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TZTS Summer 2017 Film Camp videos online on YouTube

 

Search YouTube for:

TiospaZinaTribalSchool@gmail.com

 

Film Camp behind the scenes:

https://youtu.be/pEc83D_s2Hk

 

Ivy:

https://youtu.be/7lH27IOsRNo

 

Dylan:

https://youtu.be/nJYfMAlYee4

 

 

Mystic Fight Scene:

https://youtu.be/CxZQo2FOf3U

 

 

Anhother behind the scenes look at camp:

https://youtu.be/y7_0YiFFhTE

 

 

Redwing:

https://youtu.be/N-uKyMAiDhM

 

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate: Want to re-read the Self-Governance articles from past issues of your Sota Iya Ye Yapi?

Whether or not the Tribe assumes administrative authority over your health services is a BIG DEAL. What do you know about it?

Here they are:

Self-Governance Articles from past Sotas

  Obituaries Editorials Editor's column Education
Legals
Trading post

 

 

Vol. 48 Issue No. 43

Anpetu Iyamni, Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2017

Inside this Edition –

Honoring to be held Nov. 7th for Kurt BlueDog; Must RSVP

SWST awardedfederal funding for industrial hemp feasibility study

October: Domestic Violence Month

Report to Akicita: SWST represented at ND Tribal flags presentation at Fargo Air Museum

Wotahnisa/Provider – More Than Sport: Hunting on the Lake Traverse Indian Reservation

Contracting 101: Free training for Tribal members wanting to create or build their business

50/50 raffle fundraiser to help sent TZ students to National film festival

Grow SD to hold Sisseton community master plan session this Wednesday

Veterans, homelessness grant awarded to Grow SD

Progress report on Dakota Magic renovation: 62 weeks to completion

Reminder: Deadline to submit copy for consideration in the Sota is Friday noon

October: Domestic Violence Prevention/Awareness Month

Submitted by Rhonda Kampeska

Domestic Violence is something WE as WOMEN don't always want to talk about. A lot of times WE think, I don't want to break up my family life so I just won't say anything to ANYBODY.

BUT...

*Your kids are watching this happen to you by their DAD or by your BOYFRIEND.

*When your kids go to school, they are worried about YOU.

*In order to keep the house running SMOOTH, YOU try not to argue with your companion, you try not to make HIM angry…you're doing everything to keep the PEACE in this home.

*After everyone is sleeping, your still awake and crying, trying not to wake anyone especially your companion. Wondering, is this supposed to be this way?

*I wished I didn't have to be WORRIED all the time....

*I wished things could be better....

IF THESE THINGS EVER COME INTO YOUR MIND AND YOU KNOW YOU ARE IN A RELATIONSHIP LIKE THIS ... CALL THE CRISIS LINE (605) 419-1036. THESE PEOPLE WILL LISTEN.

CALL THE VICTIM'S ASSITANCE OFFICE, I (Rhonda Kampeska) will listen: (605) 698-2022.

CALL SWEETGRASS: (605) 698-4129.

SWST awarded federal funding for industrial hemp feasibility study

By CD Floro

Sota Editor

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe is exploring development of a commercial hemp business. The idea is not new, but a successful outcome may be more likely now as hemp products are gaining popularity across the country. And growth is encouraged by increased government support.

Following the wishes of Tribal Council, former Tribal Planning Director Ella Robertson submitted a proposal for federal funding for a feasibility study.

The Tribe's industrial hemp feasibility study proposal was submitted July 8th, 2016, to the Department of Interior, Office of Assistant Secretary/Indian Affairs. The application had sought funding from the Native American Business Development Institute (NABDI). The NABDI has money set aside to assist tribes with feasibility studies for economic development.

The Tribe has recently been notified that its application for funding has been approved.

Successful applicants are assisted in conducting "a feasibility study on the viability of an economic development project, opportunity, enterprise, business or technology."

Goal of the Tribe's proposed "industrial hemp production feasibility study" is to assess the viability – legally, agriculturally and economically – of growing industrial hemp as a value-added agricultural product on Tribal land located in the two counties of Sargent and Richland in North Dakota.

Tribal Planning will use results to determine economic/market viability of taking the next step, which is to develop the capacity to manufacture hemp-based products on Tribal land in both North and South Dakota. Besides providing jobs, industrial hemp can provide biodegradable plastics for Dakota Western Corporation.

Overall, the Tribe can expand into other markets, with canvas, fiberboard, cement (hemp) blocks, and many other materials that represent alternatives to less environmentally products.

With preference to tribes and minorities – under legislation, Minority (8a) and the Buy Indian Act – the Tribe is positioned to take advantage of the marketplace.

Hemp/Marijuana Survey

Tribal Planning conducted a Hemp/Marijuana survey at the Homebuyers Fair and General Council meetings in June 2015.

A total of 201 responses were completed.

Results of the survey reveal:

*68% of the respondents are in favor of legalizing hemp on the Lake Traverse Reservation.

*73% are in favor of developing an industrial product from hemp.

*71% would like medical marijuana legalized on the Lake Traverse Reservation (with varying levels of support).

*The responses for recreational marijuana were evenly split at 49% supporting it, and 49% opposed.

*****

The Tribe's application includes an historical look at the many uses of industrial hemp, how its usage became limited by laws against cannabis (marijuana), and how more recently it is being touted as a value-added agricultural crop.

(Also, support is gaining for medical use, and recreational use; but this is not part of the application.)

The SWST's proposal is for producing plants that have either extremely low, or zero levels of Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, the active ingredient that induces a "high," and which also is proven an effective medical remedy for patients with many symptoms and diseases).

Many states have passed legislation supporting industrial hemp, including North Dakota and Minnesota.

The SWST plan calls for production to be carried out on the Lake Traverse Reservation in northeastern North Dakota.

Industrial hemp may be grown in North Dakota, authorized by the USDA through its Industrial Hemp Pilot Program.

Follow-up to the feasibility study

Once the feasibility has been completed, Tribal Council will decide a course of action.

Here are possibilities:

o Choosing the most viable business scenario or model, developing a business plan, and proceeding with creating and operating a business.

o Identifying additional scenarios for further study.

o Deciding that a viable business opportunity is not available and moving to end the business investigation process.

o Following another course of action.

Excerpt from the application narrative

(We have a) dual responsibility as tribal people to be good stewards of our tribal land and to provide for the basic needs of our tribal membership. In today's terms we define this as "sustainable economic development."

Industrial hemp's value as a desirable agricultural crop is based upon research that proposes that growing hemp would contribute to improving our environment overall, in particular our lakes on the Lake Traverse Reservation which are being destroyed by agricultural fertilizers flowing into the water and causing overgrowths of algae that not only destroys the water, but kills the fish; as well as enabling the tribe to directly address the need to improve the quality of Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate land which has deteriorated due to farming practices and products used for many years by non-Indian growers leasing tribal land. For example:

o Hemp paper is stronger than wood-based paper, and can withstand more folding. In general, hemp has strongest natural fiber of any source.

o Hemp paper hundreds of years old (found in museums) has not yellowed, and is thus a high quality paper of archival quality.

o Marijuana plants cannot be hidden amongst hemp plants. The former grows wide and less tall (5-10 feet), whereas the latter is grown more densely and taller (10-15 feet), to produce maximum stalk fiber lengths.

o Hemp can grow nearly anywhere in the world, in many types of soil - even in short growing seasons or in dry regions - and helps purify soil as well as kills some types of weeds.

o Hemp can grow without pesticides. The crop is also kills some weeds, purifies soil, and is suitable for rotation use, due not only to its short harvest cycle (120 days).

o Hemp is a high-yield crop. One acre of hemp produces twice as much oil as one acre of peanuts, and nearly four times as much fiber pulp (for paper) as an acre of trees.

o Hemp paper is naturally acid-free and does not yellow as quickly as tree pulp-based paper.

o Hemp has the strongest (and longest) plant fiber in the world, resistant to rot and abrasion, and was in long use before DuPont patented nylon in 1937. It was used for ship rigging, military uniforms, parachute webbing, baggage and more.

o Because of its strength, hemp fiber can be used for composite materials that could be used to make anything from skateboard decks to car and stealth fighter bodies.

o A hemp composite material (with limestone and water) forms a type of concrete (hempcrete) that can be used for home building, at 1/9th the weight. It also acts as insulation and repels some vermin.

Growing industrial hemp is also seen as a possible antidote to the rapidly increasing pollution of all tribal waterways in northeastern South Dakota.

The contamination of our water is a documented result of the 20,000 dairy cow herd located adjacent to one of our tribal communities, in Veblen, SD. This condition will only get worse as the State moves to finance more corporate/factory farming businesses in eastern South Dakota.

The state of South Dakota's stated economic development goal is to increase corporate dairy cow farms along the I-29 corridor; which also runs through the entire length of the Lake Traverse Reservation. E coli contamination is common in all of our water resources now and has polluted the water as far south as Sioux City, Iowa and probably beyond.

Equally important is the Tribe's agriculture initiative as a whole as it relates to adding industrial hemp as an agricultural product.

To date, the Planning Department in partnership with the Tribal Realty Department has incubated a "food sovereignty" initiative which resulted in community gardens throughout the reservation; as well as a "Three Sisters" Project that serves the entire reservation population.

For those readers who may not be aware of what the term "three sisters" refers to the tradition of inter-planting corn, beans and squash in the same mounds, widespread among Native American farming societies and is a sophisticated, sustainable system that provided long-term soil fertility and a healthy diet to generations.

This farming practice was reintroduced in an incubator farm this summer.

A second incubator farm is being planned for next year, that will expand the agricultural crops and number of tribal farmers farming their own land in future years, as a part of the solution for becoming self-sustaining, having a healthier diet and reducing health care costs rooted in diabetes and a multitude of other preventable diseases.

The reallocation of tribal resources to job creation via agricultural production also results in an improved quality of life - at least that is our hope.

A long term goal of our industrial hemp venture will be to develop our manufacturing capacity to produce some of the 25,000 hemp-based products now sold in the world utilizing the competitive edge provided to a potential manufacturer that is as an American Indian owned and/or tribal government-owned business.

When this project reaches this stage of development it will be transferred out from under the auspices of the Planning Department and to a proposed Section 17 corporation that may be able to provide both value-added hemp and finished hemp-based products to other suppliers, manufacturers or corporations.

The proposed feasibility study is the second step in our long range planning. The first step was our tribal hemp and marijuana survey. Our membership is equally divided on marijuana growth and this is not seen as a viable alternative for the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate. However, we have significant tribal support for growing industrial hemp for all the reasons previously cited in this narrative.

Short term market conditions

Industrial hemp is marketed a fiber, as a seed, or as a dual-purpose crop. Although detailed market information for hemp is not readily available, estimates from The Hemp Industries Association (HIA) show that the total retail value of hemp products in the U.S. in 2013 was $581 million. This includes food and body products, clothing, auto parts, building materials, and other products.

Funding awarded to the SWST

Amount awarded covers the basic funding requested in the Tribe's application:

1. Industrial Hemp Consultant Fee: $50,000.

2. Specialized legal consultation on hemp production on tribal land: $50,000.

*****

According to Acting Planning Director Lee Ann Tallbear, the Tribe has connected with the University of Minnesota Ag School, which has resources to assist in developing the industrial hemp project.

The University, she reports, has initial and long-term resources available to support the Tribe.

Talks are ongoing. Watch for more information as it becomes available.

More about NABDI

For readers who may be interested, here is a more detailed narrative of the purpose and scope of a feasibility study as defined by the Native American Business Development Institute:

All economic development projects and businesses pose some element of risk. Economic development feasibility studies weigh these risks to determine whether a project is worth pursuing. They empower tribes to make informed decisions regarding their economic futures by distinguishing viable economic opportunities from investments and enterprises that have a high likelihood of failure. They may also serve as third-party due-diligence documentation for Tribes and tribal businesses seeking capital, federal or state grants, or other kinds of funding for a project.

An economic development feasibility study which recommends pursuing a project can be used to help persuade lenders and investors to provide financial backing. Before making a loan or investment, a lender or investor must conduct a "due diligence" examination of the project for which credit is sought. When a lender or investor concludes that there is a chance that the project will not succeed, they may avoid financing it altogether or adjust the loan repayment terms to reflect the perceived higher risk of failure. An economic development feasibility study performed by a reputable third party can often fulfill many of the lender's or investor's due diligence requirements by answering all of the questions they might have about a project's chances of success. If an economic development feasibility study concludes that a project is worthwhile and financially sustainable, this may persuade a lender or investor that financing the project does not involve untoward risk. This could result in a more rapid approval of the loan or better loan terms.

