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Volume 50 Issue No. 20

Anpetu Iyamni, Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Inside this Edition –

Special election for Tribal Chair Tuesday, May 28th; Candidates forum Tuesday, May 14

Memorial Day flag ceremonies schedule

Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community honors Kurt BlueDog

Report to Akicita from VSO Geri Opsal

Tribal Council hears SWO contractor complaints

SWO Tribe begins phase II of its industrial hemp project

Coming: After 40 years, SWO Vietnam/Cold War Era veteran finally goes public with his story and court martial, first-ever to use the American Indian Religious Freedom Act

Reminder: Deadline for receiving copy is Friday noon

Special election for Tribal Chair Tuesday, May 28

Candidates forum Tuesday, May 14th, 5:00 p.m. at the Elderly Center

The Reservation Election Board has scheduled the special election for Tribal Chairperson on Tuesday, May 28, 2019. Polls will be open from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m. at all seven District Centers. (In case of weather-related emergencies, the polling will take place at the Tribal administration building.) Tribal Council will convene after polling in the rotunda of the administration building for counting the ballots.

The following persons have been certified to run:

Francis Crawford.

Edmund Johnson Jr.

Lisa A. LaBelle.

Jesse Larsen.

Crystal Owen.

Viva Seaboy-DuBois

Donovan White.

For more information, see the legal notice elsewhere in this edition of the Sota or contact REB members:

Angela Johnson 605-467-9737

Josie Bertsch 605-237-4067

Marjorie Bissonette 605-467-1539

Thomas Lablanc 605268-3141

Vanessa Carlson 605-742-4035

Dustin Opsal 605-237-8197

The SWO Tribal Elderly Affairs Board is sponsoring a public candidates forum this Tuesday, May 14, at 5:00 p.m. at the Tribal Elderly Center, Agency Village, SD.

All Oyate are encouraged to attend or to watch via Tribal station KXSW.

Observing Memorial Day 2019 on the Lake Traverse Reservation

United Veterans Association –

Federal Memorial Day Observance & Schedule

Continuing the tradition of honoring their fallen fellow service members, veterans from the Sisseton-Wahpeton United Veterans Association (UVA) – Desert Era Veterans and Woodrow W. Keeble American Legion Post 314 honor guards – will travel to cemeteries, churches and homes across the Lake Traverse Reservation on the federal Memorial Day holiday, Monday, May 27, 2019.

Here is the schedule with estimated times and some may be early or late depending upon weather conditions and other factors:

1.    St. Luke's Cemetery            8:00 a.m.

2.    St. Matthew's Cemetery                  8:15 a.m.

3.    St. Matthew's Church                     8:30 a.m.

4.    Mayasan Church                            9:00 a.m.

5.    Sisseton-Wahpeton Traditional       9:30 a.m.

6.    Ryan Family Cemetery                   10:00 a.m.

7.    Cook Family Cemetery                   10:15 a.m.

8.    Long Hollow Church                      10:30 a.m.

9.    Buffalo Lake Church                       11:00 a.m.

10.  Gill Family Cemetery                     11:15 a.m.

11.  Oyate Veterans Cemetery                11:45 a.m.

12.  Sisseton Veterans Circle                  12:00 noon

13.  Lake Traverse Church                     12:30 p.m.

14.  St. John's Church                           12:45 p.m.

15.  Redday Family                               1:15 p.m.

16.  Goodwill Church                           1:30 p.m.

17.  St. Mary's Church                          1:45 p.m.

18.  Bernard Family Cemetery               2:15 p.m.

19.  Pickerel Lake (South) Cemetery       2:30 p.m.

20.  St. James Church                            2:45 p.m.

21.  Roberts Family Cemetery                3:15 p.m.

22.  Big Coulee Church                         4:00 p.m.

Dakota Kit Fox Society –

Traditional Memorial Day Observance & Schedule

The Dakota Kit Fox Society in an honorable and humble tradition, will honor our fellow veterans and Dakota Warriors on (Thursday) May 30th, 2019. The following changes are estimated times and some may be early or late depending on climatic conditions and other factors.

Also, due to family request, a tribute will be conducted at the Janisch Veterans Memorial near the Buffalo Lake District Center.

1.    LaBelle's Cemetery                         7:00 a.m.

2.    St. Luke's Cemetery            7:15 a.m.

3.    St. Matthew's Cemetery                  7:30 a.m.

4.    St. Matthew's Church                     7:45 a.m.

5.    Mayasan Church                            8:15 a.m.

6.    Sieche Hollow Cemetery                 8:45 a.m.

7.    Oyate Traditional Cemetery            9:15 a.m.

8.    St. Benedicts Cemetery                   9:45 a.m.

9.    Cook Family Cemetery                   10:00 a.m.

10.  Long Hollow Church                      10:15 a.m.

11.  R. Ryan Family Cemetery               10:40 a.m.

12.  Max/Gill Family Cemetery              11:00 a.m.

13.  Francis Janisch Vets Memorial         11:15 a.m.

14.  Buffalo Lake Church                       11:45 a.m.

15.  Oyate Veterans Cemetery                12:30 p.m.

16.  Sisseton Veterans Circle                  12:45 p.m.

17.  Hoksina Wayakapi Cemetery          1:15 p.m.

18.  M. Redday Family Cemetery           1:45 p.m.

19.  Goodwill Church                           2:15 p.m.

20.  St. Mary's Church                          2:30 p.m.

21.  Renville Cemetery                          3:00 p.m.

22.  Bernard Family Cemetery               3:30 p.m.

23.  Pickerel Lake (South) Cemetery       4:00 p.m.

24.  St. James Church                            4:20 p.m.

25.  Roberts Family Cemetery                4:45 p.m.

26.  Moses Gill Family Cemetery 5:10 p.m.

27.  Big Coulee Church                         5:45 p.m.

28.  Sacred Hill Cemetery                      6:15 p.m.

29.  Lake Traverse Church                     6:45 p.m.

30.  St. John's Church                           7:00 p.m.

From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer"

GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov

605-268-0502

*WAR ON DRUGS: See the notice in the Sota. We take this very serious, we have sent out the flyer to SWHA to be posted at each home at each housing site. There is power in numbers, we need to combat this epidemic and take our community back. We will be meeting with the Police Commission as well as Tribal Council and Executives next week. No more sitting idle and watching the destruction of our people. There is also treatment available for anyone who wants to break the vicious cycle. Call Dakotah Pride at 698-3917 and Mayuteca Day Treatment Center at 698-2110.They do Evals and referrals. Please partner with us, we will ensure every lead is followed up on and it will remain anonymous. Power in numbers. Pidamaya.

*SWO ELDERLY BOARD: Wants to meet with the United Veterans Association on May 20, 2019 (Monday) at 1:00 PM. Please attend.

*Native American War Memorial Washington, DC: "Native Americans have served in the U.S. military in every major conflict since the Revolutionary War but are often overlooked, according to historians and tribal leaders. A memorial coming to Washington will honor the roughly 141,000 veterans and 15,100 -active-duty service members who are Native Americans. The memorial, which will be outside the National Museum of the American Indian on the Mall, is expected to open on Veterans Day in 2020. Museum officials said they're planning an exhibit to share the stories of Native American service members. Here are six American Indian veterans you may never have heard about.

*VA CEMETERY GRANTS PROGRAM: Check out this YouTube video [4:34] for a look at VA's Cemetery Grant Program and a special emphasis on the new Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Veterans Cemetery. Click on the picture below to be taken to the YouTube site. The Department of Veterans Affairs Veterans Cemetery Grants Program was established in 1978 to complement VA's National Cemetery Administration. The program assists states, territories and federally recognized tribal governments in providing gravesites for Veterans in those areas where VA's national cemeteries cannot fully satisfy their burial needs. Any cemetery assisted by a VA grant must be maintained and operated according to the operational standards and measures of the National Cemetery Administration. Sisseton show cased.

*NADL APPLICATION POSTED ON THE SWO WEBSITE: Thanks to Dawn Drum for posting the NADL application to the VSO Website. Here is the link: www.swo-nsn.gov and go to Departments: Human Services and scroll down to Veterans Service Office, open up and in that body will be the NADL App 2019.

*VETERAN STORIES: We would like families of Veterans to submit to stories to the Sota to be printed. We would love to continue to read of stories of our Tribal Akicita and Heroes. I think it would be beneficial for the younger generation to hear of service to our Country. Please attend Naomi's honoring as you will please to hear her story. Very inspiring.

NUMBERS TO REMEMBER: CRISIS LINE: 1-800-273-8255 PRESS 1

GERI OPSAL, TVSO 605-268-0502

GABE FISCHER, TVSO ASST 605-410-1007

DOC WANNA: 605-237-2168 - KIT FOX COMMANDER

CLAYTON ELLINGSON:605-924-1266

AMERICAN LEGION POST 314 COMMANDER

JUSTIN CHANKU: 947-3441, DESERT ERA COMMANDER

UVA represented at Tribal Council meeting

United Veterans Association representatives, from all of the SWO veteran organizations, attended last Tuesday's Tribal Council meeting to offer assistance in combatting problems stemming from illegal drug use on the Lake Traverse Reservation. (See the veterans' statement, which is being published in the Sota, concerning their stand against illegal drugs.) They pointed out the small number of Tribal Law Enforcement Officers compared to the size of the Lake Traverse Reservation and size of the problem, saying they want to assist them in any way they can.

Tribal Council meets for monthly program reports

By CD Floro

Sota Editor

The SWO Tribal Council met for its regular monthly sessions last Tuesday and Wednesday, May 7 and 8. Here is our report from notes. Highlights of program reports will be provided upon their release. See Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson's report elsewhere in this edition. Our thanks to Myrna for providing this information for readers.

Enemy Swim District Councilwoman Cheryl Owen gave the opening prayer Tuesday morning.

First business was approving April Council minutes.

During that process there was a question about how many days of school were missed because Tribal Roads did not have adequate equipment.

A motion was made and passed, although not approved by all members, to request funds be redirected from the BIA Fire Department to Tribal Roads for equipment.

Council expressed frustration with the former DNI Board, for its management decisions and for not submitting SD state sales tax reports.

Lake Traverse District Councilman Francis Crawford asked Council to "look into non-payment of state sales taxes and taking money from Dakota Western and others for the grocery store."

Lisa Jackson, Big Coulee District Councilwoman appointed to the DNI Board, described it as a "huge problem we inherited."

After approval of last month's minutes, Interim Chairman Verlyn Beaudreau gave a verbal report and said he had no action items.

Vice-Chairman Floyd Kirk Jr. also had no action items.

Budget Office Manager Lexie Fancher brought several budget modification requests to Council.

During the discussion, Verlyn said he had met with program managers and that program support "is being cut everywhere possible."

Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson submitted her written report (see accompanying article) and spoke about difficulties finding suitable foster care.

Myrna said she had "met yesterday with community members."

They are interested in getting "more culturally relevant" foster care placements under the Tribe's Child Protection Program.

Some children, she told Council, "are left in the system for months."

She said the system is in need of reform.

Council discussed how best to disperse elderly cards in light of past obstacles from IT and communications.

Derrick McCauley gave the Youth Department report.

He talked about a grant opportunity and said the Planning office was assisting.

Council put its support in the form a resolution.

Sisseton IHS CEO Randy Jordan presented the Woodrow W. Keeble Memorial Health Care Clinic report and answered questions about a variety of matters.

He shared financial and operational data with Council.

The CEO said that with carryover funds the Sisseton unit has a surplus in its contract health fund.

Staffing levels are high, he reported, and Sisseton "is right on target with the budget."

He noted that the PHN staff have earned new certifications.

Ultrasound screening will be available, he reported, "five days a week on site beginning next month."

Responding to a question from Bill LaRoque, CEO Jordan said patients with heart attack or needing heart surgery "are sent out," and added "Fortunately, here we do have on-call Medicare/Medicaid services and others with different providers for serious health issues."

Jr. Heminger asked that Council take "a hard look at the IHS housing contract."

"(We/Tribe) need to provide housing for qualified doctors and medical staff who come here," he said.

Rose Gaikowski, of the Sisseton IHS Administration office, responded.

She said that she has been meeting with SWHA Director Eric Shepherd.

The contract, she explained, is clear that the IHS site "is built to support medical staff housing."

Delano Renville asked about the VA/IHS cooperative agreement, calling it "confusing."

Randy Jordan answered, saying "We can provide care and bill the VA." He said that "basically, it's working well here."

Delano said that "Elsewhere it's not working well."

The conversation went back to IHS staff housing needs.

Jr. Heminger asked, "When a doctor or nurse comes here, do they pay (for housing) or IHS (does IHS pay for the housing)?"

It was explained that housing is built into the IHS contract, and that includes "temporary/transitional housing"

Randy said, "It is important for us to have access to housing" and that there is a need for "quality temporary housing."

The CEO added that among the new hires are two optometrists who came to work here in mid-April.

Next, Tammy DeCoteau gave the Dakotah Language Institute report.

She expressed frustration at not having a credit card for DNI, saying it makes managing the program much more costly than it needs to be.

Tammy said, "Cost is a real problem … us paying top dollar for items we can buy online for a much lower cost."

When it comes to operating the DNI website, she said, "The only way to pay is with a credit card."

When the annual fee comes due, she said, "Our website will be taken down."

Vice-Chairman Kirk explained that "Right now, we (the Tribe) do not have a credit card."

Tammy talked about "past difficulty" during Chairman Dave Flute's term in office.

"Chairman Flute," she said, "had to call the credit card company to authorize a payment."

A payment could be authorized only by "the person whose name is on the card."

Interim Chairman Beaudreau responded, saying that Council "…is not comfortable giving credit cards to programs."

Verlyn said Council would have to research possible solutions.

After more discussion, Council decided to schedule a roundtable to develop a policy for a credit card that was exclusive for DNI.

A delegation from the SWO United Veterans Association, with representatives of all three of the Tribal veterans organizations, met with Tribal Council at noon.

Delano Renville began by saying, "We're not here to request money."

"We're here to offer support combatting the drug problem."

The veterans called Council's attention to the flyer they have been circulating in the community over the past several weeks.

It is the same as the notice that is running in the Sota. (See the back page of section two.)

The veterans asked Council to revisit the issue of "banishment" for serious drug crime, with the option of reinstatement. A person who is banished could go to treatment and, if successful for a year, would no longer be banished.

There was a discussion about the number of Tribal Law Enforcement officers compared to the size of the Reservation and size of the problem.

 There was no formal action taken, but Council expressed thanks for the veterans stepping up to provide support to Tribal police.

First program report of the afternoon was for The SWO Department of Transportation.

Cliff Eberhardt, Manager, talked about this season's construction projects. – budget, agreements – including Barker Hill II.

One of the projects involves a non-Tribal bridge. The agreement is with Roberts County and the Tribe must locate and get approval from owners on the Tribal side of the road.

There may be similar bridge projects coming, which will require agreements with county governments and BIA approval.

An upgrade to Day County Highway 1 would be a benefit to many Tribal members living at rural Waubay, he said.

Cliff said he was looking for Tribal Council support "to see if we can get federal funding for rural Waubay roads…."

"We have gravel right there (at the Tribe's rock-crushing site)."

"The Army Corp. of Engineers are in discussion," he said, "to make those (rural Waubay) roads safer."

Final item on Tuesday's agenda was a report from the District Chairman's Association.

Below are highlights from the DCA written report submitted to Council.

April 30, 2019 DCA meeting

Kenneth (Dickie) Johnson was installed as DCA Chairman; Brice Roberts DCA Vice-Chairman.

Norma Perko read the Big Coulee District Meeting Minutes of April 25, 2019.

Karen White read the Heipa District Meeting Minutes of April 14, 2019.

Motion # 01: To request Councilman Rondell to meet with Derrick McCauley about the SWO Youth Board

Motion # 02: To have Heipa District submit a grant application in the amount of $10,220 to Shakopee for the mentoring program.

Motion # 03: To have Dakota Magic Casino give a full financial report to Council yearly.

Motion # 04: To have Dakota Magic Casino give a full financial report to Council quarterly.

Motion # 06: To have Heipa Chairwoman take back to DCA and make a motion for a full detailed report on DNI and charges be filed.

Motion # 07: To dissolve Chapter 80, Economic Development Association.

Motion # 08: To establish a business board for the for-profit entities to include qualifications of a Master's degree and experience in business.

Motion # 10: To start the removal process on Vice Chairman Floyd Kirk and any other employee who was involved in or knew about the embezzlement that took place in the Vice Chairman's Office.

Motion # 11: To reaffirm district motion to dissolve the SWO Budget office.

Jessie Chanku read the Long Hollow District Meeting Minutes of April 18, 2019.

Motion # 02: To advertise all coaching positions at Tiospa Zina.

Motion # 03: To have Verzella Huckfeldt sit in for Rose Gaikowski on the Election Board.

Motion # 06: To rescind Council Motion # 103.

Darwin James read the Lake Traverse District Meeting Minutes of April 25, 2019.

Motion #: That we not support the proposed Elderly Project because of the Tribe's financial situation.

Motion #: To withdraw our tribal flag from the rotunda in the Capitol in Pierre, we are in opposition to the bill Gov. Noem pushed through for big oil which violates our first amendment rights.

Jesse Larsen read the Old Agency District Meeting Minutes of April 29, 2019.

Motion # 05: To accept the Brian DuMarce as OEP Board member.

Motion # 11: Discussion on jurisdiction boundaries and why Karen G is prosecuting those caught on white land. Motion to have Milton Owen take back to Council and check into the jurisdiction issues.

Motion # 13: To request an in-depth report on the financial status of all three casinos be brought to Council, along with a daily average drop amount.

Motion # 14: To stop the Indian Health Service complex project until a financial report is brought to the district.

April 8, 2019 DCA meeting

Presentation given by Floyd Kirk Jr., Vice Chairman, discussed upcoming budgets for 2019, he will give DCA a copy once the budgets are approved by Tribal Council. DCA wanted our Chairwoman to set up meeting with CEO and officials of Dakota Magic including our Interim Chairman, Vice Chairman, and Secretary of our Tribe, to go over financials and the construction figures in the renovation that happened there.

ISSUES TO TAKE BACK TO THE DISTRICTS: Detailing Garrett Renville to Dakota Magic.

MOTION # 04-01: To meet with officials from Dakota Magic regarding their financials and construction figures on their renovation.

Motion # 15: To have council construct an in-depth report on all the projects being done currently.

Motion # 16: To bring Gary Gaikowski, Tribal police Chief, to next district meeting to discuss jurisdiction issues.

Motion # 21: To take legal action to recover the original letters from the original 38.

Brice Roberts read the Enemy Swim District Meeting Minutes of April 25, 2019.

Motion # 04: Requesting approval for SWO Planning Department to seek their own legal counsel for particular projects.

Motion # 09: To start removal process on SWO Vice Chairman for malfeasance of office.

Motion # 12: To have SWO Entities that serve food to purchase from Dakota Crossing.

Motion # 17: To start a uniform pardon process within the Tribe.

NO DISTRICT MEETING MINUTES FROM BUFFALO LAKE.

ISSUES TO TAKE TO COUNCIL: Terminate Scott German. Youth Board Members. Gaming Board Members.

Tribal Council meets

Wednesday, May 8, 2019

Continued Next Week

SWO Tribal Secretary's April 2019 report

Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson submitted a written report for the previous month at the May 7th session of Council. Here is her report and highlights from the programs administered by her office:

We distributed coupons to 2,058 elders for the month of April; 840 on-reservation; 1,214 off-reservation. The number fluctuates due to deaths and those turning 55.

Approximately 229 people, not including Program Managers and Tribal Council, visited the Tribal Secretary's Office for various reasons for the month of April.

We logged in and responded to several phone calls.

We attended and participated in meetings with Tribal Executives, Program Managers, Tribal Members, and specific programs under my direction as scheduled (approximately 69 meetings).

All off-reservation elder cards for the month of May are being mailed out this week.

And last, I have been accepted as a member of the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) Tribal Advisory Committee (TAC). I will serve as the primary representative for the Great Plains area, representing tribes in Iowa, Nebraska, North and South Dakota. I will be attending an in-person meeting in Washington, DC, May 28-31, 2019, which they fund.

Following are the reports from programs under this office:

Child Protection Program

Debra Divine, Program Manager.

Function/Mission Statement:

The purpose of the SWO Child Protection Program is to provide a tribally administered social services delivery system. Standards of child placement practices are in accordance with the standards of the State of South Dakota and the Child Welfare League of America.

The Child Protection Program offers six (6) categories of services. The following services are available through the program: child protection services, (abuse, neglect and exploitation), child placement services (foster care), adoptive services, licensing activities for adoption and foster care, parenting classes, and preventative services to families identified as "at risk".

