sota on-line masthead

 

Picture Picks of the Week

Don't miss out -- Click here
View the best pictures from this week's Sota
In full color!

 

Link to TEAB Executive candidates forum - Ocrt. 23, 2018

Link to TEAB Tribal Chair candidates forum - May 14, 2019

Link to KXSW Reznet videos here.

Wind River Water Code adapted for Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe (draft)

  Obituaries Editorials Editor's column Education
Legals
Trading post

 

 

Volume 50 Issue No. 34

Anpetu Iyamni, Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2019

Inside this Edition –

Case of rabies discovered in 3-month-old puppy at Agency Village

Positive E. coli samples at Peever Flats: Update

Chairman White hosts public forum at Rosalie's

GPTCHB receives $3.6 million grant to fight youth suicide

Highlights from National Night Out 2019

Browns Valley's Standing Buffalo Wacipi

July 2019 Tribal Court proceedings

Next week: Report on Piya Canku akan Maunipi "On the healing road we walk"

Reminder: Deadline for receiving copy is Friday noon

Chairman White holds public forum

By CD Floro

Sota Editor

Donovan White hosted another public forum, third since being elected SWO Tribal Chairman, this past weekend.

Dubbed an "anti-corruption public forum," the event was held at Rosalie's in Sisseton Saturday morning, August 17.

It drew more people than the previous forums, the first also at Rosalie's and second at the Enemy Swim community center.

There were fifty-one names on the signup sheet but as many as 80 people showed up to listen, to ask questions, and to talk.

Coffee and a breakfast of eggs, toast, and bacon were served, paid for out of the Chairman's pocket.

Issues were many but most of the discussion – which began at about 10:00 and went until nearly 12:00 noon – covered judicial and legislative affairs and Dakota Crossing.

First issue discussed was "removal of the judges."

Lorraine Rousseau, Judicial Committee Chair, was on hand to field questions.

She said that the judges were not removed, that Judicial was acting "to follow the law."

Earlier this year, she told the crowd, the Tribe's Legal department brought an applicant for associate judge to Tribal Council for their approval.

That, she explained, is not how it is supposed to be done if the law is followed.

Under chapter 21, the Judicial Committee is responsible for screening applicants, with priority given members of the SWO Tribe.

Over the past 15 years, she said, Tribal member preference has not been possible because of renewing the judge positions.

The law was not being followed, she said.

About the judges, Lorraine said, "They could all re-apply."

"B.J. Jones chose to resign."

"Associate Judge Michael Swallow chose to make it political (by writing an open letter)."

Lorraine said that interim judges are at work but candidates are being interviewed and she expects the positions to be filled soon.

There was discussion about legal issues and the constitution and the need to update the laws.

A big problem identified is lack of "separation of powers."

The Chairman said Council can do whatever it wants, "there's no due process."

For example, it's too easy, he said, for Council to remove somebody and "we still haven't paid the $80,000 owed for each of the last two (special elections)."

He called for separation of powers and due process.

"But we are hung up on a quorum (getting a high enough percentage of Tribal members to vote for changes)."

Today's Council, he said, "is closer to wanting separation of powers."

A strong ordinance "…could go a long way to avoid some of our problems," said the Chairman.

There was agreement on the need for updating the constitution.

"We need to get people out to vote," said the Chairman.

"Make it easier for people to vote."

"Add off-rez … have mail-in ballots."

He reminded people that during his brief stint at Vice-Chairman in 2017 he got Council to approve a motion allowing off-Reservation voting. (It was not implemented.)

Another idea he proposed Saturday was to have voting at the Tribal admin building instead of making members go out to the seven District centers.

The Chairman acknowledged the presence of former SWO Tribal Chairman Michael Selvage.

He thanked Chairman White for holding the meeting and expressed his thoughts.

He stressed the importance of giving the people accurate information.

Put the meetings out in the public using technology, he suggested.

People have iPhones and high-tech gadgets available to make it work, he said.

Others agreed to having open meetings shared.

But there was concern that when it comes to discussing financial numbers, videos should be paused.

"A live-streaming motion was defeated," said Chairman White, "but structure is in place for stopping for financials."

Next topic was Dakota Crossing.

Chairman White said the Tribe is implementing the steps that Super Valu "says will help."

A new general manager has been hired for the store, he said, and "We are making corrections."

"Financials will tell the true story," he said, and "over the next couple of months we will see."

The Chairman said, "We have real numbers from the bank."

"But we don't have real numbers from sales at the store."

He cautioned that "the numbers are going to be worse."

Past losses, he said, are higher than we were led to believe and "that's going to come out quickly."

(Michael Roberts has completed Dakota Crossing's financial assessment and is working on the other for-profits; confidential reports are just now going to Council and the Executives. When completed, all the for-profits will be ready to be audited, not just Dakota Western.)

The jurisdiction issue of "double jeopardy" was discussed … Tribal members being charged in both Tribal Court and District Court for the same offense.

The Chairman wants "to put a stop to that."

"Whoever is first on the scene takes the charge … not both jurisdictions."

But this meeting was publicized as an "anti-corruption forum" and the issue of corruption, theft and embezzlement, came up.

"There's a lot of good things we need to be doing … but (don't) for greed," said the Chairman.

