sota on-line masthead

 

Picture Picks of the Week

Don't miss out -- Click here
View the best pictures from this week's Sota
In full color!

 

Link to TEAB Executive candidates forum - Ocrt. 23, 2018

Link to KXSW Reznet videos here.

Wind River Water Code adapted for Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe (draft)

  Obituaries Editorials Editor's column Education
Legals
Trading post

 

 

Volume 49 Issue No. 47

Anpetu Iyamni, Wednesday, Nov. 21, 2018

Inside this Edition –

2018 SWO General Election returns subject to Tribal Court challenge

Highlights of 2018 Veterans Day Wacipi

New CEO comes to Coteau des Prairie Health Care System

SWO October 2018 Council proceedings

Reminder: Deadline for receiving copy is noon on Friday

Chairman's Corner –

Updating the Oyate

My friends and relatives:

Our sincerest condolences to those that lost loved ones these past few weeks.

As we move into a transition period for incoming leadership, I will do the best I can to address ongoing administrative issues, begin to prepare a project update for incoming leadership, and announce my departure to the regional boards and national committee so that they can hold elections for the seats I was elected to serve – Chairman of United Tribes of North Dakota, Vice-Chairman of the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's Health Board, and the national at large member for the HHS Secretary's Tribal Advisory Committee. These regional and national positions do not automatically roll over to my successor, however, it would be beneficial to our Tribe if Ms. Robertson is elected to these positions. There is a multitude of issues regionally and nationally that affect our Tribe and other tribes in our region, and holding positions on these regional and national boards can give our Tribe and our sister tribes an advantage, especially when we are constantly challenged with attacks on our sovereignty, and fighting the infiltration of hard drugs coming into our region.

The veterans wacipi was a success and I'd like to thank all those that have served our country during peace time and war time.

I look forward to Old Agency's wacipi this weekend and hope everyone enjoys Thanksgiving with their families and friends.

Finally, I would like to remind everyone of the upcoming General Council next month; I look forward to sharing my report to General Council that will include reports from our Tribal programs.

Dave Flute, SWST Chairman.

General Election returns challenged; Big Coulee District special election set Jan. 3rd

The Reservation Election Board has not yet certified the 2018 SWO general election results, pending outcome of a legal challenge.

A ruling is expected in Tribal Court as early as Monday, November 19.

The REB has issued a notice that a special election will be held on Thursday, January 3, 2019, to fill the Big Coulee District Councilperson post.

Voting will take place from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m. at the Big Coulee District Center.

2018 Veterans Princess Selection Board report

Provided by Geri Opsal, SWO Veterans Service Officer

The Veteran Selection Board this year comprised of 5 Women Veterans:

They are: Geri Opsal, USAF & Coordinator; Willow Eastman, US Navy; Teresa Thompson, US Army; Ariel Williams, US Navy; Winona Paruzo, US Navy & US Army; Alexis Larsen, AD USAF. Alternate Alexis Larsen stepped in for Ariel Williams at this time.

2017 Veterans Princess Journey Renville was provided her last Grand Entry at 7 p.m. Friday night 9th of November, 2018.

Princess crowning immediately followed.

We had four candidates vying for the title of 2018 SWO Veterans Princess.

The candidates were: Evelyn Fischer, Age 4. Maya Anderson, Age 11, Amelia Woller, Age 8 and Jaya Burshiem, Age 11.

Following an interview by the Board, with the candidates presenting in their regalia, we had them all dance one song in the style of their regalia.

We want to say that each one of the candidates were wonderful, demonstrated a lot of respect for Veterans, pride in our culture, and is a wonderful all-around person.

The winner of the Veteran Princess contest is Jaya Burshiem.

She will represent the Honor Guards during all functions until next year.

She was crowned by 2017 outgoing Princess Journey Renville.

There was an honor song sung and many people came and extended their congratulations.

We would like to think ALL contestants and would like to see them back next year along with anyone else interested.

We will have the same Board back and next year we are going to ask ALL previous SWO Veterans Princesses to dance to bring in the one we select in 2019.

We would like to congratulate Jaye Burshiem for winning the title of 2018 SWO Veterans Princess.

See the accompanying photo of the candidates, and one of Jaya and Journey and the crown being presented. Jaya will keep the crown after her reign.

Pidamaya.

Veterans and widows pension

Agency Village, S.D – Nov. 16, 2018 – If you are a veteran or widow of a veteran on limited income or with significant medical expenses, you may be eligible for a monthly pension from the United States Department of Veterans Affair (VA).

In either case, the veteran must have served on active duty and under other than dishonorable conditions for at least 90 consecutive days with at least one of those days being during a period of war.

In the case of veteran's pension, the veteran must be determined by the VA to be permanently and totally disabled. This is determined by the veteran's degree of disability and employability or the veteran must simply be 65 years of age or older. There are no age or disability requirements, however, when the surviving spouse is the applicant.

Once the above criteria are met, income, assets and unreimbursed family medical expenses are then considered in determining your adjusted income. You should also understand that the paid funeral bill is also considered a countable expense in determining adjusted income of a surviving spouse.

In most cases it takes just a few minutes to determine a veteran or spouse's eligibility for pension. Don't rule yourself out. Visit your local Veterans Service Officer to see if you qualify.

The Tribal VSO, Geri Opsal, is located at 205 East Oak Street Suite 121, Sisseton, SD; phone 605-698-3388.

Stop in or give us a call.

TGIF – Thanks Giving is Forever, to our Veterans!

November is a month rich in history and filled with numerous opportunities to thank our veterans, our military personnel and their families. It is a season of gratitude that should have etchings of how we secured and maintain our freedoms.

Earlier this month we gathered to honor and thank those men and women who have safeguarded our Nation both in peace and in war. It was a time to renew our commitment to those who have borne the battle; those who wrote a blank check made payable to: "the United States of America" for an amount of "up to and including their life."

Our veterans have a long legacy - they saw battle unfold before their very eyes and crossed into enemy territories not because they wanted to, but because they knew it was the right thing to do.

November is Native American Heritage Month and is a great opportunity to celebrate rich and diverse cultures, traditions, and histories and to acknowledge the important contributions our Native people have given this great state.

November is National Family Caregivers month. Caregivers exert a significant amount of energy and attention focusing on the needs of others by selflessly providing care to ill, injured and disabled veterans.

November is also National Veterans and Military Families month. Serving alongside our men and women in uniform are spouses, siblings, parents, and children who embody the ideals of patriotism, pride, resilience, service above self, and honor.

Last but not least, November is a time set aside to give thanks and count our many blessings. This year, as you gather with family and friends, please remember to be thankful for

America's soldiers, sailors, airmen, marines and coastguard who bravely answered the call to defend our freedom, to aid our friends and allies, and to turn back aggressors. In every generation, brave Americans stepped forward and served honorable in the United States Armed Forces.

We have a rich heritage of values, courage, sacrifice and honor.

Larry Zimmerman, Secretary.

South Dakota Department of Veterans Affairs.

State Veterans Home achieves LEED certification

Pierre, SD – The South Dakota Department of Veterans Affairs has achieved LEED Silver certification for the Michael J. Fitzmaurice State Veterans Home in Hot Springs.

LEED, or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, is the most widely used green building rating system in the world. LEED provides a framework to create healthy, highly efficient and cost-saving green buildings and is a globally recognized symbol of sustainability achievement. There are less than 200 buildings in South Dakota that are LEED certified.

"Receiving LEED certification is a great accomplishment for our State Veterans home," said Larry Zimmerman, Secretary of the South Dakota Department of Veterans Affairs. "These efficiencies will save on the environment for decades to come."

"LEED is a third-party verification system for green buildings developed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)," said Zimmerman. "We were fortunate to have TSP, Scull Construction, and the Office of State Engineering working with us to achieve this certification."

SWO Tribe's SD gaming compact up for public review

SD Dept. of Revenue hosting public meetings in Watertown and Sisseton

In a front-page news article Friday, November 9, the Watertown Public Opinion reported on discussion held at that week's Codington County Commission meeting. The Commissioners talked about changes the SWO Tribe is requesting to its gaming compact with the state of South Dakota and how they would impact Codington County.

According to the PO, the Commissioners were concerned about receiving decreased revenue for "governmental services" (highway maintenance and public safety/emergency services).

In an update on November 14, the PO reported on additional talks by the Codington County Commission regarding the scheduled hearings.

The Commissioners are said to "want to protect that source of revenue ($470 per slot machine annually for governmental services)."

The Tribe is asking to reduce payments to $200 per machine.

Under the current compact negotiated in 2012, Codington County was set to receive $225,000 per year in 2017 and 2018, but that is not happening.

The Tribe has invoked a provision which provides for a decrease in payment due to decreased casino net revenue.

So, instead of the anticipated $225,000, Codington County is now to receive $150,000 for both 2017 and 2018 – rate for 2014, 2015, and 2016.

According to the PO, the Codington County Commissioners have discussed the issue with Roberts County Commissioners, as the Tribe has a similar agreement to pay Roberts County for governmental services related to Dakota Connection Casino.

In its request to change the gaming compact, the Tribe is also asking for an additional 1,000 machines.

Public hearings about the proposed changes are being held this Tuesday, November 20th.

The first meeting will take place at the Watertown Event Center at 8:30 a.m.; the second, in the community room of the Sisseton City Hall, at 1:30 p.m.

The meetings are being hosted by the SD Department of Revenue, Commission on Gaming.

New CEO comes to Coteau des Prairies Health Care

Sisseton, SD – Nov. 12, 2018 – Coteau des Prairies Health Care System announced today that Craig Kantos will become the new chief executive officer (CEO) on Nov. 14, 2018.

Kantos has over 30 years of experience in hospital leadership roles in Wisconsin. He was involved in many community activities including Rotary, Chamber of Commerce and Boy Scout leadership.

"I am incredibly honored to lead health care in the Sisseton community," says Kantos. "I genuinely look forward to meeting the people and businesses of Sisseton and working together to form long-standing relationships to ensure quality health care."

Kantos earned a bachelor's degree from Concordia College in Moorhead, Minn. as well as a master's degree in hospital administration (MHA) from Cardinal Stritch University in Milwaukee, Wisc. He and his wife Lori have two adult sons.

"With his many years of experience in health care administration, we are fortunate to have Craig lead Coteau des Prairies Health," said Terry Jaspers, board chairman of the Coteau des Prairies Health Care System. "He has the expertise and leadership skills to continue providing excellent care in the Sisseton community."

About Coteau des Prairies Health Care System

Coteau Health Care System is a 25-bed, critical access, acute care, community non-profit hospital. We serve approximately 21,000 residents in the Glacial Lakes Region in Northeast South Dakota as well as West Central Minnesota. CDP Health Care System operates 3 certified rural health clinics including the attached Sisseton Clinic; the Browns Valley Clinic in Browns Valley, Minnesota; the Rosholt Clinic in Rosholt, South Dakota; and the Herman Clinic in Herman, MN. At Coteau Health Care System, we are passionate about the work we do. We believe in offering our patients individualized attention and care, emphasizing their unique needs.

Meet the Native American woman who beat the sponsor of North Dakota's ID Law –

Ruth Buffalo became the first Native American Democratic woman elected to the ND Legislature

By Maggie Astor

New York Times – Nov. 13, 2018 – In the end, the Native American tribes of North Dakota could not save their preferred candidate, Senator Heidi Heitkamp, from a double-digit loss.

But, galvanized by anger over the state's voter ID law and aided by the intensive efforts of tribal leaders and advocacy groups, they turned out for last week's election in numbers unprecedented even for a presidential election, much less a midterm.

In Sioux County, where the Standing Rock Indian Reservation is, turnout was up 105 percent from the last midterm elections in 2014 and 17 percent from the 2016 presidential election, according to data from the North Dakota secretary of state's office. In Rolette County, home to the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians, it was up 62 percent from 2014 and 33 percent from 2016. In Benson County, home to the Spirit Lake Nation, it was up 52 percent from 2014 and 10 percent from 2016.

One of the most striking results of the night, though, came far from the reservations: in a normally Republican district in the Fargo area, where Ruth Buffalo became the first Native American Democratic woman elected to the North Dakota Legislature. She did it by unseating State Representative Randy Boehning, the primary sponsor of the very voter ID law Native Americans had feared would disenfranchise them.

For all the symbolic resonance of her victory, Ms. Buffalo, a public health professional with three master's degrees, campaigned entirely on local issues — and her win underscored how partisan divisions can be scrambled when the national hot buttons are removed from the conversation.

"Ruth ran not as necessarily a Native American woman, but as a woman in Fargo who wanted to talk about issues that were affecting her community," said Scott McNeil, executive director of the North Dakota Democratic-Nonpartisan League Party. Mr. Boehning did not respond to a request for comment.

We spoke with Ms. Buffalo on Monday. The interview has been condensed.

Q. Tell me about your background and how you ended up in politics.

A. I have a Bachelor of Science in criminal justice and three master's degrees: one in management, another in business administration and one in public health.

I ran unsuccessfully in 2016 in a statewide race for insurance commissioner. I became party secretary [of the North Dakota Democratic N.P.L.] in April 2017. I was also appointed to the Fargo Native American Commission by the mayor in July 2017. I just kind of stayed involved in the community and continued to volunteer on different boards and commissions.

You've spent much of your career in public health.

I worked seven years at a tribal college as a "strengthening lifestyles" director. I was a head women's basketball coach for three years. For one year, after my son was born, I was assistant men's basketball coach. And then I was offered a scholarship to study public health — master's degree classes — and also be a part of a breast cancer research team in an urban setting. Prior to those seven years, I was a substance abuse prevention coordinator for my tribe, the M.H.A. Nation. I've always been more on the prevention side of things.

You've said that you went into public health because of your own family's experience. What happened there?

I'm the oldest of three girls biologically. My mom also raised two of my older first cousins, who I consider sisters, and three older brothers. When I was 10, my younger sister was misdiagnosed at the local field clinic in Mandaree. She had appendicitis, and it almost ruptured and we almost lost her. Local health care providers turned her and my mom away. They would say she just had flu-like symptoms and give her Tylenol and send her home.

My mom drove her to the nearest town that has a hospital — Watford City, 27 miles away — and the ambulance rushed her to the next level of care in Williston, and they had emergency surgeons. From that experience, with my little sister being 5 at the time — it really opened my eyes. It was scary, and I wanted to figure out how we could fix that in our community to where nobody else would have to experience that.

So from that point on, I set out to become a medical doctor. I applied and got into a summer program in seventh grade: physics, chemistry, math. It was a six-week program every summer. Then I went on to study pre-med in college. I found that I could not work with cadavers my whole senior year, so I had a life-changing decision to make [laughs].

What were the biggest issues you focused on in your campaign?

Access to health care. I knocked over 6,500 doors, and that was the most common theme I found at the doors from voters. Another issue that came up was our education system, K-12 and higher ed, and then also property taxes. People are afraid to be thrown out on the street, to lose their homes because the property taxes continue to increase.

North Dakota is a pretty conservative state. How do you think you won as a Democrat?

I would say meeting people where they're at. Literally on their doorsteps. Most people were surprised to see a candidate at their doorstep. They were pretty receptive and open to having a conversation with me on what matters most to them.

We did try to keep up on our Facebook page and do different animated videos on issues. Because I'm not a politician. And that's the feedback I got from people, too, that a lot of the words they were seeing through the videos seemed to be coming from a regular person.

