sota on-line masthead

 

Picture Picks of the Week

Don't miss out -- Click here
View the best pictures from this week's Sota
In full color!

 

Link to TEAB Executive candidates forum - Ocrt. 23, 2018

Link to KXSW Reznet videos here.

Wind River Water Code adapted for Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe (draft)

  Obituaries Editorials Editor's column Education
Legals
Trading post

 

 

Volume 50 Issue No. 3

Anpetu Iyamni, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019

Inside this Edition –

SWO 2018 Winter General Council reports, part four

Tribal Health 1,000 Days Initiative series continues

Dave Flute begins work as SD Secretary of Tribal Relations

SWO Attorney Megan LaFromboise sworn into US District Court for SD

CRST Chairman Frazier speaks for tribes against Trump's Wall, gov't shutdown

Meaningful conversation: Martin Luther King Jr., Civil Rights

Reminder: Deadline for receiving copy is noon on Friday

Part IV in a series of reports –

SWO Winter 2018 general council

The second and final general council of 2018 was held Thursday and Friday, December 20 and 21, at the SWO Tribal administration building in Agency Village, SD. Here is one in a series of articles featuring general council verbal and written reports.

Winter General Council Reports

Continued

From Last Week's Sota

SWO Homebuyers Program

Dustin "Dusty" Kirk, Manager, gave the Homebuyers report.

"We strive to … help Tribal members get into homes, purchase homes, with a $10,000.00 down payment."

Dusty said that last year Tribal Council increased the Homebuyer support from $5,000 to its current $10,000 level.

"That, obviously, pushed Tribal members to purchase homes this year."

He credited the increase for the program having exceeded its initial goal of providing support for 14 homes, to 19.

He explained the process, saying that "instead of re-doing our budget, we went on a case-by-case basis."

"When somebody would come in and be approved we'd take that to the Council then they approve it … instead of doing a lump sum into our budget."

Why the "case-by-case" process?

"The reason why," he said, "is because we exceeded our budget.

"Basically, as long as you qualified," he said. "You're going to get the $10,000.00."

He said, "Of course, we didn't pick or choose."

He described it as "first come, first serve."

Written Report

Staff:

Dustin Kirk, Director

Terri Larsen, Housing Counselor

Program Summary and Responsibilities:

*To provide financial assistance to enrolled Sisseton Wahpeton tribal members with the purchase of a primary home. There are eligibility requirements on the home being purchased and requirements that must be met by the potential homebuyer to qualify for down payment/closing cost assistance.

Program Needs & Identified Issues:

1 Unmet Needs. Limited affordable quality homes available for purchase. Continue to refer clients to outside entities e.g. Governors Homes, Cashway, etc.

2 Ongoing Issues. Clients becoming "homebuyer ready." Continue referring clients to homebuyer education classes.

Accomplishments of FY2018 Goals & Objectives:

1 Down payment/closing cost assistance provided for the purchase of 19 homes.           Exceeded our goal of assisting 14 tribal members in purchasing homes.

Looking Ahead: Goals and Objectives for FY2019

1 Goal is to assist 10 homebuyers per our approved budget with down payment/closing cost assistance.

Additional Information & Program Statistics:

*39 household members were put into homes

*$162,246.00 in down payment/closing cost assistance was distributed

*The 19 homes purchased were valued at a total of $1,265,582.27

*Program has assisted a total of 450 tribal members with their home purchase since 1999

*Total value of homes purchased since 1999 is $15,876,103.68

*Total down payment/closing cost assistance distributed since 1999 is $1,283,876.65

SWO Tribal Court

Mary High Eagle presented the Tribal Court report.

Staff:

BJ Jones, Chief Judge

Karen Gangle, Tribal Prosecutor

Michael T. Swallow, Associate Judge

Thor Hoyte, Appellate Judge

Patrick Donovan, Appellate Judge

John Murphy, Appellate Judge

Mary High Eagle, Assistant Court Administrator

Lois Kohl, Chief/Appellate Clerk

Eileen Pfeiffer, Deputy/Appellate Clerk

Jermaine Eastman, Juvenile/Appellate Clerk

Heather Renville, Receptionist

Delbert Hopkins Jr., Probation Officer

Danette Kirk, Juvenile Probation Officer

Rhonda Fatland, Treatment Court/Family Wellness

Goldie Jackson, Process Server (retired)

Kimberly Kampeska, Drug Court Clerk

Terri Quinn Brooks, Probation Officer

Program Summary and Responsibilities:

*The SWO Tribal Court works to provide quality, effective, efficient, unbiased and respectful judicial and administrative services to tribal members and non-members within the jurisdiction of the SWO. The SWO Tribal court works to ensure public safety by reducing crime; to strengthen families by providing alternative services through court process; and to protect and secure future generations by accountable practices.

*The work of the Probation Officers is to streamline the judicial process and links the courts, offenders and the community to preserve community safety while striving to rehabilitate offenders.

*The Treatment Court combines mandatory drug testing, treatment and intensive supervision to help offenders with substance abuse problems break the cycle of addiction and crime.

Accomplishments for FY2018:

1 The Probation Department now implements the Scram Monitors (ankle monitors) for those offenders on probation and house arrest. The Probation Officers along with other staff participated in training for use of the scram monitors. They also took part in training for the use of various drug testing.

2 Staff attended training for Treatment Court/Wellness to Healing Court. Purpose of training was to collect information from other Tribal Wellness Courts to implement new strategies for Treatment Court and participants.

Program Needs & Identified Issues:

1 A Detention Facility. There is a desperate need for a detention facility. The epidemic of drug abuse, distribution and manufacturing of meth brings drug related problems of violence, child neglect and abuse, elder abuse and sex trafficking. Justification for the need of a detention center.

2 Office space & the funds for space cost. The Probation Officers need office space. They need to speak to offenders in a private setting due to confidentiality and security purpose. The court needs the funds for space cost for the Probation Department.

Goals and Objectives for FY2018:

1 The Clerks to attend training for recertification. The Clerks need to attend training to enhance their skills with the daily operations of the court.

2 Implement new strategies in assisting participants in Treatment Court and on Probation. Some of these strategies would include cultural awareness.

Program Statistics:

For the fiscal year 2018, there were 430 drug cases, 530 alcohol related cases and 123 domestic violence cases. The Treatment Court had 11 participants. The number of offenders on probation are 174 males, 214 females, and 45 juveniles.

Sisseton-Wahpeton Housing Authority

Eric Shepherd, SWHA Director, gave the report.

He said that during the past year Housing accomplished its goals for the Indian Housing annual performance plan and its organizational goals.

"Our team also has administered three external federal grants as well, which were provided by Federal Home Loan Bank."

The FHLB provided subsidies for home ownership and home rehab.

Eric thanked Tribal Council for providing additional monetary support, "… for providing economic development opportunities to our local sub-contractors, our Tribal members."

"That creates quite a few jobs … puts a lot of food on the tables, that provides for a lot of families…."

The Council support, he said, has made it possible "so that we can complete those 20 units in Long Hollow, which are a home ownership project."

Eric said he looks forward "to building a sustainable healthy housing authority."

"This includes the delivery of our services to our entire Oyate."

The Indian Housing Block Grant covers community needs, he said, for maintenance and housing management services.

He admitted, "We previously have missed out on some opportunities."

"But we're capitalizing off of some technical assistance by our federal agencies."

He said that has put the Housing Authority "… in a stronger position as we pursue these grants."

"This coming year and the years to come, we'll be managing our affairs with a lens towards our wealth management and investment opportunities," he said.

The Housing Board has adopted a ten-year plan, he said, calling it "a piece of our strategic direction where we must to continue to develop."

"We look forward to strengthening our relationships … not only our SWO and our agencies but also with our regional, national, and federal partners."

He ended his talk by saying, "Housing is a pillar of our SWO Reservation and has been existent since 1968."

"Building our organizational capacity is a priority as we head into the second, third, and fourth quarters of our organizational goals."

Darlene Pipeboy commented from the floor.

"There's issues … occurring year after year in the housing units," she said.

"And it's because of the age of all these houses."

Darlene described the housing units built in the 1970s, "… Go live in those housing units, see how you like it."

"You need to look at all your people, otherwise you're discriminating against people."

"One of the issues … if you have a population that cannot afford, or have no income, the 1937 Housing Act says … 'If you have no income, your rent is zero.'"

"You guys are trying to take blood out of a rock here."

"Making people pay rent when there's no income?"

"You can love money, but you better love your people more."

"You better check on that and do something about it," she said.

She complained about mold in the houses.

"Come and look at my house," she said, "and look at all these houses that have mold."

She talked about respiratory problems in the community, linking them to mold.

Darlene ran through a litany of complaints against SWHA, its Maintenance, Tribal government for misusing federal money and discrimination.

She said she was frustrated by bringing complaints in year after year and not getting a response.

Eric Shepherd replied, thanking Darlene for "a lot of those good points."

The Housing Director said, "They are duly noted."

He said, "Yes, you did come to my office and met with me."

And "I do have a copy of your letter that you had issued."

"We are a TDHE, a Tribal Designated Housing Entity, that administers the block grant for our Tribe."

"Through that, through our self-determination, we also have rules and regulations from our federal government agency that we have a fiduciary responsibility to operate within those regulations, just as any other federal agency has, or federal other program that receives federal money."