"Our people are tired of it."

He wants to end people "helping themselves to the money … (and) putting people in who don't know what they're doing."

"We need stability … there are too many haves and have-nots."

"Going to district meetings and arguing about money."

"District money going to mostly a few."

"District members mostly get just school clothes and district days."

"High paying salaries and who-you-know," he described the situation.

"But that's not who we are as a people," he said.

He brought up the point that if someone has been convicted of embezzlement "there should be a period of time to turn your life around and prove yourself."

He said they could be provided with work, a job, but not right away given a position of trust with money.

They "should not get big salaries."

Also, "no big contracts especially with federal funds," the Chairman said. "They would jeopardize our funding."

"And not running Districts and making motions."

Chairman White talked about personal "push back" against his anti-corruption stand by people who control district meetings and DCA.

But "DCA is only advisory."

"They're supposed to take care of district business not run Tribal government."

"Removal is only a recommendation," he said.

He talked about a past case – not removal of an elected official but termination of then-CEO of Dakota Nation Gaming Eddie Lynn.

"There were rumors."

"Somebody got fired and went to the district and complained … and Council terminated him."

"But it was the general manager, not Lynn (who had done the firing)."

"Find out the facts," said the Chairman."

"This has gotten out of hand."

"Have district members – a few, five – attend Council meetings and take back that (information) to your District meetings," he suggested.

"Come to Council," he invited, "see what's happening."

In further discussion on the grocery store, a comment was made that "We should be the most powerful economic force in the area."

That the Tribe is not "goes to Council, leadership … don't blame the people."

Several elders spoke out against having it mandatory that elderly cards be spent at Dakota Crossing.

And "elderly cards are not going to save the store," said the Chairman.

"It will take the whole community to save the store."

Former Tribal Planner Shannon LaBatte wants to "bring people together to work collectively," and "to see a complete business plan and marketing plan (for Dakota Crossing)."

She brought up a different perspective on the grocery store:

"The human element," she called it.

"The need for good quality food at fair prices."

"Food sovereignty."

"Grown on our own land and sold at our own store."

"Not dependent on government … more independent."

She called "our grocery store … part of that."

Gardening, "trusting ourselves to grow our own food" she said is "part of a circle of economic opportunity."

Chairman White expressed regret at spending so "… much time on the grocery store."

The noon hour was getting close.

"Here we are fighting over gift cards," said the Chairman, "over money."

"People are OD'ing, dying, on meth."

"Meth is destroying our community."

"We are doing what we can to save our store."

"We need to save our people."

He talked about Dakotah Pride.

"The ceiling is falling down," he said.

"We need long term treatment."

"We need to get our priorities straight," he added.

*****

The case of rabies in a three-month-old puppy at Agency Village was part of a discussion on the need for better animal control in the housing areas.

People said they want Housing to do a better job of controlling animals running loose.

Chairman White agreed and commented that sanitation is a big factor in both spread of rabies and of E. coli.

Controlling animal waste and having good hygiene, he pointed out, can go a long way to prevent contamination.

*****

After the forum concluded, we heard some complaints that too much time had been spent on the grocery store and elderly cards, while other issues were ignored.

The Chairman had said as much when the event was winding down but added that we need to have more of these forums.

He suggested moving them to the Tribal elderly center at Agency Village.

The crowd was too large to fit comfortably in the meeting area at Rosalie's.

Agency Village puppy tests positive for Rabies

Rabies: a community health emergency

Exposed individuals asked to contact health officials

Pierre, SD – Aug. 14, 2019 – A Beagle Dachshund mix puppy approximately 3 months of age in Agency Village has tested positive for rabies and health officials are urging individuals who may have been bitten, scratched or in contact with the puppy's saliva to call the state Department of Health or their physician to determine whether rabies shots are needed. The department's number is 1.800.592.1861.

The rabid puppy was found August 6 in the Crawfordsville Housing area on the south side of Agency Village and has been removed from the community. Individuals who came into contact with the puppy on or after July 27 should seek consultation.

Rabies is a fatal, but preventable viral disease. Rabies is contracted by exposure to a rabid animal, typically through a bite. Scratches and saliva contact with broken skin or mucus membranes are also possible routes of transmission. Prompt treatment following exposure can prevent rabies. Treatment includes administration of rabies immune globulin and a series of four doses of vaccine administered in the arm.

Through the end of July, South Dakota has reported 4 rabid animals (4 bats). Skunks are the primary reservoir of rabies in South Dakota and are the likely source of this puppy's disease. Since 2009, 130 skunks and 9 dogs have tested positive for rabies in South Dakota. Pet owners are encouraged to make sure their animals' rabies vaccinations are up to date.

More information about rabies can be found on the department's website at doh.sd.gov/diseases/infectious/diseasefacts/Rabies.aspx

There have been 21 people exposed to rabies and are undergoing treatment.

And there are still some children that health officials have been unable to reach.

Community residents need to watch for signs and symptoms in both people and dogs.

This remains an emergency situation.

Rabies Vaccination Clinic

Due to the case, IHS scheduled a free rabies vaccination clinic this Monday, August 19.

Vaccinations will be provided at the Sisseton Wahpeton College parking lot from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. and at the SWHA garage from 2:00 to 5:00 p.m.