The goal of the Child Protection Program is to re-enforce and strengthen family values and stress management in those families experiencing dysfunction. By providing the identified services, we help such families cope successfully with stress so they are able to provide a nurturing home environment for their children. Program success is not measured by those children who are able to adjust well to out-of-home placements but by the number of parents who are able to successfully undertake the responsibility of parenthood. In this undertaking, we rely on the strengths of each other, of the extended family and of the tribe as a community concerned about our future.

Data for the month (this data should show how your services contributed to the community you serve).

The SWO Child Protection Program has legal custody of seventy-eight (78) children. Following is the breakdown on type of placements:

Foster Care:       35

Group Care:      08

Boarding School 02

With Parents     24

With Relatives   26

For the month of April 2019 three (3) children were returned to the legal custody of their parent(s)/caretaker.

For the month of April 2019, the Child Protection Program received forty (40)

referrals. Following is the breakdown: NOTE: These are only the referrals up to April 25,

2019. Count may increase with referrals through April 30, 2019.

Neglect 10

Neglect/Drug    07

Physical Abuse  08

Physical Abuse/Drugs    03

Sexual Abuse     03

Pregnant/Drugs 01

Request Financial Assist. 01

Suicidal Ideation           03

Custody Issue    01

Information      03

For the month of April 2019 the SWO Child Protection Program received one-hundred two thirty-four (134) ICWA notices. Twelve (12) of these were SWO members and ICWA eligible.

For the month of April 2019 we had five (5) persons apply for foster care licensure.

The SWO Child Protection Program has an on-going need of recruiting and retaining foster parents, this has been a continuous challenge for not only the tribes but a statewide need. The SWO Child Protection Program along with the State of South Dakota continue its efforts in recruiting Native American foster families for those children who cannot remain in their homes due to safety risks.

The SWO Child Protection Program is in need of funding for additional staff. This would allow the client/caseworker ratio to decrease allowing for more effective case management.

Child Support Enforcement - Diana Canku, Program Manager

Function/Mission Statement: Establish, modify, and enforce child support orders, collect/disburse payments, locate absent parents, and establish paternity through genetic testing.

Data for the Month:

We had an issue with payroll failing to process a voucher with the child support payments deducted from employees on pay period #10. Jaime L. was trying to get this resolved by discussing it with the payroll employees but was not receiving cooperation on their end. I met with the Secretary on Tuesday, April 23, 2019 to inform her of the situation in case she received complaints from the clients who were still waiting for their checks. I also followed up with an email explaining the situation. I received an email on the afternoon of 4/23/19 from Michelle B in Payroll informing me that it was being walked through that afternoon. Thank you for your assistance with this Myrna.

We are currently experiencing some problems with the MTS program. The program keeps kicking us out after a few minutes and sending an error message. The company that provides our technical support was contacted and they are now working with Tim Laughter to get it corrected. They are currently scheduled to deploy the solution on 4/29/19. Apparently a temporary solution with the VPN was implemented back when we were first put on our own network in 2017. This fix should be a permanent solution and hopefully will prevent this from happening in the future.

The caseworkers are currently going through their files for a review. A number of cases have been closed and will now be closed in the MTS program. They are trying to locate people associated with the old cases to get them updated, etc. They have also been tasked with getting all of the TANF information into the MTS program so the information can easily be pulled for our reports to the OCSE federal program.

I attended the National Tribal Child Support Director's meeting in Tulsa, OK on April 9 - 11, 2019. The most important topic discussed (in my opinion) was the grant match amount. A letter was drafted during our meeting along with a resolution and sent to the DHHS Secretary requesting the match amount be reduced from 20% to 10% because this creates a serious hardship for some tribal child support programs. One tribe closed their office in 2018 because they couldn't meet the matching requirement. When the Child Support program was created by the federal government, Congress did not require the tribes provide a match. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) instituted the requirement without the input of, or consultation with, the tribes. I am hoping the DHHS Secretary will honor the request and reduce the match amount. We also had leadership training on Thursday, April 11, 2014.

We continue to have clients signing up for direct deposits. Direct deposits consistently account for over 50% of the monthly disbursements. We currently have 141 clients receiving direct deposit.

Child support court is scheduled for April 24, 25, and 26, 2019.

The collections are through April 25, 2019. There were 730 receipts for April.

Community Health Education

Audrey German, Program Manager

Function/Mission Statement:

To provide community health education services in a manner that empowers Tribal members to make positive, progressive and sustained personal choices about healthy lifestyles, utilization of available health services, and prevention of chronic diseases.

New Staff:

Diana Hawkins started April 23rd as Administrative Assistant.

Cancer Prevention/Education:

For April the focus was to promote the three (3) initiatives we received funding for from the Great Plains Tribal Chairman's Health Board. All three initiatives assist our relatives with transportation through a $32.00 Cenex gas card. Screenings and early detection of cancer saves lives.

1. Prevention activities hosted and organized this month were:

a.  CHE 411 Show on CNB TV airs every Tuesday from 10:00 AM - 10:30 AM. Show dates were: April 2, 9, 16 (repeat show), 23 & 30.

b.  April 17 - "Honor Every Woman" Wellness Fair held at the Sisseton Wahpeton College auditorium: 141 individuals attended. Activities included 18 booths with health and education information, showed movie "Someone You Love," created and showed two breast cancer survivor digital stories. Survivor's stories were by Brooke Owen and Gabrielle Tateyuskanskan.

c.  April 9 & 25 - Set up an educational booth/table during mammogram days at IHS.

d.  April 25 - CHE collaborated with the Sisseton Public Health Nurses to promote colorectal screenings at the Sisseton IHS rotunda on this date from 10:00 - 2:00pm. Set up a booth with education and demonstrated how to collect a sample using the iFOB kit. Sisseton IHS Public Health Nurses set up the Rollin Colin with education and provided the iFOB colorectal screening kit to those due for a screening. Eight (8) relatives received education and gas cards through this event.

e.  Breast & Cervical Cancer and Colorectal Cancer Early Detection Initiative for April:

*26 Relatives provided education by CHE and screened for breast cancer by IHS

*22 Relatives provided education by CHE and screened for cervical cancer by IHS

*26 Relatives provided education by CHE and received an iFOB screening kit from IHS

*22 Relatives returned iFOB colorectal cancer screening kit to Sisseton IHS Lab Started a monthly Family Cancer Support Group April 26th. This group will be held the fourth Friday of each month.

Tobacco Prevention/Cessation:

a.  A Tobacco Support Group meeting was held April 3rd with one person attending. Tobacco Support Group meetings are offered the first Wednesday of each month at the Tribal Administration Building.

b.  Referral - received 3 referrals

Injury Prevention

a.  Car Seat Safety Education - 9 caretakers

b.  Child Passenger Distribution - 9 - 3-in-1's and 2 - belt positioning boosters

Health Career Promotion:

Summer Student Extern Program 2019 - Summer 2019 starts the 15th cohort of health career students mentored through this initiative. To date 97 placements were made for 65 students. The Health Careers Promotion Task Force met and reviewed the five (5) applications received. Two applications were incomplete. The task force recommended giving the students additional time to bring in the necessary documentation. Unfortunately, the students did not provide the information needed. Students selected and their placement site were:

*Lacey Bissonette   Sisseton IHS Physical Therapy Department

*Jada Redday         Sisseton IHS Optometry Department

*Diana Hawkins     Diana was hired for a position in the CHE Program

Students will start May 28 with orientation.

Camp Med - Coordinated a health career promotion activity with the Northeast South Dakota Area Health Education Center (AHEC). NESDAHEC held a Camp Med at the Enemy Swim Day School April 15th for 7th & 8th graders. Camp Med is a fun way to learn more about all the different things you can do if you decide to work in the healthcare field.

Program Name: Dakotah Pride Center - Richard Bird, MS, LAC, Program Manager

Function/Mission Statement: To promote and sustain the quality of life, integrity, and empowerment of SWO Tribal Members by planning, developing and providing alcohol & drug addiction services consistent with the behavioral, physical, cultural and spiritual values of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation.

ACTIVITIES:

1.  Evaluations for Treatment Services - Completed 34 evaluations 19 females and 15 male. Recommendations for: 25 inpatient treatment services and 9 for intensive outpatient services.

2.  Medically-Monitored Inpatient Treatment Services - On March 31, 2019 the group started with 12 clients participating in the inpatient program. Of these 8 are female and 4 are male. Two of the females are pregnant and in need of treatment services. Total for this fiscal year are 58 clients for this fiscal year. On May 5, 2019 we have scheduled 12 clients to enter the program (8 men & 4 women).

3.  Intensive Outpatient Treatment Services - As of April 30, 2019 a total of 9 clients are enrolled in the Intensive Outpatient Treatment Program. This is a six-week program.

4.  Contract Health Referral and Placement Services - As of March 28 2019 we have three clients placed at the Keystone Treatment Center in Canton, SD and four clients placed at the Tallgrass Recovery Center in Sioux Falls. To date we have placed 23 clients at Tallgrass Center and 13 clients at Keystone Center for a total of 36 clients so far for this fiscal year of 2019.

5.  Transitional House Placement Services - As of February April 26, 2019 we currently have 4 men and 3 women housed at the halfway house at Dakotah Pride Center.

6.  Aftercare and Continuing Care Services - This group meets every Tuesday at 6:00 to 8:00 am at Dakotah Pride Center. This group averages between 8-12 members who attend consistently on a weekly basis.

7.  Dakotah Pride Adolescent Services - We currently refer youth in need of services to the TREE Program. In the event they would need inpatient services we then provide assistance to see that they are placed in an appropriate program.

8.  SWO Human Service Board - This committee meets monthly to review the SWO Health Programs. We met to discuss planning for a New Treatment Center. Dakotah Pride is planning to meet in the near future to work on ideas for funding, location, etc. Potential site to consider is the Old IHS Property in Sisseton. Expansion would include a possible 24 bed -open ended capacity. Additional positions would include a Clinical Supervisor; a fulltime Nurse; a Mental Health Social Worker; additional CD Counselors and CD Technicians. During the March 2019 Tribal Council Meeting this topic was discussed and was tabled to take the matter to the District meetings for further input and discussions.

9.  Staff Updates: Positions open at Dakotah Pride are: Intensive Outpatient CD Counselor; Case Manager; & Maintenance/Transportation Coordinator. Interview dates are scheduled for May 3, 2019 to fill these positions.

Early Childhood Intervention Program

Charnelle Gill, Program Manager Function/Mission Statement:

The Early Childhood Intervention Program provides services to all native children ages 0-5 living on the Lake Traverse Reservation. ECIP's goal is to screen all children enrolled in our program at the appropriate age level. Refer children that show a possible delay or disability to the appropriate agency to be placed on an Individual Family Services Plan or Individual Education Plan according to age. Follow all children referred and placed on plans to provide Intervention services to the families. Provide monthly parent meetings with issues and concerns that affect parents enrolled in our program.

Services Provided:

Intervention: 39 Children were provided interventions

34 Family Liaison visits by Intervention Staff

31 Children Assigned

62 Attempts were made

Tracking:          72 Children were screened by Ages & Stages, Denver or BDI

55 children assigned

Some children screened were not part of the assigned list, due to walk-ins, from

previous months that were due or new intakes.

New Intakes: 12 Children (6 newborns) registered to the program.

ECIP Staff took turns registering the children.

Referrals made during the month:

1.    IFSP/IEP Meetings: many were rescheduled due to school closures/weather

2.    Developmental Delays- Total # 9

3.    Birth to Three Referrals (IFSP) - 2

4.    Northeast Ed Coop-

5.    Midwest Special Coop -

6.    Early Head Start-

7.    Sisseton Preschool - 2

8.    Milbank-

9.    Head Start -

10.  Moody County - 1

Monthly Parent Meeting: Wednesday, April 10th. Financial Management, Mary Barse, ET DEMO Program. This was going to be canceled due impending blizzard, so we had Mary Barse present it as our weekly CNBTV broadcast. Parents were then able to watch the video and stop in our office to pick up the budgeting handouts Mary had available and then we gave them diapers/wipes as their incentive for participating.

Upcoming Parent Meeting - Wednesday, May 22, 2019. First Tooth/First Exam. Importance of early dental care for 0-5 children, Dr. Zimmer, I.H.S dental department.

ANNUAL ECIP SUMMER BASH - SWO Memorial Park, Saturday, June 22, 2019.

ECIP Newsletter for April featuring Dakota Spring words, activity for children- Prepared by Terra Haug, Adm. Assistant.

Tribal Education Department (TED)

Dr. Sherry Johnson.

Mission Statement: It is the mission of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Education Department to provide a comprehensive network of services for quality lifelong learning.

The Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi (WE) project: Focus on their goals: Academic, Attendance, Culture, Behavior, Suicide, School Readiness and Research. The hiring committee hired the Academic/Technology Specialist and Student Services Specialist. We welcome them to the program. We are completing up the school year services and transitioning to the summer program.

Dakotah Language Yukini Project: Dr. Williams-Theisen (part time) and Lisa Forcier have been hired by the hiring committee and are working on the curriculum. They are realigning the process of language learning to more of a natural language acquisition process. The Montessori model of instruction is being utilized as a guideline. The ANA grant has been submitted for consideration for funding. The next grant is being worked on. Brooklyn is supporting all curriculum development. Summer sessions for curriculum are being planned for. Teacher teams need to be recruited.

Truancy: Struggling with the number of attendance concerns. The courts are limited and they have huge numbers of referrals being submitted.

CRCAIH Research: The CRCAIH Tribal Partnership grant support ending it being planned for. Continuation funding is being investigated locally and by the partnership. Heather is developing the fee scale to help offset the budget a little. Heather, I and Sara attended the CRCIAH Research Summit. Sara received the 2019 Community Engaged Research Award for all of her hard work in the area of Research. Congratulations to Sara!! Another huge accomplishment for SWO! Heather and I met with the Sanford leaders in regards to: Additional funding, Sanford staff to keep the Research Partnership together while we seek funding, retaining the CRCIAH brand, Retaining and maintaining the website and its resources, and in general keeping a partnership with tribal research.

Education Codes. Need to draft the requested revisions.

JOM: Planning for the semester end. Reviewing budgets and making plans for next year.

Focus for Next Month:

*Graduations and Ending of the School year

*Summer school planning and educational supports.

*Board meetings for the schools.

*PILC Policy meetings, Full board meeting, and Graduation

*CON Walk through visit and report

*Research Network meeting planning

*Tribal Consultation with all schools

*GPTED meeting

*Area Schools Graduation

*Meetings: YAC, ASTF, TED, ECIP, WE, Budget, JOM,

*CON board meeting and graduation

*Aberdeen Native Graduation Honoring

Ulysses K. Abraham Tribal Elderly Nutrition Center - Betty Jo Kirk, Program Manager

Statement of Services Rendered

Month/Year March 1, 2019 through March 31, 2019

Number of Service Days 11

Units of Service Provided            349

There has been no update on the planned review by the Administration for Children and Families, Community Service Block grant. The biggest expense categories for the Elder Nutrition program is food, electric, and Fuel, Inc. This is followed by the vehicle and maintenance costs. I am working to complete FY20 budgets by the May 13, 2019, deadline.

We have experienced some pretty harsh winter days...that blocked roads, brought down lines and some flooding made roads unpassable. The program is having a "Recognition Dinner on May 31st from 5 pm to 8 pm for linemen and road crews. They will be able to bring one guest. Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson will welcome the guests with an introduction from Jim Pearson. The program will ask Councilman Milton Own to give the meal blessing.

477/Employment Training Service Center

Elias Mendoza, Program Director

For the (9) nine services provided under the 477 program, 157 families and 42 individuals were served with grant funds.

Although we experienced 7 full days of weather related closures, this had no impact on services. In addition to myself, Leona I. and Chrissy H. attended the Tribal Management Institute - CCDF (Child Care Development Fund) in Kansas City, MO. The conference was week long and offered numerous breakout sessions which we spilt up in going to amongst ourselves. The overall topics covered during the plenary sessions were related to organizational structure and the role of tribal government. We covered business conduct which included practice of ethical behavior, conflict of interest, fraud and risk assessment and oversight of internal controls and security. I am pleased and confident that I was able to gather information, network amongst my peers and bring back pertinent information to build upon our existing grant.

We are still in the preliminary stages of securing modules for the daycare center. Just recently we obtained a use permit of the existing land to either put modules or renovate the existing daycare.

The following is a breakdown by service provided:

TANF - Amy Wright, Case Manager

For the month of March the TANF program had 14 active Single Parent Cases and did payments for those cases. We had 91 active Relative/Caretaker cases with a total active cases together 105.

There were eleven TANF appointments scheduled for March. Four came as scheduled. Out of the four two were eligible. The other two did not have all documents needed for the application and would need more time to get their information together. Seven of the people that made appointments did not come in as scheduled. Out of the seven people two of them did call to reschedule for April.

Other than my seeing my TANF clients through-out the month I helped twenty-two get applications for our programs that we offer: Employment Assistance, Daycare, and GED applications.

Employment Assistance, Classroom Training, Adult Work Experience - Bessy J., Case Manager:

During the month of March the program has 3 that participants that are full-time students. 1 CRT participant received car repair. There are four work experience participants that are still in their training periods with one receiving assistance for work related clothing. Employment assistance had 7 applications with 2 being approved and processed with different support services being such as vehicle repair, gaming license reimbursement, work related clothing and first month's rent and deposit, two were denied due to time frame and three are still incomplete and are still waiting to be completed by applicant. I did refer some to NESDCAP for assistance with electricity bills and fuel assistance questions and applications as the program does not assist with fuel assistance.

Summer Youth Work Experience, Childcare - Chrissy H., 477 Data Specialist/Case Manager

Currently have 3 local daycares licensed with the tribe: (Little Steps Daycare, Lori Shultz and Westside Afterschool Program)

Kids assisted - 18

Families assisted - 13

2 families eligible

Assisted 10 random people with applications

Reimbursements paid to Daycares - $3,498.00

March 6th I created a new Childcare attendance sheet for all of the daycares as the current one which was questioned by finance office was very outdated by several years.

I was given the opportunity to attend the Tribal Management Institute for Childcare during March 18-22nd. It was a good learning experience to learn/ help other tribes with Childcare.

I also learned a few tips on "Leadership", which is about "Service". Empowering others through example and action, building trust through communication, honesty, encourage, guide and support. Setting an example that is worthy of respect & trust, in order to do this we need more community involvement & feedback. We will need to collaborate with other tribal programs, especially the ones that are consistently working with children and families.

Adult Education, GED, Financial Literacy - Mary B., Adult Education Coordinator/Financial Literacy Instructor

GED program

Currently 21 enrolled students.

*Ages 18-25: 14

*Ages 25-30: 4

*Ages 30-40: 3

All Students work either in the classroom setting or from another location that is suitable to their

own personal situation. We are able to track students through the AZTEC system which they use.

GED students on TANF: 2 Students

GED students referred to Vocational Rehabilitation: 0 new referrals

GED Completions this month: 1 Completions

GED Official Tests: 2

GED Practice Tests: 8

During the month we had 2-3 students actually use the bus transport and it went very well. Continuing this service for our participants is something I personally suggest.

Adult Education Classes

Career Pillars: 0 Enrolled 0 Completed

Mindset 1 Enrolled 0 Complete

Basic Computers 0 Enrolled 0 Completed

Financial Literacy 2 Completed One on One Class

Adult Education Classes

Career Pillars: 2 Enrolled 1 Completed

Mindset 1 Enrolled 1 Complete

Basic Computers 0 Enrolled 0 Completed

Financial Literacy 4 Completed One on One Class

"Little Steps" Daycare

Leona Iyarpeya, Director

Number of staff:

7 Full-time Childcare Workers

3 Temp Childcare Workers, the Cook, the assistant director and director.

Number of Children in Enrolled:

39 Full-time

4 ET/Demo

Number of tribal employees:

37

Number of non-tribal employees:

4 (IHS, Coteau Des Prairies, BIA, Tiospa Zina)

Number attending SWC:           1

Number receiving state subsidy:  7

Number receiving tribal subsidy: 11

This month at Little Steps we have been working on the letter H. The children worked on learning the numbers 7 and 8, we worked on the shape oval (witkamibe) as we have been making Easter eggs (Wi'tka) and bunnies with them and the color for the month was white and pink (ska and gitka). We have continued teaching the children the dakotah words for the numbers, shape and colors for the month. We have been teaching the children about the changes we will see outside now that it is spring. The children from the preschool and toddler classrooms were able to participate in the Head Start's Earth Day walk. Jessica Evenson from South Dakota Birth to Three program screened all the children that are 0-36 months, proud to say that none of the children screened had any delays. Jessica said that this is the first time she came into a daycare setting and didn't find any delays, and that the staff here are doing a great job making sure that the children development needs are being meet. We will continue to have our priority to make sure our little ones are growing and learning every day. Iha?pi ?ik?istina "Little Steps" Daycare had three parents involved in the fundraising efforts, to go towards new outside play equipment. I met briefly with Derrick McCauley about working with him to get the children here at Iha?pi ?ik?istina "Little Steps" Daycare a new playground, and we are currently on his list to receive one within the next year. The program income for the month of April is going to be lower than any normal month, as we were closed so that the staff were able to get in their 21 hours of training needed to maintain our state license and also due to the winter weather closure and Easter holiday. Excited for the warm spring weather.