"As I looked back, I don't think we have ever once violated any kind of rules or regulations with mismanaging our affairs."

"Yes, there (are) some issues, and yes we know we have some internalizing to do, but I'll tell you what. If you guys stick with me, we'll overcome those issues."

Another person came to the open mic.

"Hello, Mr. Shepherd," she said.

"I've been trying to get ahold of you for a while."

She said she had "lost my place in (housing area)."

"And they told me I had ten days to get out."

She described a lengthy housing nightmare that so far has had no resolution.

She tells of inconsistency in dealing with different people at Housing, having been told she is approved for a housing unit then that she is not.

Now she finds that the Housing Authority is charging her for back rent and charges she says are not valid.

"I'm still stuck without a place," she said to Eric Shepherd.

"I have two little girls and I'm a foster parent to my nieces, and I've been trying to get in contact with you. Your voicemail's pretty full."

She said Child Protection has been trying to help her, but for about six months she and her children have been without a place – staying instead with relatives.

"And I took good care of my homes," she said, "never once never once let my electricity get shut off."

"I got credited for my electricity, and I've never, my house was never damaged, I can guarantee you that it was never," she said.

Eric Shepherd replied, "A lot of you (with) tenant related questions … I have no problem sticking around … to listen to everyone's questions."

Eric made himself available to speak with in private out of the rotunda "or else come to the office … Monday through Friday."

Darlene returned to the microphone with one more question.

"I want an audit of the Housing Authority," she said.

"Has it ever been audited?"

"Yes, we have," answered Eric. "And we're undergoing one right now actually."

"I think all of those should have been on the table, so that people can look at them," Darlene said.

"Information that is public information, we will make available," said Eric.

"Do I have to come to Housing and get it?"

"I don't have gas money."

Chairman Flute spoke, advising people with questions to contact their Housing Board Commissioners, go to your District meetings.

Request information through Council member, District officers, he suggested.

John Kampeska spoke next.

"I was sitting here listening to my elders, one of my grandpas and grandmas over here, talking, and their concerns…."

"I have the same exact concerns, and trying to work with my family members on trying to get this going…."

"One of my dreams, one of my goals … in life is to build a community that is eco-friendly with nature."

"We need to have these plants and animals brought back into our life, because our spirituality depends on it."

He called it "our purpose here as Dakotas … to have those relationships as we go on through life, our body."

"We have a connection there, and our people are struggling with it, so, you know, that's one of the things I'm trying to get going for my family is to have this place, you know like, this community of, you know, of society of warriors who watch over the community and women who look after their elders and their children, you know. Have (those) relationships, cause we're losing it."

He said, "Oure kids are getting sick because of these houses that we have that are outdated using, you know, propane or whatnot, what we, you know, all that stuff that we breathe in."

"We're having trouble leaving the house."

"We're having trouble with our spirituality."

"We need these societies back."

"And, you know, it would be nice if … we could put all our programs together and get this done."

"I know we can … it's just, this takes the people to do it. Takes leaders to get out there and do it."

"And that's all I had to say."

Written Report

Staff:

Eric Shepherd, Executive Director

Patrick Deutsch Jr, Asst Director/HR Director

Olivia Locke, CFO

Lesley LaFontaine, Administrative Assistant

David Spider, Contract Specialist

David Goette, IT Specialist

Yvonne Bear, Accounts Payable

Simon Keeble, Contract Specialist Assistant

Christine Eberhardt, Acct Payable/Tenant Services

Danielle Twostars, Occupancy Specialist - HUD

Brenda King, Tenant Accounts Receiveable

Juanita Kirk ,Tenant Services

Clayton Adams, Tenant Services

Angeline Johnson,  T - Yamni

Lorraine Wolfvoice,  Receptionist

Ephriam Redearth, Facilities Manager

Michael Selvage Jr, Inspector/Insurance

Melanie Renville, Admin Asst/Inventory Clerk

Chris Rouilllard, Maintenance

Ryan German, Maintenance

Tony Barker, Maintenance

Francis Heminger, Maintenance

Dusty Renville, Maintenance

Rider Dirtseller Sr, Maintenance

Mike Heminger, Maintenance

Thomas Marks, Maintenance

Terry McKay, Maintenance

Dean Iyarpeya, Maintenance

Sonya Lawrence, Maintenance

Mniyata Hill, Maintenance

Ron Chaney, Maintenance

Frank Barse, RRP

Arlen Renville, RRP

Russell Barse, RRP

Jacob Barse, RRP

Troy Dumarce, RRP

Okokipe Jones, RRP

Shelly Dumarce, RRP

Jack Barse, RRP

Norwood St. John, RRP

Glen Wanna Sr, IHS/RD Maintenance

Kris Kohl, IHS/RD Maintenance

Rider Dirtseller Jr, IHS/RD Maintenance

Jesse Larsen IHS/RD, Maintenance

Robert Lacroix, IHS/RD Maintenance

Candida Heminger, IHS/RD Maintenance

Program Summary and Responsibilities:

*NAHASDA - To assist and promote affordable housing activities to develop, maintain and operate in safe and healthy environments on Indian reservations and in other Indian areas for occupancy by low - income Indian families.

*To plan for and integrate infrastructure resources, coordinate and promote self - sufficiency of Indian tribes promoting economic development opportunities to strengthen our community.

*Developing effective partnerships among the Federal government, state, tribal and local governments, and private entities that allow government to accept responsibility for fostering the development of a healthy marketplace and allow families to prosper without government involvement in their day - to - day activities.

Program Needs & identified Issues:

1 Unmet Needs. Expanding communities. Identifying adequate resources

2 Ongoing Issues. Tenant account receivables. Implementing financial literacy

Accomplishments:

1 Indian Housing Plan. Annual performance plan

2 20 SFH - Homeownership project. Full capacity occupancy end summer 2019

Goals and Objectives for FY2019:

1 Infrastructure. Short term - long term range development plan

2 Operational goals. Development of long range strategic plan

Program Statistics:

*2018 Indian Housing Plan / Annual Performance Review Plan.

*2018 FHLB Rental Rehab - 21 SFH, 20 homeownership rehab, 13 new construction. All 3 grants total $1.5 million.

*Currently completing 2 NADL tribal veteran's homeownership.

*2 burned SFH replacement units provided by insurance claims.

Friday, Dec. 21, 2018

Old Agency District Councilman Milton "Nippy" Owen gave the morning prayer on Friday.

After opening remarks by Chairman Dave Flute, Tribal Secretary Eddie Johnson spoke.

Eddie began by thanking the Oyate, "You are the ones that put me in this office of Tribal Secretary."

He also thanked Old Agency District members "for voting me in as Councilman and re-electing me."

"It's been a blessing to serve the Tribe."

"I've grown up in politics," he said, "and when I was growing up I never thought I'd be in politics … seeing how it was."

But, he added, "This was the road that was picked for me."

He thanked his office staff, "working behind the scenes."

Helping Tribal members get access to Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement, he said, was a major issue for his office.

"There's a lot of reimbursement money out there…."

He said he has talked with Secretary-elect Myrna Thompson, encouraging her to continue that effort.

Eddie highlighted several accomplishments from his term in office.

"There are three big grants that just started."

"One is the LAUNCH grant; the director will be April Eastman."

"Another is the Family TREE grant; directed by Shobi Zetina."

"And the Tribal Opioids Response grant."

The director position, he said, has not been filled yet.

These grants, he explained, "help people with substance abuse."

"A lot of it is family oriented."

"One deals with high school and middle school students that need help with counseling."

He spoke about his recent trip to Australia.

The IHS supported Eddie's travel to the global wellness event.

Eddie explained how he represents the Great Plains tribes on the Tribal Leaders Diabetes Committee (TLDC), which advises the IHS Director.

It was established through consultation with the tribes in 1998, and a major function is to determine allocation of Special Diabetes Program for Indians (SDPI) funds.

He said he was proud of the work done by SDPI, and that since the program began there has been "a 50 percent reduction in kidney failure."

The SWO Tribe benefits from SDPI in its Health and Fitness Center.

"They help you with pre-diabetes, diabetes, or even if you're just wanting to feel healthy."

Eddie said it was "concerning" to talk with Aboriginal peoples in Australia.

"They have the same type of problems that we do here as Native Americans."

"The bad thing about Aborigines … they don't have any rights at all."

He said that it makes him feel "blessed … to have the rights that we do have here in the US."

Before introducing the reports for programs under the Tribal Secretary's office, Eddie thanked everyone again for being able to serve.

Winter General Council Reports

To Be Continued

In Next Week's Sota

From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer"

GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov

605-268-0502

Veterans: Please request a survey; Your information is confidential, and completed surveys help ensure our access to support

SURVEY: Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribal Veterans please help us collect data so that we can secure more VA benefits for you our Veteran. Every time we request the answer is that we have no data, so along with Eric Shepherd, SWHA CEO & the TVSO Office we are on a data collecting mission. The SWHA is covering the cost of this confidential (you will not be asked your name on the survey) survey, we have until Jan. 31st to collect as many surveys as possible. Please help us and take 10 minutes and go to tis secure link and take the survey! If at any time when it comes to the financial question and you chose not to disclose please just skip over it you do not need to divulge any finances. Should you ever chose to apply for a loan of course that is the time you would need that information. Here is the link:

https://bigwaterportal.xyz/limesurvey/index.php/992525

… and I want to reiterate this data collection does not get shared with anyone except for our purposes in the collection and data building. Call me if you have any questions and please take the survey! 268-0502 If you would like a paper survey. I would be happy to bring one to you so call and request that if it's your choice!!