Let's talk about the voter ID law. Did that affect you at all?

I'm living currently off the reservation, in a district that is not located near or on present-day tribal lands. But my entire family, basically — my mom, my sisters, my aunt, cousins, uncle — they all live on the reservation.

We have friends that had the precincts that they normally would vote at shut down for budgetary reasons, which is hard to comprehend, because they're right in the middle of oil country. There used to be two precincts in Mandaree, where I'm originally from, and the more rural precinct — the precinct that is farther east of Mandaree — for some reason was closed. They had to drive all the way around the river to Killdeer, at least 45 minutes.

As a Native American woman, you defeated the main sponsor of the voter ID law that many feel targeted Native Americans. How does that feel?

It's crazy that it happened that way because I just didn't — I guess I didn't know that, to be honest. That he was the prime author. I didn't know until the day after the election, when a current legislator pointed it out.

Savanna's Act advances in Senate Committee

New report sheds light on epidemic of Missing & Murdered Indigenous Women

Washington, DC – Nov. 14, 2018 – The U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs today voted to advance Savanna's Act, U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp's legislation to help address the epidemic of missing and murdered Native American women. Today's hearing comes as a new report from the Urban Indian Health Institute finds extensive underreporting and shortcomings in understanding the crisis, reinforcing the need for urgency and broadened awareness to address it.

Named for Savanna LaFontaine-Greywind, who was abducted and tragically killed last year in Fargo, Savanna's Act builds on a bill Heitkamp and former U.S. Senator John McCain (R-AZ) introduced and got signed into law to expand Amber alert warnings in Indian Country – where such alerts often do not exist – to help stop abductions. The Indian Affairs Committee held a hearing on Savanna's Act after Heitkamp introduced it last fall.

"When I introduced Savanna's Act, one of the main goals was to raise the issue of missing and murdered indigenous women to a national level and begin the conversation of how to address it. Today's passage of Savanna's Act in the Indian Affairs Committee is another important step forward, and a sign that this issue is closer to gaining the attention it deserves," Heitkamp said. "Not only will the bill help make sure law enforcement has guidelines in place to respond to cases of those who go missing or are murdered, but it will also encourage law enforcement agencies to submit data on those cases annually to the Department of Justice. I was proud to help pass the AMBER Alert in Indian Country Act into law earlier this year to help protect Native children, and through Savanna's Act and the #NotInvisible campaign the effort to give these issues the attention they deserve will continue."

Also today, Heitkamp helped introduce a Senate resolution designating this November as National Native American Heritage Month. Last November, Heitkamp she launched a social media campaign using #NotInvisible to raise awareness about the crisis of missing and murdered indigenous women and bring it out of the shadows.

Heitkamp helped unveil the Urban Indian Health Institute report at a press conference today in Washington. She was joined by U.S. Senators Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Patty Murray (D-WA), Maria Cantwell (D-WA), and Jon Tester (D-MT), along with advocates for Native women and families. The report revealed significant challenges in collecting data on the total number of missing or murdered American Indians and Alaska Natives residing off-reservation and outside rural villages.

On some reservations, Native women are murdered at ten times the national average, and 84 percent of Native women have experienced violence in their lifetime. In 2016, North Dakota had 125 reported cases of missing Native women according to the National Crime Information Center, but numbers are likely much higher as cases are often under reported and data isn't officially collected.

Click here for statements of support for Savanna's Act from United Tribes of North Dakota, National Congress of American Indians, and other tribal chairmen and leaders across North Dakota.

Specifically, Savanna's Act would:

· Improve data on tribal victims by requiring the Department of Justice to: provide training to law enforcement agencies to record tribal enrollment information or affiliation in crime information databases; raise awareness about the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, including conducting specific outreach to Tribes; and annually report known statistics on missing and murdered Native Americans and recommendations on how to improve data collection.

· Improve tribal access to crime information databases by requiring the Attorney General to consult and solicit recommendations from Tribes on improved access to local, regional, state, and federal crime information databases and criminal justice information systems during the annual consultations mandated under the Violence Against Women Act.

· Create locally developed guidelines for responding to cases of missing and murdered Native Americans.

Background

Heitkamp has long worked to stop violence, exploitation, and trafficking of Native women and children by:

· Creating an Amber Alert in Indian Country. Heitkamp introduced a bipartisan bill with U.S. Senator John McCain (R-AZ) to expand AMBER Alert child abduction warnings to and beyond Indian Country. The bill was signed into law last April

· Combating human trafficking in Indian Country. Heitkamp held an initial Senate hearing in September 2013 on stopping human trafficking with a focus on Indian Country. She has worked closely with Cindy McCain, a global leader in the effort to stop human trafficking. McCain testified at a Senate hearing earlier this month on human trafficking in Indian Country and highlighted Heitkamp's work on the issue. In 2015, Heitkamp brought Cindy McCain to Fort Berthold, to talk about how to combat human trafficking. In September, Heitkamp called for federal agencies and organizations to provide specific training on human trafficking to federal government employees in Indian Country. Heitkamp also played a key role in passing bipartisan legislation in 2015 to fight human trafficking, and introduced multiple other bills on the issue.

· Calling for a permanent federal law enforcement presence in Indian Country. When she served as North Dakota's Attorney General and now as a U.S. senator, Heitkamp has worked to raise awareness about the need for a permanent federal law enforcement presence across Indian Country. In 2016, she brought then-Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Director James B. Comey to Fort Berthold to press him on the issue. Just a few weeks ago, Heitkamp spoke with the current FBI director about law enforcement challenges in Indian Country and pressed the agency to make these issues a priority.

· Protecting Native women from violence. In the U.S. Senate, Heitkamp has built on her work as North Dakota's Attorney General to combat domestic violence. The first bill she cosponsored was the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, which she then played a major role in passing in 2013. Heitkamp worked to include a key provision in the bill to address the continuing crisis of violence against women in tribal communities. The provision strengthens the existing programs and provides tribal governments the force they need to prosecute non-Indian perpetrators who commit these crimes on tribal land.

· Keeping communities strong and safe. Through her Strong & Safe Communities Initiative, which Heitkamp launched in September 2014, she has worked to address the emerging challenges in North Dakota as a result of the state's population boom, including crime, exploitation, and trafficking issues in Indian Country.

Report: Crimes against Native women vastly underreported in urban areas

By Daniel Perle

Washington, DC – Cronkite News – Nov. 15, 2018 – On Nov. 14, 1992, a Native American woman was found murdered in Tucson, and 26 years later her name is still not known.

That's just one example of the lack of solid data that has led to the underreporting of hundreds of deaths and thousands of missing persons cases for Native American women and girls living in urban areas, a new report says.

The report by the Urban Indian Health Institute pointed to the fact, for example, that there were 5,712 cases of missing indigenous women and girls to the National Crime Information Center in 2016, but only 116 were logged in the Justice Department's missing persons database.

"You will never solve a problem you won't admit you have, that you don't have data on, that you don't have the ability to analyze exactly what is happening," said Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, D-North Dakota, co-sponsor of a bill that would require better federal collection of such crime data in urban areas.

The data was collected from police departments in 71 cities and 29 states through public information requests, a process that turned up 506 cases of Native women or girls who were murdered or missing or whose case status was unknown. The report began by saying that number was likely "an undercount."

While rates of violence on reservations have been found to be as high as 10 times the national average, the report said, no research had been done in the area of indigenous women in cities, even though "71 percent of American Indians and Alaska natives live in urban areas."

"And because we live in these cities there is the assumption that the same resources, the same police that every one of you would call would answer your call in the same way they answer mine," said Abigail Echo-Hawk, who co-authored the report with Annita Lucchesi. "And I'm here to tell you, and our report is here to tell you, that is wrong."

The difficulty of getting access to information was spotlighted in the report: Of the 72 law enforcement agencies contacted, 40 provided some data, 14 did not provide data and 18 still had pending public records request as of Oct. 15. The institute said three Freedom of Information Act requests filed with the Los Angeles Police Department did not result in any data for the report.

"They (LAPD) had a backlog of thousands of requests that three staff members were responsible for filling, and many were not answered" as the institute's first request was, the report said. "Or were rerouted to the wrong agency (as UIHI's second request was). An entire year later, the agency expected UIHI to file a third request and 'get back in line.'"

Although the oldest case found in the report was from 1943, less than half the agencies contacted were able to provide data from before 2000 and 77 percent did not provide data from before 1990.

Nine cities, or 13 percent of the total, said they were not able to search for American Indian or Native American victims in their databases. Police in Fargo, North Dakota, told the report's authors that "sometimes the information (on a victim's race) would not be asked and our record system defaults to white."

"One of the areas that really needs to change in Arizona and in other states is that there is rampant misclassification of race and ethnicity," Echo-Hawk said. "People aren't asking the race and ethnicity of those who are going missing and murdered, and if they're asking them, they're not putting them in the databases."

One page of the report said that "several police departments provided UIHI with data that included both American Indians and Indian-Americans with visibly Indian American surnames (e.g. Singh)."

Savanna's Act, named for a murdered Native American woman, would strengthen federal efforts to collect data on missing or murdered Native Americans. The bill was passed unanimously Wednesday by the Senate Indian Affairs Committee.

Arizona cities examined in the report were Flagstaff, Phoenix, Tempe and Tucson. Tucson reported 30 murders and one missing person case. Flagstaff had seven murders, Tempe had two murders and one case whose status is unknown while Phoenix had six murders and eight missing person cases.

"The community has a stake in safety there in the city and knowing what kind of violent crime is occurring and who are the victims … it's imperative that the police provide that information," Lucchesi said.

For more stories from Cronkite News, visit cronkitenews.azpbs.org.

Acting AG Matthew Whitaker's remarks at DOJ rural and tribal elder justice summit

Des Moines, IA – Nov. 14, 2018 – Today I am announcing that the next edition of our Journal of Justice Policy and the Law—formerly known as the USA Bulletin—will focus on Elder Justice. It will also be the longest bulletin we've ever published since we started it back in 1953. These bulletins are public, and so they can be used by state and local prosecutors as well as our U.S. Attorneys' offices. That will provide the knowledge and insights of some of the top experts on elder justice to the prosecutors who are on the front lines.

Second, we are investing in services for seniors who have been victimized by criminals.

I am announcing today that over the next 11 months, our Office for Victims of Crime will provide nearly $18 million to help seniors who are victims of crime. These funds can be used for priorities like legal services, telephone hotlines, and housing for seniors who have lost their homes—which is something that happens all too often. We are using these OVC funds for a wider variety of services for seniors than ever before.

And finally, we are continuing to enforce the law aggressively and forcefully.

Remarks as prepared for delivery

Thank you, Marc for that kind introduction and thank you for your leadership as United States Attorney for the Southern District of Iowa. I think you'll agree with me that it's one of the best jobs in the world.

This is a distinguished crowd. Thank you to:

Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller

Six U.S. Attorneys: Bryan Schroder, Trent Shores, Ron Parsons, Andrew Murray, Pete Deegan, and Marc Krickbaum

the head of our Office of Justice Programs and former U.S. Attorney for Northern Iowa, Matt Dummermuth,

Katie Sullivan, the head of our Office on Violence Against Women,

Darlene Hutchinson, the Director of our Office for Victims of Crime,

Assistant Agriculture Secretary Anne Hazlett,

Assistant Secretary Lance Robertson of HHS,

SEC Regional Director Joel Levin,

Postal Inspector Guy Cottrell,

Acting Commissioner of the Social Security Administration Nancy Berryhill,

Director Deborah Cox Roush of Senior Corps, and

A special thanks to all those who made this event possible, especially Toni Bacon, Andy Mao, Kate Peterson, and their teams at the Elder Justice Initiative and the Office for Victims of Crime.

Thank you all for being here for this summit. I think this turnout shows how important these issues are to the Department of Justice and to the Trump administration.

It's good to be home. Des Moines is my home. This is where I played football, where I practiced law, where I prosecuted criminals as a United States Attorney, and it's where I'm raising my family.

Iowa shaped my values.

One of those Iowa values is that we respect our elders. We recognize the debt that we owe to our parents and grandparents.

Many seniors in Iowa and across America spent their whole lives working, saving, and sacrificing so that they could enjoy a secure and peaceful retirement. And under President Trump their 401(k)s are looking good.

But criminals can try to take it all away with one phone call, one letter, or even one email.

Each year, an estimated $3 billion are stolen or defrauded from millions of American seniors. Through so-called grandparent scams, fake prizes or even outright extortion, criminals target our seniors to rob them of their hard-earned savings and their peace of mind.

And it appears as though this threat is only growing. The Senate Aging Committee's Fraud Hotline received twice as many reports in 2016 as it received in 2015.

These fraud schemes can happen to anyone. And so I hope that no one will feel ashamed to come forward and report if they've been a victim. Some of my family members here in Iowa have received these phone calls. Some of you have, too.

At the Department of Justice, we acknowledge that rural areas are especially vulnerable to these crimes.

In tightly knit communities like the one I grew up in, people are generous and they develop a sense of trust with one another.

Criminals look at that and they see dollar signs.

Oftentimes local law enforcement in rural communities have to cover large areas of land with only a small number of officers. They don't have the time or the resources to investigate fraud schemes that are often national or even international in scope.

Fortunately, the Department of Justice has their backs. As President Donald Trump has said, this administration supports state and local law enforcement 100 percent.

In this administration, we are well aware that 85 percent of law enforcement officers in this country serve at the state and local levels. We know that we can't achieve our goals without them.

Over the past year we have taken historic new action to support our state and local partners and to keep our seniors safe.

This year our U.S. Attorneys' offices have each designated an elder justice coordinator to help prevent crime by educating seniors about scams and other threats. Over just nine months, our elder justice coordinators participated in nearly 200 training, outreach, and coordination meetings attended by approximately 7,000 people.

Our elder justice coordinators are also customizing our strategy to protect seniors in their district and coordinating our prosecutions with state and local partners. That will help us complete more cases and secure more convictions.

In February, the Department conducted the largest elder fraud enforcement action in American history. We charged more than 200 defendants with fraud against elderly Americans and we brought civil actions against dozens more. The defendants in these cases allegedly stole from more than one million American seniors of more than half a billion dollars.

Just a few weeks ago, the Department extended a deferred prosecution agreement with a financial services company in Dallas. This company allegedly knew about criminals using their services for money laundering, but didn't do anything about it. Some of their employees even took part in the schemes—including grandparent scams and fake prize scams targeting the elderly. In exchange for avoiding prosecution, the company is forfeiting $125 million which the Department will provide to the victims. The company has also agreed to implement anti-money laundering protections to prevent these crimes from ever happening again.

There are a lot of other cases that we could talk about—but I'll just mention two right here in Iowa.

This year, a total of 33 defendants in Dubuque—11 at the federal level and 22 at the local level—have been convicted for a grandparent scam against a total of 285 American seniors. The defendants defrauding more than $750,000 and then wiring it to their co-conspirators in the Dominican Republic. Now they've been held accountable.

At the federal level, these cases were prosecuted by AUSA Tony Morfitt of our Elder Justice Task Force—Tony, great job.

In August, a jury convicted a man from outside of Des Moines for convincing elderly Iowans to sell off their investments and buy insurance from him. Instead of buying the insurance as promised, the defendant used most of the funds for personal expenses like remodeling his house and buying two new Harley Davidsons. I'm pleased to report that that house and those motorcycles have now been forfeited.