Economic development feasibility studies may be used to eliminate investment in projects hampered by logistical, technical, and market problems. They may also assess a project's market feasibility, identifying and quantifying expected costs and benefits, while examining the current and anticipated market for a product or service, identifying expected competitors and buyers, assessing a project's timing, and projecting cash flow and profitability.

They may also evaluate the technical feasibility of a project, whether the proposed service or product can be provided with existing materials, and the adequacy of the tribal management team, labor, and infrastructure.

They may address a project's financial feasibility, whether sufficient capital is likely to be available for start-up and whether return on investment will be adequate to pay financing costs. In addition, they can anticipate the potential impact on debt repayment of project delays, less-than-expected sales, cost increases, and shifting economic conditions.

Finally, economic development feasibility studies may investigate a promoter's reliability and the credibility of his or her claims.

Free government contracting training offered

Training on how your business can access government contracts is being offered free for all interested Oyate.

The class is titled "Getting Back to the Basics: Government Contracting 101, Business Insurance and Marketing our Business." And it is being held at Tribal headquarters, in Council chambers, next week, on Thursday, November 2nd, from 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.

Dustin Baird from the Native American Development Center/Procurement Technical Assistance Center (PTAC) will be the main presenter.

Dustin has said he is eager to help SWST members use the Buy Indian Act to gain government contracts.

His position is funded in part by a federal grant, with the goal of getting more Native-owned businesses off the ground, and to expand.

Dustin will show you how to develop a basic business plan, a marketing capability statement, and understanding the first steps of entering into the government contracting world.

Also presenting, in the morning, is John Rasmussen, from Roberts County National Bank, Sisseton.

John will provide information on insurance and bonding requirements needed for contractors.

For more information, see the notice elsewhere in this Sota, or contact Dustin Baird at 605-431-5862, or Tamara St. John at 605-880-3197.

About NDAC/PTAC

NADC is a Native American Procurement Technical Assistance Center, which serves as a Procurement Technical Assistance Center (PTAC), and is funded in part through a cooperative agreement from the Department of Defense (DoD) through a program that is administered by the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA).

From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer"

GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov

605-268-0502

Veteran in crisis? Call 1-800-273-8255, press 1

November: National Military Month

*FARGO AIR MUSEUM: Please see accompanying pictures. Justin Chanku, Lake Traverse District Councilman, gave the dedication of our Tribal Flag to the Fargo Air Museum. Darrell Mireau, Desert Era Honor Guard, was asked to explain what the staff was that each honor guard carries. DeLano Renville, American Legion Post #314 Commander was asked to speak about the Medal of Honor Flag that his Post carries. Delano explained how they flew to Washington DC after Master Sgt. Woodrow W. Keeble was awarded the Medal of Honor and was presented the flag by then-President Bush. He also explained that our Tribe is the only one which has a Medal of Honor Flag in the United States. We were all very proud of our rich history in the Armed Forces. There were Senators and a couple of retired Generals (regular Army) and still tough as nails, their handshake said it all. The 5 Tribes invited to represent their Nations were Turtle Mountain, Three Affiliated , Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Spirit Lake Sioux Tribe and of course the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe. Desert Era Honor Guard and American Legion Post #314 each took an Honor Guard. They included: Delano Renville, Mike Greeley, Jesse Chanku, Duane Boyd, Jaiden Carlson, Gabe Fisher and our Councilman Justin Chanku. One of our Tribal members Bob St. John was in attendance and helped with the drum group Buffalo River Drum Group out of Fargo, ND. Our Tribal Flag now hangs in the Fargo, ND Air Museum with all the other Nations Flags.

*Mark your calendars! There will be SD Native Homeownership Coalition contractor training at the Holiday Inn in Rapid City for Wednesday, January 31, 2017. I am on the Coalition as one of the 3 for Veterans for Homeownership along with Larry Zimmerman, Secretary of Veteran Affairs and Minaja Hill, Standing Rock TVSO. We are trying to ensure that NADL has the sufficient contractors during the NADL home loan application process. I will update in the future for any contractors that want to attend and become certified in the NADL process. Call me if you have any questions: 698-3388.

*The Milbank- Sisseton Disabled American Veterans Chapter 19 will be holding a meeting at Rosalie's Restaurant in Sisseton, SD on November 4th 2017 (Saturday) at 10:30 a.m. The post would like to invite any members or anyone interested in becoming a member to join us. The qualifications are that you are disabled or service connected at 0%. I will get more information and post it.

*November is recognized as National Military Month. The week of November 6th, 2017 up until Veterans Day we are going to host a series of events for Veterans. I will post a schedule next week. And on Friday, November 10th, 2017 the first grand entry of the Veterans Wacipi held at Dakota Magic Casino will start at 7PM with the first grand entry. It will be held November 10th through the 13th. We want you all to check out the poster in this edition's Sota, and you're all welcome to attend. It is FREE to all, there is not charge to attend, there will be many vendors selling many items. If you're interested in our wonderful history and want to learn more please attend you will be very impressed and remember there is no charge to attend.

*We have an elder Vietnam Veteran that recently was able to move into an elderly unit and he has the bare necessities. We are asking that if you have any gently used items, kitchen ware, towels, bedding , any furniture items that you contact Gabe at 1-605-419-1007 and he can come and pick them up. We want to help him make his apartment a home and are also asking the honor guards to ask your members also. Let's show him that he still is being taken care of by his brotherhood.

*UPCOMING VETERAN EVENTS:

Nov 10-12 - Veterans Day Wacipi-Dakota Magic Casino. Please watch the Sota for the poster of the Veterans Day Wacipi. Outgoing Veterans Day Princess is Ava German and there will be notice for anyone wanting to sign up for this contest. She has attended many Pow Wows, Parades and forums as the SWO Veterans Princess in 2016 & 2017 - Thank you for the wonderful representation. She is at the Black Hills Pow Wow this weekend representing East River Veterans!

*VETERANS: PLEASE CALL OUR OFFICE IF YOU NEED ASSISTANCE! WE ARE HERE TO SERVE! We are asking that you get your appointment slips turned in as soon as you get your slip - do not wait the day before or 2 days before. We have other avenues that we can utilize and if we have at least 4-5 days in advance that will give us plenty of time. Thank you.

*WOMEN VETERANS CALL CENTER: 1-855-VA-WOMEN. Crisis Help Line: 1-800-273-8255, available 24/7, and tell them you are a veteran. All calls are confidential.

Contacts: Woodrow W. Keeble Memorial American Legion Post 314 – Delano Renville, Commander Cell # 268-0354 & Clayton Ellingson 1-605-924-1266; Vietnam Veterans Kit Fox Society - Doc Wanna, Commander Phone # 698-3299; Desert Era Veterans - Jesse Chanku, Commander 1-605-956-0197; and Geri Opsal, TVSO 698-3388 or 268-0502.

Have a great and safe week.

Geri Opsal, TVSO.

(Also see related story here.)

Five ND Tribal Nations Flags added to Fargo Air Museum

Goal is to educate North Dakotans about the state's Native American culture

Fargo, ND – Oct. 19, 2017 – Five North Dakota Tribal Nations presented their official flags as gifts to the Fargo Air Museum today. The flags will hang so visitors to the tourist attraction can become more aware of the state's rich Native American culture. Each Tribe will have informational pamphlets for visitors who see the flags and want to learn more.

Representing the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe were Veteran Service Officer Geri Opsal and Desert Era Commander/Long Hollow District Councilman Justin Chanku. (See photos.)

*****

It was appropriate that Justin spoke on behalf of the Tribe at the ceremony.

Probably not known by most of the Oyate, here is a brief summary of his military service:

*Kosovo Campaign.

*Middle East/Gulf – 2 tours in Afghanistan and Baghdad/Iraq. He served as a medic in the first assault on Baghdad, in an engagement that cost the lives of more than 30 of his fellow soldiers.

*Mentor – Justin provides support and mentorship to fellow/younger soldiers returning from active duty.

*****

Presentation of the flags to the Air Museum came about because of efforts over the past year by Vietnam veteran/Native American Bill Peterson and ND Senator Richard Marcellais (CD-Belcourt).

This February, Senator Marcellais proposed a bill to display the flags of "each Indian nation in this state" at the state Capitol, but the measure was inexplicably killed in the North Dakota Senate.

Senator Marcellais had called the bill an important gesture to improve the state's relationship with Native Americans. "This bill is all about trust and respect. Displaying the five Native American nation flags in the Memorial Hall of the state Capitol would be a first to create a dynamic movement forward," he said, urging fellow lawmakers to vote "yes."

The bill's failure, by a vote of 23-21, was unusual for a few reasons.

*It was a bipartisan bill. It was sponsored by an equal number of Republicans (Sen. Nicole Poolman of Bismarck, Rep. Jason Dockter of Bismarck and Rep. Wayne Trottier of Northwood) and Democrats (Marcellais, Rep. Corey Mock of Grand Forks and Sen. Joan Heckaman of New Rockford).

*It received a unanimous "do pass" recommendation from the Senate Government and Veterans Affairs Committee.

*When it came time to vote, no one spoke against the bill. Here's how the Senate voted:

SB 2287 FAILED Yea 23 Nay 21 N/V 3.

Similar attempts to put the official Tribal Nation flags in the state capitol at Bismarck have failed for the past four sessions of the ND Legislature.

One Tribal leaders said has tried to put the flags in the state capitol the last four sessions but has been unsuccessful.

He said he realized he didn't need a bill to educate people about his tribe's heritage, but adding them to the Air Museum would be worthwhile, because it's a spot in town that gets a lot of traffic.

Senator Marcellais said the Tribes are hoping education will continue throughout schools in North Dakota because they are mandated to have cultural programs in the curriculum.

In announcing last week's Tribal Nations flags presentation, calling it a "sacred ceremony," the Fargo Air Museum stated it "is honored to receive Tribal Flags from all five North Dakota Tribal Nations."

The Tribal Nations were represented by color guards – SWST Desert Era Veterans and Woodrow Keeble Memorial American Legion Post 314 – and drum groups.

(Note: Information for this article comes from Danielle Church of KVRR and SWST Veteran Service Officer Geri Opsal.)

Sisseton community master plan meeting

Grow SD will hold a follow-up meeting to its Sisseton master plan session held on September 21st.

This community roundtable will be held at the Grow SD conference room this Wednesday, October 25, 2017, at 12:00 noon.

Opportunity will be given for representatives of organizations and businesses to provide brief (two minutes suggested) highlights.

Purpose is to provide everyone a look at what is going on or coming up.

Goal is for this information stream to form a hub and add to a calendar available on the internet. People can learn about, and schedule events throughout the year in the community and surrounding area.

Everyone is invited to join the conversation.

Participants are asked to bring their own lunch.

For more information contact Lori Moen at (605) 698-7654 ext. 127, or via email at lorim@growsd.org.

GROW SD awarded grant to address Veterans and Homelessness

GROW South Dakota has recently been awarded a grant through the Bring Them HOMES Veterans Initiative of the National Equity Fund for a pilot program to support low-income veterans and veterans at risk of homelessness in South Dakota with various housing-related services. The grant was funded by the Citi Community Development.

Under the pilot program, GROW SD will focus on two general areas: home improvements for low-income veterans and emergency services grants for low-income veterans and those at risk of homelessness. The funding will assist approximately five veteran homeowners in rehabilitating their homes to make them safer, healthier, and more energy efficient. This funding will also assist approximately 40 veterans who face crisis situations and have an urgent need for assistance with past due rent or utility bills, security deposits, food as well as other needs. Currently, GROW SD has a waiting list for veterans needing assistance with home improvements.

In order raise awareness of the need for the program, GROW SD is reaching out to a wide range of organizations in the state that support and provide services for veterans and that seek to address homelessness among veterans, including fraternal organizations as well as local and state Veterans Affairs service officers. "As a pilot project, we intend to learn while we provide needed services," said Marcia Erickson, GROW SD CEO. "We will find out what kinds of services are most needed and how we can best provide them. It's important for us to work with a variety of agencies and organizations across the state." The results from the pilot project will guide future planning and fundraising.

GROW South Dakota is an Equal Opportunity Lender, Provider, and Employer. It has served South Dakota communities since 1966. The organization provides housing, community, and economic development to 10,000 customers annually.

In victory for SRST, court finds approval of DAPL violated the law

By theindigenousamericans_6i2sru – Oct. 17, 2017 – The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe won a significant victory today in its fight to protect the Tribe's drinking water and ancestral lands from the Dakota Access pipeline.

A federal judge ruled that the federal permits authorizing the pipeline to cross the Missouri River just upstream of the Standing Rock reservation, which were hastily issued by the Trump administration just days after the inauguration, violated the law in certain critical respects.