If you are in the Agency Village area, including Crawfordsville Agency Village, Rehab Village, Little Crow Drive and Two Star Lane, you should be taking your animal to this clinic.

Lake Traverse District Francis Crawford printed out flyers and asked members of the softball team to deliver them door-to-door in Agency Village to encourage a good turnout.

A second clinic will be held on Tuesday at Enemy Swim. (Time and location have not been been announced at press time.)

E. coli found at Peever Flats: Update

Last week's Sota reported the case of E.coli discovered in random samples taken by Lake Traverse Utilities Commission (LTUC) workers from three adjacent homes in Peever Flats Housing.

BDM Rural Water tests show no contamination of water going into, or out of, Peever Flats.

Emergency Management/LTUC reported last week the positive test results appear to be an isolated case.

SWHA and LTUC are tasked with follow-up – monitoring the housing areas.

Chairman White has also asked for Emergency Management put together a plan on how to better respond to similar incidents in the future.

The Chairman reported over the weekend that final test results are not yet available but the drinking water provided to Peever Flats is clean. Still, bottled water is being supplied to the affected houses.

Watch for an update online on the Sota website and from KXSW-Radio.

Facts about E. coli

Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a bacterium commonly found in the gut of warm-blooded organisms.

Most strains of E. coli are not harmful but are part of the healthful bacterial flora in the human gut. However, some types can cause illness in humans, including diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, and sometimes vomiting.

Some strains of E. coli infection can include nausea, vomiting, and fever.

In susceptible individuals, certain types of E. coli infection can lead to kidney failure.

Following hygiene rules helps prevent its spread.

SWO Tribal Secretary's report for July 2019

SWO Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson released the following written report to Council at its August 6th meeting. (Secretary Thompson was on travel to a Head Start conference in Washington state for the week.)

We distributed coupons to 2,064 elders for the month of July; 856 on-reservation; 1,208 off-reservation.

The number fluctuates due to deaths and those turning 55.

Approximately 339 people, not including some Program Managers and Tribal Council, visited the Tribal Secretary's Office for various reasons for the month of July.

We logged in and responded to 280 phone calls.

Only two (2) complaints were received this month.

Attended and participated in approximately 71 meetings with Tribal Executives, Tribal Council and Program Managers as scheduled and/or needed.

The elderly cards for the month of August are on schedule.

In the planning stages for an event sponsored by the Casey Family Foundation; a 2-day event in November with the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) and Historical Trauma as the topics.

I will be attending the National Head Start Conference in Airway Hts., Washington, scheduled for August 4-9th; I will be on excused absence due to this conference and will not be in attendance for the August 6 & 7th Regular Tribal Council meeting.

$3.6 million awarded to GPTCHB to fight Youth Suicide

Rapid City, SD – The GPTCHB's Connecting With Our Youth Program (CWOY) has been awarded the Garrett Lee Smith (GLS) Suicide Prevention Grant worth $3.6 million over 5 years.

The CWOY program is operated by the GPTCHB and managed by Charles Sitting Bull, Director of Behavioral Health.

"We are very excited to have been selected for this grant and to have this great opportunity to work with our collaborating partners in the Rapid City area to help prevent suicide among our native youth," said Sitting Bull.

The funding for the grant is distributed by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and will be used to target Rapid City Area Native youth between the ages of 10 to 24 years old who are at risk of committing suicide.

Sitting Bull says that youth in the Rapid City Area have been struggling to navigate the epidemic of youth suicide that has impacted Indian Country, but he adds that the grant is supported by a coalition of healthcare professionals who are ready to take on the challenge.

"We have the largest number of collaborators ever in the history of our native community in Rapid City who we will be working together with on this grant," said Sitting Bull.

CWOY began its work on June 30th, 2019 and will run through June of 2024.

*****

The Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's Health Board is established to provide the tribal nations in the Great Plains region with a formal representative Board as a means of communicating and participating with the Great Plains Area Indian Health Service and other Health and Human Services entities and organizations on health matters.

From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer"

*United Veterans Association Meeting: Tuesday - August 20, 2019 @ 5PM at the TVSO Office. Call 698-3388 if you want to get on the agenda otherwise we shall see you all there!

*Free Admission to the State Fair in Sioux Falls. South Dakota is dedicating Thursday, August 29, as a "salute to veterans." The day affords all veterans free gate admission and a day of recognition. Governor Noem and I will be sharing our messages with veterans on the Freedom Stage at 10:30 am and will also be available to visit with our great heroes after the program.

*CEMETERY: Gabe spent the week up there mowing keeping the grounds in tip top shape per regulation. If you want to volunteer and help him contact him at 605-419-1007. He does have odd jobs that can be done where you're not running equipment.