This case was investigated by the FBI and prosecuted by Adam Kerndt and Mikaela Shotwell. Great work.

These are important accomplishments. We have increased the resources dedicated to these cases and we have increased our effectiveness in prosecuting them.

But there is more to do. And so today I am announcing our next steps.

First of all, we are improving training for our U.S. Attorneys' offices.

Earlier this year the Department's Elder Justice Initiative published its Elder Abuse Guide for Law Enforcement or EAGLE. EAGLE contains helpful information for prosecutors, including overviews of state and local law as well as best practices for evidence collection, interviewing older adults, and for documenting elder abuse. EAGLE is free and available right now to every law enforcement officer in the country.

Today I am announcing that the next edition of our Journal of Justice Policy and the Law—formerly known as the USA Bulletin—will focus on Elder Justice. It will also be the longest bulletin we've ever published since we started it back in 1953. These bulletins are public, and so they can be used by state and local prosecutors as well as our U.S. Attorneys' offices. That will provide the knowledge and insights of some of the top experts on elder justice to the prosecutors who are on the front lines.

Second, we are investing in services for seniors who have been victimized by criminals.

I am announcing today that over the next 11 months, our Office for Victims of Crime will provide nearly $18 million to help seniors who are victims of crime. These funds can be used for priorities like legal services, telephone hotlines, and housing for seniors who have lost their homes—which is something that happens all too often. We are using these OVC funds for a wider variety of services for seniors than ever before.

And finally, we are continuing to enforce the law aggressively and forcefully.

On October 1st, the Department began our Money Mule Initiative, which is a coordinated effort against the transnational criminal organizations who are defrauding our seniors.

We are hitting the fraudsters where it hurts—in the wallet.

Our prosecutors have found that fraudsters avoid using banks to launder the money they take from their victims. Instead, they launder it through so-called money mules—Americans who collect the money and then send it overseas.

Oftentimes these are co-conspirators—as in the Dubuque case that I mentioned a moment ago. But sometimes they are simply good people who have been tricked into thinking that they are doing charity work or working for a legitimate business.

Working with our Postal Inspectors, FBI agents, and other law enforcement partners, we have identified a number of these money mules across America. We have even been able to determine which ones have been tricked into this work and which ones are knowing and willful conspirators.

In the first case, we knock on their door and we explain to them what's really going on. We ask them to sign a letter acknowledging that it's wrong and promising to stop. That in itself is shutting off large quantities of money for the fraudsters.

And in the second case—when we determine that they are part of a conspiracy—we are filing civil actions and taking them to court.

Since October 1, we've taken action to stop 400 money mules across 65 districts. These involve everything from grandparent scams to romance scams, fake lotteries, IRS imposters, and fake tech support schemes.

The FBI and our Postal Inspectors have interviewed 300 money mules and sent 300 warning letters. We've charged 10 defendants and filed 25 civil actions. We've executed search warrants across America, including here in the Southern District of Iowa.

These are impressive numbers.

Our goal is to reduce crime and protect America's seniors. And we have good reasons to believe that our work with our law enforcement partners is reducing crime and having a real impact on the seniors of this country.

The Postal Inspection Service has estimated that payments by mass mail fraud victims to foreign post office boxes has dropped by 94 percent since 2016—from 150,000 per month to approximately 10,000 per month now.

There are many causes for that, but that is a remarkable achievement—and I want to thank everyone who has played a role in our efforts.

We are going to keep up this pace.

We are going to continue to provide our prosecutors and our state and local partners with the resources that they need. And we're going to keep putting fraudsters in jail.

I want to thank each of you again for your contribution to this effort. Each of us has a role to play—and certainly not just those of us in government. All of us can be on the lookout for fraud schemes and report suspected criminal activity.

If we do that—and if we remain vigilant—then we can ensure that every senior has the safety and peace of mind that they deserve.

US Attorney announces federal grant to help SD drug task forces fight meth

Sioux Falls, SD – Nov. 1, 2018 – United States Attorney Ron Parsons joined the U.S. Department of Justice in announcing that the South Dakota Attorney General's Office has been awarded a new $1,029,958 federal grant to combat the illegal trafficking of methamphetamine in South Dakota.

The funds were awarded through the Community Oriented Policing Services Office (COPS) Anti-Methamphetamine Program by the Department of Justice as part of a $7.2 million grant to law enforcement agencies in nine states (Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Montana, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Wisconsin) to support the investigation of illicit activities related to the manufacture and distribution of methamphetamine.

The grant of $1,029,958 to the South Dakota Attorney General's Office, headed by Attorney General Marty Jackley, is equal to the largest amount awarded to any state agency under this program.

"Methamphetamine and its dealers and users are connected, in one way or another, to a large percentage of the crimes committed in South Dakota, particularly drug trafficking, gun crimes, violent assaults, robberies, burglaries, domestic abuse, sexual abuse, and child abuse and neglect," said U.S. Attorney Parsons. "Federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies are committed to working together to stamp out this poison. And working together, we are making steady progress. For example, just last month, law enforcement in Minnehaha County seized more meth than was seized during the entire year of 2017. The timely award of this new federal grant will help our talented teams of South Dakota law enforcement officers accomplish even more."

"The national meth epidemic is impacting and hurting our families and communities here in South Dakota," said Attorney General Jackley. "This award presents a tremendous opportunity to cooperatively fight this meth epidemic head-on in our state."

The grant application provides that the award will be used to fund additional investigators, agents, and forensic analysts for the Sioux Falls Police Department, Minnehaha County Sheriff's Office, South Dakota Division of Criminal Investigation, Rapid City Police Department, Pennington County Sheriff's Office, and Oglala Sioux Tribal Police to serve on the Sioux Falls Area Drug Task Force, Rapid City Drug Task Force, and Northern Plains Safe Trails Task Force.

"This is great news for South Dakota and bad news for those dealing drugs in our communities," said Minnehaha County Sheriff Mike Milstead, whose deputies serve alongside other federal, state, and local law enforcement officers on the Sioux Falls Area Drug Task Force.

Jury finds 5 Central SD women guilty of retaliating against a witness

Defendants prosecuted as Part of the Guardians Project, a Federal Law Enforcement Initiative to combat corruption, fraud, and abuse in SD

Sioux Falls, SD – Nov. 6, 2018 – United States Attorney Ron Parsons announced that five individuals from Central South Dakota were found guilty for Conspiracy to Retaliate Against a Witness, following a four-day jury trial in Pierre, South Dakota. The verdict was returned the evening of November 2, 2018.

Tally Colombe, age 43, Fort Thompson, South Dakota; Elnita Rank, age 81, Fort Thompson, South Dakota; Kristal Hawk, age 58, Fort Thompson, South Dakota; Ronda Hawk, age 60, Fort Thompson, South Dakota; and Tiffany Monteau, age 43, Chamberlain, South Dakota, were found guilty for Conspiracy to Retaliate Against a Witness as a result of the trial. Stefen Monteau, age 26, Fort Thompson, South Dakota, was acquitted of the same charge at the same jury trial.

The charge carries a maximum sentence of up to 10 years in prison, and/or a $250,000 fine, 3 years of supervised release, and $100 to the Federal Crime Victims Fund. Restitution may also be ordered.

The defendants were indicted by a federal grand jury on February 6, 2018. The charge stems from an incident that occurred between September 8, 2017, and continuing through September 12, 2017, in Fort Thompson.

In June 2017, Colombe pled guilty to Wire Fraud and Program Fraud related to her prior crimes of defrauding Hunkpati Investments, where she served as Executive Director. She was using business debit cards to make personal purchases. By the Fall of 2017, Colombe was facing sentencing on those charges, when the victim, who also later worked for Hunkpati Investments, contacted law enforcement authorities to report continuing program fraud. On September 19, 2017, the victim testified at a sentencing hearing in federal court.

Between September 8, 2017 and September 12, 2017, Tally Colombe, Elnita Rank, Kristal Hawk, Ronda Hawk, and Tiffany Monteau conspired to knowingly take harmful action against this witness, in an attempt to retaliate against the individual for providing truthful information relating to the commission and possible commission of a federal offense, namely program fraud and wire fraud to law enforcement. The retaliation included interfering with the lawful employment and livelihood of the witness when Elnita Rank, Kristal Hawk, Ronda Hawk, and Tiffany Monteau went to Hunkpati Investments and forcibly removed the victim from her office, and blocked her from performing her work.

Colombe was remanded to the custody of the U.S. Marshals Service pending sentencing. The four other defendants were released on conditions pending sentencing, the dates of which have not been set.

The investigation was conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the U.S. Attorney's Office. The Bureau of Indian Affairs Office of Justice Services, Crow Creek Agency also responded to the incident. Assistant U.S. Attorneys Michael J. Elmore and Ann Hoffman prosecuted the case.

The case was brought as part of the Guardians Project, a federal law enforcement initiative to coordinate efforts between participating agencies, to promote citizen disclosure of public corruption, fraud, and embezzlement involving federal program funds, contracts, and grants, and to hold accountable those who are responsible for adversely affecting those living in South Dakota's Indian country communities. The Guardians Project is another step of federal law enforcement's on-going efforts to increase engagement, coordination, and positive action on behalf of tribal communities. Led by the United States Attorney's Office, the participating agencies include: Federal Bureau of Investigation; the Offices of Inspector General for the Departments of Interior, Health and Human Services, Social Security Administration, Agriculture, Transportation, Education, Justice, and Housing and Urban Development; Internal Revenue Service, Criminal Investigation Division; U.S. Postal Inspector Service; U.S. Postal Service, Office of Inspector General.

For additional information about the Guardians Project, please contact the U.S. Attorney's Office at (605) 330-4400. To report a suspected crime, please contact law enforcement at the federal agency's locally listed telephone number.

At ease: In Pat Tillman's hometown, a community works overtime to protect his legacy

For consideration on Veterans Day 2018

By Jack Harris

Almaden Valley, California – Cronkite News – Some 20 miles south of the San Francisco Bay, a gentle wind disturbs an otherwise peaceful afternoon in Almaden Valley.

The breeze funnels between the rolling hills that encircle the community, detected only by the shuddering blades of turf on the football field at Leland High School. With each gust, a U.S. flag hanging beyond the end zone is blown toward the distant tree-lined ridges rising above the horizon.

The patriotic banner flaps proudly beside a scoreboard that spells out the field's name in big white block letters:

PAT TILLMAN STADIUM

It's one of the modest ways the people of Pat Tillman's hometown in south San Jose have tried to solve the complex and impossible question: How do you honor a hero?

Outside of Almaden, the answers are different. Beyond these hills, Tillman's legacy of football, service and sacrifice has been celebrated to the point of celebrity. His name has been propagated with pride, the retelling of his courageous story amplified and spread like an American gospel.

In the 14 years since his death, he is worshiped more than ever. To the country he gave his life for, he's an icon of nobility and morality but also of nationalistic and military pride. Most of the remembrances are pure, carrying on the causes he left behind.

"He's not just a local hero; he's a national hero," says Peter Park, a high school teammate of Tillman's who is now the principal at Leland. "Here in Almaden Valley, we claim him. He's one of our own."

Unlike much of the nation, Tillman's legacy is still guarded in this quiet neighborhood, his memories considered sacred around the high school he came through. They are cautious in how they cherish their fallen son.

"Here, to be honest, we're protective and respectful of him," Park says. "His image gets marketed to whoever has an agenda to push. At home, we don't do that. His legacy with the young people here on campus is of someone who gave back, of leadership."

Their remembrances are kept simple, believing it is the best way to uphold the values he embraced, the traits he learned among these winding suburban streets.

"There's a sense that it's a smaller, closer, more intimate, more close-knit situation here with Pat," says Mike Ward, coach of the Leland football team.

"It's like, keep it that way."

Journey to adulthood

If it takes a village to raise a child, then most of Almaden Valley helped to form Tillman into the man he became. His journey to adulthood was much like the hilly terrain that surrounds the setting, full of ups and downs.

Residents here can recall his highs, such as when he led Leland High School to a 1993 Sectional Championship, and helped him through some of his deepest lows, including when he was arrested months later after getting in a street fight protecting a friend. They don't pretend to forget his flaws — those shortcomings can be learned from.

"His legacy is not a secret, it is well known," says Park, whose quiet and courteous demeanor reflects the attitude of the area. "And the best part, for us here in Almaden Valley, he was one of us. He showed that it can be done. He keeps giving back to his community."

The people here adore Tillman for the same reasons many others do. They celebrated his football accomplishments at Arizona State and with the Arizona Cardinals. Like the rest of the country, he was admired for his decision in 2002 to leave the sport and join the military. His tragic death fighting in Afghanistan two years later is burned into their memories too, an imprint that induces as much pride as it does pain.

When his widow, Marie Tillman, who began dating Tillman when they were teenagers, wrote a Washington Post op-ed last week about how her late husband should be remembered, she could have been speaking for the entire town that she and Tillman called home.

"When you're an icon, which Pat became, your legacy has to be guarded," she wrote. "An icon's life and image enter the public domain, and people often try to co-opt it to suit their own needs."

There is little pomp or circumstance associated with Tillman's name at Leland. The handful of public displays dedicated to his memory around the 51-year-old campus are modest, such as the stadium name, or his box-framed jersey hanging in a back corner of the front office, or the number 42 posted on door frames inside the football locker room. Anything more might feel like too much. They're wary of the way outsiders can manipulate his image.

"You do have to protect it from being pulled in every direction," Ward says. "Maybe some reasons are completely innocent and maybe some reasons, not so much. But you protect it."

They see how around the country Tillman's name has become synonymous with the military and, by extension, patriotic pride — and believe some have weaponized his memory as ammunition for political debate and gain.

When Colin Kaepernick dropped to a knee during the national anthem two years ago, Tillman's name got caught in the middle, used as a common rallying cry attempting to discredit the NFL anthem protests: Pat Tillman would never kneel for the national anthem and neither should we.

Others argued the opposite, taking his reported disdain for the justification of the war that took his life as evidence that America needs to bring its troops home: Pat Tillman would never support the involvement in a foreign war and neither should we.

The tug-of-war over his image has taken a toll on those in Almaden.

"When people come out now and say, 'Pat would say this,' or 'Pat would feel like that,' it's like, no, you don't know how Pat would feel," says Robert Braunstein a high school sports reporter who graduated from Leland, covered Tillman's playing days there and has lived in Almaden for the better part of 52 years.

"Just let it go."

At Leland, Tillman's life is compartmentalized: Scholar. Soldier. Football player.

They use his legacy to accomplish one important mission: to show he's a role model of honesty and integrity to the students at his alma mater, an example of the right way to live a life.

"Even families who were not living in Almaden Valley when he attended Leland, they quickly know about his history as they become community members," Park says. "They know who he is and they honor and respect what he has done."

Memorializing his life

Tillman's legacy serves different purposes elsewhere.

At his collegiate alma mater, Tillman's memory is everywhere: on the jerseys and shirts bearing his name that are sold around campus, on his newly built statue inside Sun Devil Stadium, a life-sized centerpiece to the venue's recent renovations, and on the foundation created by his family in his name that provides military veterans with scholarships and other vital aid.

Even before he picked the Army over the NFL, Tillman obtained a celebrity status in Arizona that would have never been possible in his hometown.