In a 91-page decision, Judge James Boasberg wrote, "the Court agrees that [the Corps] did not adequately consider the impacts of an oil spill on fishing rights, hunting rights, or environmental justice, or the degree to which the pipeline's effects are likely to be highly controversial."

The Court did not determine whether pipeline operations should be shut off and has requested additional briefing on the subject and a status conference next week.

"This is a major victory for the Tribe and we commend the courts for upholding the law and doing the right thing," said Standing Rock Sioux Chairman Dave Archambault II in a recent statement. "The previous administration painstakingly considered the impacts of this pipeline, and President Trump hastily dismissed these careful environmental considerations in favor of political and personal interests.

We applaud the courts for protecting our laws and regulations from undue political influence and will ask the Court to shut down pipeline operations immediately."

The Tribe's inspiring and courageous fight has attracted international attention and drawn the support of hundreds of tribes around the nation.

The Tribe is represented by the nonprofit environmental law firm Earthjustice, which filed a lawsuit challenging the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for issuing a permit for the pipeline construction in violation of several environmental laws.

"This decision marks an important turning point. Until now, the rights of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe have been disregarded by the builders of the Dakota Access Pipeline and the Trump administration—prompting a well-deserved global outcry," said Earthjustice attorney Jan Hasselman. "The federal courts have stepped in where our political systems have failed to protect the rights of Native communities."

The Court ruled against the Tribe on several other issues, finding that the reversal allowing the pipeline complied with the law in some respects.

The $3.8 billion pipeline project, also known as Bakken Oil Pipeline, extends 1,168 miles across North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, and Illinois, crossing through communities, farms, tribal land, sensitive natural areas and wildlife habitat. The pipeline would carry up to 570,000 barrels a day of crude oil from the Bakken oil fields in North Dakota to Illinois where it links with another pipeline that will transport the oil to terminals and refineries along the Gulf of Mexico.

U.S. Winter Outlook: NOAA forecasters predict cooler, wetter North and warmer, drier South

Drought likely to persist in northern Plains

October 19, 2017 – Forecasters at NOAA's Climate Prediction Center released the U.S. Winter Outlook today, with La Nina potentially emerging for the second year in a row as the biggest wildcard in how this year's winter will shape up. La Nina has a 55- to 65-percent chance of developing before winter sets in.

NOAA produces seasonal outlooks to help communities prepare for what's likely to come in the next few months and minimize weather's impacts on lives and livelihoods. Empowering people with actionable forecasts and winter weather tips is key to NOAA's effort to build a Weather-Ready Nation.

"If La Nina conditions develop, we predict it will be weak and potentially short-lived, but it could still shape the character of the upcoming winter," said Mike Halpert, deputy director of NOAA's Climate Prediction Center. "Typical La Nina patterns during winter include above average precipitation and colder than average temperatures along the Northern Tier of the U.S. and below normal precipitation and drier conditions across the South."

Other factors that influence winter weather include the Arctic Oscillation, which influences the number of arctic air masses that penetrate into the South and is difficult to predict more than one to two weeks in advance, and the Madden-Julian Oscillation, which can affect the number of heavy rain events along the West Coast.

The 2017 U.S. Winter Outlook (December through February):

Precipitation

Wetter-than-average conditions are favored across most of the northern United States, extending from the northern Rockies, to the eastern Great Lakes, the Ohio Valley, in Hawaii and in western and northern Alaska.

Drier-than-normal conditions are most likely across the entire southern U.S.

Temperature

Warmer-than-normal conditions are most likely across the southern two-thirds of the continental U.S., along the East Coast, across Hawaii and in western and northern Alaska.

Below-average temperatures are favored along the Northern Tier of the country from Minnesota to the Pacific Northwest and in southeastern Alaska.

The rest of the country falls into the equal chance category, which means they have an equal chance for above-, near-, or below-normal temperatures and/or precipitation because there is not a strong enough climate signal in these areas to shift the odds.

Drought

Despite the outlook favoring above-average precipitation this winter, drought is likely to persist in parts of the northern Plains, although improvement is anticipated farther West.

Elsewhere, drought could develop across scattered areas of the South, mainly in regions that missed the rainfall associated with the active 2017 hurricane season.

NOAA's seasonal outlooks give the likelihood that temperature and precipitation will be above-, near, or below-average, and also how drought is expected to change, but do not project seasonal snowfall accumulations. While the last two winters featured above-average temperatures over much of the nation, significant snowstorms still impacted different parts of the country. Snow forecasts are generally not predictable more than a week in advance because they depend upon the strength and track of winter storms. The U.S. Winter Outlook will be updated on November 16.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

Important message from Keeper of Sacred White Buffalo Calf Pipe

theindigenousamericans_6i2sru - October 15, 2017 – I, Chief Arvol Looking Horse, of the Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota Nations, ask you to understand an Indigenous perspective on what has happened in America, what we call "Turtle Island." My words seek to unite the global community through a message from our sacred ceremonies to unite spiritually, each in our ways of beliefs in the Creator.

We have been warned from ancient prophecies of these times we live in today, but have also been given a vital message about a solution to turn these terrible times.

To understand the depth of this message, you must recognize the importance of Sacred Sites and realize the interconnectedness of what is happening today, in the reflection of the continued massacres that are occurring on other lands and our own Americas.

I have been learning about these important issues since the age of 12 when I received the Sacred White Buffalo Calf Pipe Bundle and its teachings. Our people have strived to protect Sacred Sites from the beginning of time. These places have been violated for centuries and have brought us to the predicament that we are in at the global level.

Look around you. Our Mother Earth is very ill from these violations, and we are on the brink of destroying the possibility of a healthy and nurturing survival for generations to come, our children's children.

Our ancestors have been trying to protect our Sacred Site called the Sacred Black Hills of South Dakota, "Heart of Everything That Is," from continued violations. Our ancestors never saw a satellite view of this site, but now that those pictures are available, we see that it is in the shape of a heart and, when fast-forwarded, it looks like a heart pumping.

The Diné have been protecting Big Mountain, calling it the liver of the earth, and we are suffering and going to suffer more from the extraction of the coal there and the poisoning processes used in doing so.

The Aborigines have warned of the contaminating effects of global warming on the Coral Reefs, which they see as Mother Earth's blood purifier.

The indigenous people of the rainforest say that the rainforests are the lungs of the planet and need protection.

The Gwich'in Nation in Alaska has had to face oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge coastal plain, also known to the Gwich'in as "Where life begins."

The coastal plain is the birthplace of many life forms of the animal nations. The death of these animal nations will destroy indigenous nations in this territory.

As these destructive developments continue all over the world, we will witness much more extinct animal, plant, and human nations, because of humankind's misuse of power and their lack of understanding of the "balance of life."

The Indigenous people warn that these negative developments will cause havoc globally. There are many, many more original teachings and knowledge about Mother Earth's Sacred Sites, her chakras, and connections to our spirit that will surely affect our future generations.

There needs to be a fast move toward other forms of energy that are safe for all Nations upon Mother Earth. We need to understand the types of minds that are continuing to destroy the spirit of our whole global community. Unless we do this, the powers of destruction will overwhelm us.

Our Ancestors foretold that water would someday be for sale. This Prophecy was hard to believe! The water was plentiful, pure, full of energy, nutrition, and spirit. Today we have to buy clean water, and even then the nutritional minerals have been taken out; it's just clear liquid. Someday water will be like gold, too expensive to afford.

Not everyone will have the right to drink safe water. We fail to appreciate and honor our Sacred Sites, ripping out the minerals and gifts that lay underneath them as if Mother Earth were simply a resource, instead of the source of life itself.

Attacking nations and using more resources to carry out destruction in the name of peace is not the answer! We need to understand how all these decisions affect the global nation; we will not be immune to its repercussions. Allowing continual contamination of our food and land is affecting the way we think.

A "disease of the mind" has set in world leaders and many members of our global community, with their belief that a solution of retaliation and destruction of peoples will bring peace.

In our Prophecies it is told that we are now at the crossroads: Either unites spiritually as a global nation or faced with chaos, disasters, diseases, and tears from our relatives' eyes.

We are the only species that is destroying the source of life, meaning Mother Earth, in the name of power, mineral resources, and ownership of land. Using chemicals and methods of warfare that are doing irreversible damage, as Mother Earth is becoming tired and cannot sustain any more impacts of war.

I ask you to join me in this endeavor. Our vision is for the peoples of all continents, regardless of their beliefs in the Creator, to come together as one at their Sacred Sites to pray and meditate and commune with one another, thus promoting an energy shift to heal our Mother Earth and achieve a universal consciousness toward attaining Peace.

As each day passes, I ask all nations to begin a global effort and remember to give thanks for the pure food that has been gifted to us by our Mother Earth, so the nutritional energy of medicine can be guided to heal our minds and spirits.

This new millennium will usher in an age of harmony, or it will bring the end of life as we know it. Starvation, war, and toxic waste have been the hallmark of the vast myth of progress and development that ruled the last millennium.

To us, as caretakers of the heart of Mother Earth falls the responsibility of turning back the powers of destruction. You are the one who must decide.

You alone – and only you – can make this crucial choice, to walk in honor or to dishonor your relatives. On your decision depends the fate of the entire World.

Each of us is put here in this time and this place to personally decide the future of humankind.

Did you think the Creator would create unnecessary people in a time of such terrible danger?

Know that you are essential to this world. Understand both the blessing and the burden of that. You are desperately needed to save the soul of this world. Did you think you were put here for something less? In a Sacred Hoop of Life, there is no beginning and no ending.

*****

Chief Arvol Looking Horse is the author of White Buffalo Teachings. A tireless advocate of maintaining traditional spiritual practices, Chief Looking Horse is a member of Big Foot Riders, which memorializes the massacre of Big Foot's band at Wounded Knee.

Brief editorial comments from the editor's desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

Please RSVP the Chairman's office if you would like to attend the honoring of long-time friend, legal representative, and supporter of the Oyate – Kurt BlueDog.

The honoring will take place the afternoon of Tuesday, November 7th, at Dakota Magic.

See the notice submitted by Tribal Chairman Dave Flute.

*****

October is Domestic Violence Prevention/Awareness Month, and we invite you to read Rhonda Kampeska's article.

If anyone suspects they themselves, or family members, or others, are victims of domestic violence, please call the numbers she provides.

We must be proactive in changing the social environment that fosters these destructive behaviors.

*****

It's exciting to see planning underway for a possible industrial hemp operation on the Lake Traverse Reservation.

It's something that's been discussed for a number of years, and now the forces that be may be in alignment to encourage it becoming a reality.

Your Tribal leaders are also exploring other economic development, housing, and public safety/detention center projects.

Watch for more news as planning unfolds.

*****

We're pleased to provide readers with a look at each week's specials at Dakota Crossing.

Remember, Oyate, you are owners of this grocery store.

As Crystal Owen said at the grand opening, life is about making, and having choices.

There is a choice today in Sisseton that was not available before … a choice made possible by the determination of your Tribal leadership.

*****

Please join in helping our Tiospa Zina Tribal School students attend the American Indian Film Festival in San Francisco next month!

There is a 50/50 raffle underway to help pay for these 15 talented students to this national film festival where their creative film-making is being recognized.

Two of the 15 short films they produced this past summer were accepted into the festival!

See the notice elsewhere in this Sota for more information: cost is 6 tickets for $5; or arms length for $10.

Tickets may be purchased from the students or their families.

To view the students' films, see the link on our Sota website:

www.earthskyweb.com/news.htm

or

www.earthskyweb.com/slinks.htm

*****

Pidamiya ake, Sarah Sunshine Manning, for sharing from her valuable journal.

Sarah is among the best journalists covering Indian country, and this week we are grateful to share an article about our own Lake Traverse Reservation.

Thanks also to Mikey Peters and Travis Herrick, who assisted Sarah in putting together "More Than Sport: Hunting on the Lake Traverse Indian Reservation."

Please read this feature elsewhere in this Sota.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"When a man does a piece of work which is admired by all we say that it is wonderful; but when we see the changes of day and night, the sun, the moon, and the stars in the sky, and the changing seasons upon the earth, with their ripening fruits, anyone must realize that it is the work of someone more powerful than man."

- Chased-by-Bears, Santee-Yanktonai Sioux

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

There are 350 varieties of shark, not counting loan and pool. L. M. Boyd

Beware of all enterprises that require new clothes. Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862), Walden

It has been said that man is a rational animal. All my life I have been searching for evidence which could support this. Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

No human thing is of serious importance. Plato (427 BC - 347 BC)

I never guess. It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859 - 1930), The Sign of Four, A Scandal in Bohemia

The wages of sin are unreported. - Unknown

In three words I can sum up everything I've learned about life: it goes on. Robert Frost (1874 - 1963)

The things we know best are the things we haven't been taught. Marquis de Vauvenargues

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Funeral services for Gerald "Jerry" Wanna

Gerald "Jerry" Wanna, age 83, of Belcourt, ND, died Wednesday, October 4, 2017, at Presentation Medical Center, Rolla, ND.