Food Distribution Program

Mark Thompson Sr., Manager

Function/Mission Statement:

The Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR) is administered at the Federal level by the Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

We provide food assistance to income eligible families in the Roberts, Day and Marshall Counties; also assist tribal members in the other surrounding counties.

Each month participating households receive a food package to help them maintain a nutritionally balanced diet.

Data for the month (how your services contributed to the community you serve).

April participation was 570 individuals and 235 households.

Our participation numbers went up from last month slightly, due to the nice weather.

We are currently operating on a Continuing Resolution from our granting agency.

We did receive our draw down funding through the month of April.

Program Name: Generation Indigenous (Gen-I) - Sharon Morey, Program Manager

Mission Statement: Promote positive American Indian youth development and family engagement through the implementation of early intervention strategies to reduce the risk factors for suicidal behavior and substance abuse.

Goal 1: Implement evidence-based and practice-based approaches to build resiliency, promote positive development, and increase self-sufficiency behaviors among Native youth.

Goal 2: Promote family engagement

Goal 3: Increase access to prevention activities for youth to prevent methamphetamine use and other substance use disorders that contribute to suicidal behaviors, in culturally appropriate ways.

Goal 4: Hire additional behavioral health staff.

Sisseton-Wahpeton Head Start and Early Head Start

Lynn Halbert, Director

OUR PHILOSOPHY: Children are sacred. They are valued and respected; and viewed as strong, competent, and capable of understanding the most important part of living on this Earth... the spiritual nature of life.

Head Start is a federally funded program with the goal of promoting school readiness by enhancing social and cognitive development and through assorted educational, health, nutrition, social, and family support services. Each of the Head Start and Early Head Start centers provides Teaching Strategies as their source of curriculum ages 0-5.

We service 134 Head Start Student in Agency Village, 20 Head Start Students at Enemy Swim Head Start and 40 Early Head Start Students in Agency Village. This summer we will have three classrooms open at Head Start west for ages 4-5 and one classroom at Enemy Swim Head Start. Goals: 1. Behavior-Mental Health 2. School Readiness - Attendance and Parent Involvement 3. Dakotah Language and Culture.

Monthly Report for April 2019:

Now that the snow is gone we can get back on track. Teaching staff attended the South Dakota Early Childhood Annual Conference in Pierre, SD from April 3-6. Family fun night for Head Start had 11 parents and 12 children and 12 staff participate. EHS had 5 participants due to teacher shortage. Parents participated in Easter and Spring related activities.

The snow that we received this last go around was heavy, Landon had a hard time removing the snow from the parking lots and borrow equipment from another program to get our driveway cleaned. When this snow melted it created flooding in Early Head Start kitchen and storage area, I notified Arnold about this situation.

We are able to have Dakotah languages classes again every Monday, alternating with Enemy Swim Head and Head Start middle building. I have been holding culture/outfit making classes every Wednesday at 5:00 p.m. in middle building.

Linda Dibrito was here April 24-25 our behavior checklist needs to be more, need a research tool. Linda held classroom observations with Angel R.

Aaron Theno was here working on all our computers and laptops. We still have the Cromebooks at I.T., these will not communicate with our programs for Teaching Strategy, TS said they would have these programs updated to a windows program but that has not come through. Almost all our computers need to be replaced. Most are old, slow and out of date.

Completed the job description for Mental Health Professional Linda reviewed it with our Head Start managers, next working on contract.

We had a Coalition meeting with Amber Letcher, Ann Michelle, Sherry J., Angel R., Winona N. Rachelle Busmann via telephone conference. We worked on a Logic Model we worked on outcomes 1st was wellness-healthy outcomes, physicals, parent involvement to get this into HS, we discussed DIAL, MAPS and Brigance. 2nd communication to the community as a whole, create an article once a month. 3rd Early Childhood Initiatives - Read to your kids, focus on domains for each month, health and behaviors.

We have transitions that will be taking place for those who will be entering kindergarten. Their celebration will be on May 19th at Tiospa Zina, Enemy Swim Celebration will be held on 16th at 11:00 a.m.

Robin Brocato will be here May 22-23, she will be meeting with Tribal Council

Policy Council is planning a retreat for May 24-26 to work on our next 5-year continuation grant for Head Start and Early Head Start.

CACFP Financial Report: No Report at this time

HEALTH: No report at this time

EHS has 12 children on waitlist. HS has 8 on waitlist 6 of those are over income. One is a previous student, also 2 applications that are incomplete.

New Employees:

HEAD START

K. A. - 4/1/19

A. W. - 4/1/19 - Resigned 4/26/19

J. C. 4/1/19 - Declined position

Will Sub until May

EARLY HEAD START

J. B. hired 4/1/19

Vacancies:

Heads Start needs: Bus Driver/Custodian -1, Teacher aide (4), Teacher (1) Teacher Aide/Bus

Monitor - 1, Dakotah Language Specialist - 1, Substitutes

Early Head Start Needs: Teacher -2 & Teacher aid

Program Name: Higher Education Program

Janel Williams, Program Manager

Mission Statement:

The mission of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Higher Education Program is to provide educational

benefits to members of the Tribe, demonstration of cultural awareness that will encourage the Oyate to make post-secondary education a lifelong goal.

The undergraduate "Tuition Reimbursement" award is $56/credit hour earned and graduate level is awarded at $75/credit hour earned with the letter grade of at least a "C" grade or better.

Program Summary: During the month of April 2019, the program awarded a total of 10 payments to 6 undergraduate and 3 graduate level students which include the semester(s) fall 2018 and spring 2019. The program also awarded one diploma incentive, this incentive requires a copy of the diploma and the final transcript.

Bachelor- Sports, Recreation Management (off reservation), employed

The program will award the spring grade incentive until July 28 and due to the weather delays and closures the program has extended the deadline date for the fall semester (February 28) and the spring graduate incentive to April 15.

Project Indigenous LAUNCH (Linking Actions for Unmet Needs in Children's Health)

SAMHSA grant - April Eastman, Program Manager.

Function/Mission Statement: The aim is to improve the wellness of children 0-8 years of age by supporting the families and caregivers who are raising children. The goal is for children to thrive in safe, supportive environments and enter school ready to learn and succeed. To achieve this goal, SWO Project Indigenous LAUNCH plans to expand and enhance home visiting capacities through replication of the Family Spirit Program developed by Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health and to implement the Infant/Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation model to support program staff and caregivers of young children. It will also partner with the Dakotah Language Institute to adapt the curriculum and integrate language and culture throughout the project. The project will promote linkages between health, mental health, and early childhood programs.

Data for the month (this data should show how your services contributed to the community you serve).

1.  Grant Reports submitted: IPP 2nd quarter data submitted March 27, 2019. Deadline April 30, 2019.

2.  The Annual Goals and Budget report was approved on April 23, 2019 by the Government Project Officer, Dr. Edmund.

3.  LAUNCH Survey administered at the Honor Every Woman health event on 4/17/19. Thirty seven surveys were returned. The results show that most people know about Head Start and Early Childhood Intervention Program, but not much about the many other programs that serve children in our area. The data also show that community members see mental/behavioral health for kids as a gap, and they are the most concerned about the effects of drugs and suicide on kids today.

4.  LAUNCH Informational Booth. On April 17, 2019 the Community Coordinator handed out 48 Brochures to potential clients.

Work In-Progress:

1.  Year 1, Version 5 budget modification. We have salary savings due to the vacancy in the YCWBH Specialist position. We would like to reallocate funding to increase the IECHMC contract amount.

2.  Community Needs and Readiness Assessment (CNRA) due May 31st, 2019. LAUNCH is working with Tribal MIECHV to conduct the CNRA on the Lake Traverse Reservation.

3.  Parent Partner Invitation for Proposal. Deadline: April 22, 2019. The function of the Parent Partner is for a community member to inform the work of the project, assist with conducting outreach and engagement efforts with families, and participate in leadership and capacity building opportunities. Bids will be open on 4/29/19 (tentative date).

4.  IECMH Consultant - on-going. The IFP is advertised open until filled. Sara Decoteau and I have had on-going conversations with a qualified individual who plans on submitting a proposal for the scope of work.

5.  Year 2 budget due in May.

6.  SWODLI MOA; graphic design services and curriculum.

7.  Young Child Wellness Advisory Group: We have 6 MOA's that are in review with the Legal Department. They include CHE, ECIP, Healthy Start, Dakotah Pride, SWO Head Start, Project WE (Education Department).

8.  Family Spirit: pre-training to begin bi-weekly phone meetings on April 29, 2019.

9.  LAUNCH Strategic Plan. The Data Specialist has started work drafting the Strategic Plan.

10. Recruited 5 new members to the Young Child Wellness Advisory Group, the second meeting will be on the 29th of April to gain input and guidance from the community.

Tribal Opioid Response Project (SAMHSA)

Sara DeCoteau, Project Director.

PURPOSE: To increase Tribal Government's public health capacity to respond to the national opioid abuse and overdose crisis through development and implementation of collaborative prevention, treatment, and recovery support services for Tribal citizens diagnosed with Opioid Use Disorder (OUD).

Collaboration for collective impact on the SWO Health Plan (2016 - 2020) was promoted through attendance of First 1,000 Days Interagency Forum (4/18), Community Safety Team (4/19), and Behavioral Health Interagency Team (4/25) meetings this month. TOR's strategic action plan has been annexed to the Health Plan.

Access to opioid reversal agents for the Oyate has been an initiative of the Community Safety Team since March 2018 when the Indian Health Service first issued Indian Health Manual, Part 3 - Professional Services, Chapter 35. The Tribe was advised that, as a prerequisite to having a Naloxone Access Agreement with IHS, the Tribe must first have a Good Samaritan law. The First Responder and Good Samaritan Immunity Code1 was adopted by Tribal Council on 3/19/19. Now the actual Naloxone Access Agreement can be put into place. Once IHS officially sends the Agreement for signature, it can be presented to the Tribal Council for approval. The first Agreement is with SWO Law Enforcement, but there can be additional Agreements with other first responder entities. Once it is place, the TOR staff will be available to assist the IHS Pharmacists in training first responders in our workforce.

Wacinyan Tipi (House of Hope)

Yolanda Starr, Program Manager

Mission Statement:

To restore the basic integrity and dignity of Dakota values of each individual who passes through our doors by operating a shelter and developing a plan to enable them to regain their social, physical, emotional and spiritual values.

Program Manager - Yolanda Starr - 605-698-2020 - YolandaS@swo-nsn.gov

Resident Assistants - 1 Full Time

1 Full Time

1 Part Time

Resident Volunteers - 3

Current Residents - Adults 23 and 18 Children

April Applications - Adults - 9 and 3 Children

SWO Youth Department

Derrick McCauley, Manager

Mission Statement: "We are here to inspire, we are here to encourage, but most importantly we are here to guide our youth through structured physical activities, cultural awareness, community involvement and developing life skills"

Monthly Activities: Sports Academy, Life Talks, Girls Club, Book Club, Model Cars, Robotics, Teen Art, Pink Power Club, Fitness, Arts/Crafts, Monday/Wednesday/Friday meals.

April Events: 04/02 Bumblebee Movie, 04/07 WrestleMania event, 04/13 Youth Lock-In Monthly Attendance: 802 (602 5-12yr) (200 Teens)

Monthly Reporting: April has always been a transition month in terms of the weather changing and the community spending more time outside. There has been an increase in attendance at the Veterans Memorial Youth Center from 777 in March to 802 in April. This might be due to the fact that we have installed two new portable hoops and added another meal day for the youth during the week. As I stated earlier about transition April becomes the planning month for the youth department for the upcoming summer schedule to set a foundation to what we hope to be the best summer yet.

The youth showed great community involvement this month as we had around 19 youth participate in filling sand bags for the Emergency management team. They filled around 500 bags to be distributed to local tribal members during the watery season. SWO Youth council hosted its very first all night lock-in on April 13th. There was a total of 72 youth that attended the lock-in which included: motivational power hour, physical activity tournaments, and Dance contest, one on one mentoring from VMYC staff members. In a successful event, no one left the premise during event.

This month has been somewhat relaxing so there isn't a lot to report on other than increased numbers and more FOOD.

Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Youth and Family TREE

SWO Behavioral Health - Shobi Zetina, Director.

PURPOSE: Provide a comprehensive, family-centered, trauma informed, evidence-based, coordination and integrated outpatient system of care including early intervention and recovery support services to meet the complex needs of adolescent and transitional age American Indian youth and their families/primary caregiver with SUD and/or co-occurring mental disorders.

GOAL: 1) Enhance, Expand and provide comprehensive services to 50 underserved American Indian adolescents and transitional aged youth and their families/primary caregivers with SUD and/or co-occurring mental disorders. 2) Provide Tobacco Prevention and Intervention 3) Provide treatment to pregnant mothers with Substance Use Disorders, 4) Continue to provide Evidence based services and Practice (EBSPs).

Home Health Care and Elderly Affairs

Bonnie Thompson, Director.

Our medical transportation is funded by Indian Health in Aberdeen, SD. Both elderly and non-elderly may receive assistance, providing they are not on Medicaid and enrolled here also a referral from Indian Health. The board meets every second Monday of every month and the elderly protection team meets every third Wednesday of the month. There is monies available for glasses, this is for the elders 55 years and older. They may receive $140.00 each appointments can be at Indian Health optometry Sisseton, SD at 742-3793 or Dr. Grimsrud.

For the month of April 2019 there were 1 deceased elder.

Mayuetca Day Treatment Program

Skyman Redday, Manager.

Mission Statement:

To improve the physical, spiritual, emotional, mental and behavioral health of the tribal members effected with substance use disorders and his/her family through, an integral holistic system based on a balanced program of patient care through education counseling, group therapy and spiritual guidance.

Vision:

The SWO tribal member will be resilient, sustainable, healthy and productive for the community.

Activities:

We have A.A. meetings from 12-1 Monday, Wednesday and Friday, this is open to the public, we have been seeing around 6-7 community members come for these meetings.

SWO Diabetes Center

Sara Lincoln, Director.

Program Staff:

Sara Lincoln, Program Manager

Pauline White Thunder, Administrative Assistant

Natasha Renville, Incentives Coordinator

Danielle Grey, DPP Coordinator

Ashley Lee, Fitness Trainer

Chelsey Owen, Outreach

Tyler Bellonger, Fitness Room Attendant

Glenn Fineday, Trainer/Outreach

The SWO SDPI Program's mission is to implement programs and to work with other health programs to treat and prevent diabetes complications and prevent/manage cardiovascular diseases on the Lake Traverse Reservation. The purpose of the SWO Fitness and Diabetes Programs is to educate and empower people in our community to be proactive in improving their personal fitness and health levels.

Our Goals for respective Grants:

Special Diabetes Program for Indians (SDPI): Funding Cycle January 2019-December 2019

SDPI Outcomes System(SOS): Target is IHS eligible participant's that live on the Lake Traverse Reservation with a BMI greater than 25 with a Pre-Diabetes Diagnosis and utilize the Diabetes Center and/or IHS.

GOAL: 244

10/244

Health Screening: We provide a health screening, which entails Blood Glucose, Blood Pressure, BMI, Height, Weight, Waist Circumference, A1c, and Body Mass.

GOAL: 500

321/500

Community Events: This goal includes all outreach we provide at health fairs, general council, district days, and/or elderly days.

GOAL: 1500

104/1500

Monthly Activities: This goal includes all our monthly activities, walk/run, gardening, elder games, cornhole tournaments, iron man, district challenge, any other event we add to our monthly activities.

GOAL: 1500

92/1500

AstraZeneca: Funding Cycle November 2018-December 2019

Community Outreach: Outreach to get out information about cardiovascular disease. (UNDUPLICATED PARTICIPANTS)

GOAL: 1000

Tracked Participant's: Monitor and track all the information for the health screening for 3-6 months.

GOAL: 200

Activities Planned for Diabetes Center in May: Gardening Day and 100 Miles in May Manager Reports: Monthly Report (ongoing)

Grants of Interest:  Good Health & Wellness

Due: May 15, 2019

Resolution Passed on 4/24/19 for grant submission

Draft Budget Completed

April Events: Workout Challenge had 31 people signed up, 6 completed 18 or more personalized workouts in April. There were numerous participant's that barely missed the 18 workouts. We did a total of 231 workouts between 31 people in the challenge.

SWO Food Pantry

Geno Locke, Manager Mission Statement: Serve the SWO tribal members with food boxes as needed. Goals met this month:

1.  Feeding South Dakota delivered on 4/15/19 with Food Supply.

2.  Rapid City delivered there Donation on 4/23/19 for Food Pantry

3.  For Walmart Donated Produce there was 98 SWO Tribal Member That sign up.

4.  For SWO members that sign up for Food Pantry Totaling 229 SWO Tribal Families Elderly-110 Children-444 Adults-369 Total-923

5.  On 4/23/19 went and talk with Pastor Vern Donnell about helping with the 501c3 for Food Pantry. He said no meeting due to the weather but soon as they do have the meeting. He will get back to let me know and said he didn't think it was no problem with

6.  Food Pantry no action needed

Health Services Administration

Sara Decoteau, Director.

Function/Mission Statement: Administer SWO's Indian Health Service Comprehensive Health Care Services Contract (Indian Self-Determination and Educational Assistance Act or "638" IHS Master Contract); implement health initiatives and grants; participate in interagency coordination activities to promote collaboration and collective impact; and plan and develop services that will improve health status, quality, and access to care (SWO Health Plan).

Administrative updates concerning the IHS Master Contract involve budgeting. Version 6 was approved by the Tribal Secretary and processed by the Budget Office to revise the FY/2018 carry-over amounts in two of the accounts: Dakotah Pride Center Third Party and Community Health Representative. In Version 6, Dakotah Pride Center budgeted revenue credited to the Third Party Account (423) from the beginning of the fiscal year through March 31, 2019. In addition, there were reprogramming changes in various accounts. The Master Contract programs are engaged in FY/2020 budgeting, using the recurring base amount (not including Indirect Costs). Health Administration modified the budget template with the recurring base amount for each fund on 4/10 and will submit to the SWO Budget Office 5/13.

Health Administration administers the Master Contract Purchased Referred Care account for the Children's Orthodontics Program. We have been reconciling our database in conjunction with transition of a large number of participants to a different provider, occurring when one provider sold his practice to another. We reimbursed the fiscal intermediary (Delta Dental of South Dakota), for claims paid in March. Thirty-one children have been approved for the Orthodontics program this fiscal year, and is obligated for their treatment. Ten children completed treatment since October 1, 2018. Twenty-four first payments and twenty second payments were reimbursed to Delta Dental. Currently, we have 139 children who are in some phase of treatment or waiting to start treatment. During our reconciliation process we verified several patients completed or discontinued treatment; therefore, we were able to de-obligate the funding set aside for them in order to serve more children. Since the program began in 2010, 441 children were approved for services and, so far, 267 have completed treatment.

Health Administration administers the Master Contract Purchased Referred Care account used to reimburse the Tribal Elderly Affairs Program for non-emergency medical transportation assistance payments provided to Tribal members referred by the Sisseton Indian Health Service. For March, the payment was for 177 referrals in March. The year-to-date reimbursement is for 1,499 referrals.

Health Administration has oversight in start-up of two new grants funded through Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA): SWO Indigenous LAUNCH and Tribal Opioid Response. Since there are separate reports prepared for TOR and LAUNCH, no updates will be provided here. We are also partnering with Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's Health Board to implement the Tribal Maternal Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting (T-MIECHV) project, funded by the Administration for Children and Families. GPTCHB is the grantee, and the Lake Traverse Reservation is where the services will be implemented. T-MIECHV and LAUNCH are working in tandem to conduct a Community Needs and Readiness Assessment (CRNA), which is intense. The funding agency is planning a three-day onsite visit May 14-16 to provide technical assistance and monitoring. The first two days' meeting will take place at the Tribal Office. There will be a tour of several young child wellness programs that serve Tribal families on the 15th. Two from the ACF team will attend the First 1,000 Days Initiative Interagency meeting on the 16th. We are in the process of developing a more usable and updated Young Child Wellness Resource Directory for the benefit of agencies and the public. The First 1,000 Days Interagency Forum website is offline due to problems in getting the billing information changed, and we are working to resolve the issues. The Health Coordinator plans to attend the Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health Summit at the Sanford Research Center in Sioux Falls April 30 to receive the Community Engaged Research Award, having been nominated by colleagues at South Dakota State University.