"When me and my wife would go visit him in Tempe, anywhere you went people would stop on the street and say, 'Oh my god, there's Pat Tillman,'" said BJ Hardtke, one of Tillman's closest childhood friends. "It is more of a personal level back in San Jose. That's who knew him. We all just knew him as Pat. Was he a badass? Yeah, he was a badass. … But nobody looked at him like, 'Oh my gosh, that's Pat Tillman!'"

Fifteen years after his death, he remains as big of a deal now as he ever was during his playing days. Grandiose tributes to him around ASU and the entire state of Arizona are as familiar as the desert sun. The annual 4.2-mile Pat's Run has become a mecca for the thousands wanting to honor him.

"It's the state's greatest day," said ASU assistant athletic director Doug Tammaro. "There's no comparison to what happens that day."

The memorialization of Tillman's life began organically at first. After he died, people began giving money to the school, Tammaro said. Unsolicited checks came pouring in and children across the country sent envelopes stuffed with dollar bills to Tempe. It set the groundwork for the Tillman Foundation to grow.

Now, the glory given to his life helps advance the things he cared about the most. His university, his football team and his fellow men and women in the armed forces all benefit from the spotlight that illuminates his memory.

"It's awesome," his former Sun Devils and Cardinals teammate Jake Plummer said earlier this month, speaking before Tillman's posthumous enshrinement into the Arizona Sports Hall of Fame. "I knew him the way I knew him, as a teammate and real good friend. But everyone's story is different, and that's the greatest thing. I think the impact he had on people in this world in his short life is unquantifiable."

Plummer then paused.

"Is that the right word? Unquantifiable?" he asked aloud, before nodding in self-affirmation, finding a fitting term to describe Tillman's larger-than-life legacy in Arizona.

"Pat was 17 when he left the house," his brother, Kevin, said at the ceremony. "His whole adult life was played out in Arizona, here in front of everybody. I feel like the state of Arizona, the institution of ASU, the Cardinals and the fans, they provided a platform for him to grow."

Tillman's exaltation in the state has been born out of noble intentions, with the blessing of his family and for the good of the community that treasured him. But making his legacy so prominent has its pitfalls too, creating a pathway for his name to become a political reference point as well.

There's an irony to the contrast between the groups of people Tillman left behind in Almaden and Arizona. One protects Tillman's name for fear he will be remembered the wrong way. The other projects it for fear he won't be remembered at all. In the end, neither can prevent him from being periodically turned into a propagandic paw, those who knew him say. The exploitation frustrates them.

"I can't say how Pat would have felt about race in the United States today or kneeling during the national anthem," Marie wrote. "But I can say that he would have engaged in thoughtful and respectful discourse, never shying away from the nuance, never taking the easy way, and looking, always, for a conversation instead of a fight."

To some extent, though, it's tolerable to Tammaro. Social debates are an American ideal, and though some may falsely claim to know where Tillman's views would fall today, Tammaro thinks the fact his name still gets brought up shows the impact his legacy has made.

"It may not be the way I think it should be motivated, but we always said we didn't want people to forget, we wanted more than that. We wanted people to be motivated or inspired. … When people say, 'Pat Tillman would have believed this,' well, maybe not. But, that's one more person who really knows his story. And you can't know about Pat Tillman now and not know about the foundation."

Not everyone wears such thick skin.

A coach's responsibility

On the Friday afternoon of Leland's homecoming weekend, coach Ward enters a dusty shed and drags out folded canopies, stopping to wipe away the beads of sweat escaping his brow. Later, he'll have a football game on his mind. Right now, he's helping students set up.

Ward arrived here as an assistant coach in the summer of 2015, when he and his wife moved from Miami to start a family in peaceful Almaden — likely the closest you'll come to finding Mayberry in booming Silicon Valley.

Back then, no one gave Ward a playbook for how to handle the Tillman heritage. At first, Ward was completely unaware of who the school's most distinguished alumnus was at all.

"It was like the second day, we were out here at practice and I saw that," he says, jerking his head toward a blue wooden press box spelling out the stadium's name in the same big white block letters.

"I was like, 'Wait a minute. That Pat Tillman?'" Ward says. "Our head coach and another assistant were like, 'Yeah, you didn't know?'"

Ward was stunned.

"It hits you: That's pretty awesome," he says. "Then it takes some time to really sink in."

Ever since, Ward — who was promoted to head coach after his first season at the school — has learned the delicate way the community honors Tillman.

"I think there's a lot of pride," he says. "I think that goes throughout the community and the school, teachers that are still here that taught him and our principal was with him and played with him and went to school with him. I think it's pride. I think in this area, it's a very intimate thing. It's not as big of a picture."

Within his program, he's gone about carefully emphasizing the best parts of who Tillman was. Little things, like showing his players the Football Life documentary done about his life, or posting his number 42 up on the press box, make a big difference.

"You want to make sure you're communicating to the players as much as possible how important it is that we keep his legacy going," Ward says. "That's the more important thing, is the communication to the guys, to say, 'Listen. This game is bigger than just this game. We play for a legacy.'"

Matt Ames is the perfect example. The junior offensive lineman at Leland has always known of Tillman's local past. His dad, Brian, went to school with Tillman, graduating a few years before him. For Matt, the word-of-mouth stories and simple symbols he feels daily have made an impact.

"It makes you feel good, to go to the same high school as him, grow up in the same area, learn the same values as him," Matt says. "To be such a great person, a great leader, I want to take some of that to put on the football field, in the classroom. I want to use his values that he learned here in Almaden."

"It's somebody they can relate to," says Matt's mom, Trisha. "For me, the thing I like about (Pat) was he was always learning. Trying to tell the boys, it's one thing to be book smart. But to be worldly and tolerant and to want to know more about people and ideas and why people feel the way they do, why they believe in what they do. That, to me, is important."

Ward senses that feeling burning in most of his other players too. In September, the team came to Peoria to play Liberty High in the "Pat Tillman Classic," the first of a home-and-home series.

And since 2011, the school has hosted an annual "Tillman Legacy Classic" game at the beginning of the season. It's become the football team's contribution to the safeguarding of Tillman's good name. This year, when they lost after blowing a halftime lead, the group was distraught.

"They hold that standard," Ward says. "This is a game where we have to defend the Tillman Classic and honor the Tillman Classic. They get that and they hold it heavy."

Losing that game "feels like you let him down, in a way," Matt says.

On this Friday, the team's final home game of the season, Wards' boys produce a different result. A long touchdown pass with 11 seconds left breaks a tie, sending his seniors out of Pat Tillman Stadium for the last time as winners and leaving the coach exhausted and gasping for air as they huddle around him.

"Talk about pride, toughness, perseverance," Ward tells them. "It's a grind, but it's all that that's instilled in each of you."

He doesn't say Tillman's name, nor does he think about his legacy while trying to coach a coordinated collision of bodies from the sidelines. But as recites the same words so often associated with Tillman's memory, it provides at least one more modest and pure solution to the complicated question. How can you honor a hero?

Perhaps, simply, by competing as he would.

(Editor's note: As we remember, and honor, all our veterans – both living and deceased – for their sacrifices, let us not use their sacrifices to fit divisive political or social agendas. Don't we already see that happening too much?"

US has spent $6 trillion on wars that killed half a million people since 9/11

By Tom O'Connor

Newsweek – Nov. 14, 2018 – he United States has spent nearly $6 trillion on wars that directly contributed to the deaths of around 500,000 people since the 9/11 attacks of 2001.

Brown University's Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs published its annual "Costs of War" report Wednesday, taking into consideration the Pentagon's spending and its Overseas Contingency Operations account, as well as "war-related spending by the Department of State, past and obligated spending for war veterans' care, interest on the debt incurred to pay for the wars, and the prevention of and response to terrorism by the Department of Homeland Security."

The final count revealed, "The United States has appropriated and is obligated to spend an estimated $5.9 trillion (in current dollars) on the war on terror through Fiscal Year 2019, including direct war and war-related spending and obligations for future spending on post 9/11 war veterans."

"In sum, high costs in war and war-related spending pose a national security concern because they are unsustainable," the report concluded. "The public would be better served by increased transparency and by the development of a comprehensive strategy to end the wars and deal with other urgent national security priorities."

The U.S. embarked on a global war on terror following the 9/11 attacks that killed nearly 3,000 and were orchestrated by Islamist militant group Al-Qaeda. Weeks later, the U.S. led an invasion of Afghanistan, which at the time was controlled by Al-Qaeda ally the Taliban. In March 2003, Washington overthrew Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, accusing him of developing weapons of mass destruction and harboring U.S.-designated terrorist organizations.

Despite initial quick victories there, the U.S. military has been plagued by ongoing insurgencies these two countries and expanded counterterrorism operations across the region, including Libya, Pakistan, Somalia and Yemen. In 2014, the U.S. gathered an international coalition to face the Islamic State militant group (ISIS), which arose out of a post-invasion Sunni Muslim insurgency in Iraq and spread to neighboring Syria and beyond.

Wednesday's report found that the "US military is conducting counterterror activities in 76 countries, or about 39 percent of the world's nations, vastly expanding [its mission] across the globe." In addition, these operations "have been accompanied by violations of human rights and civil liberties, in the US and abroad."

Overall, researchers estimated that "between 480,000 and 507,000 people have been killed in the United States' post-9/11 wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan." This toll "does not include the more than 500,000 deaths from the war in Syria, raging since 2011" when a West-backed rebel and jihadi uprising challenged the government, an ally of Russia and Iran. That same year, the U.S.-led NATO Western military alliance intervened in Libya and helped insurgents overthrow longtime leader Muammar el-Qaddafi, leaving the nation in an ongoing state of civil war.

The combined human cost for the U.S. throughout its actions in Afghanistan, Iraq and Pakistan was 6,951 troops, 21 civilians and 7,820 contractors.

"While we often know how many US soldiers die, most other numbers are to a degree uncertain. Indeed, we may never know the total direct death toll in these wars. For example, tens of thousands of civilians may have died in retaking Mosul and other cities from ISIS but their bodies have likely not been recovered," the report noted.

"In addition, this tally does not include 'indirect deaths.' Indirect harm occurs when wars' destruction leads to long term, 'indirect,' consequences for people's health in war zones, for example because of loss of access to food, water, health facilities, electricity or other infrastructure," it added.

In February, President Donald Trump estimated that "we have spent $7 trillion in the Middle East," saying "what a mistake" it was. Weeks later, he reportedly told his military advisers to prepare a plan to withdraw from Syria as the war against ISIS entered its final phases, though senior Washington officials have since expanded the U.S. mission— considered illegal by the Syrian government and its allies—to include countering Iran and its allies.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

Dakota Prayer Ride and Water Walk

When: December 10-26, 2018.

Sharon Day will lead us in prayers and water blessing of our spiritual journey through riding horse, walking, and running.

Where: Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Memorial Park – Sisseton, SD at 9:30 a.m.

Route: Our journey will follow closely to the route our ancestors took when they fled the bloodshed in the Dakota Uprising -- maps will be passed out.

Monday, Dec. 10 the ride/walk/run begins at Sisseton-Wahpeton Memorial Park and ends on Wednesday, Dec. 26 at the site of the hanging of the Dakota warriors in Mankato, Minn. (We will be join the 38plus2 riders on Friday, Dec. 21 and continue with them to Mankato).

Invitation: We encourage Water Walkers to participate to heal our four-direction waterways that affect all people along the Continental Divide, where contamination spreads into our rivers and lakes.

We have a special invitation to all youth who want to participate.

All relatives are welcome to help come, support or participate.

Bring a vial of water from your territories to add to our Mni Wic'oni pail, for healing prayers.

Send to Sylvana Justine, PO Box 686, Agency Village, SD 57262.,

We are calling our young artists that may want to help with a Mural that we will be putting together to help bring communities and youth together to promote awareness through art, on keeping our river waters contamination-free for our future generations.

In order to create a safe place to pray, where women and children will be participating, we are asking, in a respectful way, that all sex offenders please refrain from participating.

How you can help? Donate meals through pot luck – hay - feed - warm clothing.

Follow us on Facebook: http://m.facebook.com/DakotaPrayerRideandWaterWalk

Website link: http://www.dakotawalkandride.com

Twitter link: http://www.dakotaridewalkrun@twitter.com

Horse Ride information: Helena LaBatte, hlconstrbld@gmail.com

Run sign up: Jessie Keoke510@hotmail.com (early sign up began on Nov. 1st)

Water Walk sign up email: dakotaridewalkrun@gmail.com

For more information, please call: Julian Boucher 605-268-1484; or Mel 701-339-7896.

W.A.T.E.R

We All Take Environmental Responsibility

Brief editorial comments from the editor's desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

We had planned to publish the certified, final results of the SWO 2018 general election, but there is a challenge pending in Tribal Court.

We expect a finding to be issued as early as this Monday, November 19.

Please note that the REB has set Thursday, January 3, 2019, as the date for the Big Coulee District Councilperson special election.

Voting will be held in the Big Coulee District Center from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m.

Watch for more information about the special election as it becomes available.

*****

Thank you everyone who responded to the call to honor our Sisseton-Wahpeton WWI veterans in our Armistice Day/Veterans Day edition, and a special thanks to Delvin Lufkins for providing a unique look at how that generation bridged the divide from the old warrior societies to generations more influenced by colonization.

Please see photo highlights this week provided by John Heminger, of the annual Veterans Day Wacipi last weekend at Dakota Magic Convention Center.

Our thanks also to Veterans Service Officer Geri Opsal for the information and photos of this year's Veterans Princess contest.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"Humbleness means peace and honesty — both mean Hopi. True, honest, perfect words — that's what we call Hopi words. In all languages, not just in Hopi. We strive to be Hopi. We call ourselves Hopi because maybe one or two of us will become Hopi. Each person must look into their heart and make changes so that you may become Hopi when you reach your destination."

–Percy Lomaquahu, HOPI

The Creator has made available to us all the laws, principles and values which we need to know to live in harmony. The Creator also designed each human being to learn and grow by trial and error. We have tools to help us live the right way. We have prayers, visions, nature, teachers, Elders, and we have the Great Spirit to talk to and ask for help when we have problems. We also have choice. To walk the Red Road takes courage and a lot of prayer.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

At 18 our convictions are hills from which we look; At 45 they are caves in which we hide. - F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896 - 1940)

Happiness is always a by-product. It is probably a matter of temperament, and for anything I know it may be glandular. But it is not something that can be demanded from life, and if you are not happy you had better stop worrying about it and see what treasures you can pluck from your own brand of unhappiness. - Robertson Davies

A satirist is a man who discovers unpleasant things about himself and then says them about other people. - Peter McArthur

Men, it has been well said, think in herds; it will be seen that they go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, and one by one. - Charles Mackay

Imitation is the sincerest form of television. - Fred Allen (1894 - 1956)

This is patently absurd; but whoever wishes to become a philosopher must learn not to be frightened by absurdities. - Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

CDF

Obituaries –

Services held for Debbie Fayant

Funeral service for Deborah "Debbie" M. Fayant, 59, of Watertown, SD was held Friday afternoon, November 16, 2018 at the Enemy Swim community center, Enemy Swim, SD with the Fr. Conrad Ciesel, Deacon Bitsey Ciesel, Lay Readers Valorie Augustson and Irene Rondell officiating.

Pallbearers were Christopher Fayant, Blue Grant, Garret Iyarpeya, Nathan Shepherd, Wilfred Fayant Jr., Raymond Shepherd III, Charles Vermillion, Duane Hislaw, and Corey Shepherd.