Gerald Lawrence Wanna was born on April 23, 1934, to Oliver Sr. and Racheal (Young) Wanna in Fort Totten/Crow Hill, ND.

On May 23, 1954, Jerry graduated from Ft. Totten Community School, with a graduating class of 8 students. On June 17, 1955, he enlisted in the United States Marine Corp. He was Honorably Discharged on April 24, 1959.

He moved to Belcourt to begin a career in Law Enforcement with the Belcourt PD/BIA.

While working in Belcourt he met his wife, Patricia Davis. They were united in marriage at St. Ann's Catholic Church on April 24, 1960. They made their home in Belcourt and started their family: Howie, Jay, Lisa, Leah, Myron and Mickie. Jerry had also worked as a Medical/X-Ray Tech at the Belcourt Hospital. Jerry and Pat later divorced, but remained friends.

Jerry returned to Spirit Lake/Ft. Totten to live with his auntie, Lydia. He enjoyed hunting, fishing, watching boxing and golf. He enjoyed visits from his family, and most of all he enjoyed company.

In 2016, he moved back to Belcourt.

Jerry is survived by his children, Howie, Jay, Lisa, Leah, Mickie; 29 grandchildren, 49 great-grandchildren; 3 brothers, Doc, Gino, Mugsi from Sisseton, SD, 3 sisters, Donna (Allen) Pexa from AZ, Debra Wanna of Veblen, SD and Anita Wanna from Sisseton, SD.

He is preceded in death by his parents, Oliver and Angie Wanna, Racheal & Harry Charboneau, one son, Myron Sr., an aunt, Lydia, 1 brother, Buster, 3 sisters Carmen, Sheila and Catherine, and numerous aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews & friends.

Wake services were held Thursday at Seven Dolors Cathlic Church, Ft. Totten.

Mass of Christian burial was held Friday morning, October 13, 2017, at Seven Dolors Catholic Church.

Officiating: Father Chuck Leute, O.P.

Casket Bearers: Howard Wanna Sr., Gerald Wanna Jr., Chad Wanna, Alex Wanna, Andrew Saari, Jr., Jordan Wanna, Oliver Dauphinais, Myron Wanna Jr., Joseph Johnson Jr.

Honorary Bearers: Saul Sherman, Josie Lawrence, Roland Davis, Fatty & Mary Lou Davis, Jr. & Bev Davis, Madeline Keplin, Cora Rose Iceman, Delta Nelson, Vincent Walker, Jon & Angel Keplin, Cecil & Carol Longie, Doug Yankton & family, Pauline Yankton, Tony & Vina McDonald, Spirit Lake Elders, Spirit Lake Veterans - Past, Present & Future, the Norma Rainbow Memorial Home Residents, Ft. Totten Elderly Home Residents, Skip Longie, Sr., Vern & Velma Lambert, Bert & Barbara Jackson, Claudette Ross, Bob Charboneau & Family and Jerrys' brothers, Doc, Gino & Mugsi and his sisters, Donna, Debra & Anita.

Burial is in St. Jerome's Catholic Cemetery, Crow Hill District, Ft. Totten, ND.

Funeral Tuesday afternoon for Desirae Ortley

Desirae LaVonne Ortley passed away on Thursday, October 19, 2017 as the result of an automobile accident near Sisseton.

Funeral service will be held on Tuesday, October 24, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. at the SWST community center, Agency Village, SD.

Wake services were held on Sunday and Monday at the community center.

Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD, is in charge of arrangements.

Watch for a complete obituary in next week's Sota.

Memorial services Wednesday for Harold Moore

Memorial graveside services will be held on Wednesday, October 25, 2017 at 11:00 AM at the Sisseton Cemetery.

Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD, is in charge of arrangements.

Watch for a complete obituary in next week's Sota.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Two-vehicle crash claims two lives

Sisseton, SD – Two women died last Thursday morning, October 19, 2017, in a two-vehicle crash three miles east of Sisseton on SD Highway 10. The accident happened at 11:00 a.m.

A 2008 GMC Sierra pickup, driven by 36-year-old Desirae Ortley, was traveling east when it crossed the centerline and struck a westbound 2003 Dodge Caravan, driven by 85-year-old Beverley Raw, head-on.

Both drivers were pronounced dead at the scene.

South Dakota's Highway Patrol is investigating the crash. Other agencies on scene were the Roberts County Sheriff's Office and Sisseton-Wahpeton Tribal Law Enforcement officers.

Sisseton man sentenced to 46 months for Fraud

United States Attorney Randolph J. Seiler announced that a Sisseton, South Dakota, man who was convicted of several counts of fraud was sentenced on October 16, 2017, by U.S. District Judge Charles B. Kornmann.

Keith Hagen, age 49, was sentenced to 46 months of imprisonment to be followed by 3 years of supervised release. Hagen was ordered to pay a total of $236,000 in restitution. Hagen was also ordered to pay a $100 special assessment to the Federal Crime Victims Fund for each of the eight counts of conviction.

Hagen and his former wife, Amanda Holy Bull, were indicted on February 9, 2016, for Conspiracy to Commit Mail Fraud and Wire Fraud, three counts of Wire Fraud, and four counts of Mail Fraud. A federal jury convicted Hagen on all counts on June 28, 2017. Holy Bull, age 33, also of Sisseton, pled guilty to the conspiracy charge and will be sentenced on October 30, 2017.

Hagen and Holy Bull leased pasture land from the Bureau of Indian Affairs. They used the land to provide custom cattle grazing services to cattle producers.

They entered into contracts with several cattle producers, knowing that they did not lease enough pasture land to graze all of the cattle for which they had contracted. They took up-front payments from several producers, failed to provide the grazing services, and used the money for personal purposes. In all Hagen and Holy Bull defrauded producers out of $236,000. The investigation was conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Assistant U.S. Attorney Ann M. Hoffman prosecuted the case.

Hagen was allowed to self-report to the U.S. Marshals Service.

Former Tribal executive sentenced to federal prison for Embezzlement

Defendants prosecuted as part of the Guardians Project, a federal law enforcement initiative to combat corruption, fraud, abuse in SD

Sioux Falls, SD – Oct. 18, 2017 – United States Attorney Randolph J. Seiler announced today that a former executive board member of the Old Agency District of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribe was sentenced in federal court to 6 months of imprisonment. Leslie Barse, Sr., 74, of Peever, South Dakota, was also ordered to pay restitution in the amount of $147,312, and to serve three years of supervised release after serving his prison sentence.

According to court documents, beginning on or about January 20, 2011, and continuing through March 9, 2013, in the District of South Dakota and elsewhere, Leslie Barse, Sr. formed an agreement with others to embezzle, steal, and knowingly convert to their own use, funds from the Old Agency District of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Tribe ("Tribe"), an Indian tribal organization. Barse joined the agreement knowing its illegal purpose. The Old Agency District ("District") is a subdivision of the Tribe.

Barse, among others, were elected executive board members of the District. During the relevant time period, the District's executive board members were entitled to receive a monthly stipend for their service. From approximately January 2011 through March 2013, Barse and others stole money from the District by writing checks to themselves for payroll, stipends, assistance, travel, and other miscellaneous reasons. Barse and his co-defendants stole a total of $360,499 from the District. The Defendant received $147,312 of the stolen funds and used the funds for his own purposes.

The investigation is being conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the U.S. Attorney's Office. Assistant U.S. Attorney Ann M. Hoffman is prosecuting the case.

The case was brought pursuant to the Guardians Project, a federal law enforcement initiative to coordinate efforts between participating agencies, to promote citizen disclosure of public corruption, fraud, and embezzlement involving federal program funds, contracts, and grants, and to hold accountable those who are responsible for adversely affecting those living in South Dakota's Indian country communities. The Guardians Project is another step of federal law enforcement's on-going efforts to increase engagement, coordination, and positive action on behalf of tribal communities. Led by the United States Attorney's Office, the participating agencies include: Federal Bureau of Investigation; the Offices of Inspector General for the Departments of Interior, Health and Human Services, Social Security Administration, Agriculture, Transportation, Education, Justice, and Housing and Urban Development; Internal Revenue Service, Criminal Investigation Division; U.S. Postal Inspector Service; U.S. Postal Service, Office of Inspector General.

For additional information about the Guardians Project, please contact the United States Attorney's Office at (605) 330-4400. To report a suspected crime, please contact law enforcement at the federal agency's locally listed telephone number.

Former Tribal executive sentenced to federal prison for Embezzlement

Defendants prosecuted as part of the Guardians Project, a federal law enforcement initiative to combat corruption, fraud, abuse in SD

Sioux Falls, SD – Oct. 18, 2017 – United States Attorney Randolph J. Seiler announced today that a former executive board member of the Big Coulee District of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribe was sentenced in federal court on October 13, 2017 to 3 months of imprisonment. Ann German, 59, of Peever, was also ordered to pay restitution in the amount of $11,475, and to serve three years of supervised release after serving her prison sentence.

According to court documents, from approximately June 2010 through March 2013, German and her co-defendants conspired to embezzle, steal, and knowingly convert to their own use funds from the Big Coulee District of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribe, an Indian tribal organization. The Big Coulee District is a political subdivision of the Tribe. German was an employee of the District, and her co-defendants were all elected executive board members of the District at the time.

During the conspiracy, they stole a total of $81,542.50 from the District. German received $11,475 of the stolen funds and used the funds for her own purposes.

The investigation was conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the U.S. Attorney's Office. Assistant U.S. Attorney Ann M. Hoffman prosecuted the case.

The case was brought pursuant to the Guardians Project, a federal law enforcement initiative to coordinate efforts between participating agencies, to promote citizen disclosure of public corruption, fraud, and embezzlement involving federal program funds, contracts, and grants, and to hold accountable those who are responsible for adversely affecting those living in South Dakota's Indian country communities. The Guardians Project is another step of federal law enforcement's on-going efforts to increase engagement, coordination, and positive action on behalf of tribal communities. Led by the United States Attorney's Office, the participating agencies include: Federal Bureau of Investigation; the Offices of Inspector General for the Departments of Interior, Health and Human Services, Social Security Administration, Agriculture, Transportation, Education, Justice, and Housing and Urban Development; Internal Revenue Service, Criminal Investigation Division; U.S. Postal Inspector Service; U.S. Postal Service, Office of Inspector General.

For additional information about the Guardians Project, please contact the United States Attorney's Office at (605) 330-4400. To report a suspected crime, please contact law enforcement at the federal agency's locally listed telephone number.

Chairman of local tribe arrested after resignation

By Kenneth Chase

Grand Forks, ND – WDAZ – Oct 16, 2017 – A local tribe is in turmoil after video surfaces of their former chairman allegedly being taken away by FBI agents.

WDAZ's Kenneth Chase tells us why the tribe is taking legal action against the former leader.

There are eight documents from the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians, and they tell a story involving alleged misuse of funds and nepotism leading up to an arrest with one man escorted out by law enforcement.

Wayne Keplin—the tribe's former chairman—resigned at the end of September, according to the documents.

The tribe accused him of a variety of offenses including, "misappropriation of tribal funds for his personal finances, misuse of tribal funds for personal gain—manipulation of federal contract dollars."

That's when the tribe says federal investigators took a deeper look.

Documents say the controversy surrounds Keplin Construction and grant funding from the US Department of Agriculture—possibly for a Heritage Center.

On Friday, a statement accused Keplin of six counts of tribal code violations, including issuing a refund of EPA fees back to Keplin Construction for a Heritage Center project.

A statement released on Saturday says Keplin quote, "Began a ludicrous attempt to overthrow the elected leaders."

Keplin swore in governmental leaders of his choosing on Friday, according to the documents. According to the release, Keplin's group "Caused property damage and assaulted an elder."

WDAZ's Kenneth Chase reached out to the tribe's police department, BIA officials, and FBI, but all of the organizations refused to comment.

Watertown search warrant uncovers active meth lab

By Mike Tanner

Watertown, SD – KWAT Radio – Oct. 17, 2017 – Two people were arrested on drug charges Monday after a search warrant was executed at 901 39th Street Southwest in Watertown.

Codington County Sheriff Brad Howell says the search warrant uncovered an active meth lab.

Two residents of that address, 54 year-old Timothy Duane Danek and 55 year-old Darla Kay Barse were arrested.

Danek is charged with manufacturing a controlled substance and possession of a controlled substance. His bond was set at $3,000 cash or surety.

Barse is charged with conspiracy to manufacture a controlled substance. Her bond was set at $1,500 cash or surety.

A child in the home was placed into protective custody.