SD Dept. of Labor & Regulation: This week Angela Beacom, RCVSO and Myself met with Jay Leichtenberg, Employment Spec, DVOP & Rick Gully, Veteran Services State Coordinator in our TVSO office and found out all about their services available to our veterans. VETERANS; if you are seeking employment, have questions on your GI Bill and perhaps VOCH Rehab may better suite your situation, please contact us, we can have you meet with Jane at our local office and hook you up with the 2 gentleman above ., they may be able to help you more than you expect. Please call for any questions at 698-3388.

Citizen soldier for LIFE: WE have networked with this program who serves those who sered They provide Financial Literacy, Education & Career Readiness Services, Employment Skills Training, Individual Case Management. Emy Carlson from Watertown, SD will be coming to our office to drop off info for all of us. She has Community Partnerships, Troops to Teachers, American GI Forum, just a wealth of information and offers a lot of free services. THE CSFL program officers assistance for veterans and their families, call me with any questions and I can connect you with this wonderful group of services they provide free of charge.

Quarterly executive board of TVSO/VSO meeting to be held Feb 1, 2018. I am over our Region, if any of you Veterans have any issues, concerns you want brought forth for us to work on please contact me via email at GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov and I can bring your concerns forward. I will include the link to the upcoming legislative issues coming forth for our SD Veterans. Click Below for Legislative Calendar:

http://sdlegislature.gov/docs/legsession/2019/calendar.pdf

Resolutions/Commemorations

SCR 2 Provide for legislative task forces to study, report, and develop and consider recommendations and proposed legislation regarding sustainable improvements to the continuum of mental health ser-vices available in the state.

SCR 3 Commending, honoring, and thanking South Dakota's numerous women veterans for their service to our country and state.

*VETERANS: If you ever have a question about benefits please stop in, if you haven't applied for VA Healthcare Benefits recently please allow us to fill out the 10-10EZ and get you enrolled. If you may have been denied in years past due to income but maybe retired, please come in and we will reapply - as an Honorably discharged Veteran, there are benefits you qualify for that you may not be aware of. Health benefits, Burial benefits, education and more - please stop by for a record update if you haven't recently. You earned this and you deserve it.

*GI Bill Info: 1-888-442-4551, ask any questions check eligibility!!

*Crisis Line: 1-800-273-8255 Press 1 for Veterans

*Make the Connection: 1-888-823-7458 (inspiring stories about Veterans)

*SERVICE CONNECTION FUND ISSUES: 1-800-827-1000

Contact information: American Legion Post #314 Woodrow Wilson Honor Guard: Clayton Ellingson, Commander 1-605-924-1266 / Vietnam Veterans Kit Fox Society - Doc Wanna, Commander Phone:# 698-3299 / Desert Era Veterans - Jesse Chanku, Commander 1-605-956-0197: Geri Opsal, TVSO 698-3388 or 268-0502. GABE: 1-605-419-1007 - PLEASE SCHEDULE IN ADVANCE AT LEAST 5-7 DAYS AS HE MAY BE BOOKED.

South Dakota's new Tribal Relations Secretary testifies to Legislature's Budget Panel

Bob Mercer

Pierre, SD – KELO Capitol News Bureau – Jan. 10, 2019 – David Flute told South Dakota legislators at a budget hearing Thursday he's been on the job five days as Governor Kristi Noem's new secretary of tribal relations but the time has felt like 50.

Flute, who recently finished a three-year term as chairman for the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate tribal government, explained the plan for his department to the Legislature's Joint Committee on Appropriations.

He said methamphetamine addiction was the common problem faced on all nine of the reservations and throughout the state.

"It is horrible on the reservations," Flute said. "It affects the entire tribal nation, which affects all of South Dakota."

He listed a variety of problems such as failed drug tests that affect employment, parents losing children and straining public safety resources.

Opioid and heroin have deepened their hold too, he said.

"I can't stand for that," Flute told lawmakers.

His testimony came hours before Rosebud Sioux Tribal President Rodney Bordeaux was scheduled to deliver the State of the Tribes address to senators and representatives in the House chamber.

Flute said he understood that financial resources to battle the drug problem would be limited but it didn't mean he would stop fighting.

He replaced Steve Emery, a former tribal judge, as secretary, when Noem took office Saturday as the first woman elected governor in South Dakota's 130 years of statehood.

Flute has two positions open in his six-person office. He said the Noem administration and South Dakota's three members of Congress would be offering "an olive branch" to tribal governments.

The federal Indian Health Service "failed miserably" with Great Plains tribes by rearranging funding, he said and setting tribal governments at odds.

Flute pledged to Sen. Ryan Maher, R-Isabel, that he would seek to get an agreement between the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and the state Department of Social Services regarding children's welfare.

Maher had told the story of a phone call from a 12-year-old tribal member who said she was being injected with amphetamines and being sexually trafficked by family members. Maher said she killed herself the next year.

Sen. Jim White, R-Huron, a retired bank executive, asked about getting more tribal governments to participate in uniform commercial code filings for loans.

Flute said, "The seed has been planted. We need to nurture that seed." White replied he understands it's a two-way street and asked Flute for suggestions on what bankers can do to make tribal governments more comfortable.

On tourism, Flute said reservations have much to offer. He recalled working with the U.S. Department of State in 2017 to host an international gathering of museum officials on the Lake Traverse Reservation.

"I don't just want to talk about things. I want to do things," Flute said.

From the Secretary of Tribal Relations office

MISSION STATEMENT

The Department's continuing mission is to: Recognize the nine sovereign tribes who share our geographical borders as distinct political entities Support their self-governance efforts Work with their chosen leaders in a cooperative government to government relationship in order to improve the quality of life for all South Dakota citizens Identify, develop and/or coordinate federal state and local resources to increase partnerships between state and tribal agencies Introduce and/or support any legislation that would improve the quality of life for the Native American population in the state

Secretary Dave Flute is an enrolled member of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate. Prior to becoming Secretary of the South Dakota Department of Tribal Relations, he was the Chairman for the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate and also previously served as the Lake Traverse Councilman..

A military veteran, Secretary Flute served this country in Afghanistan between 2006 and 2009. He believes that the Dakota values are similar to military values; Duty, Honor, Respect, Selfless Service, Honesty, and Bravery.

He graduated from North Dakota State University with two social science degrees and was a member of the American Honor Society, Phi Alpha Theta.

Rosebud president seeks collaboration with state

Pierre, SD – KSFY – Jan. 10, 2019 – The Latest on Rosebud Sioux Tribe President Rodney Bordeaux's State of the Tribes message:

The president of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe is urging South Dakota lawmakers to expand Medicaid and work with tribal officials to fight the opioid and methamphetamine epidemic.

President Rodney Bordeaux on Thursday gave the fourth State of the Tribes message, asking legislators and Gov. Kristi Noem to promote higher education tuition waivers for Native American students and to make the availability of mental health services in rural areas and reservations a priority.

He recommended a government-to-government summit on meth and opioids.

Bordeaux says the Keystone XL oil pipeline gives his people "great anxiety" and says he watched with regret as lawmakers passed a measure in 2017 to address potential oil pipeline protests.

He says tribes believe the law was enacted with an eye for "limiting our people and our right to protest."

Bordeaux also urged South Dakota's federal delegation to do what they can to end the partial government shutdown.

Tribes use caution amid government shutdown

By Patrick Reilly

Missoulian – Jan. 2, 2019 – As the federal government's shutdown drags on, northwest Montana's two tribal governments are using their resources carefully.

The 12-day-old government shutdown poses challenges for Indian tribes across the country, which receive a wide range of federal grants, partnerships, and other funds.

For the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, those funds include self-governance agreements with the U.S. Departments of the Interior and Health and Human Services. Under these agreements, the tribes had expected to receive about $10.5 million and $25.4 million, respectively, in fiscal year 2019.

It's uncertain how, if at all, payments under these or other agreements have been affected by the shutdown. The tribal health department, funded by the Health and Human Services pact, was open as usual Wednesday.

However, the tribal government is sounding caution. In a Dec. 26 post on the Char-Koosta News Facebook page, the tribes' Finance Office notified employees that "at this time, everyone should continue to report to their jobs as usual." But it also set forth several restrictions on travel, contracts, overtime and hiring meant to conserve funds.

On the Blackfeet Indian Reservation, Tribal Business Council Chairman Tim Davis said that "we're impacted significantly" by the shutdown. While government employees who protect life and property, such as law enforcement, will continue to work without pay, other programs have either been suspended or will end soon as residual funds run out.

Davis voiced particular concern about a lack of Bureau of Indian Affairs snow removal and road maintenance services on the vast Blackfeet Reservation, and the future of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National School Lunch Program.

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, 68 percent of American Indian/Alaska Native students qualify for free or reduced-priced lunches under this program. In a pre-shutdown press release, the Department of Agriculture stated it would continue into February.