*VETERANS DAY POW WOW: 2019 DATES ARE Nov 8-10, 2019. They held the first committee meeting this week. I will be handling the Princess Contest again and would like to reach out to those Veteran Judges that helped last year to again be part of this wonderful event. We will also be securing bids for the crown. There is limited funds for the crown and please watch the Sota for notices in the near future. Jaia Bursheim is our outgoing 2018-2019 Veterans Princess and will be crowning the 2019-2020 Veterans Day Princess. We are asking that any previous/past Veterans Princess please attend the crowning and dance in our winner of 2019-2020 Veterans Princess. The Pow Wow Committee consists of: Danielle DeCoteau - (605) 467-1206, Jessie Chanku - (605) 956-0197, Delano Renville - (605) 268-0354, Mike Greeley - (605) 924-1214,DeWayne Boyd - (605) 924-1231, Clayton Ellingson - (605) 924-1266

*War on Drugs: Thanks to Delano Renville, USMC, American Legion for holding down the fort at the Veterans table during the wonderful event that Alana Littlebird hosted and thanks to her for organizing this event to help the community. Rick Renville, son of American Legion was our guest speaker sharing his story of recovery and continues to reach out and help many others. Veterans are still receiving names of people selling, keep sending in the names. It takes a village and it this case it sure does, there is power in numbers.

*Transporting Veterans: Last week we had a couple of full days of transporting Veterans to their appointments

*VETERANS: Please make sure if you have a family member serving active duty or deployed you send me their name,. contact info to: GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov chances are they are on the roster but we want to make sure. Also, we have a update of info form if you'd like one email me at the same email address as above.

*TVSO ANNUAL BENEFITS SCHOOL: August 26-30th, 2019 in Pierre, SD. We are required to attend this annual training all T/VSOs in the State attend this annual school. Roberts County VSO will also be attending the school - Gabe Fischer will be the one helping and assisting Veterans that last week of August. It comes around much to fast every year. We are required to do the school take the test as well as attending 4 mini conferences throughout the year.

*ASVAB: For those students interested in entering the US Armed Forces, it's never to early to practice the ASVAB entrance exam, start now! There are many FREE tests you can practice with online, google ASVAB and the link will take you to the tests. The higher the score the better you can get the MOS that you desire. IF you don't have a computer come on in we have an extra one you can use here and practice.

*NADL APPLICATION POSTED ON THE SWO WEBSITE: Thanks to Dawn Drum for posting the NADL application to the VSO Website. Here is the link: www.swo-nsn.gov and go to Departments: Human Services and scroll down to Veterans Service Office, open up and in that body will be the NADL App 2019.

NUMBERS TO REMEMBER: CRISIS LINE: 1-800-273-8255 PRESS 1

GERI OPSAL, TVSO 605-268-0502

GABE FISCHER, TVSO ASST 605-410-1007

DOC WANNA: 605-237-2168 - KIT FOX COMMANDER

CLAYTON ELLINGSON:605-924-1266

AMERICAN LEGION POST 314 COMMANDER

JUSTIN CHANKU: 947-3441, DESERT ERA COMMANDER

Site clean-up nearing completion

Delayed by excessive rain, Tim LaBatte's construction crew has finished breaking apart and removing concrete from the old Tiospa Zina Tribal School grounds at Agency Village.

Final clean-up and leveling is underway.

Plans are to use the site for the Tribe's new detention/jail facility.

The Tribe is working with the BIA to start the project, and Chairman White is working with the SD Congressional delegates to secure additional funds – for both the jail project and a new long term treatment facility.

Sisseton Hwy 10 construction update

Update as of 8/15/2019

Construction has been moving along despite the delays caused by this summer's rainy weather. The original completion date for the entire Highway 10 project was October 25, 2019. Crews are still optimistic that this deadline could be met.

The roundabout on the East side of Sisseton (by Rosalie's) is nearing completion and should be finished by Tuesday. August 20th (mid day August 21st if there are weather delays). At that point, the roundabout will be opened to traffic and the detour north of town will no longer be in force. Construction crews will then start moving west to finish the curb and gutters. They estimate that they will be ready to begin roundabout construction on the west end of Sisseton in about one month. That project will begin another detour north of Sisseton.

(Update provided by Sara McGregor-Okroi.)

Sisseton observes National Night Out

Photos by Alpha Jo DuMarce

By Sara McGregor-Okroi

National Night Out is an annual event celebrated nationwide each year on the first Tuesday in August.

Purpose of the event is to promote drug prevention awareness, as well as police-community partnership and bring neighborhoods together to create safer, more caring places to live.

National Night Out provides a great opportunity to bring law enforcement and community members together under positive circumstances to celebrate what makes communities great.

This year's National Night Out celebration was planned and hosted by the Roberts County Sheriff's Office, SWO Law Enforcement and the Sisseton Police Department.

The event took place on August 6th at the SWO Memorial Park.

Over 300 community members attended and enjoyed the festivities.

Other participants in the event included: South Dakota National Guard, Sisseton Fire Department, Roberts County Emergency Management, Grant-Roberts Ambulance, South Dakota Highway Patrol, South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks, and SWO Game, Fish and Parks.

Those who attended enjoyed volleyball and basketball games, baloon animals provided by the Sisseton Memorial Library, train rides from Terry Weinkauf, a raffle for prizes, and a "kids versus cops" water balloon fight ended the evening.

CRST Chairman on ICWA win

By Levi Rickert

Eagle Butte, SD – Cheynne River Sioux Tribe Chairman Harold Frazier released the following statement on the U.S. Fifth Circuit Court's decision on the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA):

It is with great pleasure that I applaud the constitutionality of the Indian Child Welfare Act. On August 9th, 2019 the Court of Appeals overturned a lawsuit filed by multiple states challenging United States law which protects the sanctity of our families.