Honorary pallbearers were Debbie's Hospice Nurses, and all the staff at Human Service Agency, Relatives and Friends. All night wake service will be held Thursday, November 15, 2018 at Enemy Swim Community Center starting at 7:00 PM. Interment will be in the St. James Episcopal Cemetery, Enemy Swim, SD. The Cahill Funeral Chapel of Sisseton, SD is in charge of the arrangements.

Deborah "Debbie" Marie Fayant, age 59, of Watertown, SD journeyed to the spirit world on Monday, November 12, 2018.

Debbie was born July 15, 1959 in Cleveland, Ohio. She is the daughter of Wilfred Fayant Sr., and Roberta Owen Fayant. She attended school in Colorado, Kansas and South Dakota. She was employed at the Human Service Agency in their workshop with other people with developmental disabilities.

Debbie really enjoyed pop and ice cream, she enjoyed food. She also enjoyed coloring, doing beadwork, balloons, listening to a variety of music, dancing, pow-wows, painting her nails, watching the birds, enjoyed feeding the ducks and geese in the park.

Debbie is survived by her son, Simon Keeble of Sisseton, SD; daughter Dianne Keeble of Huron, SD; three brothers, Kenny Fayant of Enemy Swim, SD, Rodney Fayant of Watertown, SD, and Wilfred Fayant Jr. of Enemy Swim, SD; two sisters, Barb (Randy) Iyarpeya of Enemy Swim, SD and Roxanne (Duane) HisLaw of Enemy Swim, SD; numerous nieces, nephews and grandchildren.

She is preceded in death by her parents, Wilfred and Roberta Fayant Sr.; two brothers, Ronald and Kevin Fayant; sister, Cheryl Fayant; one niece, three nephews and grandsons; paternal and maternal grandparents.

For Debbie's obituary and on-line registry, please visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com.

Leland Ray Thompson services held

Leland Ray Thompson, age 32, of Shakopee, MN, journeyed to the Spirit World on Nov. 14, 2018.

Services were held on Saturday, Nov. 17, 2018, at Tiowakan Spiritual Center, Prior Lake, Minn.

Calvin Campbell officiated.

Serving as pallbearers were Chebon Eastman, Ron Goodeagle Jr., Chaske Heminger, David Pickit, Joe Bathel, and Seth Eastman.

Additional services were to be held in Washington, with interment at Beaver Cemetery in Toppenish, Washington.

Leland was born on February 19, 1986, in Breckenridge, MN, the son of Laurie (Eastman) Manylightnings and Leon Thompson.

He served in the United States Army during the Iraq War, earning a Purple Heart during that time.

Leland is survived by his mother, Laurie Manylightnings; father, Leon Thompson; brother and sisters, Richard, Laurelei, Mariah and Skyla Thompson.

He was preceded in death by his grandparents, Richard Thompson, Johanna Senator and Frances Eastman.

McNearney-Schmidt Funeral Home, Shakopee, Minn., was in charge of arrangements.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and should be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Mountain Lion sighting at Big Stone Lake

By David Law

Big Stone Lake – KXLG – Nov 15, 2018 – Milbank Dentist Dr. Mark Bierschbach's trail camera photo is getting a lot of attention on Facebook this week after his clinic shared a photo with their patients.

It seems that Dr. Mark was checking his camera Sunday morning about 8 a.m. south of his cabin at Linden Beach at Big Stone Lake when this big cat showed up. The photo was taken between Hartford State Park and Shady Beach.

In the Facebook post to his patients Dr. Mark stated that he had been in contact with the Game Warden, who feels this mountain lion looked to be a 1 1/2 year old male, and about 50-60 pounds. Additionally, Dr. Mark heard reports that others may have seen it as well, or possibly another separate mountain lion.

There have been no new pics since.

Thanks to Dr. Mark Bierschback for sharing the photo of his awesome mountain lion.

Gratitude and Tradition

By Governor-elect Kristi Noem

November 16, 2018

Thanksgiving is always an exciting time. Kitchens bustle in preparation for the big turkey dinner, TVs buzz with sounds of football, and families gather together. It's a time for gratitude and a time for tradition - some of which are sincere and others a bit silly.

For decades, we've made it an American tradition to spare two turkeys from the Thanksgiving table through a presidential pardon.

For generations, South Dakota's turkey producers have raised some of the world's best turkeys, bringing millions of families together around the dinner table. And this year, it is two Huron-area turkeys that have been honored with the presidential pardon, giving us an opportunity to put South Dakota agriculture on display.

These two turkeys are one of about 5 million turkeys raised in South Dakota each year, the production of which causes ripple effects throughout our ag industry. In fact, turkeys consume around 51,000 tons of soybean meal a year, as well as thousands of bushels of corn.

This is the kind of production we need in South Dakota, which is why I plan to create a Blueprint for Agricultural Economic Development as Governor. With an annual economic impact of $25.6 billion, agriculture is South Dakota's number one industry. In recent years, however, deflated commodity prices and various natural disasters have dealt a serious blow to the state's ag economy.

More diversity in ag could help soften future blows, which is why our blueprint will look both at broadening opportunities for existing farms and ranches and helping identify and recruit our next ag-related growth industries.

Without question, it is exciting to see South Dakota agriculture up on the national stage. I am so grateful for the work our turkey producers, farmers, and ranchers put in to ensure our Thanksgiving tables can be filled. I'm thankful for the families and communities that come together this time of year and for the work of our armed forces to ensure we have the freedom to join in fellowship.

Happy Thanksgiving from my family to yours.

Forever Thankful

By Sen. John Thune

There's a lot of truth to the old saying that the days are long, but the years are short. It seems like just yesterday we were celebrating the last holiday season and time spent with family and friends. For me, as we approach this Thanksgiving – and, yes, Christmas is right the corner – it's a good reminder that the list of things I'm thankful for gets longer each and every year, which is a blessing to be sure.

I've said it before, but I've always considered myself to be a lottery winner in that I was born in the greatest country on earth and that I've been able to raise my family in the land of the free and home of the brave. Family is everything to me, and the one Kimberley and I have built over the years has continued to grow. "Dad" will always be a title I'm proud of, but the joy of being a grandparent is hard to fully explain unless you are one yourself. If you are, you know exactly what I mean.

Speaking of grandparents, my dad Harold, who is now a great grandfather (several times over), will turn 99 years old this year. I'm grateful for the opportunity to be able to spend time with him and create new memories. My dad has seen a lot over the years, including during his days as a fighter pilot in World War II. A veteran himself, he still shows his support for fellow freedom fighters whenever he can, which is something I've always admired about him.

It would be hard to be thankful for anything we enjoy in this country if it wasn't for the selfless sacrifice that our military men and women make on a daily basis, particularly around the holiday season. It's impossible for those of us who've never served to fully understand what this kind of sacrifice truly means, because as most of us are sitting around the dinner table during the holidays, many members of the military are defending freedom on the opposite side of the globe.

Because of their sacrifice, I'm thankful to live in a place where, among many other things, I can freely express my faith in God, the guiding light that keeps me focused in life. I lean on the Lord's wisdom and guidance in my personal and professional life, and His strength helps me every single day.

Faith, freedom, and family: The constants in my life for which I'm eternally grateful.

I'd be remiss if I didn't also thank the people of South Dakota for having put their faith in me to serve them in the U.S. Senate. South Dakotans are my top advisors – the people who I count on to provide me with honest and straightforward advice that helps me be the best senator I can be for them and the state.

I'm also grateful to my colleagues in the Senate. They, too, offered me their faith by electing me to serve as majority whip for the next Congress, which begins in January. This new role will put me in a stronger position to give South Dakota's issues the national attention they deserve, because when I have a seat at the leadership table, South Dakota has a seat at the leadership table.

As I mentioned, there's a lot we can be thankful for this year and in the years to come. There's no time like the present to reflect on it, so from my family to yours, I hope the blessings of the holiday season are upon you and your family now and in the weeks and months ahead.

Thankful to work for South Dakota in the Senate

By U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.)

Nov. 15, 2018

This Thanksgiving, I would like to share with all South Dakotans my gratitude for the opportunity to work for you in the United States Senate. It is a privilege that I will never take for granted. I continue to work every day to make decisions that will improve the lives of everyone in South Dakota. Jean and I send our warmest wishes to you this holiday season.

Thanksgiving is a good time to look back on the year and thank the Lord for the blessings that we have received. This year, we welcomed our 10th grandchild, Maverick Michael Rounds, born to my son John and his wife Ashlee. Our kids and grandkids are our greatest gifts and we're so thankful for the time we get to spend with them.

I truly believe the pilgrims intended the first Thanksgiving to be a celebration of the harvest, and most importantly to thank the good Lord for the blessings he gave them in the new world. It is compelling they shared this first Thanksgiving with the Native Americans who had welcomed them.

None of us would be able to enjoy the freedom to celebrate this holiday if not for the service of our military members. We are incredibly thankful to them for the sacrifices they make to protect our way of life in the United States. We are also thankful to their families and friends who support them. Parents, spouses and children of military men and women make great sacrifices too. We pray for those who may not be able to spend the holiday season with their loved ones. We also pray for our first responders who put their lives in danger to protect their neighbors and communities.

We are thankful for our farmers and ranchers who work tirelessly to put food on the tables of families all across the country. South Dakota's farmers and ranchers are some of the hardest working people I know. With trade instability and farm income down, I continue calling for the administration to quickly finalize trade deals that benefit our producers. I also continue calling for a strong farm bill that will provide more stability for the ag industry.

This year for Thanksgiving, we look forward to hosting around 40 of our family members. We'll have two or three turkeys, depending on how many show up, but one is never enough to feed our whole crew. Of course we'll have all the trimmings like potatoes, gravy, dressing and my two favorites—homemade cranberry sauce and pumpkin pie with lots of whipped cream! We also try to fit in some time for pheasant hunting on Thanksgiving Day—one of the many traditions we look forward to each year.

One national tradition that South Dakota has a special role in this year is the president's pardoning of a Thanksgiving turkey. Each year, two live turkeys are sent to Washington, D.C., where they will be pardoned by the president. This year's turkeys come from the Riverside Colony near Huron. After they are pardoned they will be transported to Virginia Tech to live out the rest of their days at Gobbler's Rest.

I hope you enjoy spending time with your loved ones, partaking in your own Thanksgiving traditions this year, whatever they may be. The people of South Dakota are what make our state the best place in the world, and I am grateful for the opportunity to work for you in the Senate. Happy Thanksgiving!

Nat'l grief study launched to help Military families manage loss of a loved one

By Uniformed Services University

Office of External Affairs

Military family members who have experienced the loss of a loved one in a duty-related death often describe continued challenges with bereavement long after the death of their loved one. As a result, experts at the Uniformed Services University (USU) have just launched a new study to help bereaved military families.

The study -- Stepping Forward in Grief -- launched in August in collaboration with Columbia University's Center for Complicated Grief. The team of researchers were motivated by key findings from USU's National Military Family Bereavement Study (NMFBS), the first large scientific study on the impact of service member death on surviving family members. These findings suggest surviving family members, who have experienced the loss of a service member, may benefit from help managing their loss and grief with programs that recognize their unique experience as military families.

Over the last two years, the researchers have worked to develop new, innovative digital programs focused on loss, grief and wellness to support bereaved military families. The study is now seeking participants to enroll and help test out these programs. Eligible participants may include spouses, ex-spouses, adult partners, children, siblings, or parents (biological, step, or foster), age 18 or older, of a service member who died on or after Sept. 11, 2001, while serving in the military or as a result of their military services. More info about participating in the study can be found on the Stepping Forward in Grief website: http://steppingforwardstudy.org.

The digital programs are referred to as GriefSteps and WellnessSteps. GriefSteps is based on a model of grief therapy, used successfully with people with complicated grief, and suggests activities specifically designed to help individuals adapt to loss. WellnessSteps provides information and suggests activities designed to foster general health and wellness, including stress-management and health maintenance, which have been shown to help reduce distress.

In both programs, participants can message a program "guide" who is available to answer questions and share observations.

"As a retired military psychiatrist, I look forward to testing how these digital programs help bereaved military family members with loss, grief and wellness. We are pleased that over two hundred have already signed up to participate," said retired Army Col. (Dr.) Stephen J. Cozza, co-principal investigator on the study. Cozza is a professor of Psychiatry at USU and associate director of USU's Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress. "Equipping military families with resources that address the unique circumstance of their loss is an important part of honoring their service and sacrifice."

"Loss and grief are universally recognized as highly challenging life experiences," said M. Katherine Shear, M.D., Marion Kenworthy Professor of Psychiatry at the Columbia University School of Social Work, and study co-PI. "Most people find a way to adapt to even the most difficult losses when they are provided sufficient support. In studying how to help bereaved people who have not found a way forward, we came to understand the kinds of information and activities that can help. We are honored to have the opportunity to share these digital programs with bereaved military families and look forward to working with participants who join our study."

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

Intermediate Dakotah Language class offered

The SWO Dakotah Language Institute is offering an Intermediate Dakotah Language class.

Class is held weekly, at 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday.

This class if for people who know many words in Dakotah, yet struggle to place them into sentences.

Focus will be on learning the "little words in between" that the late treasured elder Orsen Bernard spoke about: "ca, kinhan, kta."

Those are connector words that help make words into a complete sentence.

(No, "connector words" is not a linguistic term!")

Contact Tammy DeCoteau at the Dakotah Language Institute, 605-698-2030, for more information.

Tribal Law officers visit TZ second grade class

Submitted by Janace Christjohn

SWO Tribal Law Enforcement Officers Bernard and Carlson came to Tiospa Zina Tribal School to help the second graders paint pumpkins.

The officers wanted work with the students, to interact with them, to show that we are all a community.

Jim Kranhold donated pumpkins for the event.

It was a great day and the students enjoyed getting to know the officers!

ESDS hosts Veterans Day program

Submitted by Rebecca Dargatz

School Community Director

Toka Nuwan Wayawapi Community Education Department hosted a Veterans Day Program on Thursday, November 8, 2018.

The ESDS Drum Group performed, American Legion Post #314 did the Presentation of Colors, the 6th Grade Choir performed the National Anthem in Dakota, and the 3rd Grade class led the Pledge of Allegiance in Dakota.

Guest speakers were SWO Veteran Service Officer Geri Opsal and Veteran Michael Schreiner.

Students in 6th-8th grades participated in an essay contest "What Veterans Day Means to Me."

Essay contest winners were: 6th grade – Ignatius Ryan; 7th grade – Xander Rencountre; and 8th grade – Cikala Bertsch.

Students in kindergarten – 4th grades participated in a coloring contest.

Coloring contest winners were: kindergarten – Aaliyah Rencountre; 1st grade – Justice Anderson; 2nd grade – Jaysah Rousseau; 3rd Grade – Feather Campbell; and 4th Grade – Ta Wakinyan Eastman (not pictured).

After the program cookies and refreshments were enjoyed by everyone.

Wopida tanka, Veterans!

ESDS recognizes students of the month

Submitted by Rebecca Dargatz

School Community Director

Toka Nuwan Wayawapi honors one student from each grade for each full month that school is in session.

The Students of the Month are chosen because they demonstrate the four school wide expectations consistently or have shown great progress toward them.

The school wide expectations are:

Awanicihdka: Be Safe

Waokihi: Be Responsible

Waunsida: Be Caring

Woohoda: Be Respectful

Home room teachers choose the Students of the Month in collaboration with the paras and other teachers who serve a particular candidate.