Assisting agencies included Watertown Fire Rescue, the Florence Fire Department, Watertown police and the South Dakota Division of Criminal Investigation.

More than Sport: Hunting on the Lake Traverse Indian Reservation

By Sarah Sunshine Manning

If there is any place in the state of South Dakota to experience pristine wooded areas, dozens of sparkling lakes, and excellent fall hunting, it would be the Lake Traverse Indian Reservation. Located in the northeast corner of South Dakota, the Lake Traverse Indian Reservation is home to the Sissitonwan and Wahptetonwan bands of Dakota, otherwise known as the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe.

The reservation stretches across a patchwork of checker-boarded Native and non-Native lands, from ranches and farmlands, to lakes, rolling hills, coulees and hollows, and beautiful woodlands.

"People from all over the country come here to hunt," says Travis Herrick, Tribal Ranger for the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe. "They hunt waterfowl, they hunt turkey, they hunt deer. Our deer population here is one of the highest in South Dakota."

Hunting licenses can be purchased at the headquarters of the Sisseton Wahpeton Sioux Tribe, located in Agency Village. With all hunting licenses, hunters are given a hunting tag, which is a thin strip of brightly colored plastic that is to be secured onto the animal once it is killed. This marks that the animal was harvested lawfully.

Tribal Ranger Herrick says that the many undeveloped and wooded areas around the lakes makes the reservation one of the best hunting areas in the state. "Our natural habitat is something we're trying to keep the same on tribal lands, as it should be," says Herrick.

Both tribal members and non-members are allowed to hunt on the prime lands on the reservation, however, there are a limited amount of hunting tags available to non-Indians and non-members. "We sell out of pretty much all tags for non-members," says Herrick.

Deer season, which occurs in the fall and early winter, is among the most popular of hunting seasons on the reservation. During rifle season for deer, Sisseton Wahpeton Sioux Tribal members have the privilege of hunting two weeks before non-Indians, and a full week longer, on the back end of the season. Tribal members also are sold hunting tags at a much lower price than non-Indians and non-tribal members.

For rifle season, a deer tag for tribal members is $25. For an Indian who is not enrolled with the Sisseton Wahpeton Sioux Tribe, but in a different tribal nation, a deer tag is $275, and for non-Indians, a tag is $300.

Discounted tags and early hunting dates for tribal members is one way the Sisseton Wahpeton Sioux Tribe exercises hunting rights that stem from treaties signed with the federal government dating back to the 1800s. According to the Supremacy Clause of the United States Constitution, treaties are the "supreme law of the land."

"We've been hunters for thousands of years," says Michael Peters, a Sisseton Wahpeton Sioux Tribal member. "It's in our DNA to hunt."

Peters, who works by day as the Director of the Dakota Studies Program at Tiospa Zina Tribal School, is also a father to five children, with one more on the way. For his family, hunting is integral to their health and wellbeing.

"When you're able to provide for yourself, and you're able to provide for others, that's a respectable thing among our people," says Peters.

Peters is an avid deer hunter, known on the reservation as one of the few who hunt with a recurve bow during bow season. The recurve bow, sometimes called the traditional bow, is the same type of bow that has been used around the world for centuries. Unlike the compound bow, which consists of more modern technology and enables more precise shooting and a longer shooting range, the traditional recurve bow requires a skill called instinctive shooting. Hunters also have to get much closer to a deer to shoot with a recurve bow.

Peters also prefers a more traditional method of hunting, known as spot and stalk hunting, which involves tracking the deer, and learning their behavior patterns more closely. He also prefers not to use a tree stand, which allows hunters to stake out an area up high in a tree, and simply wait for an unsuspecting deer to walk by.

"You challenge yourself when you do a traditional recurve hunt," says Peters. "It's hard to get 20 yards to a deer. It's one of the hardest things to do, especially with white tail deer."

White tail deer, which are seen all throughout the reservation, are considered more defensive than the larger mule deer. White tail deer are spooked easily, and considered by some to be more difficult to hunt, for this reason.

Among the Dakota people, hunting is also a family affair, where children and youth often accompany their parents on hunts. Mentored hunts and youth rifle season open two months before adult rifle season for deer.

Michael Peters's 14-year-old son, Akisa, shot his first deer earlier in September. "He hunted last year and passed up a few deer," said Peters. "This year, he had a perfect opportunity on opening day and was able to get himself a nice-sized buck."

"We put tobacco down and said a prayer," said Peters. "I told (my son), from here on out, you're wotahnisa, a provider."

Among the Dakota, it's tradition to take a bite of the liver of the deer after it is harvested. After his first kill, Akisa had his first taste of fresh deer liver.

"When you take a bite of the liver and you honor that deer, it actually becomes part of you," says Peters. "So that deer spirit stays with you."

Tribal Ranger, Travis Herrick, also took his ten-year-old daughter, Isabelle, on her first mentored hunt this fall. Mentored hunts give children as young as ten years old the opportunity to shoot and harvest a deer, with the accompaniment of a licensed adult who has passed a mentored hunting course.

On Herrick and his daughter's first hunting trip, a deer came surprisingly close to them as they were camouflaged in the woods. Isabelle shot at the deer and missed. After becoming too nervous, Isabelle's dad, Travis, took the rifle from her. She felt bad and cried. On their second hunting trip, she was given another chance, and to her and her father's delight, Isabelle harvested her first buck.

"She freaked out after she shot it," says Herrick. "But she was really happy.

As tradition dictates, Isabelle and her father took out the liver of the deer, and Isabelle took a bite. "Isabelle actually liked (the liver)," said Herrick. "She said it was good."

For many hunters and families on the Lake Traverse Indian Reservation, hunting is so much more than sport. It's a way of life that reaches back to the more simple and respected ways of their ancestors.

"You're holding onto tradition when you hunt, and you're able to put food on the table," says Peters. "It feels good. It's good for your mind, it's good for your health, and it encompasses everything we believe in. That's what we take from it."

Rifle season for deer on the Lake Traverse Reservation continues through the remainder of fall, and ends on December 10.

*****

This story was written by Sarah Sunshine Manning (Shoshone-Paiute, Chippewa-Cree), as part of a course requirement for South Dakota State University graduate course, "Cross Platform Storytelling." This blog page was also created by Sarah for the same purpose. She can be reached via email at sarah.sunshinemanning@gmail.com.

Open letter to the Oyate

"I'm Sorry"

To those of you who thought you knew me well…

Who wound up sad and feeling let down…

To those of you I hurt mentally and physically…

Who I forced myself upon or made you do things

you didn't want to do…

If I lied to you, stole from you, or made promises…

To those off you who thought that you could trust me well…

Who wound up heart broken and feeling used…

To those of you who I said I love you, I'm sorry,

or that whatever it was I did wrong…

I wouldn't do it again…

I promise to change and do some things

different in the future…

I'm sorry and hope that you can find it within your heart

To forgive my heart…

And whatever it is I failed to mention –

I don't mean to leave it out – because

I'm asking everybody to forgive me…

Larry Sharpfish Jr.

Open letter to the Oyate

Half of the people that vote are racist, they hate the minorities.

The other half are followers, influenced by hackers on Facebook, Google, Twitter, ads, posted by Russia. Convinced the followers to vote for the moron. All the deplorables voted for the moron.

So, to get someone responsible in office, convince the followers not to be influenced by the racist KKK deplorables.

If money influenced your vote?

Don't feel bad, most of Congress is influenced by money – and when you kneel to protect, these deplorables must think before opening their mouths.

My opinion.

Larry Nerison.

In the US, Debtors' Prisons are alive and well

An interview with law professor/author Peter Edelman

By Rebecca Vallas

TalkPoverty.org – October 19, 2017 – Officially, the United States ended debtors' prisons in 1833. Unofficially, as we saw in the Justice Department's report on racially biased policing in Ferguson, there is a system of fines and fees for minor crimes that often result in jail time for the poor, mostly black citizens who cannot afford to pay them.

To provide more context on the issue, I talked with Peter Edelman, Georgetown University law professor and former staffer for Robert F. Kennedy and Bill Clinton, about his new book Not a Crime to be Poor: The Criminalization of Poverty in America.

Rebecca Vallas: So, just to start off, what got you interested in writing this book?

Peter Edelman: I'd been working on poverty issues for long time, and I thought I'd kind of seen everything. But when it came out that Ferguson's budget was based on hauling everybody into court and whacking them with these huge fines and fees, it got me interested. I realized this is really something that people need to know more about than they do.

Part of what you did to research for the book was to speak with an array of lawyers who represent clients facing these problems. (In full disclosure, I'm one of those people you spoke with in my capacity as a recovering legal aid lawyer who used to represent these clients.) Would you mind sharing one of the client stories that came up in your research?

Absolutely. Vera Cheeks, who's a resident of Bainbridge, Georgia, was pulled over and ticketed for rolling through a stop sign. The judge hit her with a $135 fine -- which in this business is a relatively small one -- and ordered her to pay in full immediately. She told him she was unemployed and caring for her terminally ill father and had no money.

The judge said he would give her three months of "probation" to pay up, and he sent to her a room behind the courtroom where Cheeks says, "There was a real big lady, and there were cells on both sides of the room and there was a parade of people paying money to the lady. They were all black. It was like the twilight zone, totally mind-boggling."

The woman said Cheeks now owed $267; the fine, plus $105 for the for-profit probation people, and $27 for the Georgia Victims Emergency Fund. The woman put a paper in front of Cheeks and told her to sign it. Cheeks said she would not. The woman said, "You're refusing to sign the paper? I'm going to tell the judge and put you in jail for five days." Cheeks still refused and finally the woman demanded $50 or else Cheeks would go to jail right then. Cheeks' fiancé, who was at the courthouse, raised the money by pawning her engagement ring and a lawn implement.

She avoided jail, but Cheeks remained at risk of being locked up if she was late with even one payment.

You mentioned that this practice first drew serious national attention after the killing of Michael Brown in 2014, which cast eyes, nationally, on Ferguson. But not only was this not a new phenomenon, it has not been restricted to Ferguson. I personally saw something very similar play out in Philadelphia when I was still working in legal aid. What's the story behind the rise of fines and fees? You've put a face on the issue for us, but what's driving what has really become a national trend?

Well, you could say Grover Norquist. It's the anti-tax rebellion that goes back quite a bit in the past, certainly a couple decades or more. Municipalities just didn't get the money they needed to run their government, so they turned to going after people who were essentially defenseless because there aren't anywhere near the number of lawyers that we need. And then you get added to that the broken windows.

You're referring to broken windows policing.

Yes, absolutely. There was this belief that if we brought people in on junky little stuff, that would clean up the city. The big source of it that they use around the country is driver's license suspensions. In California, for example, 4 million people just a couple years back had lost their licenses. They didn't actually throw them in jails, like they do in many, many other places in the country. But they could take it out of their paycheck or their tax return. And so California was making billions of dollars going after these people.

And they don't take away the driver's license only for something you did when you're driving. They do it for a lot of different things.

People may be most familiar with traffic violations, but your book looks at a whole other range of types of fines and fees that states and localities are now leveeing on people, largely black and brown, largely low-income populations, some of which are particularly shocking. For example, you expose in your book that in 43 states people are actually charged for exercising their right to counsel if they need a public defender.

That shocked me. It was a terrific study done by Joe Shapiro of NPR. It doesn't compute, right? If you're low-income and charged with a crime, you're supposed to get a lawyer. And 43 states are charging money for it.

Well, you're a recovering lawyer, too. How is this not unconstitutional?

Well, it is. But it's got a combination of weasel language in the Supreme Court case, and it's also so prevalent you would need the legislature to fix it and they want the money. And to sue in each instance is just very difficult, so there it is. The judge says, "Looks like you got a nice tattoo on your arm there, so you must have the money to pay for the lawyer or pay for the fine," or, "You've got these fancy shoes and so you're able to pay."

Wrapped up in this is effectively a vicious cycle. The people that you're profiling in this book begin without having actually committed any crime, and it never ends just because they are poor and can't afford to get out from under a debt.

Well, this raises money bail, because it's a major player in all of this. So, as you said, someone who's innocent, but has allegedly done some very small-potato thing. Nonetheless, bail is set at $500 or $1,000, and they don't have it and they can't get it. So how do they get out of jail? They plead guilty even though they're not. Then they get a payment plan. And then they can't pay it.

At that point, when they haven't paid it and they have pleaded guilty, it's a whole new violation. They owe the criminal debt; they didn't pay so they're back in jail again. There's another bail deal. There's more money that they owe. It goes on and on and on.