Health Administration participates in a number of teams to coordinate efforts and achieve collective impact. In April, the following groups met: Health Career Student Extern Task Force (4/5), Diabetes Team (4/10), First 1,000 Days Initiative Interagency Forum (4/18), Community Safety Team (4/19), Early Childhood Caries Prevention Collaborative (4/24), Behavioral Health interagency Team (4/25), and young Child Wellness Advisory Board (4/29). The Interagency Inhome Care Team and Adults Services Task Force meetings scheduled 4/11 were cancelled due to the Spring blizzard. An Emergency Management team meeting is being planned for May 8 to debrief and plan for improved communication and coordination for patients with serious medical conditions.

Health Administration coordinates the SWO Health / Tribal Action Plan (2016-2020) to achieve collective impact on 15 priority initiatives. The Health Coordinator is the Lead for #4 (First 1,000 Days) and #12 (Grant Writing). The LAUNCH and T-MIECHV grants come out of the First 1,000 Days Initiative. In conjunction with First 1,000 Days, the Health Coordinator was asked by the Region VIII Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Director to participate in a panel presentation at the "Family Recovery Pathways: Addiction. Parenting. And Implications for Practice" conference in Sioux Falls scheduled May 6.

With our Health Plan Grant Writing initiative, we are currently working on two grant applications. We have been waiting since last November for the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to come out from the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education from the Vocational Rehabilitation Service Projects for American Indians with Disabilities grant. Since we have invested in developing of a proposal, anticipating the FOA, it is worrisome it's not been posted. The proposed Voc Rehab proposal will request funding per year for five years (FY/2020 through 2024) to assist tribal members with disabilities obtain and maintain high quality employment that will increase opportunities for self-sufficiency. If funded, it will be administered by the SWO Employment Training Center. Secondly, we are working on a Good Health and Wellness in Indian Country Cooperative Agreement proposal to expand services at the Diabetes Center. The application is due May 15, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is the funding agency. We plan for per year for five years (from September 30, 2019 to September 29, 2024) for a project that will implement strategies and activities to increase physical activity, reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes, and reduce the prevalence of high blood pressure and high blood cholesterol.

The Health Plan Stakeholders' Work Group, which is convened every-other-month, is scheduled May 20, during which time the Early Childhood Tooth Cavities Prevention Initiative (tabled at the March meeting) and Planning & Development initiatives will be reviewed. We are in the fourth year of the five-year SWO Health Plan span.

Native Connection Behavioral Health

Dr. Gail Mason, Director

PURPOSE: To prevent and reduce suicidal behavior and substance abuse, reduce the impact of trauma, and promote mental health among American Indian young people up to and including age 24 through the collaboration of new and existing programming.

Accomplishments this Month:

1.  Dr. Mason continues to respond to Coteau de Prairie Community Hospital through Consultation with Emergency Department personnel. The paperwork to obtain full time, regular privileges has been turned in and until the paperwork is approved Dr. Mason will be on consultation status. Dr. Mason initiates crisis services and assesses the individual for hospitalization.

2.  There are 8 people trained who answers the Crisis phone 24/7.

Throughout the month of April there have been 42 contacts, Crisis Calls and Facebook Contacts and 30 Text from Tribal Members demonstrating suicidal behavior or family members of those who have attempted or completed suicide. In addition, there were 34 clients who walked into the SWO Behavioral Health office for services. The Roberts County Jail called for assessments on 5 tribal members for Mental Health Assessments to remove them from Mental Health Holds Each of the tribal members were interviewed by a licensed therapist and placed on a plan for treatment and follow-up.

Plans for April 2019:

1.  Continue to Post Crisis line information, posters and call cards, at all district offices, tribal programs, businesses, and schools and check on those posters that have been up for needed tear off numbers.

2.  Work with the Behavioral Health Interagency Team to manage the Suicide Prevention Task Force. Continue to assume the role of "Co-Facilitator" for the Behavioral Health Interagency Team.

3.  Participate in the Youth Mental Awareness month on May 3, 2019 with an information table in the Rotunda.

4.  Continue work on a clear and distinct plan for on call personnel for Law enforcement in relationship to mental health issues.

5.  Work on data for 2018 and uploading it into SPARS

SWO Domestic Violence Prevention Initiative

Patricia Roth, Health Specialist

Function/Mission Statement:

To promote and sustain the quality of life, integrity and empowerment of tribal members by planning, developing and providing health care services consistent with the behavioral, physical, cultural and spiritual values of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation.

Objective: Expand crisis intervention, counseling, advocacy, behavioral health and case management services to victims of domestic and sexual violence.

*Thirteen total clients seen in April 2019. Services provided individual and group counseling, community outreach providing DBT/conflict resolution, grief group, and women's group therapy.

*Weekly collaborative meetings working with Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault (DVSA) to create coordinated case management for victims.

Objective: Foster coalitions and networks to improve coordination and collaboration among victim service providers, health care providers, and other responders

*Weekly DVSA Collaborative meetings being held, with 4 programs actively participating.

o   Working on universal referral form, coordinated case management, and Chapter 52 updates.

o   Coordinating with SWO Youth Department to plan Teen Dating Violence Awareness event.

o   May is National MMIW month. DVSA collaborative is organizing event to raise awareness for MMIW.

Objective: Promote community education for adults and youth on domestic and sexual violence

DVSA collaboration planning event to bring Lenny Hayes Company to present on Bullying prevention, and sexual assault awareness. Dates and location to be announced.

SWO Tribal Law Enforcement public statement  --

Q&A concerning suspected illegal drug use

Agency Village, SD – May 7, 2019 – Here are questions Law Enforcement officers are usually asked in reference to drugs.

 

How do you know if a house is selling or using drugs?

 

Watch for a lot of foot traffic people coming and going throughout the day. These people only stay for a few minutes or less. Let's be honest for every drug user and dealer out there someone in the community knows what they are doing, we live in a small community. If a drug user is going to a house regularly chances are they are selling and doing drugs at that house. For Law Enforcement we have the tough part. We have to follow laws and rules to prove that drug use is happening and dealings are going on in a house. That is why all information we receive is critical for us. There's a term out there snitches are bitches. Since when as a human being in any culture looked down upon for wanting to live in a neighborhood where they don't have to worry about drugs and crime in their community. My understanding is that good communities care, help and look after each other. The bad people were excluded and punished from the communities. So, somehow this idea got turned around in our culture and society. We are protecting the evil people and not helping the victims and the innocent people in the communities.

Vehicle traffic, if cars are stopping at a house throughout the day and someone runs in the house and only stays for a few seconds or minutes and leaves. Or if someone comes out and hands or leans into a car window for a few seconds and the vehicle leaves. Chances are they are selling drugs at that house. Getting the License plates help us and if you can identify the people in the cars also help. When you start to see vehicles with out of state plates or never seen a car around before start to take a mental note or write down the license plate for us. You can turn that information into Law Enforcement anytime.

Let's not kid ourselves. People that sell will run out of drugs. At that time traffic will be less until they resupply. When they do the traffic will pick up again. Watch for patterns first of the month, the 10th of the month, 15th of the month and when people have money and local paydays.

A lot of the time only one person is working in the house and the drugs seller can't or won't get a job. But do you wonder where they get their money to drive around all the time and afford nice things. Or maybe neither one the people work. Don't kid yourself we have had report on people selling drugs at work also.

 

What to note when you suspect drug dealing and drug use at a home?

 

You should always note the Day of the week and the time. If you can get license plate numbers from the vehicles that show up, that helps us tremendously. Law Enforcement can run the license plate to find out who's car it is. That's when we can run that person's background check and see if they been arrested for drugs before. Trust me chances are they have. This goes for the back roads also if you run across two vehicle parked next to each other get the license plates. We all have cell phones take a picture of the car and the person. Let them know you know what they are doing. Drug deals happen quickly. Especially if you live on a backroad and you never seen vehicles on it before. Trust me drug dealers and user are always adjusting to law enforcement activities. If you can't get a license plate note the description of the vehicle and people in the vehicle or if you know them.

We do have People that sell drugs for other people so it might be hard to know if they are selling drugs or using drugs in the home. But continue to be vigilant and trust your gut feeling. Because don't assume that Law Enforcement can be everywhere and know who all the drug dealers and users are. It starts with you the people who want safe neighborhoods. If it's your family member then get them help talk to them about your concerns or you may have to confront them. You're going to be lied to over and over and over again by the user. Only their actions can be trusted if they want to get help. We hear the struggles with that all the time. We have laws and ordinances that help and assist you but to be honest unless they want the help themselves treatment won't work. People say jail doesn't work either that true but at least they are off the Drugs for now. When the courts and Law Enforcement have to get involved. They are going to hate you for a little while but in the end they are going to love you for caring and loving them. Tough Love.

 

Remember ~ Take Photos. Take down the plate number. Remember the vehicle description. Call it in to 605- 698-7661.

Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community honors Kurt BlueDog legal career

The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community honored its longtime General Legal Counsel Kurt BlueDog at a dinner at Mystic Lake Center Friday, May 3rd, 2019.

Kurt BlueDog, Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal member of Toka Nuwan District, served in that position from 1992 until retiring this year.

Words from the invitation to a "dinner honoring the legal career of Kurt V. BlueDog":

Kurt's distinguished career includes representing federally recognized Indians tribes, including his own tribe, the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, as well as many Native American organizations.

Kurt has always been and remains a steadfast advocate for tribal sovereignty and strengthening tribes through law and economic development.

Kurt has been a longtime member of the National Indian Gaming Association Board of Directors and also serves as Vice-Chairman of the Native American Rights Fund (NARF) Board of Directors.

We extend our thanks to Kurt BlueDog for his service to the United States of America as an officer in the United States Army and for his inspired work as an attorney at law and General Legal Counsel to the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community.

*****

MC for the evening was William "Willie" Hardacker, former attorney at BlueDog Law and Shakopee's current General Legal Counsel.

Business Council Chairman Charles R. Vig spoke on behalf of the SMSC, and along with Vice-Chairman Keith Anderson and Secretary-Treasurer Rebecca Crooks-Stratton, presented Kurt with a star quilt.

Ernie Stevens, Chairman, and fellow NIGA Board members were present for the occasion.

They presented Kurt with a "lifetime of achievement" award.

Interim SWO Chairman Verlyn Beaudreau, Buffalo Lake District Councilman Louie Johnson, Big Coulee District Councilwoman Lisa Jackson, Enemy Swim District Councilwoman Cheryl Owen, and Heipa District Councilman Winfield Rondell Jr. presented Kurt with a decorated buffalo head. The buffalo was taken from the Tribe's herd.

Also present were former Council members and members of the SWO legal office.

Sisseton BIA Superintendent and former Tribal Chairman Russell Hawkins was there and spoke on behalf of his step-father Master Sgt. Woodrow W. Keeble.

He talked about Woody's dramatic, larger-than-life actions in the Korean War that led, finally, to his becoming the first Dakota to earn the Medal of Honor – posthumously.

Russell thanked Kurt for his dedicated legal work which made the award of the Medal of Honor possible for his blood relative.

He said that the same strength and blood also "flows" in Kurt.

Speaking and offering prayers were Danny Seaboy and Chief Arvol Looking Horse.

There was a long line of people going forward extending gratitude for Kurt's professional career as well as his friendship and encouragement. There were many former law clerks and novice attorneys who got their start at BlueDog Law, including Greg Paulson, who works for the SWO Tribe.

Also attending were Kurt's wife Violet "Vi," family members, and relatives.

Angela Two Stars named director of AMRA

Minneapolis, MN – May 8, 2019 – Native American Community Development Institute (NACDI) and All My Relations Arts President and CEO Robert Lilligren announces the appointment of Angela Two Stars as the new Director of All My Relations Arts. Angela brings over 10 years of experience as a visual artist, and has broadened her skills as a curator and public artist in the Twin Cities.

Angela is an enrolled member of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate and received her BFA from Kendall College of Art and Design in Grand Rapids, MI in 2017.

"I am incredibly honored for the opportunity to serve the community as Director of All My Relations Arts. My connection with All My Relations Arts has progressed as I began my career as a practicing artist in the 3rd installment of On Fertile Ground at All My Relations Arts. I am excited for this next step in my journey. I am committed to furthering the vision of NACDI by increasing the visibility of American Indian art and providing broad access to quality art exhibitions that promote the historical understanding and contemporary strength of American Indian artists," said Angela.

Angela Two Stars has continued her involvement with All My Relations Arts as Curator of the powerful show "Bring Her Home: Stolen Daughters of Turtle Island" that raises awareness of the issues around missing and murdered Indigenous women (MMIW). Two Stars has also produced Dakota language and cultures public art on the shores of Bde Maka Ska.

Robert Lilligren, shared his excitement for the newest NACDI staff member, "Angela's arts experience, working with Native youth, and curating the past work at All My Relations are important assets that align with NACDI's mission. I am excited to see what her vision, talent and commitment brings to our community and organization."

NACDI Board of Directors Chair, architect Sam Olbekson adds, "We are confident that Angela's vision will continue to help take our arts program to its next level under her leadership."

Two stars will officially start her position as the All My Relations Arts Director, on May 20th, 2019.

NACDI

Native American Community Development Institute (NACDI) is an American Indian community development intermediary organization - the first of its kind in the Twin Cities metropolitan area. NACDI believes all American Indian people have a place, purpose, and a future strengthened by sustainable community development. NACDI's key projects include the development of the American Indian Cultural Corridor, management of All My Relations Gallery, and catalyzing the implementation of the American Indian Community Blueprint.

All My Relations Arts Gallery (AMRA)

Operates the All My Relations Gallery, Minnesota's premiere American Indian owned and operated contemporary fine arts gallery. Situated on Franklin Avenue in Minneapolis, the gallery resides within the heart of the American Indian Cultural Corridor. AMRA serves a very distinct role in NACDI's community development work, providing the public with education about American Indian history, culture, and contemporary experiences through the arts.

SWO Tribe undertakes phase II of its industrial hemp project

Plans have been made and seeds ordered for the next step in the SWO Tribe's foray into industrial hemp production and marketing. In phase II, 40 acres will be planted on Reservation land in North Dakota, and seeds have already been ordered.

From Planning Department Manager LeeAnne TallBear: "The Tribe is in the process of developing hemp codes. There are Tribal members interested in becoming hemp farmers; this is exciting because this is an opportunity for our Tribal members to farm their own land or Tribal lands."

The project is part of the goal of achieving "seed sovereignty," she said.

Here are excerpts from the University of Minnesota feasibility study phase I final report and proposed phase II. This information was provided to Oyate attending the April 18th forum.

Update –

The Planning Department Manager was joined by Jerry Eastman, Realty Manager, and Charlene Miller, Natural Resources/Fish & Wildlife Manager, in Council chambers last Wednesday morning, May 8, to discuss their combined roles in phase II of the hemp study with Tribal Council.

Council was informed that the BIA will not approve the project.

Sisseton BIA Superintendent Russell Hawkins was asked to attend, and he clarified the Bureau's position.

While the SWO had received a $50,000 grant for phase I, the initial feasibility study, Russell has been notified by the central office that until details are worked out for the new, 2018 Farm Bill, the Bureau is unable to put its approval on any tribal hemp project – and that includes SWO phase II.

He emphasized that the BIA "is not an enforcement agency" and while there might be "consequences" from federal law enforcement (US Attorney's office) for tribes going ahead with hemp projects, that would not happen from the Bureau.

He said that he was unable to give advice but if Tribal leaders want to know about possible consequences they should contact the US Attorney.

Russell also said that as soon as a decision is made at the central office he would notify Tribal Executives.

It is possible, he said, that they could get "a green light" to go ahead after details are worked out at the federal level.

There was discussion about why the Tribe could not use the 2014 Farm Bill, which was the basis for the first phase.

Finally, the decision was made to go ahead.

The planting season is fast approaching and seeds need to be planted.

Council voted that the proposed budget, $177,903, be paid from section 7 funds.

SWO Hemp Economic Feasibility Study

Principal Investigators: George Weiblen, Jonathan Wenger, Eric Singsaas, Clemon Dabney and Dean Current.

Prof. Weiblen and colleagues prepared this report on behalf of the University of Minnesota in fulfillment of sponsored project award number 00070638 (31 May 2018 - 31 December 2018).

Rationale

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate (SWO) aims to bring new economic development to its agricultural land and develop a hemp industry around products with substantial value-added market opportunities. The tribe is particularly interested in hemp as a crop alternative to sustain environmental quality and support a healthy community.

Project History

The Native American Business Development Initiative (NABDI) supported a hemp economic feasibility study initiated by the SWO Planning Division in 2017. The University of Minnesota (UMN) partnered with SWO Planning, SWO Natural Resources Division, and Dakota Nation Industries in 2018 to demonstrate the cultivation of fiber hemp on SWO land, to identify markets for hemp fiber, and to recommend value-added hemp product options.

Project Team

Principal Investigator George Weiblen (UMN) oversaw the project team. Dakota Nation Industries CEO Josh Flute was licensed by the North Dakota Department of Agriculture Industrial to participate in its Industrial Hemp Research Program. Research Associate Jonathan Wenger (UMN) coordinated SWO hemp agronomic research with Mr. Flute, SWO Natural Resource Manager Charlene Miller, and Agronomist Burton Johnson (North Dakota State University). Professor Dean Current investigated current production costs and markets. Professor Eric Singsaas examined processing technologies for manufacturing hemp composite materials. Clemon Dabney, a PhD candidate in Plant & Microbial Biology, also assisted the project.

Background

Fiber hemp has a history of cultivation in the Upper Midwest dating from the 19th century. It was cultivated during 1943 in the Minnesota River Valley when the United States Army supported hemp, intended for canvas and cordage. Today, hemp fiber can be processed into a remarkable number of different products including plastics, paper, fiberglass, insulation, cement-bonded composites, geo-textiles, and other fabrics. Hemp stalks are 'decorticated' to separate the pithy core of the stems ('hurd') from the long and strong outer fibers ('bast'). Both fractions have value as they can be used in a number of product applications (Figure 1). Emerging applications range from using fiber hemp to absorb spilled oil to building super capacitors and carbon nanosheets.

The crop value of fiber hemp has not been competitive with that of other Upper Midwestern crops. However, market forces and tariffs have driven down the price of soybean and corn to the point where industrial hemp might be a profitable alternative for farmers. For example, soybean crop gross revenue was projected in 2016 at $653 per acre based on a yield of 71 bushels per acre yield and $9.20 per bushel in 2016 while corn crop gross revenue was projected at $762 per acre based on a yield of 231 bushels per acre yield and $3.30 per bushel (Schnitkey, 2016). With an average raw hemp fiber yield of 3 tons per acre at $200-$250 per ton, projected gross revenue per acre is $600-$750. The SWO Hemp Economic Feasibility Study was motivated by interest in assessing demand for hemp fiber, estimating the investment necessary for a regional processing facility, and exploring markets for value-added products made from hemp fiber composites.

Study Objectives

The objectives of this study were threefold:(1) hemp fiber crop demonstration, (2) market opportunity and economic feasibility, and (3) cost and needs assessment for hemp production, processing and manufacturing.

Hemp Fiber Crop Demonstration

It was important to demonstrate how hemp is cultivated and what it looks like in the field for several reasons. First, social stigma and questions about illegality arise from the close relationship of hemp to its sister plant, marijuana. The demonstration plot was intended to show that hemp can be grown legally in the state of North Dakota, that it is not marijuana and that it does not attract the attention of drug users. Second, it was necessary to demonstrate the feasibility of hemp production on SWO land for tribal members and stakeholders. Thirdly, the demonstration crop provided raw materials (bast fiber and hurd) for future study of hemp-composite materials and markets.