It is imperative for the United States to honor the laws to protect our children and the begin to heal the damages done to our families. Without these crucial laws our children would be stripped away from our people which would rob them of the chance to learn who they are and from where they come.

I cannot understate the importance of our children staying with our people and continuing to share the life our forefathers shed blood to protect. Family is the core of our people. It is who we are. Affirming this important act allows the governments of both the United States and Tribal nations to honor our ancestors and protect their blood today and for future generations.

Court rules FCC must follow Federal laws

Washington, DC (August 16, 2019) - On Friday, August 9, 2019, the DC Circuit Court of Appeals struck down an order issued by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) that would have exempted construction of the 5G cellular network from laws that protect Indian sacred sites, cultural resources, and the environment.

In the past, wireless cellular service depended on large towers to transmit signals. The latest generation of wireless service, called 5G, would shift wireless service to smaller but far more densely packed wireless facilities. Although they are called "small cells," they are in fact more intrusive and have greater impacts because they are far more numerous. These so-called small cells are also not small, since most of them will require entirely new towers be built to position them. The FCC has exclusive control of this entire cellular spectrum.

In order to accelerate the deployment of 5G—to the benefit of some of the world's wealthiest companies—in March 2018 the FCC issued a new Order that purported to exempt this entire 5G network from review under the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). On the books since the 1960s and early 1970s, these laws are meant to protect all Americans' cultural heritage and environment by ensuring that citizens' voices could be heard in federal government permitting processes, such as those that ordinarily occur when companies wish to build communications infrastructure throughout the United States. In the new Order, the FCC sought to excuse itself from compliance with these federal laws, meaning that private companies could construct new towers and "small cells" on top of irreplaceable historic sites, and even burials, at will without having to secure any federal permission. The FCC's Order was essentially a gift to industry saying 'build anywhere you want, no questions asked.' This makes no sense, especially when the cost of typical small cell NHPA and NEPA reviews is only several hundred dollars. In other words, the impacts are large, the cost is small, and the FCC still tried to write itself a hall pass to avoid complying with federal environmental laws. On Friday, the DC Circuit effectively tore up that 'hall pass.'

The Tribes sued to stop implementation of this new Order, and they prevailed. The D.C. Circuit ruled:

The Commission failed to justify its determination that it is not in the public interest to require review of small cell deployments. We therefore grant the petitions in part because the Order's deregulation of small cells is arbitrary and capricious. The Commission did not adequately address the harms of deregulation or justify its portrayal of those harms as negligible. In light of its mischaracterization of small cells' footprint, the scale of deployment it anticipates, the many expedients already in place for low-impact wireless construction, and the Commission's decades-long history of carefully tailored review, the FCC's characterization of the Order as consistent with its longstanding policy was not "logical and rational."

The case has now been remanded to the FCC and the Tribes look forward to participating in that process.

The Native American Rights Fund and Greenberg Traurig LLP represent the Blackfeet Tribe, Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana, Fort Belknap Indian Community, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Ute Mountain Ute Tribe, and USET (United Southern and Eastern Tribes, Inc.) in the case.

Decision available at https://www.narf.org/nill/documents/20190809fcc-decision.pdf

About Native American Rights Fund (NARF)

Since 1970, the Native American Rights Fund (NARF) has provided legal assistance to Indian tribes, organizations, and individuals nationwide who might otherwise have gone without adequate representation. NARF has successfully asserted and defended the most important rights of Indians and tribes in hundreds of major cases and has achieved significant results in such critical areas as tribal sovereignty, treaty rights, natural resource protection, and Indian education. NARF is a non-profit 501c(3) organization that focuses on applying existing laws and treaties to guarantee that national and state governments live up to their legal obligations.

About Greenberg Traurig, LLP

Greenberg Traurig, LLP is an international, multi-practice law firm with more than 2,100 attorneys serving clients from 41 offices in the United States, Latin America, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East. Greenberg Traurig's American Indian Law Practice handles litigation, mediation, transactional, and governmental affairs matters involving American Indian and Alaska Native tribes and tribal entities in every part of the United States.

StrongHearts Native Helpline: Weaving a braid of support for Native victims of Domestic Violence

Calls to the StrongHearts Native Helpline confirm what Native advocates have known all along - Native victims of domestic violence prefer culturally-appropriate resources from their community

With more than 4,600 calls now received, the StrongHearts Native Helpline (1-844-7NATIVE), an anonymous and confidential domestic violence and dating violence helpline for Native Americans, is fulfilling its purpose serving as the first culturally-appropriate, national helpline for Indian country.

Based on recent information gathered from randomly selected caller stories, at least 80 percent of Native American callers facing intimate partner violence (IPV) preferred to be connected with a Tribal-based and/or culturally-appropriate direct service provider rather than with their non-Native counterparts.

Since the launch of services in March 2017, the StrongHearts Native Helpline has offered callers peer advocacy, emotional support, crisis intervention, and connection to community-based resources based on location and services needed. Referrals for callers include Tribal shelters, Native legal services, sexual assault nurse examiners (SANE), and domestic violence advocates and programs connected to Tribal communities, among many other critical services.