I think it's helpful sometimes to put concrete examples to "small potatoes offenses." Things like laws against public urination. There is also a different kind of subset of what I think of as the criminalization of survival, where we criminalize the types of behaviors that people need to engage in to scrape by. This is one of the stories I shared with you for your book -- one of my own clients had sold blood platelets to a blood bank to supplement her family's income from food stamps and disability benefits, because it wasn't enough to live on. She ended up being charged with what's known in public assistance jargon as an IPV, an intentional program violation, which can itself bring criminal penalties.

Yes, it's not just the fines and fees and the money bail. There's issues with vagrancy and you can't sleep in a car and you can't sleep standing up and you can't sleep lying down. Instead of having mental health services and housing to help people, they just tell them to get out of town. There's a man in Sacramento who I talk about who had mental health issues. He was arrested 190 times.

190 times. So, we've talked about a lot, but I'm curious what shocked you the most in doing research for this book.

The one that really got me are chronic nuisance ordinances. For example, say a woman calls 911 to get protection from domestic violence. If it happens two or three times, the police have been given the power to say to the landlord, "This woman is a chronic nuisance, and you have to evict her." And it's just totally shocking.

Now the good news is the ACLU in various parts of the country has found or been found by the person who has been hurt in this way, and won lawsuits. In Pennsylvania, both the local town and the whole state changed their laws.

I mean it sounds like common sense that a domestic violence survivor shouldn't be punished for experiencing domestic violence. It is sort of astounding to think that litigation could be necessary to make that the law of the land.

It's stunning.

Your book argues powerfully that we need to be addressing these problems. But we also can't miss the fact that addressing these problems is part of a larger anti-poverty agenda.

That's the last third of the book. It is about seven places that I visited and met the people doing the work. They're organizers and they're people who help families in a variety of ways, whether it's early childhood or mental health support or the Promise Neighborhoods that President Obama started.

If we're serious, we certainly have to have de-carceration. And Lenore Anderson in California with Prop 47, they've done the best job in the country and they're the first ones to tell you that it's not going to work if people get out but they're homeless or they can't find a job. They're going to be back in. So, one way to look at it is it's not going to work if we don't actually attack poverty itself.

There's obviously a lot at stake under the current administration. There is a lot of real fear on the part of communities as well as advocates working on these issues who had been seeing a tremendous amount of bipartisan agreement and momentum up until the election when it came to criminal justice reform, and obviously now there's not a lot of hope on that front at the federal level. But it sounds like you're arguing for there being a lot to be done at the state and local level in the meantime.

The action is heavily, mostly at the state and local level. Some of the things are suing in federal court and when you get up to the Supreme Court if you don't have the five votes then that way of doing it doesn't work. But that's going and meanwhile all of these things that are happening at the local and state level and that's now for example the chief justices and chief judges of all of the state systems as a group are strongly speaking about the fines and fees and not that long ago, ten years or so, they were talking about how "what a nice thing it is that we were getting money." And then somebody said, "Wait a minute, that's not right."

This interview was conducted for Off-Kilter and aired as part of a complete episode on August 13. It was edited for length and clarity.

This interview was conducted for Off-Kilter and aired as part of a complete episode on August 13. It was edited for length and clarity.

*****

Rebecca Vallas is the managing director for the Poverty to Prosperity Program at the Center for American Progress.

Local coalitions, strong legislation needed to stop exploitation of children

Grand Forks, ND – Oct. 20, 2017 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND) today underscored the need for strong on-the-ground coalitions, and robust solutions to help stop the exploitation and trafficking of children, and provide the necessary victims services across North Dakota and in Indian Country.

During a panel discussion shining a light on child sexual exploitation at the University of North Dakota (UND) School of Law – hosted by the law school and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, Heitkamp spoke with social service organizations, anti-human trafficking advocates, law enforcement, experts, and a survivor about the multifaceted approach needed to safeguard North Dakota children from being exploited or trafficked, particularly online. Heitkamp highlighted several legislative measures she has helped introduce that would directly help tackle these challenges –including her Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act to help close loopholes to prevent companies like Backpage.com from facilitating sex trafficking on their websites and her bipartisan bill to expand AMBER Alert child abduction warnings to and beyond Indian Country.

"When someone sexually exploits a child they not only commit one of the most vile crimes imaginable but they steal their innocence and create lifelong trauma for their victims," said Heitkamp. "Some online companies like Backpage.com knowingly help facilitate sex trafficking, especially of young children – and made money doing so. And sexual predators like traffickers and others are well aware that children in Indian Country are easier targets because of their remote locations and systems alerting communities when they go missing often don't exist or are not synced with statewide or regional systems on tribal lands. Today I had the chance to talk with experts and leaders who have seen and understand these tragedies and how they have impacted children, our families, and our communities. We can take action now not only to close legal loopholes to stop companies like Backpage.com from selling children online, or expand AMBER Alert systems on and outside of Native lands, but to also work together to form strong and comprehensive local and statewide responses to keep our children safe and get those who would do them harm off our streets and behind bars."

As part of her years-long work to combat human trafficking and protect victims, Heitkamp helped introduce the Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act that would make sure websites would no longer be able to exploit a legal loophole in the Communications Decency Act allowing them to knowingly serve as a platform for sex trafficking crimes. The legislation was crafted following a comprehensive investigation and report by the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs' Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations – on which Heitkamp serves – that detailed the role of Backpage.com in deliberately facilitating human trafficking – particularly of children – on its site. At the hearing on the report, leadership of Backpage.com refused to testify, invoking their First and Fifth Amendment rights. Backpage.com also successfully hid behind the First Amendment when a minor, who was sold online on Backpage.com and raped repeatedly, sought to hold the site accountable. During that case, the courts made clear that for victims to seek justice, Congress needs to act.

Already companies and websites are joining the call to protect human trafficking victims from being bought and sold online. Just last month, leading information technology company Hewlett-Packard added its voice in support of the bill.

Heitkamp has long been fighting for better protections more robust response to addressing crime and human trafficking in Indian Country and of Native Americans. Recently, she introduced a bipartisan bill earlier this year with U.S. Senator John McCain (R-AZ) to expand AMBER Alert child abduction warnings to and beyond Indian Country passed in a Senate committee. And earlier this month, Heitkamp introduced Savanna's Act to build better tools to keep Native women – who disproportionately go missing or are victims of homicide – safe. She has also been working for years to combat human trafficking in Indian Country and has long been calling for federal law enforcement presence on the ground on North Dakota's tribal lands.

Long an advocate against human trafficking, Heitkamp led an initial hearing in September 2013 to sound the alarm on the prevalence of human trafficking right in our own backyard, including in North Dakota. Since then, Heitkamp has been a leader in fighting for legislative action to fight human trafficking, playing an integral role in passing in the U.S. Senate's bipartisan legislation.

Now law, the bill includes stricter punishments against traffickers who transport victims across state lines, and legal protections from her Safe Harbor bill to make sure victims are not treated as criminals. Heitkamp reintroduced her bipartisan Stop, Observe, Ask and Respond (SOAR) to Health and Wellness Act to give health care providers – including doctors, nurses, and social workers – training to help identify and protect victims of human trafficking. She is also continuing to push the Senate to protect runaway and homeless youth, some of the most susceptible targets of human traffickers, and successfully secured landmark anti-human trafficking protections for children in schools in the No Child Left Behind reform legislation.

Sisseton area immunization clinic set for seasonal flu

The Sisseton Area POD and the South Dakota Department of Health are offering free influenza vaccine on Nov. 6, 2017 from 3:30-7:30 p.m. at the Sisseton High School in Sisseton. This flu shot clinic is a test/exercise of the Sisseton Area POD Plan. Flu vaccines will be for infants and children 6 months through 18 years of age only.

A POD (Point of Dispensing) Plan is a coordinated effort among several agencies and community members to dispense and distribute medication or vaccine to a regional population in the event of a large infectious disease outbreak or other public health emergency, including bioterrorism and pandemic influenza. The Sisseton Area POD receives funding from the South Dakota Department of Health through its federal preparedness grants.

Vaccinating children helps protect them from serious influenza illness and complications, and decreases the spread of influenza in the community as children are often the biggest spreaders of influenza to adults and other children.

If you have questions about the vaccine, please contact Robert County Community Health Services at 698-4183. For questions regarding the scheduled clinic, please call Emergency Management at 698-3800.

IHS observes Health Care Quality Week

The Indian Health Service seeks to provide trusted, high quality health care to American Indians and Alaska Natives by promoting practices and policies that improve health outcomes. During National Health Care Quality Week, the Indian Health Service is recognizing the quality efforts that are improving the level of service it provides its patients.

"We are steadfastly committed to providing quality health care to American Indians and Alaska Natives, and our concerted efforts since the release of the Quality Framework last year is producing results," said Rear Adm. Michael D. Weahkee, IHS acting director. The accomplishments we're announcing today are just a small portion of the work being done across the Indian Health Service to improve the quality of care we provide every day."

The IHS Quality Framework was released in November 2016, and outlines how the IHS will develop, implement, and sustain an effective quality program that improves patient experience and outcomes, strengthens organizational capacity, and ensures the delivery of reliable, high quality health care at IHS facilities. The Framework will be reviewed and updated annually. The IHS is now working with tribes to develop the IHS strategic plan that will guide the agency mission, vision and goals, including efforts to sustain quality health care delivery. The IHS will incorporate the Framework into the IHS 2018-2022 Strategic Plan.

"Incorporating the Quality Framework into the IHS Strategic Plan ensures that our approach to high quality health care is consistent across all I HS facilities," said Jonathan Merrell, acting IHS deputy director for quality health care. "We will continue our collaboration with our partners on actions to confront long-standing health care service challenges to improve quality of care at hospitals and facilities across IHS, as we have over the past year."

In February 2017, the IHS was listed in the Government Accountability Office (GAO) High Risk Report. The GAO cited 14 recommendations that focus on IHS. Three months prior to the High Risk Report's release, IHS had already released the Quality Framework. The Framework incorporates quality standards from national experts, including best practices and expertise from across the IHS system of care.

Since the framework was released, IHS quality improvement efforts include:

o Awarding a master contract for accreditation of hospitals - IHS is announcing for the first time a new contract awarded to The Joint Commission as the single accrediting organization for all I HS hospitals. This will result in a uniform set of health, quality and safety standards across the organization. On-site inspections at hospitals will verify compliance with recognized standards, including the Medicare conditions of participation established by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Additionally, IHS awarded a contract for accreditation of IHS non-hospital-affiliated ambulatory health centers to the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC).

o Acquiring a credentialing software system - IHS is modernizing the way provider credentialing and privileging is carried out across the agency to facilitate the hiring of qualified providers and ensuring patient safety. IHS is now utilizing a centralized electronic credentialing database across all of its federallyoperated facilities.

o Developing a quality assurance accountability dashboard - The National Quality Accountability Dashboard is a system to aid in evidence-based strategic decision making. The dashboard will allow the Indian Health Service to monitor data on key performance indicators in a succinct and easily viewed display. It will also allow oversight and management of compliance with policy and regulatory requirements that ensure quality and safety of care. The measures and data requirements are aligned with current IHS policy and quality improvement initiatives that directly relate to achieving high performance.

o Establishing patient wait time standards for primary and urgent care settings - Wait times are an important measure of the patient experience. IHS federally-operated service units are collecting and tracking this data to improve patient care and services. IHS will use the data collected to continually improve patient experience and access to care at direct service sites.

o Developing a standard patient experience of care survey and an implementation strategy using electronic tablets -A patient experience survey is an important tool for gathering information about experience and also for determining perceptions of the quality of care received. A well-designed survey can help identify gaps in the care experience that can be addressed to improve health care delivery and quality. IHS developed a standardized patient experience of care survey for uniform use and administration across all I HS ambulatory primary care sites, including hospital outpatient departments.

o Implementing Emergency Department (ED) telehealth consultation in the IHS Great Plains and Billings Areas - This service is available to providers handling complicated or unusual cases in the ED. At the push of a button, IHS emergency department staff have immediate tele-video access to a team of highly specialized, emergency medicine doctors and nurses. IHS has a long history of using telemedicine to meet the needs of patients.

Health Care Quality Week is a national observance that recognizes the healthcare quality profession and the contributions and impact these professionals make in their organization.

The IHS, an agency in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, provides a comprehensive health service delivery system for approximately 2.2 million American Indians and Alaska Natives. Follow the agency via social media on Facebook and Twitter.

Man formerly accused in false-claims scandal gets Indian health deal

By Seth Tupper

Rapid City - Rapid City Journal – Oct 15, 2017 – A company chosen to potentially operate emergency departments at four Native American hospitals in the Great Plains is led by a man whose former company paid $10 million to settle allegations of submitting false claims to Medicare, Medicaid and other government programs.