The 2018 SWO hemp cropping project was conducted with a focus on demonstrating production of high quality fiber hemp. A North Dakota Department of Agriculture Industrial Hemp Pilot Program (NDDA-IHPP) license was issued to Joshua Flute, SWO Tribe member and CEO Dakota Nation Industries. Working in consultation with SWO Natural Resources, a five acre site was identified for conducting the demonstration near Havana, North Dakota on SWO Tribal trust land. The site is immediately adjacent to the Coteau des Prairies Lodge with which SWO Natural Resources maintains an excellent working relationship. This location provided a convenient venue for working meetings conducted during the growing season. Physical characteristics of the site that favored its selection were medium textured clay loam soil, ~6% slope, and an inconspicuous location easily accessible from adjacent roadways. Planting seed was obtained by foreign import to the North Dakota State Capitol in Bismarck and transported to SWO by the principal investigator. High quality fiber hemp varieties 'CS' and 'Carmagnola' were used for the trial.

Burton Johnson, an agronomist at North Dakota State University with expertise in hemp cultivation, was contracted to undertake the planting of the seed. Following seedbed preparation by SWO Natural Resources technicians, a 3.3 acre section of the plot was drill seeded on July 12, 2018. This was approximately 4-6 weeks later than what would have been optimal due to permitting, contracting, seed importation and weather delays. The plot was planted in two sections at different seeding rates: low-density for inner stem (hurd) production and high-density for outer stem (bast fiber) production. Hemp variety CS was planted in the low-density (hurd) section. The high-density (bast fiber) section was planted with hemp varieties CS and Carmagnola. A combination of fertile soil and abundant rain at the site over the course of the season provided ideal conditions for germination, emergence, stand establishment, and canopy closure. At 34 days after planting, there were an average of 12.4 plants/ft2 in the low-density section and 15.5 plants/ft2 in the high-density section. During the same interval, the hemp plants grew about an inch/day to an average height of 34 inches and 38 inches in the low and high-density sections, respectively. At 46 days after planting, plants were about 66 inches (5.5 feet) to 72 inches (6 feet) tall and male plants had begun flowering

The high-density section of the plot closest to the access road was harvested with a sickle mower on September 18, 2018 (68 days after planting) when bast fibers were well developed but before stalks had thickened extensively and when plants had reached an average height of 70 inches. Mowed plants were left on the field for retting - a natural process of degradation in which the stems change color and the separation of long bast fibers from the inner stalk is facilitated. The low-density section was mowed on October 18, 2018 (98 days after planting) when the stalks had thickened allowing more extensive hurd development and when plants had reached an average height of 82 inches. Both the retted bast fiber harvest and the dried hurd harvest were raked and baled on October 23, 2018 for future processing. The total yield of the plot (11,000 lbs.) was approximately 1.7 ton per acre. This is considerably lower than what was expected for fiber hemp but still impressive given the late planting date.

Cost and Needs Assessment for Hemp Production, Processing and Manufacturing

Currently, there are only a handful of commercial hemp processing facilities in the USA. The lack of processing capacity has been identified as a major constraint to the development of industry for hemp fiber in the USA with perhaps the exception of BastCore Inc. (Omaha, Nebraska. Equipment and facilities are also available in Canada and may provide advice to clients on equipment, costs, and process startup.

Because of the lack of processing facilities and experience in processing hemp fiber in the USA, as well as the continually evolving technology at this point in time, it is difficult to estimate equipment costs and feasibility. To do that, we will need to identify a market which will demand a price sufficient to guarantee profitability. In parallel we will provide some guidance on market opportunities based on anticipated volumes of hemp bast and hurd to help estimate return on investment.

In addition, recent changes in law under the 2018 the Farm Bill will have a significant impact on future options in the market for industrial hemp in the United States. This can provide an opportunity to SWO as one of the first suppliers in the hemp fiber market but will require an understanding of the impacts of the changes in the laws governing the production, transporting and processing of hemp fiber which will become apparent as the changes in the law are implemented.

As we are able to explore options for market development, the team worked with Jim Lupien of BastCore Inc. to explore decortication and market development. BastCore purchased the industrial hemp bales from this years trial at $300/ton, and also paid the transportation costs for transport to their decortication facility in Omaha. They aim to identify potential clients for the fiber and we are told that they have been in discussion with the Patagonia outdoor supply company about providing SWO fiber for manufacture of clothing.

BastCore represents an opportunity for SWO for a number of reasons. They have access to different buyers of hemp fiber, they are evaluating SWO hemp fiber quality, and they are excited about the opportunity to work with SWO and UMN in selecting and testing hemp varieties for high end fiber markets. They could potentially continue to be a partner as SWO develops its capacity to decorticate and process industrial hemp into value added products as long as the terms of the partnership are fair and favorable. Currently Bastcore is providing decortication and marketing services to SWO.

Decortication is a physical milling process to separate and screen the fiber (Figure 3). The outer bast fiber produces two sizes of fibers. The longest and highest quality are primary, followed by shorter secondary fiber. The inner hurd (pith) comprises a third category of relatively uniform fine fiber. It would be ideal to develop markets for all marketable fiber types.

Bastcore has an innovative process that allows them to use both the bast and the hurd and convert them into high value products. They currently are working with some high end opportunities to produce textiles and also using the hurd for innovative applications including' use in the petroleum industry as mentioned above. Bastcore is developing markets for apparel, textiles and other uses and offers the opportunity to access those markets. Bastcore is a leader in the hemp fiber industry and is developing the markets and innovative technology for hemp fiber processing and looking towards "green" processing.

We also made contact with Hemplogic USA. Hemplogic USA has developed and initiated the use of a mobile decorticator. Hemplogic USA provides consulting services and could potentially be a source of information and design for a processing facility at SWO. They offered their services to SWO and could also be an option for moving ahead with hemp fiber processing on tribal land.

The first step in determining the feasibility of hemp production and processing is determining the costs of production and the potential price for hemp fiber and whether the price covers the costs and generates a profit for the farm enterprise. There are a number of production cost estimates from several states in the USA and provinces in Canada as well as estimates prepared by Universities in the USA. Because the production of hemp for fiber is such a new activity many estimates are based on limited data. We selected an analysis and calculation tool that was produced by Penn State Extension which builds off of data gathered from studies from several available sources of information.

We selected the Penn State Extension model because it represents an "average" production scenario but also because it allows the user to modify the data based on particular site and equipment parameters. Thus it provides a good estimate of the potential costs and benefits of hemp fiber production which will be helpful in making decisions related to developing a hemp fiber enterprise and can be fine tuned to reflect the particular production methods selected by the operator or SWO

Determining the potential productivity in terms of tons per acre of stalks produced is especially problematic due to the proliferation of industrial hemp varieties for grain, fiber, CBD oil and dual purpose varieties. North Dakota State University Research trials at Langdon, North Dakota provide a good estimate of the range of potential productivity on SWO lands because of their proximity. NDSU has been carrying out trials of industrial hemp since 2015 and provide some good initial data.

The disadvantage of the Langdon data is that the varieties tested have been grain or dual purpose varieties although early trials did include fiber varieties. Across varieties, fiber production varied between 3,500 and 7,000 lbs of dry stalk per acre (1.75-3.0 tons/acre). The lowest dry stalk weights per acre were from grain varieties as expected. Three dual purpose varieties tested in 2018 had dry stalk weights varying between 6,699 and 7,199 lbs (3.35-3.6 tons) per acre. Based on research in other locations, it would be reasonable to assume that a fiber only variety would produce greater tonnage than grain or dual purpose varieties.

Prices for hemp fiber can also be variable and there is not a well established market for hemp fiber in the US because of the lack of processing facilities. Based on publications, conversations with potential buyers and the sale price we received for the sale of hemp from our research plot, $300/acre seemed reasonable price in a market that is very young and subject to change. Preliminary assessment by BastCore suggest that the varieties and conditions produced fiber of exceptionally high quality so that higher prices might be attainable in future.

Given of the variability in prices and crop productivity per acre, we carried out a sensitivity analysis of gross income showing the impact on income of different prices ($150-$350/ton) for the hemp stalks and at different levels of productivity of the crop (2-4 tons). We estimated (1) gross income, (2) gross income minus variable costs, and (3) gross income minus variable and fixed costs at dry tons per acre with different combinations of crop price and productivity levels).

Market Opportunity and Economic Feasibility

Existing Market Options

We surveyed technical and business literature sources to better understand the landscape of fiber products, understand the business opportunities available today, and explore new product categories for the future. In consultation with SWO's tribal leadership and economic development office, we explored options that will allow for creation of new jobs in hemp processing or manufacturing of value-added projects within the community. This search, and subsequent discussions with regional companies has identified two immediate opportunities for bast and hurd fibers. We recommend exploring these further to plan for developing value-added manufacturing businesses on tribal land.

Our contact at Bastcore Inc. identified opportunities with high-end clothing manufacturers (e.g., Patagonia) who have expressed interest in sourcing greater quantities of hemp fiber from domestic sources rather than from their current overseas suppliers. This presents a unique opportunity for SWO to develop a relationship with an established brand that could lead to investment in new processing facilities (decortication, cottonizing, fabric weaving) on tribal land. The other advantage of Bastcore is their interest in expanding decortication facilities regionally. This could present an opportunity for SWO to form a business partnership to locate a decortication plant on tribal land. We recommend further negotiation with Bastcore to explore business models such as joint ventures.

We also identified a current market opportunity for hurd fibers in the hemp fiber composite industry. c2renew (Fargo, North Dakota) produces plastic composite resins incorporating natural fibers. Including fibers in a plastic composite can increase the strength and toughness of a molded part while reducing overall cost and reducing weight. C2renew have been seeking a regional source for more hemp fibers as demand for hemp-fiber composites has grown from 500 to 2000 lbs. per month in the past year. They expect significant market growth in the coming years, based on the number of calls they are receiving. Our team contracted with c2renew to produce travel coffee mugs from hemp fiber composites for market development and public relations. The mugs bear an SWO logo and the brand "Dakota Hemp". These will be available to SWO for market development and sharing with interested members of the tribe.

Potential Market Options

In addition to identifying immediate offtake opportunities, we surveyed research and development work on hemp fiber products to assess the breadth of potential opportunities. This list was narrowed to identify the most promising options, based on opportunities most likely to emerge in the near future, as well as those that meet criteria identified in conversation with SWO members. These criteria were: (1) opportunity to develop tribal businesses with a worker-owned democratic management structure, (2) potential synergy with existing Dakota Western Corp. blown plastics business, (3) opportunities to leverage federal 8A procurement status, and (4) opportunities to address other tribal needs (e.g., housing). Based on these criteria, we have identified the following areas for further exploration and business development:

Clothing

Beyond the immediate opportunity for business development with Patagonia Inc. (as above) there are potential emerging markets in textiles and clothing markets. Hemp fiber has a long history of use for fabrics. Indeed, the scientific name Cannabis is derived from the old French word for canvas cloth (chanevaz). While other fibers, especially cotton and synthetics, have taken over the market in the past fifty years, there appears to be a recent market resurgence due in part to new processing techniques and consumer choices. Cotton production is very water and chemical intensive, and therefore some clothing manufacturers are seeking more environmentally responsible alternatives. We recommend that SWO explore market penetration opportunities with specialty clothing manufacturers.

Hemp Fiber Composites

There appear to be emerging opportunities for value-added manufacturing with hemp-based composites. Composites are made up of two or more different materials that each contribute different physical properties to the overall material. Some common composites include fiberglass and carbon fiber reinforced materials (e.g., materials for aviation, automotive, wind turbine blades) and mineral-plastic composites (e.g., quartz countertops and wood-plastic decking). Bio-composites contain one or more components that are biological in origin. Most commonly, biocomposites are plastic materials with natural plant fibers such as hemp or flax as a reinforcing agent. Natural fiber composites such as these were developed in the early 20th century but had been replaced by synthetics by the 1980's (Mohanty et al., 2018). Recently, interest in reducing the environmental impact of manufacturing, consumer preference, and new processing technologies have revived interest in natural fibers as part of composite materials. The recent upward trend in demand for hemp fiber composites seen by c2renew, mentioned above, is part of this trend. Likewise, international automotive manufacturers, including Toyota, Mercedes-Benz, and BMW have begun incorporating natural fiber composites in cars for elements such as door panels, trunk liners, and headliners (Akampumuza et al., 2016). In addition to working directly with c2renew, we recommend that the SWO begin to explore automotive applications through contact with tier 1, 2, and 3 suppliers to characterize the opportunities and identify a market entry point.

Another class of fiber-based composites are so-called linear composites made by extrusion or pultrusion. Various products have been explored in the past made from bio-based pultrusions including structural lumber, window components, trucking components, and architectural members such as window interior components and even structural I-beams (Fairuz et al., 2016; Smits 2016). In the standard pultrusion process the reinforcement materials like synthetic fibers, woven or braided strands are impregnated with resin, possibly followed by a separate preforming system, and pulled through a heated stationary die where the resin undergoes polymerization. The impregnation is either done by pulling the reinforcement through a bath or by injecting the resin into an injection chamber which is typically connected to the die. Many resin types may be used in pultrusion including polyester, polyurethane, vinyl ester and epoxy.

The University of Minnesota Natural Resources Research Institute is collaborating with regional companies to develop new materials containing completely bio-based resins that could represent entirely new family of renewable building materials made by pultrusion. While this manufacturing method offers lots of opportunities for new products and leverages Dakota Western Corp. expertise in plastics manufacturing, we recommend a thorough evaluation of the markets, especially in structural and architectural components, before investing in product development.

Pulp and Paper Products

Hemp-based paper production holds promise for making high quality products with lower environmental impact compared with typical wood pulp paper (da Silva Vieira et al. 2010). During phase I we made an introduction between SWO and W-Cycle (https://w-cycle.com/), a developer of molded pulp food service products. W-Cycle has worked with hemp fibers for new product lines as its strength and durability are superior to that of other pulp-based products. W-Cycle provided us with prototype pulp-based coffee cup lids as a potential first marketable product made from pulp (Figure 5). While this represents an interesting and novel product from hemp fibers, we recommend that SWO explore the business relationship with W-Cycle carefully to make sure that all parties can come to a satisfactory agreement before moving forward with product development.

Building products; There has been considerable past interest in using hemp as a concrete aggregate to produce hempcrete for housing and building applications. Three hemp-based building product concepts were explored in 2004-2005 by NRRI's building materials research team. Hemp was found to provide rigidity and insulating properties to hardboard products (similar to oriented strand board lumber) similar to other fiber-based boards (e.g., flax). A sample of hemp concrete block (hempcrete) made in Germany was subjected to physical testing and found to be less dense and potentially more insulating than concrete blocks, but absorbed and retained water in a moist environment. Another approach investigated by NRRI was to incorporate hemp fibers into phosphate cement. There is substantial intellectual property in this field, with products ranging from construction materials to oil well linings to dental cements. One promising approach would be to coat hemp fibers and press them into hardboard panels similar to wood wool concrete products commonly used in northern Europe (https://www.eltomation.com/eng). All of these concepts produce building materials that show some potential applications, but have not yet gained widespread acceptance. We recommend doing a thorough market assessment and techno-economic analysis to better understand whether these products represent real opportunities.

Biofuel

Biofuels have great potential market size, but are a low value product so only unmarketable portions of hemp should be considered as a fuel source. Because there are relatively few markets for the dust generated by the decordication process, and it represents approximately ten percent of the decordication products, there may be some opportunities to explore pellet fuel for heating systems in local markets. NRRI has developed low-cost binders from cellulosic ethanol and cranberry processing residues that can be used to produce a water resistant and durable pellet fuel from sawdust (Figure 6). A similar formulation could be developed for hemp processing dust to make maximal use of the plant. We recommend a thorough understanding of the market opportunity for formulated heating pellets to supply large users such as schools, businesses, and district heating systems as well as exploration of opportunities to convert residential heating systems to pellet furnaces and boilers. After that, there is an opportunity to develop custom fuel pellets and match them to boiler technology to ensure reliable and clean burning of the fuel.

Recommendations

*Increase hemp fiber production to 40 acres in 2019

*Develop business relationships with c2renew, BastCore and Patagonia

*Explore planning for a decortication facility near Agency Village

*Prioritize product development opportunities based on market analysis and relationships

*The UMN team recommends that Dakota Nation Industries formalize a contract to sell the hemp bales resulting from Phase I to BastCore, Inc. with the following conditions: (1) SWO/UMN retains a small bale of mature stalks for demonstration & research purposes. (2) BastCore agrees to share information on the quantity and quality of the bast fiber & hurd resulting from decortication. (3) BastCore agrees to share with SWO/UMN samples of decorticated material (bast & hurd) for Phase II demonstration research purposes.

*Unless SWO has funds to support the cost of cultivating and decorticating in 2018, we recommend that SWO enter into a contract with BastCore to cultivate 40 acres of fiber hemp on SWO land in 2019. John Lupien of BastCore has indicated interest in working with SWO with potential to contract fiber-variety hemp production.

*We advise SWO to limit 2019 hemp acreage and minimize risk associated with scaling production until the project team has demonstrated success with larger acreage.

*We recognize that maintaining ownership of the crop and downstream products is more desirable than selling the crop to BastCore and allowing them to develop their relationships with other customers. A long term goal of SWO should be to maintain ownership over as many of the business transactions as possible for flexibility and profitability. Beyond 2019, we advise SWO to either pay for decortication or establish a decorticating facility in order to maintains ownership of hemp fiber and hurd for sale by SWO to customers. We understand that BastCore and/or Patagonia have expressed interest in siting decortication equipment at SWO in the future.

*Lastly, we recommend that the hemp composite coffee mugs bearing an SWO logo and the "Dakota Hemp" design be used to communicate the direction of the project to the community during a tribal event such as a community gathering or pow wow and also to pursue market opportunities at trade shows during Phase II.

Phase II

The second year of the SWO hemp economic feasibility study has three objectives: (1) collecting voice of the customer information to build a business case for entering the hemp marketplace, (2) increasing SWO hemp cultivation to 40 acres in 2019, and (3) identifying costs for decorticating hemp and manufacturing hemp-based plastics at SWO.

In Phase II we will expand SWO hemp production to provide the raw material needed to pursue market opportunities, customer segments, and market size for hemp products. A final report will include specifications and costs for Phase III (a) identifying markets, (b) building a decortication facility to process hemp regionally, and (c) expanding an existing tribally owned manufacturing operation at SWO for value-added hemp composite products.

Voice of the Customer for Industrial Hemp

Joining the team for Phase II is business advisor Chris Shay who proposes to conduct a voice-of-customer study and develop a business plan for Dakota Hemp.

*Product ideation including hemp canvas, hemp reinforced fiberboard, and hemp reinforced cement blocks. Examples of new product development opportunities include: compostable drinking cups, dinnerware, and food containers. Pultrusion technology has the potential to employ hemp composites in producing high-strength materials such as wind turbine blades, solar panel supports, flooring, fencing, siding window and door parts. Thermal modification of hemp composites could allow for other applications.

*Identify potential product markets for hemp, including but not limited to clothing and hemp-fiber reinforced plastics, and building products.

*Interview customers to identify market pull for product areas

*Select focal product areas and identify target prices for focal product areas

*Identify value added opportunities by aligning UMN research capabilities

*Lead development of a business case for the target opportunity

*Evaluate clothing and fiber reinforced plastic markets for hemp options

*Interview SWO stakeholders at the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate to understand their objectives for entering the hemp market

*Visit Natural Resource Research Institute to understand the research and development capabilities at UMN

*Attend trade shows: B2B Hemp Industry & Natural Products Expo West

*Visit two potential customers to gather customer requirements

*Use SWO 2018 harvest to gain feedback from customers

*Summarize market opportunity and target price for each application identified in market survey.

*Deliver report summarizing each customer and product opportunity

Increase SWO Hemp Production

*Identify an appropriate hemp variety for cottonized fiber production

*Consult with SWO Realty to identify 40 acres of SWO land in North Dakota near the 2018 plot

*Obtain 2,400 lb. seed from a North Dakota source (e.g. fiber variety hlukhovsjii 51 from Richard McDonald, Reiten Farms and Legacy Hemp) and sow at 60 lbs per acre

*Harvest and square-bale for transportation provided by BastCore

*Report results of an experiment comparing commercially available industrial hemp varieties for fiber production on SWO land according to the following protocol:

Plot dimensions: 6' wide by 10' long (allows 7.5" row seeding in single pass)

Replication: each of four replicates per variety per seeding rate

Aisle width: 4' (allows maintenance/mowing with single pass)

Border width: 6' wide planted with hlukhovsjii 51

Factors: varieties and seeding rate (40 lb/acre versus 60 lb/acre)

Varieties: hlukhovsjii 51, Beniko, CHG, Futura 75, Felina 32, & Santhica 70

Considerations for site selection include: loss of lease income ($155/acre or $6,200), prior rotation (soy or alfalfa perhaps requiring less fertilizer than corn), soil conditions (medium textured, well-drained loam, not prone to flooding), accessibility and isolation (security).