Students of the Month are honored during opening ceremony on the first Monday following each full month of school. Students of the Month receive a student of the month shirt and a dinner hosted by ESDS.

The October 2018 Students of the Month are: Kindergarten – Isaiah Shepherd, 1st Grade – Hollyjai Rockwood, 2nd Grade – Kevin Fayant, 3rd Grade –LaShay DuMarce, 4th Grade – Kaya Running Hawk, 5th Grade – Miley Contreras, 6th Grade – Kendryck Sharpfish, 7th Grade – Bre'Ann Bernard, and 8th Grade – Alyssa Rodriquez.

Scholarship program encourages ND Native American college students to seek Mental Health careers

AICF/UHF program creates solutions to address substance use disorders and opioid crisis

Fargo, ND – (Business Wire) – Nov. 14, 2018 – The American Indian College Fund, in partnership with the United Health Foundation, awarded 11 Native American North Dakota college students with scholarships through the United Health Foundation Tribal Wellness Scholarship Program.

The program encourages Native American college students to seek careers as mental health professionals so they can help their communities recover from substance use disorder in a way that honors their tribal heritage and traditions.

The United Health Foundation Tribal Wellness Scholarship Program was funded through a $360,000 grant from the United Health Foundation in May. It includes scholarships, mentoring, academic support, job training and research opportunities.

The following 11 Native American students from North Dakota pursuing degrees in recovery-related fields will receive educational support. Five awards were designated for associate degree candidates and six for students seeking a bachelor's or master's degree.

Danelle Belgrade (Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians), seeking an associate degree in nursing at Turtle Mountain Community College;

Latoya Delorme (Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians), seeking a bachelor's degree in nursing at the University of North Dakota;

Briana Delorme-Jeanotte (Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians), seeking a bachelor's degree in nursing at the University of Mary;

Raeanne Henry (Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians), seeking an associate degree in nursing from Turtle Mountain Community College;

Trista Jetty (Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians), seeking a bachelor's degree in nursing from North Dakota State University;

Christine LaRock (Spirit Lake Dakota Tribe), seeking an associate degree in applied science-pre-nursing from Cankdeska Cikana Community College;

Desarae Martin (Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians), seeking a bachelor's degree in nursing from the University of North Dakota;

Krista Miller (Minnesota Chippewa Tribe), seeking a bachelor's degree in nursing from the University of North Dakota;

Alisha Parisien, (Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians), seeking a bachelor's degree in social work from the University of North Dakota;

Pelchee Slater (Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians), seeking an associate degree in pre-nursing from Turtle Mountain Community College; and

Maria Vormestrand (Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians), seeking an associate degree in social work from Cankdeska Cikana Community College.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, president and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said: "Communities across the country are being devastated by substance abuse. Educating culturally competent health professionals in tribal and rural communities is part of an effective response to this crisis. We need to bring our own knowledge and resources to healing our family members, and providing scholarships for health education does that for us."

North Dakota, with a lower rate of drug deaths than other states overall, has experienced a sharply rising death rate due to drug overdose. Drug deaths in North Dakota have increased 90 percent between 2014 and 2017, according to the America's Health Rankings Annual Report. Finding suitable drug treatment within a reasonable travel distance is a challenge in this primarily rural state. By working to educate citizens of rural communities affected by drug misuse, the goal is to get patients on the path of full recovery.

"Thousands of Americans are dying from opioid overdoses, and people living in rural areas often suffer more due to the lack of easily accessible health care," said Tracy Malone, president of the United Health Foundation. "The United Health Foundation is honored to support these bright and motivated students who will serve an important and needed role fighting the disease of addiction, provide culturally competent care to their Native communities and give back to the people of North Dakota."

To view a video profile of Maria Vormestrand of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians, please visit https://www.unitedhealthgroup.com/newsroom.html.

bout the American Indian College Fund

Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation's largest charity supporting Native higher education for more than 28 years. The College Fund believes "Education is the answer" and provided 6,548 scholarships last year totaling $7.6 million to American Indian students, with more than 125,000 scholarships totaling over $100 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation's 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation's top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau's Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.

About the United Health Foundation

Through collaboration with community partners, grants and outreach efforts, the United Health Foundation works to improve our health system, build a diverse and dynamic health workforce and enhance the well-being of local communities. The United Health Foundation was established by UnitedHealth Group (NYSE: UNH) in 1999 as a not-for-profit, private foundation dedicated to improving health and health care. To date, the United Health Foundation has committed $430 million to programs and communities around the world. We invite you to learn more at www.unitedhealthgroup.com/SocialResponsibility

DSU President Griffiths to serve on Nat'l Security Commission on AI

 "She is passionate about expanding educational and research opportunities in computer science and cybersecurity and developing a tech-enabled workforce. I'm certain she will be a strong asset to the commission." – Sen. Thune

Washington, DC – Nov. 16, 2018 – U.S. Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.), chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, today announced the selection of Dakota State University President Dr. José-Marie Griffiths to serve as a member of the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence, which was included in the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019. The independent commission was established to review advances in artificial intelligence, related machine learning developments, and associated technologies.

"I'm honored to select Dr. Griffiths to serve on the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence," said Thune.

"As chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, I've had the privilege of working with Dr. Griffiths and have invited her to testify in front of our committee on several occasions. She is passionate about expanding educational and research opportunities in computer science and cybersecurity and developing a tech-enabled workforce. I'm certain she will be a strong asset to the commission."

Griffiths, who has testified multiple times in front of the Commerce Committee, has served as the president of Dakota State University, a leader in science and technology, since 2015.

Griffiths has worked in higher education for more than 30 years, focusing her academic research on the use of information technology in higher education, the contribution of technology and informatics, and health informatics.

Legals

RFB

Land For Sale

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation is now accepting competitive sealed bids on one (1) individual home site.

All bids must be addressed to: Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, Attention Tribal Realty Department, P.O. Box 509, Agency Village, SD 57262. Your bid shall be plainly marked on the outside of the envelope as follows: "BID ON LAND FOR SALE BY THE SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE." The tract of land offered for sale is legally described as: SW¼NE¼SW¼SW¼ in Section 2 T.126N. R.53W., Red Iron Lake Township Marshall County Containing 2.5 acres. The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate reserves the right to reject any and all bids. The Sisseton-Wahpeton also reserves the right to allow a Tribal Member to match the high bid. The bid period will be for thirty (30) calendar days beginning on November 12, 2018 to December 21, 2018, until 4:30 p.m. Bid opening will be made by the governing authority of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate on or after December 28, 2018.

46-2tc

 

RFB

Land For Sale

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation is now accepting competitive sealed bids on one (1) individual home site.

All bids must be addressed to: Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, Attention Tribal Realty Department, P.O. Box 509, Agency Village, SD 57262. Your bid shall be plainly marked on the outside of the envelope as follows: "BID ON LAND FOR SALE BY THE SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE." The tract of land offered for sale is legally described as: NE¼NE¼NE¼NE¼ in Section 16 T.124N. R.51W., Agency Township Roberts County Containing 2.5 acres. The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate reserves the right to reject any and all bids. The Sisseton-Wahpeton also reserves the right to allow a Tribal Member to match the high bid. The bid period will be for thirty (30) calendar days beginning on November 12, 2018 to December 21, 2018, until 4:30 p.m. Bid opening will be made by the governing authority of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate on or after December 28, 2018.

46-2tc

October 2018 Tribal Council proceedings

REGULAR TRIBAL COUNCIL MEETING

Tuesday, October 2, 2018, 9:00 AM

TiWakan Tio Tipi Council Chambers

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT:

BUFFALO LAKE: Arnold White Jr.

ENEMY SWIM: Lois Owens

HEIPA/VEBLEN: Winfield Rondell Jr.

LAKE TRAVERSE: Francis Crawford (9:11)

LONG HOLLOW: Justin Chanku (9:06)

OLD AGENCY: Milton Owen

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT:

BIG COULEE: Alvah Quinn Sr. (medical)

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES PRESENT: Tribal Chairman David Flute, Tribal Vice-Chairman Floyd Kirk Jr., and Tribal Secretary Edmund Johnson Jr.

 

CALL TO ORDER: Tribal Chairman David Flute called the meeting to order at 9:05 AM with three (3) Executive and four (4) Council members from seven (7) Districts answering Roll Call. Opening Prayer for the Big Coulee District said by Old Agency Councilman Milton Owen.

 

MOTION NO. 1: made by Justin Chanku, second by Milton Owen, question by Floyd Kirk Jr., to approve the Agenda of the Day for the October 2, 2018 Tribal Council Meeting.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 1: 12 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 1 Absent From Vote: Arnold White Jr. (1). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

Note: Lake Traverse Tribal Council Member Francis Crawford now present at meeting.

 

MOTION NO. 2: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Milton Owen, question by Floyd Kirk Jr., to approve the Regular Tribal Council Meeting Minutes of Tuesday, September 11, 2018.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 2: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 3: made by Floyd Kirk Jr., second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Justin Chanku, to approve the Regular Tribal Council Meeting Minutes of Wednesday, September 12, 2018.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 3: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 4: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Floyd Kirk Jr., question by Lois Owens, to approve the Regular Tribal Council Meeting Minutes of Wednesday, September 26, 2018.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 4: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 5: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lois Owens, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to approve Executive Resolution No. 18-10, "The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate (SWO) Calling upon Congress to assist the SWO to preserve, manage, and consolidate the Indian lands of Canadian Sisseton-Wahpeton's and related cultural sites on and near the Lake Traverse Reservation".

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 5: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Executive Resolution No. 18-10

 

MOTION NO. 6: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Milton Owen, question by Justin Chanku, to approve the Tribal Chairman report, as presented by Tribal Chairman David Flute.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 6: 14 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 1 Absent From Vote: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 7: made by Justin Chanku, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Floyd Kirk Jr., to authorize SWO Fuel Inc. to purchase a 2001 Freightliner FL 112 Fuel Truck, from Mark Liebersbach, in Mandan, ND, in the amount of $55,000.00, with carryover funds as the funding source, as presented by Interim General Manager James Bird.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 7: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 8: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Lois Owens, question by Francis Crawford, to approve the Tribal Vice-Chairman report, as presented by Tribal Vice-Chairman Floyd Kirk Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 8: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 9: made by Milton Owen, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Arnold White Jr., to approve the Tribal Secretary report, as presented by Tribal Secretary Edmund Johnson Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 9: 14 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Opposed. 1 Abstained: Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 10: made by Justin Chanku, second by Lois Owens, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to approve the Revised Budget Matrix for FY 2019, as presented by Budget Supervisor Lexie Fancher.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 10: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 11: made by Lois Owens, second by Arnold White Jr., question by Floyd Kirk Jr., to approve the Keepseagle Funding/Farm Incubator Project budget for FY 2019, as presented by Budget Supervisor Lexie Fancher.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 11: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 12: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lois Owens, question by Arnold White Jr., to accept the bid from J&J Earthworks Inc., for the Barker Hill Phase II project, in the amount of $1,496,320.00, with Rural Development and IHS funds as the funding sources, and to authorize Tribal Chairman David Flute to execute the Agreement, pending legal review, and concurrence from USDA Rural Development, as presented by DOT Manager Cliff Eberhardt.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 12: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 13: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lois Owens, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to approve the Change Order for Bid Schedule D - Wastewater Treatment, in the credit amount of ($35,000.00) for the Barker Hill Phase II project, as presented by DOT Manager Cliff Eberhardt.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 13: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 14: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Arnold White Jr., to authorize $300 for SWO Tribal Elders at the next Elderly Day, scheduled for Wednesday, November 14, 2018, at Dakota Magic Casino, as presented by the Tribal Elderly Advisory Board.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 14: 14 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Secretary (1). 1 Opposed: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 15: made by Winfield Rondell, second by Arnold White, question by Edmund Johnson Jr., to approve the Tribal Elderly Advisory Board report, as presented by TEAB Members; Zelma Flute, Mike Greeley, Barbara Mail, Carol Jordan, and Martha Renville.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 15: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 16: made by Justin Chanku, second by Lois Owens, question by Floyd Kirk Jr., in resolution form, to enroll into the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate the four (4) applicants as listed in Exhibit A, as presented by Enrollment Officer Zelma Flute.

Barrientos Jr., Miguel Angel Bowen, Jasper Lee

Demarrias, Taimah Sevyn Julius, Greyson Lane

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 16: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Resolution No. SWO-18-095

 

MOTION NO. 17: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Milton Owen, question by Floyd Kirk Jr., in resolution form, to enroll into the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate the four (4) applicants as listed in Exhibit B, as presented by Enrollment Officer Zelma Flute.

Guevara Jr., Israel Raymond McCauley, Drew Edward

Martin, Daniel Allen Torres, Elara Jane

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 17: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Resolution No. SWO-18-096

 

MOTION NO. 18: made by Milton Owen, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Arnold White Jr., in resolution form, to enroll into the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate the eight (8) applicants as listed in Exhibit C, as presented by Enrollment Officer Zelma Flute.

Appenay, Areyes Taran Blackthunder, Brayven Henry

Brant, Ezra-Louise Beatrice Decoteau, Eileen Julia

Ellis, Heather Marlene Mauricio, Shanda Mae

Springer, Quentin Charles Staples, Charles Favin Kelly

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 18: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Resolution No. SWO-18-097

 

MOTION NO. 19: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Lois Owens, question by Floyd Kirk Jr., in resolution form, to relinquish from enrollment with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate the two (2) applicants listed in Exhibit D, as presented by Enrollment Officer Zelma Flute.

Campbell Jr., Buffalo Bear-David Edward  St. John, Daniel Roy

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 18: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Resolution No. SWO-18-098

 

MOTION NO. 20: made by Lois Owens, second by Justin Chanku, question by Edmund Johnson Jr., to approve the Enrollment Office report, as presented by Enrollment Officer Zelma Flute.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 20: 14 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 1 Absent From Vote: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 21: made by Lois Owens, second by Arnold White Jr., question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to authorize Dakota Language Institute to begin the process to apply for an Indian Land Tenure Foundation grant, as presented by Manager Tammy DeCoteau.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 21: 14 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 1 Absent From Vote: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 22: made by Lois Owens, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Floyd Kirk Jr., to acknowledge the receipt of the Enemy Swim District Minutes for the meeting held September 27, 2018.

Enemy Swim District Minutes for meeting held September 26, 2018:

1. Give the current playground back to the housing and wait for a new and bigger one.

2. Accept Adult Membership: Kyla Rencountre, Olivia Bendickson, Roshaun Pomani, Veronica Cloud, and Vicente Bautista.

3. Accept Youth Membership: Azariah Appenay, Brae Bryant-DeMarrias, Ella Iyarpeya, Elyssia Salazar, Kapeya LaRoque, Zuya LaRoque, JalaCoy Seaboy, and Milani Seaboy.

4. Reaffirm Membership: Chloe Desilets-Shepherd and Arica Roberts.

5. Accept Relinquishment: Adam Bernal-Sabino, Anthony Bernal-Sabino, Carlos Bernal-Sabino, Eliana Bernal-Sabino, Jasenia Bernal-Sabino, and Vernon R. Brennan.