John Shufeldt is the chief executive officer and chief medical officer of Tribal Emergency Medicine, aka Tribal EM, which is a Scottsdale, Ariz.-based company. Tribal EM and Central Care Inc., or CCI, of Alexandria, Va., were each awarded contracts Sept. 27 by the federal government's Indian Health Service after a competitive bidding process.

The contracts are for the management and staffing of emergency departments at IHS hospitals in Pine Ridge and Rosebud, both in South Dakota, as well as Fort Yates, N.D., and Winnebago, Neb.

IHS spokespeople did not immediately respond to questions from the Journal about whether the agency knows about, or is concerned about, the allegations against Shufeldt's former company.

Shufeldt founded NextCare Inc. in 1993 and grew it into a chain of dozens of urgent-care clinics spread among Arizona, Colorado, Texas, North Carolina, Ohio and Virginia.

In 2009, a former NextCare sales employee filed a lawsuit against the company on behalf of the U.S. government. The lawsuit alleged that NextCare conducted hundreds of unnecessary allergy and respiratory tests, and submitted the costs for reimbursement from government programs such as Medicare and Medicaid. The government also alleged that the company inflated billings as part of a practice known as upcoding.

One of the exhibits in the lawsuit was a 2009 email from Shufeldt, the then-CEO, exhorting company employees to administer more allergy tests and authorizing company-funded rewards such as dinner and ice cream in exchange for conducting at least four tests per day.

In 2012, NextCare agreed to settle the allegations by paying $10 million.

Shufeldt, who communicated this week with the Journal by phone and email while he was in Pine Ridge, denied any wrongdoing and said NextCare's testing program was medically justified by the number of high-risk patients who visited the company's clinics and by criteria from groups such as the World Allergy Organization.

"In no way were we financially motivated to perform unnecessary tests," Shufeldt said.

Shufeldt also said he disagreed with the decision by the NextCare board of directors to pursue a settlement, and he left the company with a severance package in 2010.

Shufeldt — who has medical and law degrees and is also an author, speaker and pilot — has been involved in several entrepreneurial efforts since then, including Tribal EM. The company has one other contract, he said, to run the emergency department of the Carlos Apache Health Care Corporation for the San Carlos Apache Tribe in Arizona.

People on the Rosebud Sioux Reservation are concerned about Shufeldt's possible involvement in their health care, said O.J. Semans, a member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribal Health Board. He accused the IHS of insufficient consultation with the tribe during the contract-awarding process. He also accused the IHS of insufficiently researching Shufeldt's involvement in the NextCare scandal, which is easily searchable online.

"What we should do is try to get a hearing before Congress to see if we can get internet and Google put in at the IHS," Semans said sarcastically. "Then when people apply, they can Google them like we did."

IHS statement

The Indian Health Service sent the following statement by email after the Journal posed questions about new contracts for emergency department staffing and management at four IHS hospitals in the Great Plains.

"As part of ongoing efforts to deliver high quality health care to American Indians and Alaska Natives, the Indian Health Service awarded two contracts to provide Emergency Department staffing, operations support and management services at four hospitals in the IHS Great Plains Area.

"These contracts will provide physicians, nurses and other health care providers for the emergency departments at Rosebud and Pine Ridge IHS Hospitals in South Dakota, Omaha Winnebago Hospital in Nebraska and Fort Yates Hospital in North Dakota. The contracts were awarded to Central Care Incorporated of Alexandria, Virginia, and Tribal Emergency Medicine of Scottsdale, Arizona. The combined maximum ceiling of the contracts is $26.8 million per year.

"While IHS has often contracted with health professionals to enhance staffing in the past, these contracts are designed to be more flexible in order to meet the individual needs of each hospital. Each hospital can select either contractor to provide only emergency department staffing, or comprehensive emergency department operations, management and staffing depending on the needs of the respective hospital. The contracts have a one-year base period, with four one-year option periods, meaning that IHS can choose to extend them for a total of five years.

"These are Indefinite Delivery, Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contracts which will allow each hospital to decide whether they need management and staffing or just staffing services. Each hospital can place task orders for the necessary services, which will then be competed between the two vendors. IDIQs help streamline the contract process and speed service delivery."

Comfort, support, or service from a furry friend

By Richard P. Holm, MD

If you ask any of the members of my family to describe us, each would likely include our dog in that description. Our current dog Sasha was discovered at the Humane Society by our daughter, Julia. I asked Julia, "Why do you think our dog is good for us?" She quickly came back, "Sasha is playful and joyful, yet calming, soothing, relaxing, and comforting." She said, "Sasha is sad when you're sad and happy when you're happy; a companion that loves you unconditionally; and on top of all that, SHE IS SO CUTE!" Our son Preston points out how the dog protects our home by bark-warning us of intruders and cleaning the floor of bug-alluring food spilled from the dinner table. Our son Carter referenced how the dog says to us in dog-speak, "Car ride? I wanna go." or, "Family is home, HOORAY!" Carter said, "It has something to do with her innocence, blind faith, and pure enthusiasm."

The four dogs I have loved in my lifetime could each be described by those same descriptors. It doesn't matter whether a person is emotionally devastated or filled with confidence, everyone can use a little companionship and unconditional love, especially during the lonely episodes that we all face, from time to time.

Different than a loving pet is a specially trained service dog. Service dogs are specially trained dogs who help individuals with mental or physical disabilities. Dogs can pull a person in a wheelchair, protect a person having a seizure, remind a person with mental illness to take their medicine, and calm a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack. Service animals are not restricted to just canines. Recently, miniature horses have been helpful for some disabled, and after special training, are being accepted as service animals as well.

Service dogs (and sometimes miniature horses) are allowed in places which serve the public, like restaurants or libraries. To allow this, however, the dogs or horses must be specially trained to perform specific tasks for their handler and be well behaved in public. Separate from these service animals are animals providing emotional support. Along with service animals, emotional support animals are allowed to live in housing that has a 'no pets policy' when a medical professional certifies that the individual has a verifiable disability and that the animal in question provides a benefit. Different from service dogs and miniature horses, comfort and emotional support pets do not need special training, but are often expected to be disciplined and well trained.

No question, our dog Sasha provides plenty of comfort and emotional support.

*****

Dr. Rick Holms wrote this Prairie Doc Perspective for "OnCall®," a weekly program where medical professionals discuss health concerns for the general public. "OnCall®*is produced by the Healing Words Foundation in association with the South Dakota State University Journalism Department. "OnCall®*airs Thursdays on South Dakota Public Broadcasting-Television at 7 p.m. Central, 6 p.m. Mountain. Visit www.oncalltelevision.com

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

SWST JOM program report

By Darlene Jo Roberts

Congratulations to Christine Fineday, for her representation on the National Johnson O'Malley program!

Christine Fineday became the National Region 5 representative at the 2017 NJOMA conference held in Albuquerque. Christine currently serves on the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate JOM board, as a parent representative for the Sisseton School. She has worked in higher education for ten years and continues to be a strong advocate for education. She also served on HDST policy board and parent committees while her boys were young. Her oldest son is now in college and her youngest son is a senior in high school.

Christine has recently completed a Master's in Business Administration. She has been classified throughout college as a first generation student, being that she was the first in her family to graduate from college.

"It was a challenge", she says.

But Christine was glad to have accomplished her educational goals and will use that knowledge to assist the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate and other programs, in any way that she can.

Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate, Johnson O'Malley Parent Board

The SWOJOM parent board consists of 7 members:

Tom Wilson, Sisseton Public School Representative

Sylvana Flute, Browns Valley Public School Representative

Sheila Mendenhall, Wilmot Public School Representative

Irene Rondell, Waubay Public School Representative

Dionne German, Sisseton Public School Representative

Orvella Bird, Sisseton Public School Representative

Christine Fineday, Sisseton Public School Representative

Also pidamaya for attending the retreat: Skyman Redday, Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Secretary Executive Assistant; Jo Roberts, Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate JOM Education Administrator; and Dr. Sherry Johnson, Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Education Director.

This is a dedicated and involved group that spent their Saturday at Dakota Sioux conference room, covering SWOJOM retreat topics.

Pidamaya SWOJOM for your dedication to our JOM students in the public schools!

SWC Mustangs rodeo team report

By Jayme Valnes

Coach Valnes is very proud how the SWC Mustange finished off their fall Rodeo season.

Their next College Rodeo will be in Brookings, SD in April 2018.

If anyone is wanting to follow the SWC Mustange, they have a Facebook page (Sisseton Wahpeton College Rodeo Team).

We are also very happy and thankful for all the parents, family, friends, and community members that showed up in Fargo to help support the SWC Rodeo team.

University of North Dakota-Fargo Rodeo results:

*Austin Beaty - Saddle Broncs - Placed 2nd in the short round.

*Lane Kvien - Steer Wrestling - Placed 4th in the long round and 6th in the average.

*Delane German - Bull Riding - Placed 2nd in the long round and 2nd in the average.

TZ 4th graders take field trip

Submitted by Kelsey Stadler

4th Grade Teacher

The fourth graders at Tiospa Zina Tribal School went on a field trip to Sica Hollow on September 23rd.

Pictured here are students who participated.

Browns Valley School observes Heritage Day

The Browns Valley School held its Heritage Day last week, on Wednesday, October 18.

Heritage Day is a celebration of cultures.

The event began in 1994 to provide an opportunity for Browns Valley students to learn about the area in which they live and the many cultures within our community.

This year the day started with a welcome by SWST Chairman and former Browns Valley student Dave Flute.

The kids then went outside to watch the Tribal Department demonstrate how to set up a tipi.

Students decorated their library with star quilts and flags from their native countries. There were 13 presentations for students to choose from in a five session rotation.

Presenters included Jessica Tiger and Mali Souksavath with beading and quill work, Mr Nodsle and Eric with furs and trapping, Dustina Gill and Jo Roberts corn drying, food, and Dakota culture, Charlotte Almanza plants for medicine and tea, visits to Sam Browns Cabin and Carnegie Library with Richard Johnson and Edith Foren, Aritfacts Dianne DeRosiers and Tamara St. John, lefsa making Chrity Erickson and Chad Boothby, pie making Sharon Medbery, homemade ice cream Jeanne Huber and Megan Nieland, Lacrosse Santee Red Eagle and Jacob LaBlanc, and fishing with Bob Johnson. Dean and Mason Sultz also brought in their foreign exchange student from Germany to talk to their SA groups, and Giahna and Wakinyan Webster brought in a strawberry drink from their Tribe.

The day closed with a special treat – the Tiospa Zina dancers and drum group, with advisor Darrell DeCoteau. Browns Valley first graders Nadia WhiteThunder and Tayden Crawford danced during the performance and 8th grader DayDay Heminger joined the drum group.

Many thanks to all of the presenters who helped make this a special and educational day for the Browns Valley students!

It could not have happened without you.

Also, thank you to community members/families who joined the day of celebrating cultures.

Rounds accepting Spring 2018 internship applications

Deadline Extended to Nov. 1

 

Washington, DC – Oct. 18, 2017 – U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) today announced that he is currently accepting internship applications for spring 2018. The deadline to apply for internships in his Washington, D.C., Pierre, Rapid City and Sioux Falls offices is Nov. 1, 2017. College credit is available.

Duties in the Washington, D.C., office may include tracking legislation, researching bills, attending committee hearings and briefings, leading tours of the U.S. Capitol, handling constituent phone calls, sorting mail and providing legislative support. Duties in the South Dakota offices include researching constituent inquiries and requests, participation in outreach activities, assisting staff on special projects, handling phone calls and constituent requests and sorting mail. In all offices, students will work closely with constituents and staff, polish their research and writing skills and gain an in-depth understanding of a Senate office.

Interested college students should complete the online internship application and submit a resume no later than Nov. 1, 2017. Resumes should be submitted to intern coordinator Rebecca Herman at rebecca_herman@rounds.senate.gov. Information about the internship program, along with the application, can be found online at www.rounds.senate.gov/internships.

Additional questions can be directed to Rebecca Herman at (605) 224-1450.

Garden Corner

Submitted by Eric Hanssen

Browns Valley, Minnesota

Storing potatoes for quality and food safety

As summer is coming to a close, those with their own gardens or others purchasing produce at the last few farmer's markets of the season will want to make it last through the winter.

Whatever the situation, it is important to understand the proper methods of storing produce for safety and quality. One vegetable almost everyone stores regularly is potatoes.

Often we stash them under a counter in the kitchen and forget about them, but did you know that potatoes, if not stored properly, can actually be dangerous or even deadly?

Potatoes, like tomatoes and eggplant, are members of the nightshade family, which contain the toxin solanine.

While these plants always contain some amount of solanine, the toxin increases in abundance when potatoes are exposed to light. That is why they should be stored in complete darkness.

Exposure to light causes the skin, and flesh just under the skin of the potato, to turn green.