Production acreage and experimental plots require 100 lb/acre nitrogen, 60 lb/acre phosphorus, and 60 lbs/acre of potassium. Amendments will be based on soil test results to achieve these rates of fertility. Fields will be prepared using conventional tillage practices and fertilizer will be incorporated into the soil at a depth of 3 to 4 inches by cultivation. Fields will be prepared by disking to reduce weed pressure. No herbicides or pesticides will be applied. Seed will be drilled at a shallow, controllable depth.

Two to three weeks after planting, vigor will be measured by visual assessment of each plot and using a 1=high through 5=low scale. A month after planting, plant populations will be recorded by counting the number of plants in a foot-long section of a row, four times per plot. Every two weeks prior to harvest, data will be collected on plant height by measuring eight randomly selected plants per plot.

Stalks will be harvested at or after 20% flowering from two, randomly selected 1m2 subplots from within each main plot, careful to avoid plot edges using a handheld sickle mower, baled and sent to BastCore for decortication and processing. Data to be measured from sub-plots will include plant density, stalk height, stalk basal diameter, total biomass (straw dry weight), fiber yield, hurd yield, and processed fiber yield.

Identify Options for Business Planning

*Assess costs and technical needs for a decortication facility to process hemp at SWO.

*Assess costs and technical needs for expanding an existing tribally owned manufacturing operation at SWO (Dakota Western Corp.) for hemp-based plastic products.

*Draft a business plan for hemp processing and/or manufacturing with respect to the following considerations: local hemp production capacity, competition, location, facility size, equipment costs, construction costs, operating costs, labor, transportation, subsidies for minority-owned business, capital investment needs, risks and alternatives.

*Establish a brand presence (e.g., Dakota Hemp) and trademark through USPTO.

The proposed objectives will position SWO to implement a business plan while minimizing exposure to risk in the emerging and uncertain marketplace for industrial hemp. Depending on Phase II outcomes, other future opportunities to consider include other product areas, new product development, hemp variety development, seed production and improvement of agronomic practices.

(Note: Budget proposed for phase II is $177,903.)

State-Tribal Relations Office reacts to Oglala Sioux governor banishment threat

By David Law

KXLG Radio – May 7, 2019 – The Secretary of the South Dakota Department of Tribal Relations says the unanimous vote taken by the Oglala Sioux Tribal Council recently to banish Governor Kristi Noem from the Pine Ridge reservation if the state follows through with plans to implement Keystone XL Pipeline demonstrator damage costs is unfortunate. The tribal action was announced by Oglala Sioux President Julian Bear Runner who, along with the Tribal Council, are upset with legislation supported by Governor Noem and approved by the legislature that would make demonstrators fiscally responsible. Dave Flute, who is the former Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Reservation Tribal Chairman admits that some, but not all tribes, have issues with the pipeline, but that the legislation approved by the legislature really protects freedom of speech for those who want to protest peacefully.

Flute says the Governor has been a class act in maintaining her poise to keep lines of communication open with all of the tribes. He's not sure the Oglala Tribal Council received all of the pertinent information about the legislation and that the lines of communications may have been misunderstood:

He said that it's not helpful to any of the tribes when they shut out local, state, and federal partners.

Flute says it's O-K to disagree sometimes, but that you also have to listen and communicate. He's not ever seen a tribe take action to banish anyone.

Flute says the Indian communities need to be fighting a different kind of pipeline.

Flute is hopeful they can set differences aside, rebuild relationships, and come up with a better future for the state and tribal nations.

Law says Oglala Sioux Tribe can ban Gov. Noem from Pine Ridge

By Cory Allen Heidelberger

Dakota Free Press – May 7, 2019 – I wondered if the Oglala Sioux Tribe has the legal authority to ban Governor Kristi Noem from the Pine Ridge Reservation. Jeremy Fugleberg does some homework and says, yup, looks like they do:

The tribe is on firm legal footing due to court decisions that date back to the late 1800s, said Grant Christensen, associate professor at the University of North Dakota law school, where his teaching and research focus is American Indian law.

"There's no question they have the right to prevent her from entering, and if she chooses to enter, the ability to use their law enforcement to escort her from the border and watch her step back into the state of South Dakota and off Pine Ridge," he said. "They absolutely have that right."

…The tribe's decision is backed by decades of case law, including the landmark 1982 U.S. Supreme Court case, Merrion v. Jicarilla Apache Tribe, about oil and gas taxes.

"One of the fundamental, inherent attributes of sovereignty is the right to exclude," he said. "And there's a whole line of cases that have upheld how to banish persons from reservations" [Jeremy Fugleberg, "Can Oglala Sioux Tribe Ban Gov. Kristi Noem from Reservation? Here's What the Law Says," that Sioux Falls paper, 2019.05.07].

Noem's weekend propaganda message talked about how "Travel Matters." "There's always something new to discover in South Dakota," her little Goebbelses penned for her, "and you can always count on a handshake and a smile to be waiting when you arrive." But according to legal precedent, if Noem tries to discover anything on Pine Ridge, she'll find awaiting her a frown and maybe handcuffs.

I'd suggest that Governor Noem should round up a posse of her Trumpist friends and go protest at the White River on Highway 73 just south of Kadoka… but that could be interpreted as riot-boosting.

SD high court takes up case lawyer says could destroy tribal sovereign immunity

By Sarah Mearhoff

American News Capitol Correspondent

Pierre, SD – May 2, 2019 – A former school principal is alleging he was wrongfully terminated from his job in a South Dakota Supreme Court case that one lawyer said could be an "absolute destruction" of tribal nations' sovereign immunity.

The Supreme Court Tuesday heard oral arguments for an appeal on a lower court's August decision to dismiss Timothy Stathis v. Marty Indian School. Marty Indian School, located on the Yankton Reservation in southeast South Dakota, hired Stathis in May 2017, then fired him months before his contract ended in June 2018.

According to court documents, First Circuit Court Judge Bruce Anderson dismissed the case based on tribal sovereign immunity and immunity of tribal officials and employees, a doctrine reiterated in state and federal court decisions stating that sovereign tribal nations have the right to make and uphold their own laws.

But Stathis' lawyer, James Taylor of Mitchell, is arguing that "tribal immunity as a doctrine should be abandoned or narrowed."

In court documents, Taylor writes that tribal immunity is a "completely judiciously created doctrine" with no basis in the U.S. Constitution, which "often provides tribal defendants with a unique vehicle to avoid liability for their actions that is simply unavailable to other similarly situated defendants."

In Stathis' case, Taylor argued that Marty Indian School should be held responsible in state court for prematurely terminating Stathis' contract even though the school is located on a reservation. He noted that the school is a registered South Dakota nonprofit, so they should be held to state legal standards as well.

"This case shows that individuals who contract with tribal entities are left with no forum," he said Tuesday.

Asked why he didn't take this case to federal court, Taylor said he "didn't see that we had jurisdictional basis in federal court."

Defense lawyer for Marty Indian School Rebecca Kidder of Rapid City Tuesday said that plaintiffs are arguing for "no less than the overrule" of several court decisions upholding tribal sovereign immunity, and for state jurisdiction over "any suits of any non-Indian against any tribal member for conduct of tribal members on trust lands, on the reservation."

"Certainly, your Honors, to enact that in this case would not just be defining the perimeters of immunity or infringement, but an absolute destruction of them," Kidder said.

Kidder added that Stathis' contract was "crystal clear" in reiterating its tribal immunity and that the school was not subject to state laws or court.

Congress decades ago passed the Indian Self Determination and Education Assistance Act of 1975 and the Tribally Controlled School Act of 1988 — two laws that Kidder said were meant to provide tribes with control over their education.

"That includes decisions about personnel — whether to hire them, whether to discipline them, whether to terminate them," Kidder said. "If you cannot control your contractual relationships within the school, you can't control the education that you're providing to your children."

"There's no field more important to the development of tribal governance and tribal communities than the education of the children," she added.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

Do not let go of your loved one

Life is sacred.

We are sacred and the Great Mystery or God whatever we want to call that sacredness is always with us.

He is in the air we breathe, in the unseen world of life itself.

We are here on earth for a purpose yet sometimes we become lost, and our life enters a world of no purpose or no reason to exist.

It might take only a word, one single word, or one single act that is witnessed, to cause trauma.

This is a crucial moment in someone's life journey, when we as family, need to be aware and supportive.

If we allow that loved one to go on this unseen journey alone, the road to recovery becomes extremely difficult. The way back to harmony, to balance, can seem impossible.

When one's sacredness is broken, can it be repaired?

Oh yes, but it takes time to heal.

We may never be the same, but the Great Mystery offers us healing.

There are times when we forget the ones who are in the darkest moments of their life.

It is our forgetting, shunning, shaming, embarrassing that we feel, which causes us to push that loved one further into a world we don't want to enter.

But we must remember at a certain moment in our own lives, we too enter that darkness.

We each and all of us enter on some different level and suffer with the loved ones addicted to meth, other drugs, and alcohol.

We may not be using ourselves, however we become spiritually addicted along with our loved one.

When the pain and darkness become overwhelming our loved one contemplates suicide, then suicide becomes their life!

In order for suicide to live, it needs a life.

It is indeed a frightening world for the suicidal individual.

But we too become spiritually suicidal as we grasp to find a reason or answer to the "why."

We ourselves begin to die, and this dying process generates a whole other form of life within our Oyate.

We give life to drug use of all kinds and to suicide.

But we are strong Sisseton-Wahpeton Tribal members and through our heritage and love for our family members, we take on this suffering with them, because we love them that much.

The struggle to live is a lifetime.

Never let your loved one go on this dark journey alone.

Let them know you too are suffering with them.

When they die we die too as a family and Oyate.

Stay strong in prayer to the Great Mystery, for He hears our pleas for mercy and He visits us at His sacred time of night.

He knows the sica ones (drug dealers, pushers, rapists, pedophiles, abusers) by their names, those who are harming, who are traumatizing our Oyate.

He the Great Mystery will take care of them as will the other one we call Wahkan Sica.

Stand fast and spiritually hold the hands of your loved one suffering from addictions and thoughts of suicide.

Spiritually create a sacred hoop around the loved one suffering.

The time to do this is when they are going through withdrawals or their darkest times.

Do not let go of them.

Remember, every time they use, or ponder suicide, we also suffer … because our spirits die along with them.

Betty Anne Owen, Sioux Falls, SD.

Sota guest editorial –

Petitioners seek reform of OST government

By Stewart Huntington

Pine Ridge, SD – KOTA-TV – May 8, 2019 – History was made Wednesday on the Pine Ridge Reservation as petitions were filed that could bring a vote to dramatically reshape the tribal government.

A task force of Oglala Sioux Tribal council members handed in petitions at the Bureau of Indian Affairs Pine Ridge office with almost 5,000 signatures asking for a vote on a package of constitutional reforms that, if enacted, would seismically alter nearly a century of tribal governance.

Never before in the 82 year history of the current OST government have petitions ever been filed by the people to seek reform.

Two years ago the tribal council formed a task force to explore reforming the tribe's constitution.

"I've been in this council position for 10 years and I see that what we are currently doing is not working," said tribal council member Robin Tapio. "And that we need change in our government structure."

The current government structure was imposed on the reservation in 1934 by the Interior Department with no Indian input.

Today the tribal council wields absolute power and is sometimes viewed as capricious and opaque.

After a series of public meetings to get input from tribal members the task force, a year ago, submitted a list of 50 amendments to the constitution to the tribal council asking it to put the document up for a vote of the membership.

The key points? Adding checks and balances that would diminish the council's authority.

"That is definitely one of the things that the people had asked for is that separation of powers," said task force member and tribal council member Nakina Mills.

What was the council's decision? It tabled the motion.

So the task force set out to gather signatures to put the matter to a vote of the tribal membership. Two weeks ago the task force asked the tribal council again to put the reform package to the voters. The council -- again -- tabled the idea.

So on Wednesday the task force filed its petitions. It handed in 4,801 signatures. Only 4,094 are needed to trigger a vote.

"I'm very excited for the people," said task force and tribal council member Dr. Valentina Merdanian. "The people have persevered and making changes within the tribal government system and bringing checks and balances and accountability which provides a better future for our people."

It could be months before the Department of the Interior ultimately approves to election and challenges are likely from within the Oglala Sioux Nation but task force members on Wednesday were elated.

"We're not done yet," said Mills. "We still have a lot of work we still have years. Even though this was a big relief to get to this step this last couple of years, there's still a lot of work to do."

And the effort might reverberate beyond the Pine Ridge borders.

"This historic moment of constitutional reform will also, I would say, guide the other tribes," said OST Vice President Darla Black. "The trials and tribulations that the five tribal councilwomen who took part in (the petition drive) and all the work that they did, they were making headway for not just the Oglala Sioux Tribe but also the Oceti Sacowin," or other tribes of the Great Sioux nation.

Brief editorial comments from the editor's desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

The Reservation Election Board has scheduled the special election for Tribal Chairperson on Tuesday, May 28, 2019.

See our front page news article and notice in the legals section for details and list of certified candidates.

Thank you to those who have filed to serve the Oyate in this chief leadership post.

Tribal members, it is now your job to turn out and elect the person who will set aside self-interest and behind-the-scenes commitments, who will seek out the best advisors and lead the Tribe responsibly and transparently.

To the candidates: You are welcome to provide open letters as well as political ads. The political advertising is discounted; however, the ads must be paid in advance.

Details are in the Sota legals section.

The SWO Tribal Elderly Affairs Board is holding a Tribal Chair candidates forum this Tuesday evening, May 14, beginning at 5:00 p.m. at the elderly center.

Please attend if possible or check it out on KXSW.

*****

This is a time of great hope as we watch our Oyate graduate from pre-school, high school, and college!

Congratulations to all who are graduating this Spring and those who are going from one grade into the next and, for some, from undergraduate to graduate level programs!

Sisseton Wahpeton College held its graduation this past Saturday and we will have a report next week.

The Tiospa Zina graduation wacipi will be held next Wednesday, May 22; graduation is Saturday, May 25.

Yes, this is a time of great hope.

This is, unfortunately, also a time of despair.

We have been witnessing a decline in accountability and transparency in Tribal affairs that threatens not only the Tribe's stability today but well into the future.

This is not something that has happened overnight nor can it be blamed on a single past leader or administration.

It has been happening over many years.

This is a problem not only in top leadership but in committees and boards that have become entrenched and secretive.

When the new Council took office this January we had some hope of seeing a reversal, just as in January 2017. (Back in January 2017 we had all three Executives pledged to doing so.)

What happened this year?

We had a Trump-imposed federal government shutdown.

We had lost work days, day after day, due to winter storms.

We had our Tribal Chairwoman removed from office.

These events combined into a "perfect storm," a storm that Tribal programs and employees are struggling to navigate.

It is amazing and demonstrates the resilience of our employees, that we seem to be catching up well with the day-to-day business of the Tribe and its programs.

But when it comes to gathering facts about past and current finances, which was promised by this new Council, the wheels don't seem to be turning very fast.

This new Tribal Council still does not have all the information requested in January.

Last week, during open sessions in Council chambers, we listened to a litany of unresolved issues.

Why is a wasicu general contractor that is non-complaint with TERO law working on the SWO elderly village project?

Why is the project even going ahead when Tribal Council, the current Council, has said it would not begin until funding had been secured?

What are the financial facts about the grocery store, about its sales tax collection and reports?

Vague statements about how it is close to being profitable are not enough. We doubt that Council members have the facts.

And what about the rest of the Tribe's debt?

How well is repayment going for the Shakopee loan to renovate Dakota Magic?

Those are a few questions raised in chambers.

And with so many unresolved questions about finances, should the Tribe be making new loans to create its own electric utility company or to expand Dakota Connection into a truck stop?

This is not to say these projects are without value for the Tribe, only that common sense tells us the financial house must be sturdy before building upper floors.

*****

One other matter that came up in Council, on Wednesday, concerned a possible visit by SD Governor Kristi Noem to the Lake Traverse Reservation.

The Governor's office and SD Dept. of Native American Affairs Secretary/former SWO Tribal Chairman Dave Flute had tried to schedule a visit on Monday, May 13th.

Interim Chairman Verlyn Beaudreau informed us that the Governor would not agree to the Tribe's terms, which had her staying here longer and meeting with representatives of all the tribes of the state.

So, there will be no visit.

Also, Tribal Council passed a motion to send the Governor a letter criticizing lack of tribal consultation in her anti-KXL protest legislative package that violates the right of free speech, and in lack of tribal consultation by the SD Dept. of Education that violates federal law.

The letter has not yet been released, so we don't know how it will be worded.

*****

May is National Mental Health Month, and we call attention to the TREE program notice about free counseling being offered.

Screening dates are May 20 and 27.

For more information, contact Shobi Zetina at 605-698-2106.

Also, please read Dr. Magat's "Healthy Kids" column.

We are grateful to receive her columns even after her retirement from the Tribe's Early Childhood Intervention Program.

*****

Please note that this year's annual Fourth of July Wacipi has been scheduled July 5, 6 and 7!

Watch for more information and the poster when it becomes available, and plan to attend, to gather with relatives and friends.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"[The Old People] would gather words as they walked a sacred path across the Earth, leaving nothinig behind but prayers and offerings."

—- Cleone Thunder, NORTHERN ARAPAHOE

Whenever we walk on the Earth, we should pay attention to what is going on. Too often our minds are somewhere else, thinking about the past or thinking about the future. When we do this, we are missing important lessons. The Earth is a constant flow of lessons and learnings which also include a constant flow of positive feelings. If we are aware as we walk, we will gather words for our lives, the lessons to help our children; we will gather feelings of interconnectedness and calmness. When we experience this, we should say or think thoughts of gratitude. When we do this, the next person to walk on the sacred path will benefit even more.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

In a real dark night of the soul it is always three o'clock in the morning, day after day. - F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896 - 1940), "The Crack-Up" (1936)

Today's scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality. - Nikola Tesla (1857 - 1943), Modern Mechanics and Inventions, July, 1934

Not only is the universe stranger than we imagine, it is stranger than we can imagine. - Sir Arthur Eddington (1882 - 1944)

I think that one possible definition of our modern culture is that it is one in which nine-tenths of our intellectuals can't read any poetry. - Randall Jarrell (1914 - 1965)

Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from a religious conviction. - Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Imagine if every Thursday your shoes exploded if you tied them the usual way. This happens to us all the time with computers, and nobody thinks of complaining. - Jef Raskin, interviewed in Doctor Dobb's Journal

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

CDF

Obituaries –

Services held for Amy Crawford

Funeral service for Amy Crawford, 82, of Agency Village, South Dakota was held on Saturday afternoon, May 11, 2019 at 1 the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Community Center, Agency Village, SD.

Officiating was Brother Mark Goldthorpe. Pianist was Donna Murdock, and Drum Group was Dakota Nation.

Pallbearers were Jeremiah Jandreau, Will Crawford, Alec Erdrich, Aaron Erdrich, Joseph Erdrich, Christopher Schaller, Nicholas Schaller.

Honorary pallbearers were Evelyn Pilcher, Carole Adams, Linda Crawford, Lydia Derby, Crystal Heminger, Mary Red Leaf, Ruth Houle, Donna Sitake, Delphine Wanna, Sonia MaGott, and Kathryn Akipa.

Interment was in the Sisseton Cemetery, Sisseton, SD.

There was a wake service Friday night at the SWO community center, Agency Village, SD.

Amy passed away on Monday, May 6, 2019 at Prairie Lakes Hospital in Watertown, SD.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD was in charge of funeral arrangements.

Amy Myra Crawford was born February 10, 1937 in Agency Village, Sisseton, South Dakota.

Her parents were Mary White and Donald Gill, Sr.

Amy was born to a single mother who had to do double the work to care for her children: Cyrus, Archie, Amy and Barbara.

Amy grew up near Enemy Swim Lake and lived with relatives because they did not have their own home. Childhood was a difficult time for her.

She often reminisced about her childhood meals. Perch was her favorite fish and perch eggs were a delicacy. She did not like mud hens. She grew up eating rabbit, skunk, all types of fish, turtles and berries from an island within Enemy Swim Lake.

She went to Enemy Swim Day School.

Amy was a first language Dakota speaker and she had to learn English as a second grader at 8 years old.

She loved school because she loved to learn.

She was always afraid of the teachers though because they would hit the students' hands with rulers when they disobeyed, even in the slightest.

When she was in middle school, her mother found a job with IHS as a cook. They moved to Sisseton and for the first time they had their own home!

It was a one room apartment, but she said it felt like a palace and it was their very own place.

Middle school and high school in Sisseton was socially very cruel and traumatic for her. She was bullied and shamed by the non-native students for allegedly having "nits, lice and being dirty" and was often called "squaw."