"One of the first questions that many of our callers ask is whether our advocates are Native, and when they hear that the answer is yes, it opens the floodgates," said Lori Jump (Sault Ste. Marie Chippewa), Assistant Director of the StrongHearts Native Helpline. "We hear how thankful they are not to have to explain who they are and how being Native impacts their victimization and survivorship."

With a strong understanding of the importance of Tribal cultures, family, and traditions, Native advocates offer callers culturally-appropriate support, crisis intervention, assistance with safety planning and a connection to Tribal resources as they navigate the difficult barriers to justice and safety. The helpline is available daily from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. CST. Callers reaching out after hours can access the National Domestic Violence Hotline (1-800-799-SAFE) by selecting option 1.

In Spring 2019, StrongHearts increased its available hours to better serve victim-survivors of domestic violence and dating violence, concerned family members and friends, 'helper' programs seeking assistance for clients or patients, as well as people questioning their own abusive behavior. Advocates assist anyone who calls the helpline, which is available free of charge.

Moving the Needle

Since October 1, 2018, StrongHearts call volume increased by 414% compared to the same time in the previous year. This increase is demonstrative of an unmet need for culturally-responsive services for Native victims and survivors of abuse.

"In our outreach to Tribal communities and at national trainings and community events, we heard loud and clear from so many of our relatives how desperately their communities need a shelter or domestic violence program," said Mallory Black (Diné), StrongHearts Communications Manager. "Many people tell us how they wish StrongHearts was around when they needed it and how grateful they are that a helpline now exists to provide a safe, supportive space for our Native people."

The StrongHearts team continues to forge partnerships with Tribal coalitions and Native organizations, such as the Indian Health Service (IHS) and the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board. During October which is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, IHS and StrongHearts collaborated to provide a webinar about StrongHearts services to the IHS Domestic Violence Prevention Initiative (DVPI) grantees. DVPI is a congressionally mandated, nationally coordinated grant and federal award program for Tribes, tribal organizations, Urban Indian organizations, and federal facilities providing violence prevention and treatment services. IHS also published a blog post on its website sharing StrongHearts as a resource and provided a link to the helpline's website and phone number.

In observance of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, StrongHearts partnered with the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board (NPAIHB) in April 2019 to facilitate a webinar on what domestic violence looks like, the signs of relationship abuse, and an overview of services available as a resource for service providers and community members. In June 2019, StrongHearts supported the NPAIHB by helping facilitate a domestic violence training for Tribal service providers and presenting a Native youth-specific dating violence and healthy relationship workshop for their THRIVE annual conference.

This year, StrongHearts is also collaborating on the Tribal Resource Tool (TRT) to provide expertise in populating its directory of services for victims of crime. The Office for Victims of Crime of the U.S. Department of Justice funded the National Center for Victims of Crime to create the TRT, a web-based resource mapping tool that provides a listing of all services available for Native survivors of crime and abuse and identifies resource gaps. The StrongHearts-TRT collaboration provides an administrative assistant position that will simultaneously provide support to both the TRT directory and the StrongHearts referral database. StrongHearts advocates utilize the helpline's referral database to connect callers with Tribally-run resources that can serve their needs in a culturally rooted way.

The Steps Ahead

Data gathered from IPV victim-survivors reaching out to the helpline over the past two years has helped illustrate the great need for culturally-relevant advocacy, education and support services. According to StrongHearts' data from its first 25 months* of operations, the severity of those 547 callers' experiences is telling:

*At least three out of four (77 percent) IPV victim-survivor callers who identified as Native American or Alaska Native reported being enrolled members of a federally-recognized or state-recognized tribe;

*More than four out of five (85 percent) reported emotional abuse; and

*About one-third (33 percent) had experienced financial abuse.

*Based on 17 random excerpts of caller experiences in April 2019, at least four out of five Native victim survivors (80 percent) had left or were in the process of leaving their abuser and needed additional support.

Funded by the Family and Youth Services Bureau, which administers the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA) in the Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, StrongHearts works to support the safety and healing of Native people by upholding the sovereignty of Native nations in protecting their people. Whenever possible, helpline advocates refer callers to resources connected with their Tribal communities and culture.

FVPSA is the primary federal funding stream dedicated to supporting lifesaving services and related programs for victims of domestic violence and their children. While FVPSA legislation is currently up for reauthorization, policymakers could enact legislation that includes an amendment for the permanent inclusion of the StrongHearts Native Helpline this fall.

Native advocates, including organizational efforts by the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center, have made significant steps forward to provide Tribes with the recognition, jurisdiction and resources to protect their communities under FVPSA with each reauthorization. These advances help to support Native victim-survivors of violence in Tribal communities by breaking down barriers to justice and safety.

"Our work at StrongHearts has revealed what we have always known but struggled to prove - there is a serious resource disparity in Indian country," Jump said. "There are huge swaths of land where no resources exist for our people. In many cases, our advocates are left to refer our callers to non-Native programs, and while we are thankful for those programs, they do not always understand the specific barriers our people face. StrongHearts is a critical link supporting the safety and healing of our people and sovereignty of our communities."

*Based on data gathered from calls to the StrongHearts Native Helpline reported March 6, 2017 through April 30, 2019, unless otherwise specified.