While the green itself is harmless chrorophyll, the green color is an indicator of the presence of solanine.

So what?

Grocery stores sell green potatoes all the time.

Well, if enough solanine is eaten, the toxin can cause vomiting, diahrrea, headaches, paralysis of the central nervous system, coma, and in rare cases, death.

How much is too much?

This depends on the ratio of body weight to toxin ingested, and each person's individual tolerance to alkaloid toxins.

For a small child, it may only take a small amount, whereas an adult may have to ingest several green potatoes to feel the effects.

The best way to avoid solanine poisoning is to avoid eating green potatoes.

It is not only important to keep potatoes out of the light for long term storage, but those stored under the counter, in a basement or root cellar that have started to grow eyes and become mushy and rotten can be dangerous also.

Rotting potatoes give off a noxious solanine gas that can make a person unconscious if they've inhaled enough.

There have even been cases of people dying in their root cellars due to unbeknownst rotting potatoes.

While these types of poisonings are rare in the U.S., it is still important to properly store potatoes at all times of the year, no matter how many you have.

Keep them in a cool, dark place, and avoid exposure to light during transport.

If you find or buy green potatoes, throw them out.

While removing the green and cooking them removes some of the solanine, it may not be enough to prevent illness.

Also avoid eating potatoes that are past their prime, have eyes growing on them, or show any signs of decay.

If you store potatoes for any amount of time checking them regularly for signs of mold, decay or eyes and remove any that display those traits.

If there are a bunch of potatoes that have gone bad, make sure to properly ventilate the area before working to remove the bad potatoes.

This article written by Michelle Jarvie, Michigan State University Extension, available online at http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/storing_potatoes_for_quality_and_food_safety.

 

Legals

Request for Bids

For Snow Removal

Dakota Crossing is requesting bids for snow removal this winter season.

Deadline for submitting a bid is 4:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 3, 2017.

Submit bid to Josh Flute, Dakota Nation Industries, PO Box 509, Agency Village, SD 57262; phone 605-698-2002.

42-3tc

 

SISSETON WAHPETON OYATE

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

IN TRIBAL COURT

CASE NO: CS-16-104

AFFIDAVIT AND MOTION FOR ORDER FOR PUBLICATION

SWO OFFICE OF CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT, EX REL.

David Redthunder, Plaintiff/Custodian.

Vs.

DEBORAH DIVINE, Defendant.

The Court being satisfied by Affidavit duly filed herein that personal service cannot well be made, it is Ordered that, Deborah Divine, who is a parent, in the above-entitled matter, be notified by (3) three weeks publication in full of the Notice of these proceedings in the regular issue of a qualified newspaper.

Dated this 5th day of October 2017.

SISSETON WAHPETON OYATE

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

IN TRIBAL COURT

CASE NO: CS-16-104

NOTICE OF HEARING

SWO OFFICE OF CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT, EX REL.

David Redthunder, Plaintiff/Custodian.

Vs.

DEBORAH DIVINE, Defendant.

Take notice that a hearing will be held at the above named Court, Agency Village, outside the city of Sisseton, County of Roberts, South Dakota, on the of 2nd day of November 2017 at the hour of 9:00 A.M or as soon thereafter as possible. You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter. Dated this 5th day of October 2017.

By order of the Court:

Tribal Court Judge, LGB.

Attest:

Lois Kohl Clerk of Court.

41-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 10-067

SWOCSE/ TANF/Eugene Bissonette, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FAITH BISSONETTE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

42-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 09-032

SWOCSE/ TANF/Jolene Bissonette, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FAITH BISSONETTE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

42-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 17-113

SWOCSE/ TANF/Sophia Bissonette, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FAITH BISSONETTE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

42-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 10-056

SWOCSE/ TANF/Marlys Blue Dog, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FAITH BISSONETTE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

42-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 12-046

SWOCSE/ TANF/Cherilyn Davies, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FLOYD CLOUD, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

42-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 16-206

SWOCSE/ Destinee Eastman, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FLOYD CLOUD, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

42-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 06-004

SWOCSE/ Gayla German, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FLOYD CLOUD, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

42-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 17-039

SWOCSE/ SD/Jodeen Hensen, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FLOYD CLOUD, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

42-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 09-036

SWOCSE/ Sheila Huff, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SKY LAWRENCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

42-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 01-105

SWOCSE/ Lydia Godfrey, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SKY LAWRENCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

42-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 13-205

SWOCSE/ Della Whiting, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SKY LAWRENCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

42-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 03-253

SWOCSE/ Rhiannon Redday, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JOSHUA DUMARCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

42-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-099

SWOCSE/ Sheila Lufkins, PLAINTIFF

VS.

OLIVER JACK, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

42-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-067

SWOCSE/ SD/Candace Hill, PLAINTIFF

VS.

HAZEN DUMARCE, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of October, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

42-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 17-077

SWOCSE/ Tonia Campbell, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MICHAEL EAGLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of October, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

42-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 13-139

SWOCSE/ Justin Barse, Sr., PLAINTIFF

VS.

RHIANNON FRUCTUOSO, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of October, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

42-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 09-099

SWOCSE/ Geri Fisher, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LONALD RUNNELS, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

t is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of October, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

42-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 17-003

SWOCSE/ Cheryl Iwata, PLAINTIFF

VS.

KEITH WANNA, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of October, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

42-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-122

SWOCSE/ Jerrilyn Rousseau, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DAVID EBERHARDT, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of October, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

42-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-059

SWOCSE/ Amy Laughter, PLAINTIFF

VS.

GABRIEL SANCHEZ, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of October, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

42-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 15-036

SWOCSE/ Dana Egan, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CHRISTOPHER YELLOW EARRINGS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of October, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

42-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-142

SWOCSE/ Ruth Hill, PLAINTIFF

VS.

GLEN WANNA, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 1st day of November, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Youth Development Coordinator, Youth Department

Indian Highway Safety Project Officer, Law Enforcement

Biologist Technician, Fish & Wildlife

Closing Date: October 27th, 2017 @ 04:30PM

Cook, Head Start

Bus Driver/Custodian (2), Head Start

Dakotah Language Specialist, Head Start

Truancy Interventionist, Education Department

College/Career Specialist, Education Department

Land Acquisition Clerk, Tribal Realty

Realty Manager, Tribal Realty

Closing Date: November 3rd, 2017 @ 04:30 PM

Application and job description information can be seen at SWO Human Resources Office or http://www.swo-nsn.gov/contact/employment. Application can be downloaded from "Apply Now" and emailed to ArnoldW@SWO-NSN.GOV or DeniseH@SWO-NSN.GOV. Contact can also be at Arnold Williams 698-8238 or Denise Hill 698-8251 with questions. (Tribal preference will apply).

 

Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate

Legal Department

Job Announcement

Position Title: Appellate Court Justice.

Send Resume or request job description at AmberC@swo-nsn.gov or call (605) 698-8409.

Open until filled.

 

Sisseton Wahpeton College

Has the following vacancies:

Director of Student Services: This position is responsible for the overall day-to-day management and coordination of the Student Services Department, which includes overseeing the activities related to creating a successful student experience, from assessing student college readiness, matching the student to a program of study that meets their career goals, advising students on behaviors that leads to successful completion of their program, and providing support services throughout their program. This position is under the direct supervision of VP of Academic Affairs. Requirements for this position are: Master's degree in counseling, social work, education, or similar related field. Candidates must also have previous experience in student services, supervisory experience and experience working on a reservation, tribal government, and/or tribal students.

Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118. Position closes at 4:30 p.m. November 3, 2017.

Cashier/Cook: The SWC Café has an opening for a part-time cashier/cook. This position is responsible for waiting on customers and operating the till. Candidates will also assist in the preparation of ingredients for daily specials and menu items. Requirements for this position are: High School diploma or GED. Previous cashiering and/or cooking experience preferred.

Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118. Position closes at 4:30 p.m. November 3, 2017.

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Enemy Swim Day School

The Enemy Swim Day School has an opening for an Executive Assistant. Primary duties include assistant to the Principal: report and grant writing, data analysis, communications, program planning and implementation and other general clerical duties. Qualifications: A.A. or equivalent. Grant writing experience, proficient in technology and software applications and organizational skills are required. For more information about the position call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 and ask for Mrs. Dolney. This position is open until filled. Send application, resume, 3 letters of recommendation, and copy of education to: Enemy Swim Day School, 13525 446th Avenue, Waubay, SD 57273.

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Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Count Department:

Team Member (2 Full-Time) 3:00am to Finish

Hotel Department:

Laundry/Room Attendant (Full-Time) 8:00 am to finish

Closing Date: October 27, 2017 at 4:00 p.m.

Two identifications documents required upon hire.

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE, Hankinson ND 58041.For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO. (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment). Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

The Marketing Department Is Now Accepting Applications For

Position: Player Development Manager-Marketing Trainee (Full-Time)

Job Description: Oversees daily operations of the Casino Hosts and Magic Rewards Club. Responsible for growing and retaining our guest database through one-on-one interactions, telemarketing, written correspondence, direct contact, and on and off-site event participation. The Player Development Manager will ensure customer retention, increased trip frequency, guest loyalty and repeat business by building personal relationships with our mid-level and VIP club members.

Closing Date: October 31, 2017 @4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D. O. E. Tribal Member of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate are exempt from the knowledge and education below but are held to all skills and abilities required. At least 21 years of age Bachelor's Degree in Marketing and 2 years of experience in Player's Club and Player Development Operations. Associates Degree in Marketing or related field and 4 years of experience in Players' Club and Player Development Operations. 6 years combination of education and experience in Players' Club and Player Development Departments. Knowledge of Aristocrat and Agilisys software preferred. Knowledge of Microsoft Office suite applications.

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department 16849 102nd Street SE Hankinson ND 58041 For complete Job Description contact James Neconish @ 701-634-3000 ext. 2583 Indian Preference will apply / EEO (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment).

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Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

The Human Resources Department Is Now Accepting Applications For

Position: Training Coordinator

Job Description: Responsible for offering training in a job-specific area. Focusing on teaching areas of knowledge or on-the-job capabilities needed for certain positions or departments. Assisting in the growth of new ideas, policies, soft skills, and other necessary trainings as needed. Closing date: October 27, 2017 Starting Wage: Negotiable Requirements: High School Diploma/GED required 5 years Clerical Experience in a professional office setting Experience in facilitating, organizing and creating events, meetings, trainings and presentations required (must be present in resume) Must have a positive and motivating attitude. Must pass a typing proficiency test of 40wpm (will be conducted after interview) Excellent written, verbal communication skills must be articulate and have public speaking skills required (will be evaluated and conducted during interview)

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department 16849 102nd Street SE Hankinson ND 58041 For complete Job Description contact James Neconish @ 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment)

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Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

SURVEILLANCE: SURVEILLANCE OBSERVER (1 Full- Time) ROTATING GENERAL FUNCTION: Responsible for monitoring table games, slot activity, casino cage transactions, hard and soft count procedures, as well as, all other non-gaming areas throughout the casino.

REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. Ability to handle diverse situations and or people. Must work all shifts. (Day, Swing, Graveyard) Weekends and Holidays. Shifts will rotate every 3 months. Excellent verbal and written communication skills. Able to sit for long periods of time in a cool environment. Must obtain a Key Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on October 26, 2017 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Surveillance Department:

Agent (2) part-time; rotating shifts; day, swing, graveyard, weekends, holidays, and the ability to work flexible hours. Must have excellent written & verbal communication skills, motivational & mechanical skills. Knowledgeable of Tribal, State, and Federal gaming regulations. Knowledgeable in the operation of Microsoft Word. 1 year previous experience preferred. Must be at least 21 years old, must have a High School Diploma or GED. Must be able to obtain a Key Gaming License.

C-Store Department:

Clerk/Cashier (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays, and ability to work flexible hours. Excellent customer service skills; math skills essential; ability to operate necessary equipment; physical ability to lift moderate amounts of weight; previous experience working with money preferred; strong organizational skills managing various functions; dependable & available to work any & all shifts. Must be at least 21 years old & have a High School diploma or GED.

Restaurant Department:

Prep cook/cook (1) full-time & (1) part-time, rotating shifts, day, and swing, includes weekends & holidays. Previous experience is preferred. Must be able to multi-task; have the ability to work under pressure; the ability to operate necessary equipment; knowledge of food preparation safety requirements and ability obtain a "Food Handlers" certification; physical ability to clean, lift heavy object up to 20 lbs. or more and restock inventory. Have the physical ability to stand for prolonged periods of time. Appropriate dress code. Must be very dependable. Must be at least 18 years old & must have a High School Diploma or GED.

Opening date: Thursday, October 19, 2017

Closing date: Wednesday, October 25, 2017 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 
 

 

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