In gym class the boys refused to hold her hand so the teacher always held her hand.

Despite all this, she loved learning and did very well academically.

She was kind to all people. She was very shocked to be nominated as a homecoming princess in her senior year of high school.

When Amy was 19 years old she met and married Franklin Crawford.

He was known to be a hard worker and had a fancy car, which, he did but she also said he had a beautiful smile.

They had six children: Bryan, Debbie, Lois, Teri, Evelyn and Charles.

They made their home in Huron, SD.

Franklin worked hard at a meat packing plant and Amy stayed home with the children.

They lived on a tight budget and in a two bedroom house for 8 people.

Amy made it a home with her kindness and home-made bread, home-made suppers and home-sewn curtains and children's clothes.

When her children were all in school, Amy went back to school and became a respiratory therapist and worked at Huron Regional Hospital.

Her mother came from Sisseton to live with the family and helped raise her children while she worked.

In 1974, Amy was recruited to attend college at the University of South Dakota.

It was a bi-lingual program where she was learning to be a teacher of our Dakota language in the schools.

Unfortunately, the program ended, but Amy continued college with 6 children still at home.

She completed her Bachelor's degree in 1978 in Sociology at Huron College in Huron, SD.

In November of 1976, Amy and several of her children were baptized in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

This was a pivotal moment in her life which changed her spiritual course forever--even, now in death.

She loved all the teachings of Christ's church and often said the teachings were so simple, yet so beautiful.

She began to feel a real love for Jesus Christ and our Father in Heaven.

As she began to learn more about Christ and our Father, she could feel their love for her.

She had a very spiritual experience after the death of her mother when she was in a state of depression and despair. Jesus Christ and her mother came to her and she felt the love of the Savior.

She said His love permeated her every pore and cell--she could feel the love throughout her body. She said it was a love more powerful than anything she felt here on earth.

She came out of her depression and held that sacred experience close to her heart the rest of her life.

Amy and her family moved home to Sisseton in 1978.

Sadly, her marriage to Franklin ended and they divorced. However, she quickly found a job with the SWO Child Protection Program as a case worker.

She worked hard and eventually proved herself capable of being the CPP director.

She worked with the Child Protection Program for 18 years.

During this time she was also awarded Social Worker of the Year for the state of South Dakota.

Despite the work being hard and involving difficult feelings for the families and children, she was always patient, kind and compassionate.

That was her nature. It really was the essence of who Amy was.

Whether it be at work or in her home, she was patient and kind.

She made some of her best friends while working at CPP. Her co-workers were always laughing and made work crazy and fun for her.

She then developed and was the director of Early Childhood Education program, where she worked for 12 years. She found this job less stressful, calmer, and with little or no crises and that was a better fit for her at that time.

Amy retired when she was 74 years old.

Amy gently and genuinely loved all people, and people loved her.

She was especially loved and cherished by her children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren.

One grandchild stated, "Grandma totally embodied the pure love of Christ."

She enjoyed the remainder of her life with her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She attended many college graduations, weddings, birthday parties, gender reveal parties and many dinners out. Amy had 6 children, 20 grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren.

Amy is survived by her six children, Bryan Akipa, Debbie Crawford, Lois Crawford, Teri Erdrich, Evelyn Akipa, Charles Crawford; grandchildren Jeremiah Jandreau, Sarah Crawford, Will Crawford, Rachelle Crawford, Simone Nielsen, Rachel Sine-Meyers, Camille Sine, Imogene Red Elk, Alec Erdrich, Aaron Erdrich, Joseph Erdrich, Jalina Erdrich, Nicholas Schaller, Christopher Schaller, Lauren Schaller-Sanderson, and Myra Akipa; eighteen great-grandchildren; one great-great-grandson; two sisters Delphine Wanna, and Donna Sitake.

Amy was preceded in death by her parents, three sisters Barbara Mendoza, Marcella Gill, and Janice Gill; seven brothers Cyrus White, Francis Gill, Fredrick Gill, Archie White, Gilbert Gill, Donald Gill II, and Gaylord Gill; three grandchildren Michael Erdrich, Emmy Poorman-Akipa, and Samuel Sine.

For Amy's obituary and on-line registry, please visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com

Funeral service for KarenFawn Taylor Monday

KarenFawn (Lufkins) Taylor, "Mah pi ya Ihdu ha Win" (Sky Keeps it Self Woman), age 31, of Watertown, SD journeyed to the Spirit World in the morning of Tuesday, May 7, 2019.

She was born on May 15, 1987 in Watertown, SD the daughter of Mary (Genia) Goette and Timothy J. Lufkins. She is the third child born, the youngest daughter.

KarenFawn grew up her young years in Long Hollow, where the family lived next to the Seaboys. There she made the best friendships that lasted into her adult years.

In 1992 her mother met Mike Goette they later married. Mike received her as his daughter when he adopted the children, she received a Daddy!

Throughout junior high and high school she played the flute and the clarinet in band. She enjoyed all kind of music but her favorite when she was a young girl was classical. As she grew to young adult she began to Love the Drum and Dancing Fancy Shawl and turned to Jingle Dress as well. She was a cross country runner, involved in gymnastics, ballet and a cheerleader throughout her school years.

Karen was chosen to be the Tribal Princess in 2003 when she was 16. As the Tribal Princess, she traveled the whole North American Continent. It was during these times of traveling and enjoying her culture that she really enjoyed, being with Pow-Wow Family. Karen was shy but if you got to know her, she is energetic, fun loving, honest and loyal to the people she held close. As her interests grew she loved to fish, hunt and going to construction jobsites with her Daddy.

After High School graduation, Karen attended Sisseton Wahpeton College where she was crowned the College Princess. When her younger brother, Micah, graduated from high school, they both moved to Watertown where she attended National American University, studying Business Administration/Accounting, all while working full time at the Days Inn Hotel.

While in Watertown, she met and married Kevin Taylor on September 17, 2016 in Haiti, SD. Together they enjoyed Harley Davidson motorcycle riding, going to auctions and having a booth at the Peddlers Market and dining out, also taking all the children out fishing and picnicking. She Loves her children and was a mother to her nieces and nephews before she had her own children. They all continue to be her children as they grew up.

Survived by her husband: Kevin Taylor, her children Kendra Cook, Dusty Cloud Jr, Carter Cloud and Logan Cloud; brothers: Thomas JohnT. Lufkins, Micah Adelord Lufkins and David M. Goette; sisters: Amanda Marie Lufkins and Dennille K. Goette; her parents: Mike and Mary Goette; many, many nieces & nephews, aunts, uncles and cousins all who she held Dear in Her Heart. She was always proud of her family and extended family.

She is preceded in death by niece Cassie Lufkins, nephew Zell Lufkins, her grand parents Kermit and Barbara Goette, Howard Sr. and Pansy (Patsy) Genia, great grand parents John Sr. and Bessie Cloud, Patricia Maskewit and Nicky Brown.

Funeral service for KarenFawn Taylor will be held on Monday, May 13, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church in Sisseton, SD. Pastor Lamar Whittemore, Pastor Abigail Ozanne, Danny Seaboy Sr. and John Cloud III will officiate. She will be laid to rest at the Long Hollow Presbyterian Church Cemetery.

Funeral procession starts on Saturday May 11, 2019 at 5:00 pm east of Browns Valley, MN at the wayside rest area, then on to the Lake Traverse District Center.

Wake services were held all night Saturday and through Sunday at the Lake Traverse District Center.

Honorary Casket Bearers are Cedar Woman Seaboy, Rosie Maskewit, Heather "Tiny" King, Martina Burnett, Loretta Kohl, Lucinda Rose Runnels, Cansas Cooper, Trina Rose Khalifa, Lidia Mckin, Roxanne Roberts, April Peterson, Jana Sams and Chastity Whittemore.

Casket Bearers are her Brothers Thomas Lufkins, Micah Lufkins, David Goette, Good Friends Terry Haug Jr., Howard Derby, Preston Jones, Dustin Brown and Mike Witham.

Chilson Funeral Home, Winsted, MN served the family. On-line condolences can be made at www.chilsonfuneralhome.com

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and should be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Surprise party for Charlene Miller

Charlene Miller, Natural Resources/Fish & Wildlife Manager, was recognized for 30 years of dedicated service to the Tribe in a surprise party last Friday at noon.

Interim Tribal Chairman Verlyn Beaudreau, Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson, and Big Coulee Councilwoman Lisa Jackson were there and presented Charlene with a star quilt.

Her sister Karena Miller, who provided these photos, writes: "Thank you all who did the cooking and brought drinks … and all who came to share this special time with her!"

The event was held in the Fish & Wildlife suite at Tribal headquarters.

Open letter to the Oyate

Thank you, Harry Renville, for your life words on the internet for others such as myself to read while you also share your life given to Christ Jesus.

It does the Heart of me and I'm sure others as well.

Keep His Faith and Rest in Christ/Shalom.

Laura White.

Authorities release photo of Sioux Falls woman wanted in teen overdoses

Sioux Falls, SD – KSFY – May 6, 2019 – Law enforcement officials have released a photo of a woman wanted in connection to a case where several teens were found unconscious from an apparent overdose.

Police say 34-year-old Sonni Heminger is responsible for the drugs which led to three teens overdosing.

Police say three teens, from the ages of 15 to 19, were found unconscious at Heminger's home on April 17. The teens were treated at a Sioux Falls hospital.

Police say Heminger was out of the state when the incident occurred and has not returned yet. She is wanted on various drug charges, including distribution or manufacturing of a controlled substance.

The Minnehaha County Sheriff's Office released a photo of Heminger on Monday.

Heminger is 5'7" tall, weighs around 120 pounds, and has hazel eyes and auburn hair.

Anyone with information about Heminger's whereabouts are asked to call Crime Stoppers at (877) 367-7007.

Reclaiming Hope

By Governor Kristi Noem

May 10, 2019

The lone graduate stood in front of the audience and tried to hold back tears as she told her story of addiction and her plans to stay clean – for her daughter. She wants to sing with her and teach her about her Native American culture. She wants to have a strong family and be a good, sober mom.

As I listened to Mary speak at the Drug Court graduation ceremony earlier this month, I was reminded of the pain and difficulty of overcoming addiction.

As governor, I often see the impact of drugs and alcohol on individuals and families. I've seen people get out of jail, only to land back in the courts. Sometimes, it seems like an endless cycle of arrests, hearings, and releases – one in three people who are in South Dakota's state prison right now are serving time for drug offenses. Nationally, half of all inmates are clinically addicted to drugs or alcohol.

I want to get aggressive on confronting South Dakota's drug epidemic and breaking our cycles of addiction. To do this, I'm focusing on prevention, enforcement, and rehabilitation.

We need to educate kids about the dangers of drugs. At the beginning of this year, I worked with legislators to build a life skills training program to implement in our middle schools. This program consists of 15 sessions per year over the three years where students learn practical skills. Programs like this have been proven to reduce the risk of alcohol, tobacco, violence and drug abuse through the teaching of drug resistance, life-management, and general social skills. I'm hopeful a program like this will show kids an alternative to drugs and give them hope for a brighter future.

I also want to reach out to people who are already caught in the cycles of addiction. We need to expand treatment options for people who need help. Sometimes, that will require jail time, but many times, I think there is a better way to help people than to make them sit in jail for five or ten or 15 years.

The most recent study put out in South Dakota shows that 45 percent of people who serve a prison sentence will end up committing another crime. More than four in ten people serving time right now will return to prison within three years. Ninety-five percent of people who are incarcerated due to substance abuse will relapse. Yet many of those incarcerated cannot get treatment within those walls.

We can't keep doing the same things and expect different results. In this regard, our criminal justice system is broken. It's outdated.

Programs like the Drug Court show different results. Drug courts reduce crime by 45 percent more than other sentencing options. They show that people are more likely to stay clean than those who only serve jail time. They incorporate families into the recovery process and teach people life skills.

It's also cost-effective. In South Dakota, it costs about $21,000 per person per year to incarcerate a drug-using offender. The cost of a year in the Drug Court program is about $9,000.

The drug court program is strict, but it produces results. Seventy people have graduated from the 6th Circuit's problem-solving courts alone. I want to expand options like this in our state. I'm committed to doing that.

Because I want to hear more stories like Mary's. Her story is a testimony of reclaiming hope – proof that perseverance produces progress, and that addiction can be beat.

If you or someone you love is battling an addiction, I encourage you to get help. You are stronger than this. Your story is not over. Reach out and reclaim hope.

SD Dept. of Veterans Affairs partners with SD Alzheimer's chapter

Pierre, SD – The South Dakota Department of Veterans Affairs (SDDVA) and the South Dakota Chapter of Alzheimer's Association (AA) announced a partnership to better connect South Dakota's veterans with the resources for Alzheimer's and other dementias. Together they are collaborating on outreach opportunities for veterans and their families to learn more about the educational materials, care and support services offered by the Alzheimer's Association.

It is estimated that 17,000 South Dakotans are living with Alzheimer's, many of which are veterans.

"We need to ease the burden of this disease for all who are impacted," said Kathi Herreid, state director of the South Dakota Chapter of Alzheimer's Association.

Caring for someone with Alzheimer's or other types of dementia impacts every aspect of the caregiver's daily life. As an Alzheimer's patient loses one ability after another, a caregiver faces tests of stamina, problem solving, and resiliency.

"Learning all we can about memory-related diseases is beneficial for our veterans, their families, and our staff," said Brad Richardson, superintendent of the Michael J. Fitzmaurice State Veterans Home. "Increasing awareness about the resources available will enhance the lives of our veterans and their caregivers."

Richardson's staff will have the opportunity to participate in a fundraiser for the Alzheimer's Association by wearing "End Alzheimer's" t-shirts on Fridays and donating to the fund.

To learn more about Alzheimer's and the South Dakota Chapter of Alzheimer's Association visit https://www.alz.org/sd.

Prairie Doc® Perspectives –

Men Would Rather Face a Charging Lion

By Richard P. Holm, MD

Did you know that an average South Dakotan male lives to 75-years-of-age, and the average woman lives to 80? Why is that? Is it because we men are more prone to violent deaths early by going to war, riding motorcycles or driving cars faster? Nah! This accounts for only a small part of the difference.

I think more likely it is because men, who are genetically built larger and more muscular (likely in order to be the defender or hunter for the family) no longer need to use those muscles in this modern world.

Just look at most 22-year-old men, they come built almost automatically ready to fight or lift or throw or build. But instead, in this society, you find them driving a car, sitting at a desk or laying on the couch rolling through the channels looking for videos of people playing games and being physically active.

Even our young boys are often living through the pretend movements of action figures or computer-generated warriors, rather than actually running through fields in some sort of sport, or chase, or hunt. As men age, their activity drastically reduces while their caloric intake continues excessively on. All the while their bellies grow. I truly believe this combination of excessive calories and reduced activity accounts for the sleep apnea, diabetes, vascular disease and, overall, increased death rate of men over women.

But there is one more factor, which should be added here. Men are also built to deny and do what they can to avoid going to the doctor to have a check-up. Let's face it, denial has something to do with being a man. It goes with the testosterone, guns, action toys, and channel changers. You would think a man would rather face a charging lion than the yearly physical exam.

Men, please don't just think about it, find a way to stay active, participate, don't just watch. Prevent or lose the belly by eating smaller amounts (fewer calories) and by being more active. Also, go see your doctor every once-in-a-while. You just might live longer and feel better too.

*****

For free and easy access to the entire Prairie Doc® library, visit www.prairiedoc.org and follow The Prairie Doc® on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter featuring On Call with the Prairie Doc® a medical Q&A show streaming on Facebook and broadcast on SDPTV most Thursdays at 7 p.m. central.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

TZTS schedule

May 14: K-2 Track and Field Day-First Grade=11:00 am-12:00 pm, Kindergarten=1:00-2:00 pm, Second Grade=2:00-3:00 pm

May 15: 3rd-5th grade Track and Field Day-Third Grade 11:00 am-12 pm, Fourth Grade 1:00-2:00 pm, 5th Grade 2:00-3:00 pm

May 16: First Grade field trip to Children's Museum in Brookings, 2nd Grade field trip to Wahpeton Zoo, 3rd Grade field trip to MSU Planetarium

May 17: Kindergarten Graduation at 10:30 am, Dakota Immersion classroom field trip to Wahpeton Zoo and Circle of Nations Wacipi, Fourth Grade field trip Unity Square

May 20: Eighth Grade Graduation at 10 am, Fifth Grade field trip

May 20-22: Kindergarten registration for 2019-2020 school year

May 22: End of Year Cook Out 11:00 am-2:00 pm at Tekakwitha Park, Graduation Wacipi Community Feed at 4:30 pm, Grand Entry at 6:00 pm

May 23: Last Day of School, Dismissal at 1 pm

May 25: High School Graduation at 2 pm

SWC archives display

The Sisseton Wahpeton College Archives office has a new display on exhibit in the main hallway. Items include an SWC diploma from 1990 on loan from Cheryl DeCoteau, a picture of the 1983 graduating class, and the issue of the Sota Iya Ye Yapi highlighting their graduation!

The SWC Archives are open Monday - Thursday from 9 am-4 pm.

SWC Mustang Rodeo team news

Dickinson State University Rodeo results

By Jayme Valnes

Austin Beaty- won the short round in Saddle Bronc ridding.

Darin Pertson - made the short round in both Saddle Bronc and Bulls.

Rich Marone and Lane Kvien - Team Roping - 3rd in the long round.

Lane Kvien- Steer Werlsting- 6th in the short round and 6th in the average.

Lane Kvien - Calf Roping- 5th in the long round

Our men's team finished fifth in the year end standing.

Heading to the College National Finials Rodeo (CNFR) are:

Rich Marone and Lane Kvien- Team Roping - 3rd in the region

Lane Kvien- Steer Wrestling- 3rd in the region.

Super excited and happy for this good group of student athletes that rodeoed for SWC this year, and for the two that are heading to CNFR in June to representing Sisseton Wahepton College.

Go Mustangs!

ESDS holds annual OST Carnival

Submitted by Rebecca Dargatz

School Community Director

Enemy Swim Day School

The Enemy Swim Day School Community Education Department hosted its annual Carnival.

The Carnival is a fundraiser to support the Out of School Time Program.

The 8th grade class hosted a spaghetti dinner for the community, there was a Scholastic book fair available, along with games & prizes.

Pidamaya to everyone who came out to support the program!

Here are photo highlights.

Legals

Request for Bids

Requesting sealed bids for: Demolition of the former Tiospa Zina Tribal School Building

PROJECT INFORMATION:

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate gives notice that bid proposals will be accepted for the Demolition and Disposal of the remaining old Tiospa Zina building, the concrete pad under both the high school portion and the elementary portion, and the foundation and footings underlying both pads. The dimensions are as follow: the high school pad is 30,365 sq. ft. and the elementary school pad is 9,600 sq. ft. and maybe as thick as 6 inches. The Contractor is responsible to coordinate with the Tribal Office of Environmental Protection (OEP) in the disposal of the building rubble in accordance with the direction of the OEP. The concrete will be disposed of at the Tribal gravel pit north of Sisseton (approximately 14 miles from site) in an area designated by Tribal Transportation department. Only concrete will be allowed in Tribal gravel pit. Site must be backfilled to include 35% shrinkage factor, backfill material to be provided by contractor.

STATEMENT OF WORK:

Contractor will be responsible to provide all equipment to accomplish all aspects of the demolition, the building, the concrete pads, the foundations and footings. Timeline must be provided for the three (3) divisions of work: Building demolition, pad demolition, and the foundations and footings demolition, work will be completed 30 days after contract has been finalized. Contractor will also be required to erect a construction fence to limit access to site.

REQUIREMENTS:

Contractor must possess and show proof of Tribal business license, Workers Compensation insurance and Liability insurance to be submitted with Bid Proposals. The Tribe accepts no liability for anything occurring on site, or in the performance of this work. Contractor must coordinate disposal of building materials in accordance with OEP direction. Whetstone Electric will be marking where the utilities enter the site, but it is the responsibility of the contractor to notify the utility as to when power needs to be shut off so demolition may proceed.

AUTHORITY:

Council authorized the Request for Proposals by Motion #13, Wednesday, January 9, 2019.

Bid sheets are available at the SWO Procurement office.

Additional Information: any additional questions please contact: SWO Procurement Office Lennie Peters 605-698-8302. Or PO Box 509 Agency Village SD 57262.