Former tribal chairman indicted for embezzlement and theft from an Indian tribal organization and aiding and abetting

Defendants prosecuted as part of the Guardians Project, a federal law enforcement initiative to combat corruption, fraud, and abuse in SD

Sioux Falls, SD – Aug. 9, 2019 – United States Attorney Ron Parsons announced today that a former Crow Creek Sioux Tribe councilmember and chair was indicted by a federal grand jury for embezzlement & theft from an Indian tribal organization, and aiding and abetting.

Brandon Sazue, age 45, of Chamberlain, South Dakota, was indicted on August 6, 2019. He appeared before U.S. Magistrate Judge Mark Moreno on August 9, 2019, and pled not guilty to the Indictment.

According to the Indictment, in about March 2014 through February 2019, Roland Robert Hawk Sr., Francine Maria Middletent, Roxanne Lynette Sazue, Jacquelyn Ernestine Pease, and Brandon Sazue embezzled, stole, willfully misapplied, willfully permitted to misapplied, and converted to their own use over $1,000 of monies, funds, credit, goods, assets, and other property belonging to the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe. During times relevant to each defendant's case, Brandon Sazue served as Chair of the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe, Hawk served as the elected Treasurer of the tribe, Roxanne Sazue was also Chair, and Middletent was an elected councilperson. When not serving in their respective leadership positions, all defendants, except for Brandon Sazue, worked for Hawk in the tribe's finance office. In their respective leadership roles and employment positions, the defendants had the access and opportunity to the funds that were embezzled from the tribe.

The maximum penalties for each defendant upon conviction are as follows: 5 years imprisonment and/or a $250,000 fine; 3 years of supervised release; $100 to the Federal Crime Victims Fund; and restitution may be ordered.

The charges are merely accusations and the defendants are presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty.

The investigation is being conducted by the U.S. Attorney's Office and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Assistant U.S. Attorney Jeremy R. Jehangiri is prosecuting the case.

Hawk Sr. was remanded to the custody of the U.S. Marshals Service. Defendants Pease, Middletent, Roxanne Sauze, and Brandon Sazue were released on bond. A trial date has been set for September 10, 2019.

The case was brought pursuant to the Guardians Project, a federal law enforcement initiative to coordinate efforts between participating agencies, to promote citizen disclosure of public corruption, fraud, and embezzlement involving federal program funds, contracts, and grants, and to hold accountable those who are responsible for adversely affecting those living in South Dakota's Indian country communities. The Guardians Project is another step of federal law enforcement's on-going efforts to increase engagement, coordination, and positive action on behalf of tribal communities. Led by the U.S. Attorney's Office, the participating agencies include: Federal Bureau of Investigation; the Offices of Inspector General for the Departments of Interior, Health and Human Services, Social Security Administration, Agriculture, Transportation, Education, Justice, and Housing and Urban Development; Internal Revenue Service, Criminal Investigation Division; U.S. Postal Inspector Service; U.S. Postal Service, Office of Inspector General.

For additional information about the Guardians Project, please contact the U.S. Attorney's Office at (605) 330-4400. To report a suspected crime, please contact law enforcement at the federal agency's locally listed telephone number.

A Browns Valley celebration 118 years in the making

Browns Valley hosts Standing Buffalo Wacipi

By Jim Smoger

Wheaton Gazette – Wheaton, Minn. – Aug. 13, 2019 – Ericka Fischer smiled when she looked over the pow-wow grounds on Wednesday afternoon in Browns Valley.

In the middle of the action were her two daughters, Amelia Woller, age 8, and Evelyn Fischer, age 5. Both were wearing jingle dresses.

For Amelia, the dance steps seemed as natural to her as hitting a baseball or playing the violin might be for other children.

"It makes me feel really proud, and I'm happy she's so into it," said Ericka. "I'm so happy I can give this to her. She can be out here and feel like she belongs."

The first pow wow in Browns Valley in 118 years was a large success, according to organizers. The opening dance was Tuesday evening followed by two dances on Wednesday afternoon and in the evening.

The audience on Wednesday afternoon was only about half of what it was the night before, but it still circled the grounds in front of the Sam Brown cabin and the school. Cooler weather had arrived the night before, making the conditions ideal for dancers and spectators.

Lloyd Haney, one of the organizers with the Browns Valley Historical Society and the American Legion Post, said he was humbled and blown away how well the event came together.

"I would love to see this happen again," Haney said. "It's nurturing for the community and allows us to grow a little bit."

There were 17 youth dancers and 14 adults dressed in regalia Wednesday afternoon. They were accompanied by 6 drum groups that took turns playing.

Many of the dancers had a story behind their interest in being there.

Ericka was a jingle dress dancer for three years when she was a girl about the same age as Amelia. She stopped dancing after her mother passed away. Her mother made all her regalia.

"It's something I did as a kid and I wished I would have continued," Erika said. "We didn't have any other family members who danced at pow wows, but I decided it was important for them to know where they came from and who they are."

Terry "Pazi" Pashee of Dakota Tipi, Manitoba, was invited to the event by organizers along with tribal elder Randolph Bashe. Pashee works with a Canadian government program called Bright Futures that focuses on the mental health of Native American youth.