But determining the shutdown's full impact is no easy task. Blackfeet treasurer Tinswella Bird Rattler explained that "we have a lot of programs, and every one has different aspects of how the funding comes down."

For the moment, Bird Rattler said, the Blackfeet are simply using their funds conservatively. "Depending on the length of what might be expected [with the shutdown], we'll start getting more formal with our planning," she said.

The U.S. House will reconvene Thursday with a new Democratic majority, which plans to take up several bills to reopen the federal government. However, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has stated that any funding legislation must be able to pass both houses of Congress and receive a signature from President Trump before it receives a vote from the Senate.

(Editor's note: We have not heard any official comment from the SWO Tribe about how the federal shutdown impacts us, although the absence of Superintendent Russell Hawkins from the 2019 Inauguration was announced as being due to the government shutdown. Note that this article was written on January 2nd; we have now surpassed the previous record for the longest government shutdown created because of political bickering in Washington, DC.)

Two bills aim to help ND with Murdered and Missing Indigenous people

By C.S. Hagen

Bismarck, ND – HPR – Jan. 9, 2019 – North Dakota's first Native Congresswoman introduced two bills related to murdered and missing Indigenous people.

Ruth Buffalo, of Fargo, turned in the bills – House Bill 1313 and House Bill 1311 – to require additional training and data collection by law enforcement related to MMIW issues.

Buffalo, a Democrat, and a registered member of the Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara Nation, recently made national headlines after receiving permission from the House minority leader and choosing to wear traditional attire to her swearing-in ceremony at the state capitol.

The first bill Buffalo turned in will require the state's criminal justice data information sharing system to include data related to missing and murdered Indigenous people. Basing information from the Urban Indian Health Institute, there were 5,712 reports of missing and murdered Indigenous women or girls in 2016, yet only 116 cases were reported to the federal missing persons database, according to Buffalo.

The second bill would authorize training for state's attorneys and law enforcement officers and officials regarding missing and murdered Natives. The North Dakota Human Trafficking Commission would provide all training.

Buffalo has been raising awareness about MMIW issues and human trafficking for years. In 2016, she spoke at the Women's March in Bismarck, and considers the issue to be of vital importance not only to Native peoples, but to everyone in the nation.

"These bills were introduced after meeting with the Attorney General, seeking input from local task forces, and the Human Trafficking Commission," Buffalo said.

Newly elected to the state legislature, the bills are the first Buffalo introduced. The process was complicated, but she's a community organizer at heart. Connecting with people and bringing everyone to the table wasn't the difficult part.

"These bills are so important to North Dakota in threading the needle toward justice," Buffalo said. "These bills will accomplish a pathway toward justice for one of our most vulnerable populations. Not only will these bills continue to raise awareness and prevention of the epidemic of missing and murdered Indigenous people, but it also provides a sense of hope."

Ruth submits a third bill

From Ruth Ann Buffalo – Jan. 8, 2019 – I submitted my third bill today.

Dress code - Inclusion of traditional tribal regalia and objects of cultural significance.

The board of a school district or a school may not establish a dress code policy that includes prohibiting a student from wearing traditional tribal regalia or objects of cultural significance while participating in a school sanctioned or sponsored activity or event.

High school students would be free to wear their eagle feathers and plumes and regalia at school sanctioned or sponsored activity or events including graduation.

I haven't received a bill number yet.

Co-sponsors of bill are equally from both sides of the "aisle" – bipartisan support.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

CRST Chairman Frazier issues statement on government shutdown

By Levi Rickert

Eagle Butte, SD – Jan. 9, 2019 – Native News Online – With the partial federal government shutdown now in its third week and the second longest ever, Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Chairman Harold C. Fraizer issued the following statement on Tuesday, January 8, 2019:

Yet again the United States government has shutdown services due to the inability of government officials to run it. I have been told that all of this is due to a wall that the President of the United States wants to build. I condemn the actions of the President of the United States and the federal government.

If the President of the United States wants to build something that would make America great again, then build bridges. Build bridges to span the division that the President's spoiled child rhetoric has created. Build bridges between people, cultures, societies or nations and if that is too hard then at least build bridges in our aging infrastructure of roads. The President of the United States should quit trying to build a wall that would have been better served at Plymouth Rock in 1492.

THE TRUTH OF THE MATTER IS THAT THE NATIVE AMERICAN PEOPLE WILL SUFFER DURING THIS PARTIAL SHUTDOWN.

The United States' treaty obligations to native nations is the first thing to be thrown out the door during this shutdown. Indigenous people are not immigrants to this land. Have we not suffered enough because of the immigrants the United States brought to this land?

Brief editorial comments from the editor's desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

We were glad to see Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Chairman Franzier's public statement decrying the costly federal government shutdown.

An indefensible as is support for the multi-billion dollar barricade, we find it remarkable that there are so few other tribal leaders speaking out against it.

(In his state of the tribes message to South Dakota lawmakers last week, Rosebud Sioux Tribal Chairman Rodney Bordeaux did ask the state's federal delegates to do what they can to end the government shutdown.)

We find our Congressional leadership, however, very supportive of the President's Wall … "on humanitarian grounds."

If this Administration and Congress were really concerned about suffering humanity, they would put those billions of dollars into human services.

*****

How refreshing it is to witness Ruth Ann Buffalo's election victory, her swearing in to the North Dakota State Legislature (in her regalia), and explosive entrance out of the gate with not one, not two, but three bills!

Congratulations, Ruth, and we are hopeful about what you will be able to accomplish not only for our tribal nations people but also the awareness you can bring to the non-Natives of North Dakota.

*****

Tiospa Zina Tribal School has a brand new website!

Here is the new url:

https://www.tzts.us/o/tzts

If you don't want to type in this link, just click on the graphic link on our Sota website.

There is also an app for keeping updated on school news and events on your smartphone and/or computer.

Just check out the TZ App on your device's App Store.

*****

Please see the fourth in our ongoing series of articles from the 2018 winter general council.

We are now on to day two of general council!

We are featuring highlights from both oral and written program reports.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"The first thing that we want you to understand is that spirit has no color or race to it. It doesn't matter whether your skin is white, black, red, brown – whatever. No one out there is any better than you, and you are no better than anyone else out there."

–John Peters (Slow Turtle), WAMPANOAG

We are all created to be of equal worth. We may be different sizes, different heights, different ages, different colors, we may have different beliefs and be of different cultures. In the unseen world, we are all spirit formed into different shapes and colors but we are all worthy. For example, you can have water, you can have steam, or you can have ice. Which of these is not made up of H2O?

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

At the age of eleven or thereabouts women acquire a poise and an ability to handle difficult situations which a man, if he is lucky, manages to achieve somewhere in the later seventies. - P. G. Wodehouse (1881 - 1975), Uneasy Money

If men could only know each other, they would neither idolize nor hate. - Elbert Hubbard (1856 - 1915)

Some have been thought brave because they were afraid to run away. - Thomas Fuller (1608 - 1661)

Preserving health by too severe a rule is a worrisome malady. - Francois de La Rochefoucauld (1613 - 1680)

My life has no purpose, no direction, no aim, no meaning, and yet I'm happy. I can't figure it out. What am I doing right? - Charles M. Schulz (1922 - 2000)

In America, through pressure of conformity, there is freedom of choice, but nothing to choose from. - Peter Ustinov (1921 - 2004)

Oh, I don't blame Congress. If I had $600 billion at my disposal, I'd be irresponsible, too. - Lichty and Wagner

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

CDF

Obituaries –

Services held for Tony Madison

Anthony James Madison, age 33, of Minneapolis passed away on Thursday, January 3, 2019. He was born on December 27, 1985 in Minneapolis the son of Angel and Wanita Madison. Anthony was employed as an exterior/interior decorator along with many other talents and traits; he was a true maverick.

How can someone describe such a man? Tony was a man who appreciated many things in life. Food, travel, cooking, music, fishing, he truly loved nature and being part of any new experiences. At the center of all that was two key factors, friends and his family.

With that being said, he was that kind of guy who could pick up a conversation with people like it never ended and it could have been years in between. He enjoyed laughing, telling jokes and making his friends and family happy. He was free spirited and loving.

Tony appreciated the value of family and putting it first.

He was a spiritual man and a lover of Jehoveh God.

His values of justice and doing things that were right were important to him, no matter the cost. He always kept that at the forefront of his decisions. That may mean at times he would go against the grain, but you always knew where he stood on those matters.

Tony left his mark with his family and his friends by how he touched each and every one of our lives and the memories he gave us. In the end that is what was most important to him and what he would wish us to remember him by.

He lived life to the fullest. He did it with class and he did it with style.

We will always miss him. Sad to say the many memories that we could have made with him were taken away too soon. Let's continue to cherish him and take comfort in the laughter, memories and stories we have with our beloved Anthony James Madison "Tone G". We Love You!

Survived by his parents: Angel and Wanita Madison; son: Anthony Madison Jr. (mother Shametria Nelson); daughter: Saniyah Madison and her mother Sarina Whittmon and her son Kardiae Whittmon; brothers: DeAngelo Madison and Michael Dedomenico; sisters: Dierre Guyse, Vernita Englund, Casandra Herbert, Angelita Madison and Tiffany Madison; niece Janella; nephew Eliseo; and other relatives.