Please submit sealed bid to:

SWO Procurement Office

Attn: Lennie Bernard Peters lenniebp@swo-nsn.gov

PO Box 509

Agency Village, SD 57262

Closing is 4:00 pm Friday, May 24, 2019

All interested parties acknowledge that any Agreement executed and performed within the Tribe's exclusive jurisdiction is subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the Tribal Court of Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation. All interested parties acknowledge that they must comply with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Ordinances: TERO Chapter 59 Requirements, Wage Rates & Compliance Plan; Business License Ordinance Chapter 53 and Tax Ordinance Chapter 67; and Chapter 75 Sex Offender Registration.

20-2tc

 

Request for Bids

Requesting sealed proposals for:

The Mayuteca Day Treatment Program is looking for a (Female) Recovery Coach for the following:

Engages with patients in the Addiction Treatment Program and encourages them to maintain sobriety, participate in recovery-oriented activities and develop a network of sober supports. Participates in group treatment activities and models effective group participation and recovery-oriented perspective for patients with substance use disorders. Helps patients identify and access needed resources and recovery supports.

Consultant will provide the following:

1.  One on one coaching and support to those in need

2.  Respond as needed to referrals from community stakeholders

3.  Facilitate a community-based peer support group

4.  Participate in staff, community and program meetings

5.  Work regularly with community partners

6.  Participate in regular clinical supervision

7.  Provide rides/transport clients to their support groups/treatment sessions

8.  Collect data and complete reports in a timely manner

9.  Provide community presentations of the project

10. Provide warm-handoffs/referrals to other programs and services in the community

Recovery Coach will report to the Youth and Family TREE Director

11. Consultant and Tribe will ensure compliance with the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act requirements (25 U.S.C Chapter 34) and provide compliance to Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Behavioral Health.

12. Consultant will be considered a mandatory reporter as a childcare provider under the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Chapter 38 Codes of law.

All sealed bids must include and be submitted by May 24, 2019:

Applicants must submit the following as a part of their proposal:

1.  Bio-sketch or resume of academic and professional credentials, technical competence, experience, and expertise.

2.  Statement of qualifications, competence, and capacity to perform the scope of work.

3.  Itemized budget needed to perform scope of work.

Required Documentation:

1.  Copy of SWO Business License, if proposal is approved.

2.  Copy of a valid South Dakota State Driver's License

3.  Must be able to pass a federal background check, if approved.

Length of Contract

6 months

Payment

Shall not exceed $4,050

Contact the Procurement Office for specifications: LennieBP@SWO-NSN.GOV

Please submit sealed proposals to:

SWO Procurement Office

Attn: Lennie Peters

PO Box 509

Agency Village, SD 57262

By 4:00 pm on Friday May 3, 2019

All interested parties acknowledge that any Agreement executed and performed within the Tribe's exclusive jurisdiction is subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the Tribal Court of Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation. All interested parties acknowledge that they must comply with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Ordinances: TERO Chapter 59 Requirements, Wage Rates & Compliance Plan; Business License Ordinance Chapter 53 and Tax Ordinance.

20-2tc

 

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

NOTICE FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY

LEGAL SERVICES

April 30, 2019

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate (SWO) Department of Planning & Economic Development is soliciting proposals to provide renewable energy legal services from qualified law firms who have specialized experience representing municipal, cooperative and/or investor-owned utilities as well as project developers in the provision of solar energy through a variety of grid-based or micro delivery systems.

Deadline for receipt of proposals: May 17, 2019 - 4:30 P.M. Central Standard Time

Notification of pre-selection and interviews: May 22, 2019 by 4:30 P.M.

Final contract notices: May 30, 2019

All requests for instructions on proposal submission and full proposals must be sent to:

Ms. Lennie Bernard-Peters, Program Manager

Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Procurement Department

12254 BIA Highway 711/ P.O.Box 509

Agency Village, South Dakota 57262

Tel (605) 698-8302

Lenniebp@Swo-Nsn.Gov

19-2tc

 

 

REQUEST FOR BIDS/PROPOSALS (RFB/RFP)

Project: Enemy Swim Head Start

RFB#: 05/3/19

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Head Start on this 3rd day of May, 2019 herein provides notification that bids will be received for the Enemy Swim Head Start Roof Replacement Project located in Enemy Swim, South Dakota on the west side of the Enemy Swim Community Center.

Work performed will include equipment, transportation, permits, materials and labor to complete the following per specifications and any manufacturer's warranty specifications and will include a contractor's warranty of work for one-year commencing from completion and acceptance of the project.

*Removal & disposal of the existing shingles

*Removal and replacement of the existing underlayment and decking/sheathing

*Removal and replacement of existing roof insulation

*Removal and disposal of the existing soffit, fascia, gutters, downspouts and splashguards

*Inspection, removal and disposal of all existing vents

*Install vent for cooking stove

*Install hood for cooking stove

*Removal and resetting of any existing antennas or satellites

*Materials and installation of underlayment, felt material, decking/sheathing

*Materials and installation of D rib steel, insulation, foam, lumber, versa vents and all other materials and hardware

*Materials and installation of .032" thickness seamless rain gutters, downspouts, splash blocks or approved equal

*Materials and installation of soffit, fascia and drip edge

*Materials and installation of all new furnace, sewer and other vents

*Site cleanup and removal of all debris and materials

Bidder shall be responsible for conducting site review, inspection of project area and recording and taking all measurements associated with furnishing materials and completing the tasks listed above. To schedule the site review, contact Lynn Halbert at 605-698-3103.

Sealed bids must have bid schedule sheet completed in full with quantities, unit cost per bid item, total cost per bid item and total cost for project. Failure to complete the bid schedule completely will result in an incomplete bid and will not be considered.

All sealed bids must include, along with bid schedule sheet:

*Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Business License

*Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate TERO Certification, if applicable

*Workmen's Compensation Coverage

*Liability Insurance

Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate TERO and Tribal Tax requirements:

*TERO Tax - 3.00 %

*SWO Tribal Use Tax - 5.50 %

*SWO Tribal Excise Tax - 2.00 %

Any questions regarding TERO and SWO Tribal Tax please contact the SWO TERO Office or the SWO Tribal Tax Office at (605) 698-3911.

Sealed bids will be received by the Procurement Office beginning on May 6, 2019 and closing on May 21st at 4:00 pm with project and company name on the envelope. Any bids received after this time and date will not be opened and sent back to the bidder. Acceptable sealed bids will be opened by the SWO Head Start Director, Procurement and Tribal Secretary's office on May 22 at 10:00 am at the Tribal Secretary's Office, Tribal Administration Building.

Notice of this Request for Bids herein is posted on the bulletin boards of Sisseton Wahpeton Housing Authority, Sisseton; SD; SWO TERO, Agency Village, SD; SWO Head Start, Agency Village, SD; Enemy Swim Head Start, Enemy Swim, SD; and copies of the same supplied to all building suppliers and builders exchanges located on or near the Lake Traverse Reservation, SD. The SWO Head Start reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids received for this project.

Contact the Procurement Office for copies of bid schedule, specifications and copies of any other forms and/or project documents: lenniebp@swo-nsn.gov or 605-698-3911 Ext. 8302

All interested parties acknowledge that any Agreement executed and performed within the Tribe's exclusive jurisdiction is subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the Tribal Court of Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation. All interested parties acknowledge that they must comply with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Ordinances: TERO Chapter 59 Requirements, Wage Rates & Compliance Plan; Business License Ordinance Chapter 53 and Tax Ordinance Chapter 67; and Chapter 75 Sex Offender Registration.

19-2tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-19-384-181

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE

OF NAME OF:

JACE ANDREW JAMES ANDERSON, Minor,

And concerning:

CARRIE GREELEY, Petitioner.

ORDER AND NOTICE OF HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from JACE ANDREW JAMES ANDERSON to JACE ANDREW JAMES LEFTHAND shall be heard before the Honorable Michael T Swallow, Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at 10:00 A.M. on the 13th day of JUNE, 2019.

Dated this 7th day of May, 2019.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST: Eileen Pfeiffer, CLERK OF COURTS

20-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-19-441-237

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE OF NAME OF:

WILLOW WAKINYAN NOHEART HENRY, Minor,

And concerning:

DAVONNA KEEBLE, Petitioner/Mother.

ORDER AND NOTICE OF HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from WILLOW WAKINYAN NOHEART HENRY to WILLOW WAKINYAN NOHEART KEEBLE shall be heard before the Honorable Michael T Swallow, Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at 9:30 A.M. on the 13th day of JUNE, 2019.

 

Dated this 7th day of May, 2019.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST: Eileen Pfeiffer, CLERK OF COURTS

20-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-19-401-197

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE OF NAME OF:

DANEEN LEIGH GIANNA ST. JOHN, Minor,

And concerning:

KEITH DECOTEAU, Petitioner.

ORDER AND NOTICE OF HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from DANEEN LEIGH GIANNA ST. JOHN to OLIVIA WICANHPI DECOTEAU shall be heard before the Honorable B.J. Jones, Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at 1:30 P.M. on the 29th day of MAY, 2019.

Dated this 6th day of May, 2019.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST: Eileen Pfeiffer, CLERK OF COURTS

20-3tc

 

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-19-455-251

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE OF NAME OF:

GAYLE VAZQUEZ, Petitioner.

ORDER AND NOTICE OF

HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from GAYLE EVELYN VAZQUEZ to GAYLE EVELYN STONE ARROW shall be heard before the Honorable Michael Swallow, Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at 9:00 A.M. on the 13TH day of JUNE, 2019.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2019.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST:

E. Pfeiffer, CLERK OF COURTS

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 16-178

SWOCSE/ Devola Bird, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JOSEPH GOODBIRD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 14-046

SWOCSE/ Brandilyn Franzen, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JOSEPH GOODBIRD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 07-120

SWOCSE/ Ashley Haug, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JOSEPH GOODBIRD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 08-044

SWOCSE/ MN/Erica Palacio, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JOSEPH GOODBIRD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 19-078

SWOCSE/ Elizabeth Janisch, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LUKE HANSON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO CS-19-082

SWOCSE/ Ashley Haug, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LUKE HANSON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 09-092

SWOCSE/ Connie Miller, PLAINTIFF

VS.

RANDOLPH HISGUN, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 07-056

SWOCSE/ Theresa Miller, PLAINTIFF

VS.

RANDOLPH HISGUN, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 07-049

SWOCSE/ Debra DuMarce, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ELROY WHITE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS-09-037

SWOCSE/ Jacqueline Franzen, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ALEX WANNA, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 15-113

SWOCSE/ Erica Keoke, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ALEX WANNA, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 12-070

SWOCSE/ Jennifer Owen, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CHERELLE KEEBLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 19-054

SWOCSE/ Leslie Neconish, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ALEXIS SHEPHERD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 19-014

SWOCSE/ Liberty Strutz, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ALEXIS SHEPHERD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 19-006

SWOCSE/ Brandon Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MARLENA DUMARCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 17-154

SWOCSE/ Laura Small, PLAINTIFF

VS.

KALISE BAGOLA, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Dismiss Child Support & Establish Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 19-046

SWOCSE/ Jolene Pumpkinseed, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BLOSSOM BLACKTHUNDER, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 05-489

SWOCSE/ Summer DuMarce, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TYSON BRANT, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 19-064

SWOCSE/ Sophia Bissonette, PLAINTIFF

VS.

WILFRED FAYANT, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 14-218

SWOCSE/ Mary Jo Keeble, PLAINTIFF

VS.

WILFRED FAYANT, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Establish Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 19-074

SWOCSE/ Donnette Redbear, PLAINTIFF

VS.

RICHARD HILL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 19-016

SWOCSE/ Liberty Strutz, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SAMUAL HILL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 07-132

SWOCSE/ Mary Goette, PLAINTIFF

VS.

AMANDA LUFKINS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 18-226

SWOCSE/ Lashannon Quinn-Mack, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ARCHIE MACK, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 19-058

SWOCSE/ Donna Thompson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ARCHIE MACK, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 19-048

SWOCSE/ Jolene Pumpkinseed, PLAINTIFF

VS.

RANDALL PUMPKINSEED, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 19-056

SWOCSE/ Donna Thompson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LASHANNON QUINN-MACK, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 19-072

SWOCSE/ Miranda Rodlund, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LONI RODLUND, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 19-018

SWOCSE/ Belva White, PLAINTIFF

VS.

PAIGE WHITE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of May, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 19-062

SWOCSE/ Sophia Bissonette, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JOLEEN BISSONETTE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of May, 2019 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 18-010

SWOCSE/ Tina Bernard, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MAYCEE CRAWFORD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of May, 2019 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 16-102

SWOCSE/ Dustin Locke, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BELINDA LOCKE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of May, 2019 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 19-052

SWOCSE/ Nadine Eastman, PLAINTIFF

VS.

RICHARD VALENTINE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of May, 2019 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 19-071

SWOCSE/ Dawn Eagle, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JACENTA MILK, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of May, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 19-063

SWOCSE/ Tara Mittelstaedt PLAINTIFF

VS.

GARY WHITE, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of May, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of April, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

19-3tc

 

March 2019 Tribal Council proceedings

Watch for March Council minutes to be released for publication.

Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following position(s):

Behavioral Health Administration Assistant, Health and Social Services

Closing Date May 17th, 2019 @ 04:30 PM

Field Operations Supervisor, Fish & Wildlife

Office Manager, Fish & Wildlife

Protective Service Worker, Child Protection Program

MCH Aide, CHR/MCH

Patrol Officer, Law Enforcement

School Resource Officer, Law Enforcement

Family Coordinator, Behavioral Health/Youth & Family TREE

Closing Date May 24th, 2019 @ 04:30 PM

Dakota Culture & Language Teacher, Head Start

Bus Driver/Custodian, Head Start

Teacher, Early Head Start

Teacher Aide, Early Head Start

Young Child Wellness Behavioral Specialist (LAUNCH) Half-Time, Health & Social Services

Positions Open Until Filled

Application and job description information can be seen at SWO Human Resources Office or http://www.swo-nsn.gov/contact/employment. Application can be downloaded from "Apply Now" and emailed to ArnoldW@SWO-NSN.GOV or DeniseH@SWO-NSN.GOV. Contact can also be at Arnold Williams 698-8238 or Denise Hill 698-8251 with questions. (Tribal preference will apply).

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Employment Opportunities

SUBSTITUTE AREAS OF NEED

Substitutes needed for the following: *Teaching,*Bus Driver, Custodian, Cook, Receptionist, and Bus Monitor.

Qualifications: High School Diploma or GED and *specific certification requirements for Teaching and Bus Driving.

Applications accepted on an on-going basis. Please call or stop in the office for more information.

ADMINISTRATION POSITIONS

SPECIAL EDUCATION POSITIONS

NOW ACCEPTING BIDS TO FILL A SERVICE CONTRACT FOR AN OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST FOR THE 2019-2020 SCHOOL YEAR

Qualifications: Bachelor's degree in Occupational Therapy from an American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) or the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) certified school, and currently licensed as an occupational therapist in South Dakota

Open Date: April 29, 2019

Closing Date: May 14, 2019

HIGH SCHOOL POSITIONS

Position: Special Education Teacher (w/sign-on bonus)

Qualifications: Current Teaching Certification in any state meeting the requirements for the position in which applying

Opening Date: November 2, 2017

Closing Date: Open until filled

Position: Science Teacher

Qualifications: Current Teaching Certification in any state meeting the requirements for the position in which applying

Opening Date: December 11, 2018

Closing Date: Open until filled

Position: Social Studies Teacher

Qualifications: Current Teaching Certification in any state meeting the requirements for the position in which applying

Opening Date: April 19, 2019

Closing Date: May 3, 2019

MIDDLE SCHOOL POSITIONS

Position: Special Education Teacher (w/sign-on bonus)

Qualifications: Current Teaching Certification in any state meeting the requirements for the position in which applying

Opening Date: April 19, 2019

Closing Date: May 3, 2019

ELEMENTARY POSITIONS

Position: Special Education Teacher (w/sign-on bonus)

Qualifications: Current Teaching Certification in any state meeting the requirements for the position in which applying

Opening Date: April 26, 2019

Closing Date: May 10, 2019

K-5 ELEMENTARY SUMMER SCHOOL 2019: JULY 8-AUGUST 2, 2019

Position: Elementary Teacher (6)

Qualifications: Current Teaching Certification in any state meeting the requirements for the position in which applying

Position: Kindergarten Paraprofessional

Qualifications: High School Diploma/GED with score of 461+ on the Paraprofessional Praxis or 48+ college credits, and experience working with elementary students

Position: Elementary Principal

Qualifications: Current Elementary Principal Certification in any state.

Position: Cultural Activities Teacher

Qualifications: High School Diploma/GED with score of 461+ on the Paraprofessional Praxis or 48+ college credits with a background in Dakota Language and Culture and experience working with elementary students

Position: Bus Driver (3)

Qualifications: High School Diploma/GED with current South Dakota School Bus Drivers License

Opening Date: April 26, 2019

Closing Date: May 10, 2019

DAKOTA STUDIES POSITIONS

SUPPORT STAFF POSITIONS

Application Materials can be found at the TZTS Documents link: All applicants are required to complete both the Application and *Background check forms. Tiospa Zina is an Indian Preference employer.

*All applicants and employees are subject to both 25 U.S.C. 3207: The Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act and the 42 U.S.C. 13041: Crime Control Act

 

ENEMY SWIM DAY SCHOOL

SPECIAL EDUCATION PARA EDUCATOR

Enemy Swim Day School has an opening for a Special Education Para Educator for the 2019-2020 school year. Duties include assisting students, working with SpEd staff, reporting and other duties. Must have post-secondary education, an AA degree or equivalent or successfully passing the ParaPro Assessment. ESDS can assist with ParaPro Assessment preparation, if needed. Wage is dependent upon experience. This position includes benefits. Call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 and ask for Dr. Eastman to inquire about the position. Applications may also be picked up in the administration office or on our website www.esds.us. Indian Preference policies apply. Position is open until filled.

20-2tc

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Foods Department:

Bus Person (Full-Time) Swing

Cashier (2 Full-Time) where needed

Cook II (3 Full-Time) where needed

Cook III (2 Full-Time) where needed

Housekeeping Department:

Attendant (10 Full-Time) where needed

Marketing Department:

VIP Ambassador (Full-Time) Swing

Shift Supervisor (Full-Time) Swing

Closing Date: May 17, 2019 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions.

Two identifications documents required upon hire.

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department 16849 102nd Street SE Hankinson ND 58041 For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment) Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

ADMINISTRATION: ASSOCIATE MANAGER (1 PART-TIME)

GENERAL FUNCTION:

The purpose of this position is to maintain interdepartmental communications to ensure the smooth operation of the property and promote the highest degree of customer satisfaction.

REQUIREMENTS:

High school diploma or G.E.D. equivalency. Minimum of three years' experience in gaming, preferably supervisory experience. Must be able and willing to work any and all shifts. Knowledge of casino          operations, policies and procedures. Excellent communication skills, both written and oral. Be able to handle diverse situations. Be able to stand/walk for long periods of time. Must obtain a Key Gaming License.

This position will close on May 22, 2019 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply / EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

TABLE GAMES: BLACKJACK DEALER (2 Full-Time) Rotating & On Call as needed.

GENERAL FUNCTION: To deal the assigned game in accordance with all applicable policies and procedures as stated in the Dakota Sioux Casino Dealer's Manual. Pay winnings or collect losing bets as established by the rules and procedures of a specific game.

REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. Experience preferred but not necessary, will provide training. Knowledge of arithmetic, demonstrate effective communication skills, Must be able to work any/all shifts. Must be willing to work 8+ hours if needed. Must be able to stand for long periods of time (1 to 2 hours at a time). Must demonstrate excellent attendance practices and customer service skills. Using mathematics to solve problems. Must obtain a Key Gaming License.

This position will be open until filled.

Indian Preference will apply / EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

GIFT SHOP: GIFT SHOP CLERK (1 Full-Time Rotating)

GENERAL FUNCTION: Must have excellent customer service background. Must have good communication skills, must greet customers and welcome various venders entering establishment.

REQUIREMENTS: Must have a High school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. Must be neat in appearance, must have working knowledge in retail sales operation. Operate Infogenesis Point of Sale system cash register, receive various payment types. Must be 21 years of age for cross training purposes. Must be able to lift, bend and use a step ladder. Must obtain a Non-Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on May 15, 2019 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply / EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

GROUP SALES: EVENT STAFF - SEASONAL (4 Part-Time)

GENERAL FUNCTION: Perform a variety of event service functions to include event guests.

REQUIREMENTS: Must be 18 years of age. Must obtain Non-Gaming license upon hire. Applicants must be team player and possess outstanding customer service skill. Cash handling experience preferred.

This position will close on May 15, 2019 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply / EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 
 

 

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