6. Rescind Motion #42, dated 9-12-18, concern Tribal Youth Department.

7. Have our District Chairman go to Tribal Elderly Program and get our equipment back.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 22: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 23: made by Milton Owen, second by Arnold White Jr., question by Lois Owens, to acknowledge the receipt of the Old Agency District Minutes for the meeting held September 24, 2018.

Old Agency District Minutes for meeting held September 24, 2018:

1. Reaffirm Bud White for SWO Police Commission.

2. Accept Adult Membership: Wyatt German, Heather IronShirt, and Amara Traxler.

3. Accept Youth Membership: Kaion Sheridan and Prestley Owen.

4. Accept Adult Relinquishment: Douglas Barse.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 23: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 24: made by Francis Crawford, second by Arnold White Jr., question by Justin Chanku, to acknowledge the receipt of the Lake Traverse District Minutes for the meeting held September 27, 2018.

Lake Traverse District Minutes for meeting held September 27, 2018:

1. DCA, Councilman and Program Manager involved in the budget process.

2. Have Councilman Crawford look into the reason why SWC BOT would not seat LTD member.

3. SWO to reimburse LTD for taxes paid to I.R.S out of the settlement monies, due to the Tribe paying the delinquent taxes and penalties paid to the I.R.S for THPO employees contracted by THPO program.

4. Accept New Membership: Kaylie Block, Damian White Jr., Jordan Mireau, Hugo Thompson, and Jared Lee Kurrasch.

5. Accept voting results for LTD District Election Board alternate.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 24: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 25: made by Justin Chanku, second by Arnold White Jr., question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to acknowledge the receipt of the Long Hollow District Minutes for the meeting held September 20, 2018.

Long Hollow District Minutes for meeting held September 20, 2018:

1. Accept voting results for RPC: Shane Cook.

2. Remove the current public defender Scott as recommended from the Judicial Committee.

3. Pay Fuel Inc. old receivables same amount as Little Steps Daycare

4. Conduct a forensic audit on Little Steps Daycare.

5. We eliminate the for-profit corporation as a whole and make the Managers report to Council.

6. Have all Elderly cards within a 100-mile radius be used at the Dakota Crossings.

7. Accept Youth Membership: Alois Wanna.

8. Accept Relinquishment: Tonya Bissonnette.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 25: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 26: made by Arnold White Jr., second by Floyd Kirk Jr., question by Justin Chanku, to acknowledge the receipt of the Buffalo Lake District Minutes for the meeting held September 27, 2018.

Buffalo Lake District Minutes for meeting held September 27, 2018:

1. Request on behalf of the Buffalo Lake District's business venture The Buffalo Lanes the amount of $500.000.00.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 26: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

Note: Big Coulee District did not have their meeting minutes available to present.

 

Note: Heipa District did not have their meeting minutes available to present.

 

MOTION NO. 27: made by Winfield Rondell Jr, second by Floyd Kirk Jr., question by Justin Chanku, to approve the District Chairman's Association (DCA) report, as presented by DCA Members; Karen White, Duane Hislaw, Jesse Larsen, Louis Johnson, Chanda Joseph, and Sherilyn Marks.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 27: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 28: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Francis Crawford, question by Justin Chanku, to authorize the payment to HKG Architects, in the amount of $38,454.12, for an outstanding invoice from 2014 for the proposed Justice Center Project, with the Justice Center set-aside as the funding source, as presented by Tribal Vice-Chairman Floyd Kirk Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 28: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Justin Chanku (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 29: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lois Owens, to adjourn.

 

MEETING ADJOURNED 1:05PM.

 

Respectfully Submitted

Lindsey Abraham, Recording Secretary Asst.

 

SPECIAL TRIBAL COUNCIL MEETING

Tuesday, October 16, 2018, 2:23 PM

TiWakan Tio Tipi Council Chambers

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT:

BUFFALO LAKE: Arnold White Jr.

ENEMY SWIM: Lois Owens

HEIPA/VEBLEN: Winfield Rondell Jr.

LAKE TRAVERSE: Francis Crawford

OLD AGENCY: Milton Owen

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT:

BIG COULEE: Alvah Quinn Sr. (passed away on 10/11/18)

LONG HOLLOW: Justin Chanku

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES PRESENT: Tribal Chairman David Flute and Tribal Vice-Chairman Floyd Kirk Jr.

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES ABSENT: Tribal Secretary Edmund Johnson Jr. (illness)

 

CALL TO ORDER: Tribal Chairman David Flute called the meeting to order at 2:23 PM with two (2) Executives and five (5) Council members from seven (7) Districts answering Roll Call. Opening Prayer for the Big Coulee District said by Tribal Chairman David Flute.

 

MOTION NO. 39: made by Lois Owens, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Arnold White Jr., in accordance with Article VI of the SWO Revised Constitution and By-Laws, to declare the Big Coulee Tribal Council Member position vacant, due to the death of Big Coulee Tribal Council Member Alvah Quinn Sr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 39: 12 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 40: made by Milton Owen, second by Francis Crawford, question by Floyd Kirk Jr., to appoint Floyd DeCoteau as the Interim Big Coulee Tribal Council Member, as recommended by the Big Coulee District Executive Committee.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 40: 12 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 41: made by Francis Crawford, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Lois Owens, in resolution form, to accept the grant award from the U.S. Department of the Interior for construction of the Detention/Justice Center project, in the amount of $4.875 million, and to authorize Tribal Chairman David Flute to execute the acceptance letter and other necessary documents, pending legal review, as presented by Tribal Chairman David Flute.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 41: 12 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Resolution No. SWO-18-099

 

MOTION NO. 42: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Lois Owens, to adjourn.

 

MEETING ADJOURNED 2:28PM.

 

Respectfully Submitted

Verlyn Beaudreau, Recording Secretary

 

SPECIAL TRIBAL COUNCIL MEETING

Thursday, October 18, 2018, 3:11 PM

TiWakan Tio Tipi Council Chambers

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT:

BIG COULEE: Floyd DeCoteau

BUFFALO LAKE: Arnold White Jr.

HEIPA/VEBLEN: Winfield Rondell Jr.

LAKE TRAVERSE: Francis Crawford

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT:

ENEMY SWIM: Lois Owens

LONG HOLLOW: Justin Chanku

OLD AGENCY: Milton Owen

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES PRESENT: Tribal Vice-Chairman Floyd Kirk Jr. and Tribal Secretary Edmund Johnson Jr.

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES ABSENT: Tribal Chairman David Flute

 

CALL TO ORDER: Tribal Vice-Chairman Floyd Kirk Jr. called the meeting to order at 3:11 PM with two (2) Executives and four (4) Council members from seven (7) Districts answering Roll Call.

 

MOTION NO. 43: made by Francis Crawford, second by Arnold White Jr., question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to approve the request from the Sisseton-Wahpeton Housing Authority for a waiver of the TERO Ordinance requirement of soliciting bids for projects over $1,000.00, only for: 1) Insurance Claims, that need immediate repairs for the tenants and for reimbursements from the insurance agencies; and 2) for Grant Funded Projects, such as Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB), that require repairs/renovations to be completed in expedited time frames, as recommended by the TERO Commission, and as presented by TERO Director DelRay German.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 43: 9 For: Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice- Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 44: made by Francis Crawford, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Edmund Johnson Jr., to approve the draft resolution, "Opposition to the Nomination and Confirmation of Eric Miller to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals", as presented by Lake Traverse Tribal Council Member Francis Crawford.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 44: 9 For: Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice- Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Resolution No. SWO-18-100

 

MOTION NO. 45: made by Francis Crawford, second by Arnold White Jr., question by Floyd DeCoteau, to authorize the Sisseton-Wahpeton Housing Authority to apply for a grant from the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development, to address homelessness in Tribal areas, and to authorize Tribal Chairman David Flute to execute the documents for the application.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 45: 9 For: Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice- Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 46: made by Francis Crawford, second by Floyd DeCoteau, question by Edmund Johnson Jr., to authorize the Sisseton-Wahpeton Housing Authority to apply for grants from Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB), and to authorize Tribal Chairman David Flute to execute the documents for the application.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 46: 9 For: Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice- Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 47: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Francis Crawford, question by Floyd DeCoteau, in resolution form, to support the Sisseton-Wahpeton College to apply for grant funds form the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community (SMSC), in the amount of $200,000.00, for a fire/sprinkler system for the SWC Dormitory Project.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 47: 9 For: Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice- Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Resolution No. SWO-18-101

 

MOTION NO. 48: made by Francis Crawford, second by Arnold White Jr., to adjourn.

 

MEETING ADJOURNED 3:26PM.

 

Respectfully Submitted

Lindsey Abraham, Recording Secretary Asst.

 

REGULAR TRIBAL COUNCIL MEETING

Wednesday, October 31, 2018, 9:00 AM

TiWakan Tio Tipi Council Chambers

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT:

BIG COULEE: Floyd DeCoteau

BUFFALO LAKE: Arnold White Jr.

ENEMY SWIM: Lois Owens

HEIPA/VEBLEN: Winfield Rondell Jr.

LAKE TRAVERSE: Francis Crawford

LONG HOLLOW: Justin Chanku

OLD AGENCY: Milton Owen

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES PRESENT: Tribal Chairman David Flute, Tribal Vice-Chairman Floyd Kirk Jr., and Tribal Secretary Edmund Johnson Jr. (10:28)

 

CALL TO ORDER: Tribal Chairman David Flute called the meeting to order at 9:11 AM with two (2) Executives and seven (7) Council members from seven (7) Districts answering Roll Call. Opening Prayer for the Big Coulee District said by Big Coulee Tribal Council Member Floyd DeCoteau.

 

MOTION NO. 49: made by Francis Crawford, second by Floyd DeCoteau, question by Floyd Kirk Jr., to grant a limited waiver of sovereign immunity to John German Sr. in SWO Tribal Court, to determine whether he was afforded due process and was properly terminated pursuant to DNGE Policy, with the relief, if any, limited to a remand to the DNGE Grievance Committee for a full hearing; and if successful, any relief the DNGE Grievance Policy provides.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 49: 11 For: Lois Owens (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 5 Opposed: Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Milton Owen (2). 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 50: made by Francis Crawford, second by Floyd DeCoteau, question by Lois Owens, to adopt the Agenda of the Day for the October 31, 2018 Tribal Council Meeting.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 50: 16 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 51: made by Floyd Kirk Jr., second by Justin Chanku, question by Floyd DeCoteau, to authorize Dakota Western Corporation to purchase a generator for their building sprinkler system, from Mayou Electric, in the amount of $108,192.50, and to have the Legal Office draft a contract for this purchase and installation, with the authorization for Tribal Chairman David Flute to execute the contract, as presented by DWC General Manager Robert Huff.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 51: 16 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 52: made by Francis Crawford, second by Justin Chanku, question by Floyd Kirk Jr., to approve the Dakota Western Corporation report, as presented by General Manager Robert Huff.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 52: 16 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 53: made by Justin Chanku, second by Floyd DeCoteau, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to transfer the assets of the Dakota Crossing Grocery Store from the Tribe's accounting inventory listings to the Dakota Crossing Grocery Store's accounting inventory, as requested by DNI CEO Josh Flute.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 53: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 1 Absent From Vote: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 54: made by Francis Crawford, second by Floyd DeCoteau, question by Milton Owen, to approve the Dakota Crossing Grocery Store report, as presented by Interim General Manager Wade Sukut.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 54: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 1 Absent From Vote: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 55: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Arnold White Jr., question by Francis Crawford, to approve the SWO Fuel, Inc. report, as presented by Interim General Manager James Bird.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 55: 13 For: Justin Chanku (2); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 3 Absent From Vote: Lois Owens (3). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 56: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lois Owens, question by Floyd Kirk Jr., to approve the Agency C-Store report, as presented by SWO Fuel, Inc. Interim General Manager James Bird.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 56: 16 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 57: made by Floyd Kirk Jr., second by Floyd DeCoteau, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to approve the Letter of Support for the Sisseton-Milbank Railroad rebuilding project, and to authorize Tribal Chairman David Flute to sign the letter, as presented by DNI CEO Josh Flute.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 57: 16 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 58: made by Floyd Kirk Jr., second by Floyd DeCoteau, question by Justin Chanku, to approve the Dakota Nation Industries Corporate Allocation budget for FY 2019, with the funding source to be the DNI For-Profit entities, as presented by DNI CEO Josh Flute.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 58: 14 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 2 Opposed: Francis Crawford (2). 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 59: made by Justin Chanku, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Arnold White Jr., to approve the I-29 Motel and Dakota Nation Industries reports, as presented by DNI CEO Josh Flute.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 59: 13 For: Justin Chanku (2); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 3 Absent From Vote: Lois Owens (3). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

Note: Tribal Secretary Edmund Johnson Jr. now present at meeting.

 

MOTION NO. 60: made by Floyd Kirk Jr., second by Arnold White Jr., question by Justin Chanku, to approve Change Orders CRX 094.01 - Relocate HVAC Unit, in the amount of $6,927.00; CRX 0124 - Gasket Replacement at Rotunda Window, in the amount of $3,065.00; CRX 0135 - Relocate Delicatessen, in the amount of $8,500.00; CRX 0137 - Front Desk Revisions, in the amount of $11,098.00; CRX 0142 - Replace Tile at Buffet Entry, in the amount of $2,235.00; CRX 0149 - Water Hammering Arrestors at Men's & Women's Restrooms, in the amount of $2,761.00; and CRX 0151 - Miscellaneous Electrical Changes, in the amount of $8,492.00; for the Dakota Magic Casino Expansion Project, as submitted by PCL Construction, and as presented by DNGE CFO Weston Quinn.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 60: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 61: made by Justin Chanku, second by Floyd Kirk Jr., question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to approve the Certificate of Substantial Completion for the Dakota Magic Casino Expansion Project Phase III, as submitted by Lightowler Johnson Associates Inc., and as presented by DNGE CFO Weston Quinn.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 61: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 62: made by Justin Chanku, second by Arnold White Jr., question by Lois Owens, to approve the Release of Retainage Requests for: Central Door - $11,446.34; and K&M Concrete Construction - $40,589.71, for the Dakota Magic Casino Expansion Project, as submitted by PCL Construction, and as presented by DNGE CFO Weston Quinn.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 62: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 63: made by Francis Crawford, second by Justin Chanku, question by Arnold White Jr., to authorize Dakota Magic Casino to purchase surveillance workstations, monitors, and accessories, from ECI Systems, in the amount of $32,444.00, as presented by DNGE CFO Weston Quinn.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 63: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

Note: Tribal Chairman David Flute briefly left the meeting. Tribal Vice-Chairman Floyd Kirk Jr. now chairing the meeting.

 

MOTION NO. 64: made by Lois Owens, second by Floyd DeCoteau, question by Milton Owen, to authorize Dakota Magic Casino to utilize Buck's Paving Inc., for parking lot and asphalt repairs, in the amount of $35,090.00, as presented by DNGE CFO Weston Quinn.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 64: 16 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

Note: Tribal Chairman David Flute returned to chair the meeting.