Preceded in death by his sister Janelle Arcoren Madison.

Funeral services for Anthony Madison were held on Saturday evening, January 12, 2019 at the Peterson Chapel, Buffalo, MN. Jackson Arcoren officiated.

Casket Bearers were Anthony J. Madison Jr., Michael Dedomenico, Lorenzo Merrill, Henry Thinkelk, DeAngelo Madison, Carl Englund, Obadiah "OJ" Pipe Boy and Davis Arcoren.

Honorary Casket Bearers were Jason Whiting, Dwayne Stackhouse, Brandyn Bendickson, Allen Hodges, David Gonzalez and Gary Herbert.

Chilson Funeral Home, Winsted, MN served the family.

On-line condolences can be made to www.chilsonfuneralhome.com

Services held for Marlo White

In loving memory of Marlo Elroy White Sr., 50, of Sisseton, SD, services were held on Wednesday morning, January 9, 2019 at the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Community Center, Agency Village, SD with Rev. Enright Big Horn and Jr. Heminger officiating.

Drum group was Arnold Williams and singers. Soloist was Tim White. Pianist was Billy Kohl.

Pallbearers were Randy White, Delwyn Redday, Joe LaCroix Jr., Barry LaCroix, Doug Flute, Clinton Small.

Honorary Pallbearers were Stacey Wanna, Keith Wanna, Mandell Yankton, Douglas Peake, Robert Dixon, Roland Cloud, Wayne Heminger, Josh White.

Interment is in the Sisseton Cemetery, Sisseton, SD.

All-night wake services were held Monday and Tuesday at the community center.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD was in charge of funeral arrangements.

Marlo was born June 9, 1968 to Elroy White Sr. and Jeanne Hayes in Sisseton, SD.

He attended school in Sisseton, Peever, and Heart of the Earth School in Minneapolis, MN.

He resided in Minneapolis for a majority of his life until he returned home in 2015.

He worked at Cedar Box Company in Minneapolis, Woodland Cabinetry in Sisseton, Dakota Magic, and Schiltz in Sisseton.

He was a fun guy to be around and was a social butterfly.

One of his favorite games to play was handball.

His favorite color was blue.

Marlo came home to spend time with his mother Francine, sister Jeannie, and the love of his life his daughter Jada Germaine White.

Marlo is survived by his children Marlon L. White, Brent P. White, April L. White, Marlo E. White II, Amber L. White, Jada G. White; mother Jeanne Hayes; brothers Elroy White Jr., Dion White, Anthony Hayes Jr., Elroy Walter White; sisters Jeannie White Jr., Anntonnetta White Doney.

Marlo is proceeded in death by his father Elroy White Sr.; brother Darren White Sr.; maternal grandparents Sylvester and Gladys Small; paternal grandparents Francis and Mary S. White.

For Marlo's obituary and on-line registry, please visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com.

Ron Owen services are Tuesday

Funeral Service for Ronald Patrick Owen, 70, of Sisseton, SD will be held at Tuesday, January 15, 2019 at 10:30 a.m. at St. Peter's Catholic Church, Sisseton, SD.

Wake services are being held Sunday evening and all night Monday at St. Kateri Tekakwitha Hall, Sisseton.

Ronald passed away on January 10, 2019 at Sanford Hospital, Fargo, ND.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and should be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Open letter to the Oyate

In last fall's election, the Oyate voted to replace our Chair and the majority of Council seats with new members. There were several at large issues with the big one being our failed grocery store that is costing the Oyate thousands of dollars each month to keep it open.

In the business world, one goes into such a venture to make a "profit." Without exception, if the business does not make a profit it is closed by the investors. They simply do not want to see their money wasted on a failed venture. It happens to some of the largest retailers in the country including Sears, J.C. Penny, Walmart, et. al. certainly, the stores that are showing a profit continue to thrive as long as they are making the company or corporation money.

The Oyate have repeatedly requested the previous Chair and Council for the figures and/or budget regarding our Tribal grocery store. What did we get? We got a lot of "smoke and mirrors" and a falsified budget report. We were never shown the actual figures by the previous administration. The Oyate want to know if we are in debt. If so, how much?

As I mentioned before, the Oyate spoke loud and clear in last fall's election and expressed their displeasure of being misled and deceived by the Chair, Council, and Budget Director by phony budget reports.

Now, it is time that the Oyate are told the truth about our Tribal grocery store since its inception in September 2017.

Our new Council must change this dilemma once and for all. Please do not allow the attorney, previous Council members, and Tribal judge to continue this deception! If they do not cooperate then they need to be fired! You were elected to be open, honest and direct with the Oyate.

Finally, our Tribe cannot move forward if we continue with these deceptive budget policies of the past two years.

We will eventually bankrupt our Tribe when our expenses exceed our revenues.

This affects all of us, infants, youth, employees, and especially the elderly who rely on their food assistance, monthly coupons, and related services.

We must restore our true Dakota values of sharing and generosity for the many tribal members who have unmet needs on the Lake Traverse Reservation.

Most sincerely,

John Derby, Ed.D

Sioux Falls, SD.

Open letter to the Oyate

You are the new administration. Your goal should be – Let's not put this Tribe further in debt.

This office is to learn and achieve.

Remember the elderly put you in office.

Elderly coupon is for; where they want to spend it.

You are held to an accountability by the members who elected you.

Let's not siphon money off for travel and dumb projects.

The BIA has a responsibility for monies and projects.

Let's speak out if you don't agree with what the Tribe is doing.

As a Council member don't just agree, think and ask questions.

And let's look into these casinos.

Mismanagement … is paying a band 60-70 K and just selling a hundred tickets.

Let's terminate these casino managers, don't look down on other people because – that is character assassination.

Another responsibility for the Tribe … you must protect the children.

Let's put these molesters in prison.

Let's stop the corruption.

My opinion.

Larry Nerison.

At 87, Emmett Eastman runs to honor the 38 Indians hung in Mankato including his great-great-grandfather

In three decades, Emmett Eastman, 87, has missed only one Dakota 38+2 Run

By Randy Furst

Star Tribune – Dec. 28, 2018 – At just past midnight on the morning after Christmas, Emmett Eastman walked briskly over a thin layer of snow in an open field near historic Fort Snelling, reached Hwy. 55 and began jogging across the Mendota Bridge.

It was the first leg of a group relay run to Mankato to mark the 156th anniversary of the largest mass execution in U.S. history, the hanging of 38 Dakota Sioux Indians in Mankato in 1862. About 50 people participated in the relay, but Eastman was the run's most eminent presence and the eldest among them, having turned 87 on Christmas Eve.

"I do it to memorialize my ancestors, the ones who were hanged, the ones who were incarcerated," he said.

For Eastman, a Dakota Sioux, the run is deeply personal. His great--great-grandfather was Wakinyan Cistina, whose English name was Little Thunder, one of the 38 who was hanged. Eastman has participated in the relay 32 times, missing only the first one in 1986. He lives on the Sisseton Wahpeton Reservation in South Dakota, but often visits his daughter Anne White Eastman in New Prague. She has accompanied him on runs and did so again this year. She did much of the driving, picking him up after a mile.

"My runs represent a prayer step," he said. "Each step is a prayer for world peace and dignity."

The relay is an annual tradition. About 80 people gathered near a small bonfire in a field next to the historic park, mostly Indians, but some whites, both runners and drivers.

In Mankato, about 500 people, mostly Indians from the region, assembled by 10 a.m. at Reconciliation Park in Mankato, site of the hanging, for a short memorial program. They greeted runners as well as 70 Indians on horseback who rode in from South Dakota.

The crowd included Gov.-elect Tim Walz of Mankato, who stood silently with his daughter, Hope, a 17-year-old high school senior. They've been coming for several years, he said.

"This history here in Mankato is a painful one," he said. "But this Reconciliation Park was meant to tell the story and it's a place for telling the history, especially for the Dakota."

The Dakota uprising was sparked by a surge of settlers pushing Indians off their land.

"A series of broken peace treaties culminated in the failure of the United States that summer to deliver promised food and supplies to the Indians, partial payment for their giving up their lands to whites," wrote Jon Wiener in the Nation in 2012.

But before the revolt was put down, 490 white settlers, including women and children, were killed by the Indians. In quick mass military trials in which the Indians had no lawyers, 303 Indians were sentenced to death. President Abraham Lincoln commuted the sentences of 264, but agreed to hang 39, later reduced to 38.

While Little Thunder was hanged, Eastman said his grandfather on his mother's side, Jacob His Many Lightning, had his sentence commuted. He was released from prison after six years, after taking the English name, "Eastman," his wife's name, and becoming a Christian.

Eastman's father was the only Indian farmer in Sisseton, S.D., where he grew up. Eastman and his sister were the only Indians at a local school and remembers students called him "dirty Indian." He said he believes there's less racism now.

Eastman worked at a boarding school in Wahpeton, N.D., for 25 years, looking after the children in the dormitory He was laid off at age 52.

He joined the American Indian Movement (AIM), and ran in the 1972 Boston Marathon. With the support of AIM leader Dennis Banks, he joined Sacred Run International, which sponsored runs worldwide. He said he has run hundreds of marathons in 22 countries, but was slowed after he slipped on the ice while attending Barack Obama's second inauguration in 2012.

