor Opening Date: May 23, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Reading Coach Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Reading Coach Opening Date: October 30, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

2014-2015 Extra Curricular Vacancies:

Vacancy: AISES Advisor (American Indian Science and Engineering Society) Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: April 11, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Destination Imagination Advisor Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: April 11, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Rodeo & Riding Club Advisor Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: May 8, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Military Club Advisor Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: September 11, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

If you would like to apply to be a part of the TZ tiwahe you may pick up an application from the TZTS HR office located at #2 Tiospa Zina Dr. Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications may also be printed off the HR web page by downloading from links under employment forms to the left. Completed applications may be sent to PO Box 719, Agency Village, SD 57262. Faxed to: 605-698-7686. For further information call 605-698-3953 ext. 208. Indian Preference employer. At will employer. All applicants are subject to a Background Check and Pre-Employment Drug Test, pursuant to SWSB policy.

 

Enemy Swim Day School

Bus Driver

Enemy Swim Day School has an opening for a bus driver for the 2014-2015 school year. This is a 6 hour per day position. Applicant must have a valid CDL driver’s license with passenger endorsement. ESDS will assist driver in obtaining a CDL if needed. Health and vision insurance is included as well as retirement benefits and paid leave. Wage is dependent upon experience. If interested please pick up an application from the business office or visit our website: www.esds.us. ; Call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 and ask for Ed Johnson for details. Indian preference policies apply. Open until filled.

46-2tc

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

C-Store Department: Clerk (3 Full-Time) 2 Swing, & Graveyard

Cage Department: Cashier (5 Full-Time) 4 Swing, 1 Graveyard

Count Department: Team Member (2 Full-Time) 3:00 am to finish

Foods Department: Sous Chef (Full-Time) Day

Hotel Department: Room/Laundry Attendant (Full-Time) 8:00 am to finish

Smoke/Gift Shop Department: Clerk (Full-Time) Day

Closing Date: November 28, 2014 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions

Two identifications documents required upon hire

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE, Hankinson ND 58041.For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO. (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment). Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Opening

The Smoke Shop/C-Store Department Is Now Accepting Applications For

Position: Manager (1 Full—Time)

Job Description: Manages and provides supervision of the Smoke Shop/C-Store department personnel and the department operations.

Closing Date: December 5, 2014 @4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions

Two identifications documents required upon hire

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE, Hankinson ND 58041.For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO. (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment). Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Opening

Purchasing Department: Clerk I (Full-Time) Day shift. Computer Skills, Knowledge in Microsoft Excel Must have excellent communication skills (oral & written) Strong interpersonal & persuasive skills Able to lift 50lbs multiple times. Able to stand for extended periods of time. Able to walk across the layout of the property multiple times daily

Closing Date: November 28, 2014 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions

Two identifications documents required upon hire

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE, Hankinson ND 58041.For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO. (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment). Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

HUMAN RESOURCES: RECRUITER/TRAINER (1 FULL- TIME). GENERAL FUNCTION: The purpose of this position is for the recruitment and placement of new and current employees with the Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel. Also to provide ongoing training and development for team members; develop training programs that benefit team members in areas determined by the Human Resources Manager. REQUIREMENTS: A.A. degree in Gaming Hospitality or related field preferred. Work experience and/or related training in business and/or Human Resources. Proficient typing skills required. Ability to maintain the highly confidential nature of Human Resources work. Tact, above average communication skills and ability to work effectively with both employees and managers. Must display proven excellent reading, writing, and organizational skills. Extensive knowledge of computers including Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. Experience in publishing, newsletter layout, design, and editing. Successful candidate will be energetic and enthusiastic with ability to motivate others. Previous computer experience (AS 400, Microsoft Excel, Word, and Outlook). Minimal bending, lifting and walking. Repetitious computer work.

This position will close on December 3, 2014 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

CAGE: MANAGER TRAINEE (FULL-TIME) GENERAL FUNCTION: Manage, plan and coordinate the activities and operations of the cage department. Administrator of all cage regulations, policies, procedures and related internal controls. REQUIREMENTS: Must have high school diploma or GED equivalent. Minimum A.A. degree in Accounting/Business. Bachelor's degree in Accounting/Business Administration preferred. Minimum of two years previous experience. Ability to stand for long periods of time. Must obtain Key Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on December 4, 2014 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Cage Department: Main Bank Cashier/Cashier (2) part-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Excellent customer service skills, excellent communication skills. Appropriate dress code; the ability to work under pressure. Excellent Math Skills, Basic Computer Skills, Knowledge of basic office equipment. At least 2 years of previous experience in the cage department. Ability to lift 50 lbs. Must be at least 21 years old, must have a High school diploma or GED. Must be able to obtain a Key License.

Opening date: Thursday, November 20, 2014

Closing date: Wednesday, November 26, 2014 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.