 

MOTION NO. 65: made by Justin Chanku, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Arnold White Jr., to approve the Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise (DNGE) Operating Needs budget for FY2019, as presented by DNGE CFO Weston Quinn.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 65: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 66: made by Justin Chanku, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Milton Owen, to approve the Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise report, as presented by DNGE CFO Weston Quinn.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 66: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 67: made by Francis Crawford, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Floyd DeCoteau, to approve the Consulting Contracts with: Gene Thin Elk, in the amount of $11,665.40; Marlin Farley, in the amount of $10,600.00; and Maria Hazel Stands, in the amount of $19,200.00, to conduct various training for Dakota Pride Treatment Center, with the Dakota Pride budgets as the funding source, and to authorize Tribal Chairman David Flute to execute the Contracts, as presented by Tribal Secretary Edmund Johnson Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 67: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 68: made by Francis Crawford, second by Arnold White Jr., question by Floyd DeCoteau, to authorize the payment to Technology & Innovation in Education, in the amount of $6,000.00, for Professional Learning Support services, with the Wiyukcan Ka Ecunpi grant as the funding source, as presented by Education Director Dr. Sherry Johnson.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 68: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 69: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Justin Chanku, question by Floyd Kirk Jr., to approve the draft resolution, "BIA Master Contract Programs and Services for Fiscal Years 2019, 2020, and 2021", as presented by Tribal Chairman David Flute.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 69: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Resolution No. SWO-18-102

 

MOTION NO. 70: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Milton Owen, question by Lois Owens, to approve the 2018 Winter General Council budget, in the amount of $20,000.00, with the Executive Committee budget as the funding source, as presented by Tribal Chairman David Flute.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 70: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 71: made by Francis Crawford, second by Floyd DeCoteau, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to authorize the sale of the Tribal vehicles declared as excess property, and to advertise/re-advertise any remaining vehicles for bids, as presented by Tribal Chairman David Flute.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 71: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 72: made by Francis Crawford, second by Justin Chanku, question by Floyd Kirk Jr., to authorize SWO Law Enforcement to purchase Taser Cartridges from Aardvark, as a sole source vendor, in the amount of $3,032.00, with the Law Enforcement budgets as the funding source, as submitted by Captain of Police Gary Gaikowski.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 72: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 73: made by Floyd Kirk Jr., second by Francis Crawford, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to authorize SWO Law Enforcement to purchase a 2019 Chevy Equinox, from Steven Lust Automotive, in the amount of $25,386.00, with the Victims Assistance grant as the funding source, as submitted by Captain of Police Gary Gaikowski.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 73: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 74: made by Edmund Johnson Jr., second by Arnold White Jr., question by Lois Owens, to go into Executive Session to discuss a legal issue, at 11:24am

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 74: 16 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 1 Absent From Vote: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 75: made by Edmund Johnson Jr., second by Lois Owens, question by Floyd Kirk Jr., to come out of Executive Session, at 11:38am.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 75: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 76: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Floyd DeCoteau, question by Lois Owens, to approve the September 2018 CACFP Food report for Head Start & Early Head Start, as presented by Director Lynn Halbert.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 76: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 77: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Milton Owen, question by Arnold White Jr., to approve the September 2018 Attendance report for Head Start & Early Head Start, as presented by Director Lynn Halbert.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 77: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 78: made by Justin Chanku, second by Milton Owen, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to rescind Tribal Council Motion No. 21, of 8/7/18, "to accept the bid submitted by BL Construction, for the Enemy Swim Head Start Roof Replacement Project, in the amount of $48,752.42, with the Head Start budgets as the funding source, as requested by Head Start Director Lynn Halbert.", as requested by Head Start Director Lynn Halbert.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 78: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 79: made by Floyd Kirk Jr., second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Lois Owens, to authorize the SWO Head Start to apply for one-time funding from the National Head Start Office, for roof replacement for the Enemy Swim Head Start and for cameras/surveillance equipment for the Head Start, as presented by Head Start Director Lynn Halbert.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 79: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 80: made by Milton Owen, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Floyd Kirk Jr., to approve the Head Start & Early Head Start report, as presented by Director Lynn Halbert.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 80: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 81: made by Lois Owens, second by Floyd DeCoteau, question by Arnold White Jr., to authorize the purchase of the 139 acres of land, offered for sale by Karen Janish, in the amount of $242,000.00, with the Section 7 budget as the funding source, as recommended by the Reservation Planning Commission, and as presented by Realty Director Jerry Eastman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 81: 12 For: Lois Owens (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Milton Owen (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 3 Opposed: Winfield Rondell Jr. (3). 0 Abstained. 2 Absent From Vote: Francis Crawford (2). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 82: made by Floyd Kirk Jr., second by Lois Owens, question by Floyd DeCoteau, to authorize the purchase of the 14.15 acres of land, offered for sale by Arlene Spider, in the amount of $50,244.91, with the Cobell account as the funding source, as recommended by the Reservation Planning Commission, and as presented by Realty Director Jerry Eastman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 82: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 2 Absent From Vote: Francis Crawford (2). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 83: made by Floyd Kirk Jr., second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Floyd DeCoteau, to authorize the purchase of the 0.28 acres of land, offered for sale by Joanna Gill, in the amount of $627.17, with the Cobell account as the funding source, as recommended by the Reservation Planning Commission, and as presented by Realty Director Jerry Eastman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 83: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 2 Absent From Vote: Francis Crawford (2). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 84: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Arnold White Jr., question by Floyd DeCoteau, to authorize the purchase of the 0.84 acres of land, offered for sale by Mary Daily, in the amount of $4,676.98, with the Cobell account as the funding source, as recommended by the Reservation Planning Commission, and as presented by Realty Director Jerry Eastman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 84: 15 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 2 Absent From Vote: Francis Crawford (2). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 85: made by Floyd Kirk Jr., second by Milton Owen, question by Lois Owens, to authorize the demolition and disposal of the dilapidated house that is located on land purchased from Ed Red Owl, as recommended by the Reservation Planning Commission, and as presented by Realty Director Jerry Eastman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 85: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 86: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lois Owens, question by Floyd DeCoteau, to approve the 2.5-acre Home Site Leases for: Cody and Melanie MacConnell, and Elsie White, as recommended by the Reservation Planning Commission, and as presented by Realty Director Jerry Eastman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 86: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 87: made by Justin Chanku, second by Francis Crawford, question by Arnold White Jr., to amend Tribal Council Motion No. 53, of 9/12/18, to reflect the updated amount for tractor repairs of $32,738.25, as presented by Realty Manager Jerry Eastman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 87: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 88: made by Floyd DeCoteau, second by Lois Owens, question by Floyd Kirk Jr., to approve the draft resolution, "Inter-Tribal Buffalo Council Herd Development Grant", as presented by Realty Manager Jerry Eastman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 88: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Resolution No. SWO-18-103

 

MOTION NO. 89: made by Justin Chanku, second by Floyd DeCoteau, question by Lois Owens, to approve the Realty Office report, as presented by Realty Director Jerry Eastman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 89: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 90: made by Lois Owens, second by Arnold White Jr., question by Floyd Kirk Jr., to reaffirm the Water Sources of the Lake Traverse Reservation report, and for the Tribe to use our own water resources for community and economic development needs, as presented by Planning Director LeeAnn TallBear.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 90: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 91: made by Lois Owens, second by Milton Owen, question by Floyd Kirk Jr., to approve the Policies and Procedures for the Reservation Planning Commission, as recommended by the Reservation Planning Commission, and as presented by Planning Director LeeAnn TallBear.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 91: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 92: made by Floyd Kirk Jr., second by Lois Owens, question by Arnold White Jr., to approve revisions to the Section 7 Small Business Grant Policies and Procedures, as recommended by the Reservation Planning Commission, and as presented by Planning Director LeeAnn TallBear.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 92: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 93: made by Lois Owens, second by Floyd Kirk Jr., question by Floyd DeCoteau, to authorize the payment to Short Elliot Hendrickson, Inc. (SEH), in the amount of $36,363.71, for work completed on the Dakota Connection Casino Expansion Project/Master Plan, with the Section 7 budget as the funding source, as presented by Planning Director LeeAnn TallBear.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 93: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 94: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Arnold White Jr., question by Floyd DeCoteau, to authorize the payment to Community Transit Inc., for shuttle bus services, in the amount of $8,740.48, with the Section 7 budget as the funding source, and that these funds will be reimbursed when the Community Transit grant funds are received, as presented by Planning Director LeeAnn TallBear.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 94: 16 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 1 Absent From Vote: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 95: made by Floyd DeCoteau, second by Milton Owen, question by Lois Owens, to approve the survey for the Carnegie Library Building in Sisseton, SD, as recommended by the Reservation Planning Commission, and as presented by Planning Director LeeAnn TallBear.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 95: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 96: made by Lois Owens, second by Floyd Kirk Jr., question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to approve the Small Business Grant awards to: Amanda Iyarpeya - $10,000.00; Joshua Gill - $10,000.00; Travis Herrick - $10,000.00; and Alta German - $2,421.42, with the Section 7 budget as the funding source, as recommended by the Reservation Planning Commission, and as presented by Planning Director LeeAnn TallBear.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 96: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 97: made by Lois Owens, second by Floyd Kirk Jr., question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to approve the Planning Department report, as presented by Planning Director LeeAnn TallBear.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 97: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 98: made by Floyd Kirk Jr., second by Lois Owens, question by Milton Owen, to approve the draft resolution, "Alvah D. Quinn Sr. Buffalo Farm", as presented by Big Coulee Tribal Council Member Floyd DeCoteau.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 98: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Resolution No. SWO-18-104

 

MOTION NO. 99: made by Francis Crawford, second by Arnold White Jr., question by Floyd Kirk Jr., to declare the Big Coulee District's 2007 Chevrolet Suburban as excess/surplus property, and to authorize the Big Coulee District to sell this vehicle.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 99: 17 For: Lois Owens (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Floyd DeCoteau (2); Francis Crawford (2); Justin Chanku (2); Arnold White Jr. (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 100: made by Lois Owens, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., to adjourn.

 

MEETING ADJOURNED 2:43PM.

 

Respectfully Submitted

Verlyn Beaudreau, Recording Secretary

Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following position(s):

Procurement and Contracting Officer, Office of Procurement and Contracting

Fitness Trainer/Outreach/Life Style Coach, Health & Fitness (Diabetes) Program

Counselor, Day Treatment Program/MSPI

Curriculum Specialist, Yukini/Education Department

Health Project Manager/Data Specialist, Health & Social Services

Closing Date: November 26th, 2018 @ 4:30 pm

EDA Planner, Planning Department

Family Coordinator (TREE), Health and Human Services

Youth Services/Recovery Support Coordinator (TREE), Health and Human Services

Bus Driver (part-time), Head Start

Teacher, Head Start

Teacher, Early Head Start

Bus Monitor/Teacher Aide, Head Start

Teacher Aide, Head Start

Teacher (Substitute), Enemy Swim Head Start

Closing Date: November 30th, 2018 @ 4:30 pm

Application and job description information can be seen at SWO Human Resources Office or http://www.swo-nsn.gov/contact/employment. Application can be downloaded from "Apply Now" and emailed to ArnoldW@SWO-NSN.GOV or DeniseH@SWO-NSN.GOV. Contact can also be at Arnold Williams 698-8238 or Denise Hill 698-8251 with questions. (Tribal preference will apply).

 

Enemy Swjm Day School

Dakotah Language Teacher/Instructor

Enemy Swim Day School is seeking a Dakotah Language Teacher/Instructor. Qualifications: Dakotah Language Teacher Licensure preferred or willing to work toward certification. For more information about the position call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 and ask for Dr. Nadine Eastman. Please visit our website at www.esds.us for a detailed position description and application. Please submit application, resume, 3 letters of recommendation and credentials to: Enemy Swim Day School, 13525 446th Avenue, Waubay, SD 57273. Indian Preference policies apply. This position is open until filled.

Substitute Workers Needed

Substitute workers will periodically cover shifts for regular staff absences. This is temporary, on call work. Must have a phone, pass background checks, GED or high school diploma is required to work in the classroom. Applications are accepted on an ongoing basis. For more information contact Nadine at 605-947-4605, ext. 3097.

47-2tc

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Count Department:

Team Member (5 Full-Time) 3am to finish

Foods Department:

Bus Person (Full-Time) where needed

Cashier (4 Full-Time) where needed

Cook II (Full-Time) where needed

Hotel Department:

Front Desk Clerk (Full-Time) where needed

Room/Laundry Attendant (6 Full-Time) 8:00 am to finish

Management Information Systems Department

PC Technician (Full-Time) Rotating

Smoke/Gift shop Department:

Supervisor (Full-Time) where needed

Surveillance Department:

Observer (3 Full-Time) where needed

Closing Date: November 23, 2018 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions

Two identifications documents required upon hire

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department 16849 102nd Street SE Hankinson ND 58041 For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment) Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Sales & Marketing/Reel Deal Club Department:

Sales & Marketing/Reel Deal Club Supervisor (1) full-time, rotating shifts, week-ends & holidays. Oversees all marketing activity, will work with all department managers and other marketing departments. Excellent communication skills - both written and verbal. Excellent people skills, and organizational and motivational skills. Knowledge of and ability to use the necessary equipment, proficient with computers, word processing, database and other related programs. Minimum of 2 years' experience in Marketing. Ability to work independently.

Must be at least 18 years old. High School Diploma or G.E.D. required.

Opening Date: Thursday, November 15, 2018

Closing Date: Wednesday, November 28, 2018 @ 4:00 pm

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke.

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Restaurant Department:

Wait staff (2) full-time, rotating shifts, day, and swing, includes weekends & holidays. Customer service skills, prior experience with waiting on tables and working with a cash register is preferred. Must be able to multi-task. Appropriate dress code. Have the physical ability to stand for prolonged periods of time. Must have a High school diploma or GED & be at least 18 years old.

Prep cook/cook (2) full-time, rotating shifts, day, and swing, includes weekends & holidays. Previous experience is preferred. Must be able to multi-task; have the ability to work under pressure; the ability to operate necessary equipment; knowledge of food preparation safety requirements and ability obtain a "Food Handlers" certification; physical ability to clean, lift heavy object up to 20 lbs. or more and restock inventory. Have the physical ability to stand for prolonged periods of time. Appropriate dress code. Must be very dependable. Must be at least 18 years old & must have a High School Diploma or GED.

Surveillance Department:

Agent (1) part-time, rotating shifts; day, swing, graveyard, weekends, holidays, and the ability to work flexible hours. Must have excellent written & verbal communication skills, motivational & mechanical skills. Knowledgeable of Tribal, State, and Federal gaming regulations. Knowledgeable in the operation of Microsoft Word. 1 year previous experience preferred. Must be at least 21 years old, must have a High School Diploma or GED. Must be able to obtain a Key Gaming License.

Bingo Department:

Rover/Paymaster (1) part-time, will be required to work any shift assigned during Bingo hours, weekends & holidays. Will be trained in all positions in the bingo department; such as floor clerk, cashier, pack maker, paymaster and caller. Previous experience working with money preferred. Must have good customer service skills, communication skills, ability to get along with other. Must be 21 years old, must have a High school Diploma or GED. Must be able to obtain a Key Gaming License.

Opening date: Thursday, November 15, 2018

Closing date: Wednesday, November 21, 2018 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

C-Store Department:

Clerk/Cashier (3) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Excellent customer service skills; math skills essential; ability to operate necessary equipment; physical ability to lift moderate amounts of weight; previous experience working with money preferred; strong organizational skills managing various functions; dependable & available to work any & all shifts. Must be at least 21 years old & have a High School diploma or GED.

Opening date: Thursday, November 15, 2018

Closing date: Wednesday, November 21, 2018 @ 4:00 p.m.

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 
 

 

Return to Sota Home Page