Eastman is the father of eight children, some of whom have participated in the run to Mankato. Daughter Anne, 35, is often one of the runners, including this year. She named her youngest son, 4, Wakinyan Cistina White after his ancestor who was hanged.

At the Mankato memorial, the names were read of the 38 who were executed and two other Indian leaders who were later hanged. People then drove 3 miles to Land of Memories Park, where another memorial was held, attended by about 150 people.

At the end of the ceremony, it was announced that Eastman had turned 87. The crowd sang "Happy Birthday," which has become a tradition, too. Eastman said he was embarrassed "but it made me feel great."

Said his daughter, Anne, who stood beside him. "I'm very proud of my dad."

*****

Randy Furst is a Star Tribune general assignment reporter covering a range of issues, including tenants rights, minority rights, American Indian rights and police accountability.

Meaningful conversation: Martin Luther King Jr. Civil Rights

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day/Civil Rights Day Celebration Monday, January 21

"I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character." These words, spoken by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in a speech in 1963, remind us that this goal is still a dream in America.

Monday, January 21 is a federal holiday - Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. This is also a South Dakota State Holiday.

Please join other community members on the 21st, at 5:30 PM for a meal and presentations at the Sisseton City Hall Community Room, at 406 2nd Ave. W. We will be celebrating the efforts and sacrifices of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and thousands of others who have stood up, and continue to stand up, for justice and equal rights and opportunity in America.

Mr. Lawrence Diggs will be the featured speaker. Lawrence Diggs is a South Dakota Humanities Scholar who writes and performs music and poetry in English, French and Japanese. He is the author of several books including "Allies: A Positive Approach to Racial Reconciliation." He has been featured on numerous radio and television shows including "To Tell The Truth" and "Oprah." As "The Vinegar Man", he founded and was the curator of the International Vinegar Museum in Roslyn South Dakota.

Diggs said, "Learning about what has happened and what has brought us to this place in history can help us create a future that brings humanity together with a greater ability to share our contributions. Knowing the stories that have been untold can help us create models for living in peace together that have been unimagined. Come add your story to the history we will make together."

Brian Akipa, a Sisseton-Wahpeton Dakota flute maker, composer and musician, will play a song for participants.

A video about early contact between Native people and African people will be shown and discussed.

Martin Luther King, Jr. was born on 15 January 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia. After earning his Ph.D., he worked as a Baptist minister and a civil rights activist. He studied Mahatma Ghandi's non-violent resistance methods, and became a major spokesperson for nonviolent activism during the Civil Rights movement.

Dr. King began making significant impacts on race relations in the mid-1950s, and was elected head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. This movement protested very successfully the racial discrimination institutionalized in U.S. federal and state laws.

Dr. King therefore played a significant role in ending legal segregation of African-Americans and other minorities across the nation, through the passing of the U.S. Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Dr. King lived his life serving others. King is particularly remembered for his 1963, "I Have a Dream" speech during the 'March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom' demonstration at the National Mall in Washington D.C. He received many honors, including the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964. Unfortunately, he was assassinated in April 1968.

This program is made possible by the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

This event is sponsored by the Baha'is in the Sisseton area. To learn more and get involved in this event, contact Rick and Mehran DeLoughery at 605-419-2169.

Battling the Meth Epidemic

By Governor Kristi Noem

January 11, 2019

Earlier this month, I placed my hand on my dad's worn Bible and made a promise to South Dakota to govern in a way that respects and benefits every person in our state. I promised to serve in a way that improved things for the next generation. My dream? To grow our state into a place where our kids can thrive. We're going to produce a stronger tomorrow for the next generation.

But my parents taught me to do more than dream, they taught me to do. So 73 hours after I took that Oath of Office, I stood in front of the legislature and outlined my plan to create a stronger South Dakota for the next generation. One of those plans is to aggressively battle the meth epidemic.

As I've talked with first responders about our meth problem, they've told me of situations where they walked into homes of meth users and found kids starving in their bedrooms, their parents drugged out of their minds. Stories like this are frequent. In Iowa, a four-month-old baby was killed just over a month ago after his meth-addict dad forgot him in a swing. He died of malnutrition and infection. The police found his little body covered in maggots and sores – his parents too strung out on meth to remember his existence.

This is what our law enforcement has to deal with every day. Meth is filling our jails and prisons, clogging our court systems, and stretching our drug treatment capacity. But meth is rarely made in South Dakota anymore. The vast majority of this meth is coming from Mexico. Our meth epidemic is the price we are paying for our nation's failure to adequately secure our southern border.

Meth destroys people, but it does much more. It destroys families. It hurts our kids, and we see that in our schools, in our foster families, and in our health care providers. This breaks my heart. Not because I'm the governor. Because I'm a mom.

In the coming months and years, we'll work to expand prevention and treatment programs. We need to do more to educate our young people about the effects of meth and give them strategies to avoid it. We'll also help every South Dakotan learn to identify the early signs of meth use to increase early referrals to treatment. I want to reach meth users before they enter the criminal justice system and commit other crimes. Our objective isn't to imprison people – that hurts families too. We need additional mental health services. We must help people beat their meth addiction and return to their jobs and families.

Furthermore, we're going to get more aggressive in enforcing our laws against meth. We need to stop the traffic of meth into our state and crack down on those who deal drugs.

And while we crack down on enforcement, we must pave avenues for rehabilitation. Earlier this year, I visited Teen Challenge in Brookings – an incredible program that helps people struggling with life-controlling substance abuse and equips them to become productive members of their community. We need more options like this for people trapped in addiction, recognizing that second chances are available to people willing to walk the road to recovery.

I recognize this is a big problem to tackle, but I'm committed to confronting it, and I'm confident I have the plan to make an impact. We must continue having these conversations and addressing these problems to create a stronger South Dakota for the next generation.

Ready to hit the ground running

By Sen. John Thune

While the Senate floor is often the epicenter of big legislative debates, most of the bills or nominations that receive a final up-or-down vote by all 100 senators have been carefully reviewed by smaller groups of senators at each of the various committees, which, collectively, have jurisdiction over nearly every policy issue in the United States.

Traditionally, if an individual member of Congress has an idea for a bill, they start by putting pen to paper. For me, a significant number of the bills I draft each year are inspired by ideas or suggestions I receive from fellow South Dakotans, because, frankly, the best ideas almost always come from outside of the Capital Beltway.

After a bill is drafted and introduced, it's typically sent to the Senate committee that has jurisdiction over the area the bill covers. It's here, in the committees, where most of the groundwork is laid. Each of the committees are able to convene hearings so their members can evaluate legislation, hear from policy experts, or determine whether or not an executive branch or judicial branch nominee is qualified to move forward to the full Senate.

At the beginning of each Congress, every senator is able to request which of the more than a dozen standing committees he or she wants to serve on for the next two years. Committee seats are assigned based on seniority and areas of expertise, among other things, and not everyone gets to serve on all of the committees they request.

Fortunately for me, though, I was once again assigned to three powerful committees, all of which cover issues that are important to South Dakota, and I'm eager to hit the ground running.

I will again serve as a member of the Senate Agriculture Committee, which puts me in a prime position to continue advocating for South Dakota's top industry. The ink is barely dry on the 2018 farm bill – the fourth farm bill I've helped write – but there are plenty of wins to which we can already point. Thanks to the advice and suggestions I received from the South Dakota agriculture community, I authored roughly 40 legislative proposals, of which a dozen were included in the new law.

I will also spend this Congress, as I have in past Congresses, serving on the Senate Commerce Committee, which oversees a wide variety of issues, including our nation's transportation system, technology, telecommunications, and everything from the depths of the ocean to the heights of outer space.

I'm taking on new responsibilities this year as the Republican whip, the Senate's chief vote counter, so I've had to relinquish the chairman's gavel at the Commerce Committee, but the work goes on. Leading the full committee for the last four years has been highly rewarding, and through our committee work, we've been able to deliver on issues large and small that matter to South Dakota – and nothing about that will change going forward.

While I won't be serving as the full committee chairman this Congress, I'm humbled to have been selected as the committee's new chairman of the Subcommittee on Communications, Technology, Innovation, and the Internet, which will allow me to stay focused on issues like 5G mobile broadband deployment in South Dakota – one of my top priorities.

Finally, I'll rejoin my colleagues on the Senate Finance Committee, the same committee that drafted and helped shepherd through Congress landmark reforms to our nation's tax code. Tax reform is already helping American families and businesses, and since this is the first time Americans will file their taxes under the new law, I'm confident many people will begin to notice even more relief in their family budgets this year.

I say it as often as possible, but I always want my priorities in the Senate to reflect the priorities of South Dakota, and serving on these committees will help me continue to advance them each and every day.

Cybersecurity remains top priority in 116th Congress

By U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.)

Jan. 11, 2019

As we get to work in the 116th Congress, increasing our nation's ability to defend against cyberattacks remains a top priority in the Senate. During the last congress, I had the privilege to serve as chairman of the Senate Armed Services Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, first established in 2017 by the late Senate Armed Services Committee (SASC) Chairman John McCain (R-Ariz.). The creation of this subcommittee marked the first time in our nation's history that a congressional committee or subcommittee was formed that is completely dedicated to cybersecurity.

The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity has primary jurisdiction over all cyber-related oversight and legislation for the Department of Defense. As malicious cyber threats continue to grow exponentially in both size and scope, the subcommittee's oversight and legislative roles are critically important. For the past two years, the subcommittee's oversight role has focused on developing a robust combat-ready Cyber Mission Force, as well as a strategy and policies that enable that force to respond rapidly and effectively. Now, more than ever, the U.S. defense strategy must include protecting our military and civilian infrastructure from cyberattacks.

While the U.S. military's dominance in the air, land and sea domains is undeniable, the cyber domain has afforded bad actors -- with much fewer resources and expertise than ours -- the opportunity to inflict significant damage to American interests from thousands of miles away, with computers as their weapon. Adversaries with much less military power could damage the superior weapons systems we possess, potentially rendering them useless in conventional warfare.

A cyberattack on our civilian critical infrastructure – such as our electric grid, transportation system or financial system – could lead to devastating, irreversible economic damage as well as threaten the lives of Americans.

The importance of this infrastructure -- nearly all in the private sector -- highlights the need for the federal government to work closely with the private sector in coordinating its defense. Failing to coordinate efforts between the government and private sector creates significant cyber vulnerabilities.

The subcommittee's work has resulted in legislation that has improved the Defense Department's cyber efforts, both offensively and defensively. Most recently, the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 included a provision that confirms cyber operations as a traditional military activity even if the operation is conducted outside an active combat zone.

Prior to this important provision being signed into law, the Defense Department faced significant obstacles to conducting necessary cyber operations -- the types of operations that our adversaries, and even our closest allies, have undertaken for years.

The Trump administration recently announced a major policy change that significantly boosted our nation's cyber capabilities. President Trump rescinded Presidential Policy Directive (PPD) 20, an overly risk-averse policy from the last administration that virtually paralyzed the Defense Department's ability to conduct major cyber operations, replacing it with the new, more agile policy directive, National Security Presidential Memorandum 13.

The 115th Congress' oversight and legislative efforts, coupled with the Trump administration's work in revising outdated policies, has greatly empowered U.S. Cyber Command to operate more efficiently and effectively in the cyber domain. We hope to continue making progress on cybersecurity over the next two years.

Health –

Prairie Doc® Perspectives –

How to prevent Sudden Death

By Richard P. Holm, MD

My first experience with cardiopulmonary resuscitation was during the summer of 1969. I was an orderly in a Minneapolis intensive care unit (ICU) when my patient stopped breathing. I called for help and provided mouth-to-mouth breathing and chest message until the team arrived. Later the doctor told me I saved the patient's life, further convincing me that medicine was my life's purpose.

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is the act of rhythmically pushing on the chest and breathing into the mouth of a person whose heart beat and breathing has ceased. CPR can result in enough circulation to keep the victim alive until spontaneous circulation and breathing resumes.

In 1740, the French described how mouth-to-mouth breathing sometimes saved drowned people, and, through the early 1900s, mouth-to-mouth breaths were given to bring lifeless newborns around. In the mid-1950s, two anesthesiologists, Dr. Elam and Dr. Safar, with help from the Red Cross, began promoting mouth-to-mouth resuscitation for adults discovered in cardiac arrest. In 1960, chest compressions were proven valuable in preserving circulation, especially to the brain, and even more important for survival than artificial respiration. In fact, rapid (100-120/minute), constant, three to four-inch chest compressions (without artificial breathing) are now recommended for patients having out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

In 1947 a Cleveland surgeon used an internal (open chest) defibrillator to save a 14-year-old boy, and in 1955, Boston cardiologist, Paul Zoll, developed the now popular external (on skin) defibrillator. Studies show that the defibrillator is even more important than chest compression. With available automated external defibrillators (AEDs) and education on how to perform CPR and use AED devices, we have even better outcomes.

For those having a cardiac arrest, the sooner they get defibrillation, effective CPR, and a 911 call for help, the greater the chance of functional recovery. Out-of-hospital successful survival after CPR is about ten percent but increases to 35 percent when the arrest is witnessed and the victim is provided early defibrillation. The sad news is that more than 50 percent of those who could benefit will not have CPR because bystanders fear they might do something wrong. The big mistake is NOT TO TRY.

Simple, first-level, CPR courses are available for anyone interested in every community and through the internet, while AED devices are popping up in almost every community gathering area. Please notice where they are placed. Trust me, if someone has a cardiac arrest, and you try to help, you might just save a life.

Watch On Call with the Prairie Doc® most Thursdays at 7 p.m. central on SDPTV and follow the Prairie Doc® on Facebook and YouTube for free and easy access to the entire Prairie Doc® library.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

Contact SWC to take part in Dakotah Language program

Dakota iapi kin teunkihindapi! Owas ded yahipi kin waste!

We treasure the Dakotah Language, and all are welcome here!

The SWC Dakota language program is up and running again after the winter break at Sisseton Wahpeton College.

There exciting events coming up this spring and as always, ongoing language programming.

Wopida tanka to the teachers for sharing their knowledge and their continued support!

If you are interested in joining in any language programming, please contact Erin at egriffin@swc.tc or Sylvana at Sylvana.flute@swc.tc for a schedule of programming.

See accompanying photos courtesy of SWC.

Tiospa Zina fifth graders play vocabulary games

Submitted by Joy Pipgras

Here are 5th graders at Tiospa Zina playing vocabulary games.

They are presenting their European Reports using technology and cooking for the class European Food Festival.

How important is Dakotah Language at Enemy Swim Day School

These photos show  readers how important it is!

About twenty ESDS staff members are pictured her taking part in Sisseton Wahpeton College Dakotah Language outreach studies!

Foundation for Rural Service to award scholarships in 2019

The Foundation for Rural Services (FRS) will be awarding numerous scholarships in the year 2019, one in each National Telephone Cooperative Association region and one made available to NTCA's Associate membership. The remaining awards will be distributed proportionate to the number of applications received from each NTCA region.

Venture Communications Cooperative, as your local communications service provider, is pleased to participate in this scholarship program. Should a student from the Venture's service area be selected to receive one of the 30 national scholarships ($2000 each) Venture Communications will make a $500 matching contribution to the scholarship. Preference will be given to individuals expressing an interest to return to work in a rural area following graduation.

Students may also be eligible for four FRS Staurulakis Family scholarships valued at $5,000 each. Students who are majoring in math, science, engineering, or medicine are given preference for the FRS Staurulakis Family Scholarships. Also available to students is the TMS Scholarship for $1500, Everett Kneece Scholarship valued at $7000 and three $500 Alan Cox Memorial Scholarships.

The Foundation for Rural Service (FRS), in cooperation with NTCA-The Rural Broadband Association, seeks to sustain and enhance the quality of life in America by advancing an understanding of rural issues. Through its various programs and initiatives, FRS strongly supports the continuing education of rural youth.

Venture Communications is proud of this effort to promote higher education in rural America.

Scholarship applications may be obtained by visiting www.frs.org or by contacting your local high school counselor. Completed applications should be sent to Venture Communications, PO Box 157, Highmore, SD 57345, postmarked no later than February 18, 2019.

Citizenship and Community Service Scholarships

Venture Communications Cooperative, a Highmore based telecommunications provider, announces the availability of 12--$500 Citizenship and Community Service Scholarships to High School Seniors.

The local telecommunications company will be awarding scholarships throughout the serving areas operated by Venture Communications. "We hope that the scholarships will assist the students in achieving their higher education goals", says Venture Communications General Manager Randy Houdek.

Judging of the applications will be based on local community involvement and citizenship with credit also being given for academics and leadership skills. Only student's whose parents or guardians are an active subscriber of Venture Communications are eligible for the scholarship program. "The scholarship program takes a high priority with the Venture Communications Board of Directors", says Houdek.

This is the twenty-first year for the scholarship program. The scholarship application deadline is March 4, 2019. Applications are available online at venture.coop/why-venture/scholarships.. For more information contact the local high school counselor's office or Venture communications at 852-2224.

Legals

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO: D-18-768-588

IN THE MATTER OF THE DISSOLUTION

OF MARRIAGE OF:

MICHAEL WANNA, Plaintiff,

VS.

CARRIE WANNA, Defendant.

NOTICE OF HEARING

TO: CARRIE WANNA

Take notice that a hearing will be held at the above named Court, Agency Village, outside the city of Sisseton, County of Roberts, South Dakota, on the of 15th day of FEBRUARY, 2019 at the hour of 11:00 A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the Clerk will provide you with a copy of the

Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 10th day of January, 2019.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ BJ Jones

TRIBAL COURT JUDGE

ATTEST: Eileen Pfeiffer,

Clerk of Courts

3-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 16-206

SWOCSE/ Destinee Eastman, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FLOYD CLOUD, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of January, 2019 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of December, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 06-004

SWOCSE/ Gayla German, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FLOYD CLOUD, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of January, 2019 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of December, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 12-046

SWOCSE/ MN/Cherilyn Davies, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FLOYD CLOUD, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of January, 2019 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of December, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 17-039

SWOCSE/ SD/Jodeen Hansen, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FLOYD CLOUD, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of January, 2019 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of December, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 04-415

SWOCSE/ Lynelle Quinn, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LEONARD DUMARCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of January, 2019 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of December, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 16-057

SWOCSE/ Colleen Cloud, PLAINTIFF

VS.

VICTORIA LABELLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Paternity & Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of January, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of December, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 17-136

SWOCSE/ Valerie Cloud, PLAINTIFF

VS.

VICTORIA LABELLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Establish TANF Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of January, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of December, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 08-062

SWOCSE/ Faith Finley, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LONA BARSE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of January, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 20th day of December, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 18-198

SWOCSE/ Thomas DeCoteau, PLAINTIFF

VS.

AMBER DUMARCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of January, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 20th day of December, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 10-053

SWOCSE/ Vera DuMarce, PLAINTIFF

VS.

HOPE DUMARCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of January, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 20th day of December, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 18-186

SWOCSE/ Micah Gill, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DENNIS GILL, II, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of January, 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 20th day of December, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

2-3tc

 

Request for Bids

Requesting sealed proposals for:

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate is seeking proposals from qualified, experienced professionals to facilitate development of an Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (IECMHC) program that will be used by Project Indigenous LAUNCH. The consultant will utilize the IECMHC toolkit developed by the Center of Excellence to guide the work plan. The work plan can be implemented through a combination onsite and offsite interactions. The consultation program will incorporate the four, required foundational building blocks: 1) eligibility, 2) service design, 3) workforce, and 4) infrastructure. These services are expected to begin on or about March 1, 2019 and end on September 29, 2019. The scope of work shall not exceed a $10,000.00 maximum budget. To be considered, the proposal must be received no later than C.O.B January 4, 2019.

All sealed bids must include and be submitted by January 4th, 2018:

Applicants must submit the following as a part of their proposal:

1.  Bio-sketch or resume of academic and professional credentials, technical competence, experience, and expertise.

2.  Two References that highlight the applicant's ability to perform the scope of work.

3.  Work plan to perform the scope of work delineating deliverables, timelines, costs, roles and functions.

Required Documentation:

1.  Statement of qualifications, competence, and capacity to perform the scope of work.

2.  Able to pass background checks.

3.  Copy of SWO Business License, if proposal is approved.

Contact the Procurement Office for specifications: colletteh@swo-nsn.gov

Please submit sealed proposals to:

SWO Procurement Office

Attn: Collette Haase

PO Box 509

Agency Village, SD 57262

By 4:00 pm on Friday, January 4th, 2018

All interested parties acknowledge that any Agreement executed and performed within the Tribe's exclusive jurisdiction is subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the Tribal Court of Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation. All interested parties acknowledge that they must comply with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Ordinances: TERO Chapter 59 Requirements, Wage Rates & Compliance Plan; Business License Ordinance Chapter 53 and Tax Ordinance Chapter 67; and Chapter 75 Sex Offender Registration.

50-4tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

OCSE: I 08-058

In the Matter of:

SWOCSE/MASON KOHL, Plaintiff,

Vs.

DEANNA LABELLE, Defendant.

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

TO: Deanna LaBelle

Take notice that a hearing will be held at the above named Court, Agency Village, outside the city of Sisseton, County of Roberts, South Dakota, on the day of 16th day of January, 2019  at the hour of 2:00 P.M., or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing this matter.

Dated this 12th day of December 2018.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

B.J. Jones, Chief Judge

ATTEST:

Melinda Carlson, OCSE Clerk of Courts.

51-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO: D-19-170-894

IN THE MATTER OF

SHAYLEECIAH WEIDENBACH, Minor Child,

And concerning:

CHANCE & ALICIA WEIDENBACH,

Petitioner,

Vs.

CARRIE SHEPHERD WANNA, Respondent.

NOTICE OF HEARING

Take notice that a hearing in the matter of the above named minor child will be held at the above named Court, Agency Village, outside the city of Sisseton, County of Roberts, South Dakota, on the of 17th day of JANUARY, 2019 at the hour of 2:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the Clerk will provide you with a copy of the

Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of December, 2018

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ BJ Jones, TRIBAL COURT JUDGE

ATTEST: Eileen Pfeiffer, Clerk of Courts.

52-3tc

Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following position(s):

Curriculum Specialist (Full time or Part-time), Education Department

Health & Nutrition Technician, MSPI Day Treatment Program

Family Liaison/Intervention Paraprofessional, Early Childhood Intervention

Protective Service Worker, Child Protection Program

Water & Sewer Laborer, LTUC

Water/Wastewater Operator, LTUC

MCH Aide, MCH/CHR

Closing Date: January 18th, 2019 @ 4:30 pm

Receptionist/Data Entry Clerk, MCH/CHR

Academic Technology Officer, Education Department

Gaming Commissioner, Gaming Commission

Maintenance Technician V, Facilities/Maintenance

Bookkeeper V, Finance

Childcare Worker, Little Steps Day Care

Young Child Wellness Behavioral, Health & Social Services, Specialist (LAUNCH) Half-time

Closing Date: January 25th, 2019 @ 4:30 pm

Application and job description information can be seen at SWO Human Resources Office or http://www.swo-nsn.gov/contact/employment. Application can be downloaded from "Apply Now" and emailed to ArnoldW@SWO-NSN.GOV or DeniseH@SWO-NSN.GOV. Contact can also be at Arnold Williams 698-8238 or Denise Hill 698-8251 with questions. (Tribal preference will apply).

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Job Vacancies

SUBSTITUTE POSITIONS

Substitutes needed for the following: *Teaching,*Bus Driver, Custodian, Cook, Receptionist, and Bus Monitor.

Qualifications: High School Diploma or GED and *specific certification requirements for Teaching and Bus Driving.

Applications accepted on an on-going basis. Please call or stop in the office for more information.

HIGH SCHOOL POSITIONS

Position: Special Education Teacher

Qualifications: Current Teaching Certification in any state meeting the requirements for the position in which applying

Opening Date: November 2, 2017

Closing Date: Open until filled

Position: Science Teacher

Qualifications: Current Teaching Certification in any state meeting the requirements for the position in which applying

Opening Date: December 11, 2018

Closing Date: Open until filled

ELEMENTARY POSITIONS

Position: Elementary Teacher

Qualifications: Current Teaching Certification in any state meeting the requirements for the position in which applying

Opening Date: January 10, 2019

Closing Date: January 24, 2019

SUPPORT STAFF POSITIONS

Position: Head of Transportation/Bus Driver

Qualifications: High School Diploma/GED and Current South Dakota Commercial Drivers License with Air Brake and Passenger Endorsements and 1 Year of Directly Related Experience

Opening Date: January 10, 2019

Closing Date: January 24, 2019

Position: Student Services Coordinator (Secondary School)

Qualifications: Associated Degree in a directly related field or a combination of related work experience and/or training.

Opening Date: January 10, 2019

Closing Date: January 24, 2019

Application Materials: All applicants are required to complete both the Application and *Background check forms. Tiospa Zina is an Indian Preference employer.

*All applicants and employees are subject to both 25 U.S.C. 3207: The Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act and the 42 U.S.C. 13041: Crime Control Act

Siyo Peters

Human Resources Director

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

PO Box 719

#2 Tiospa Zina Dr.

Agency Village, SD 57262

Phone: (605) 698-3953 Ext. 208

Fax: (605) 698-7686

http://www.tzts.us

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Accounting Department:

Revenue Audit Clerk (Full-Time) Day

Foods Department:

Cashier (4 Full-Time) where needed

Cook III (4 Full-Time) where needed

Supervisor (Full-Time) where needed

C-Store Department:

Clerk (5 Full-Time) where needed

Purchasing Department:

Clerk (Full-Time) Day

Golf Course Department:

Head Professional (Full-Time) Day

Slots Department:

Technician (Full-Time) where needed

Uniforms Department:

Seamstress (Full-Time) where needed

Closing Date: January 18, 2019 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions

Two identifications documents required upon hire

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department 16849 102nd Street SE Hankinson ND 58041 For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment) Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

FOOD SERVICE: BUFFET WAIT STAFF (1 Full-Time) ROTATING SHIFTS

GENERAL FUNCTION: To greet customers immediately, provide excellent customer

service, and to make sure the customer has a wonderful dining experience.

REQUIREMENTS: High School Diploma or GED required. Customer Service experience. Operate cash register, wait tables and counting money. Must be licensable by DNGE Non-Gaming. Stooping, bending, standing for long periods of time, or lifting up to 50lbs. Required to rotate shifts, work holidays and weekends.

This position will close on January 17, 2019 at 4 pm.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

C-Store Department:

Clerk/Cashier (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Excellent customer service skills; math skills essential; ability to operate necessary equipment; physical ability to lift moderate amounts of weight; previous experience working with money preferred; strong organizational skills managing various functions; dependable & available to work any & all shifts. Must be at least 21 years old & have a High School diploma or GED.

Deli Attendant (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Ability to operate necessary equipment. Physical ability to stand for long hours, clean, lift heavy objects up to 30 lbs., and restock inventory; 6 mos. Previous cooking experience preferred, 6 mos. working with the public. Knowledge of food preparation safety requirements. Must be dependable & available to work any and all shifts. Must be at least 18 years old and have a High School Diploma or GED.

Opening date: Thursday, January 10, 2019

Closing date: Wednesday, January 16, 2019 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke.

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 
 

 

Return to Sota Home Page