Pashee and Bashee are both descendents of the Sisseton-Wahpeton people. The hereditary Chief Standing Buffalo led a group to Manitoba about 150 years ago to escape U.S troops who were chasing them. At the time, native people had a treaty with the British government, and thus were safe in Canada.

Pashee said driving to Brown Valley seemed to incite feelings in him. "When I see the banks of the lake (Traverse), it struck me that our people used to live in this area and our tepees used to be there," Pashee said. "It was kind of like DNA memories."

Taking a break from the dancing near the entrance to the pow wow grounds were Alice Wynde of Browns Valley and Melissa Crowfeather of Sisseton. Wynde wore a bright red dress and her grey hair was neatly pulled back.

She left the Browns Valley area when she was younger and moved to the Twin Cities. At that time, pow-wows weren't held often in Minneapolis.

Her grandchildren have encouraged her to begin dancing. The regalia she wore was made by a granddaughter, Myriah Crowfeather.

"It means a lot to me," Wynde said. "It's a good feeling. It started here."

Wednesday afternoon's pow wow included two tribute dances for veterans. Those honored were Joe Owen, a Vietnam veteran who is a resident of the Browns Valley Health Center, and the family of Winfield Thompson who was a prisoner in the Philippines during World War II.

Venture Communications annual meeting

Highmore, S.D. – Venture Communications Cooperative, a Highmore based communications company, will hold its 62nd annual meeting of the membership on Wednesday, September 11, 2019 at 1:00 p.m. at the Hyde County Memorial Auditorium in Highmore, SD.

A complimentary meal will be served beginning at 11:30 a.m.

Entertainment will be provided by the Company Cowboys.

The meeting will follow at 1:00 p. m.

Items on the agenda for the business meeting include comments from the board president and the general manager of the cooperative.

Door prizes will be handed out during registration and prize drawings including the grand prize drawing for a 65 inch smart TV will be held after the business meeting.

Venture Communications Cooperative members are encouraged to attend.

Venture Communications provides telecommunications services, high definition digital TV services, Gigabit WiFi Internet services and wireless cellular service in Central and Northeast South Dakota.

SD Legislative reports

Report from Dis. 1 Rep. Steven McCleerey

Hello! I hope everyone has been enjoying the warm weather. I wanted to check in with you all and talk about a few more of the things we did in the Legislature when there was still snow on the ground. I was lucky enough to be chosen to sit on the Retirement Laws Committee this year so that I could pass legislation that helps our community of retired folks. We passed three good bills this year that will help our laws make sense and make sure that all of our public servants can qualify for South Dakota Retirement Service Benefits.

HB 1010:

HB 1010 is a bill that creates long standing organizational clarity for the South Dakota Retirement System to help make it more user friendly and well ordered. This was a time consuming project that was made possible by the SDRS having access to an intern who helped with the project. This bill transfers over 200 statutes to a new chapter to order them in a clear way, and over 40 were amended to clarify their style and form. Definitions were also changed to better reflect the current practices, remove certain gender specific language, and to clear up, simplify, and bring the language up to date. The definition of "teacher" was amended to certified school employee because the definition of teacher was outdated. The new definition is more accurate and includes administrators and counselors as well as other school officials. Unnecessary sections were repealed, like a section that had already been accomplished by another piece of legislation. This legislation had nothing to do with the assets or liabilities of the South Dakota Retirement System, this was simply an organizational bill that updated the State's legal lingo. This bill will help make the SDRS more efficient and better able to do their job and helps our laws make more sense. This bill passed through every step of the legislature unanimously without a single vote against it and was signed into law by the Governor.

HB 1011:

This bill was a clean up bill that fixed a number of issues caused during the reorganization. This bill irons out these issues. The South Dakota Retirement System sent a representative to help us break down the fixes in our committee which I summed up.

Section 1 of this bill redefines juvenile correction agents, including those working at juvenile corrections facility. Communities outside of minnehaha have class B employees under the sheriff's office. Because Minnehaha County has a juvenile corrections facility, the sheriff's office employees are not class B agents, this bill fixes that so that the Minnehaha employees are also class B, since they are doing the same work

Section 2 fixes a compliance issue to meet IRS qualification requirements. It adds more detail to permanent long term elected officials of the SD Retirement System.

Currently under the law, if a member leaves covered employment, they get a refund. Section 3 adds a requirement that the application has to be notarized so that the right person gets the refund.

Section 4 makes it so that people can still contribute to their retirement fund while on a leave of absence.

Sections 5, 6, and 10 update the filling of vacancies of the retirement board of trustees so that the filler of the vacancy serves more than 3 years, but less than 4 years. In the past the person filling the vacancy just filled the remainder of the term, this update makes it so that they serve most of, or all of, the term.

Section 7 updates the supplemental pension benefit so that it is funded with pre-tax dollars. This adds additional financial security for those participating in the fund.

Sections 8,11, and 12 make it so that people who participated in past, but stopped, are still included in their retirement plan and can pick up where they left off if they did stop.

Section 9 removes an outdated dollar maximum and adds a reference for maximum contributions.

The person that came and talked to us about this bill also mentioned the fact that this bill is not about money, but about IRS compliance, although, this bill does save about a million bucks by making these changes.

This bill passed easily through the Legislature.

HB 1045:

This bill makes it so that all campus security officers qualify as employees of the South Dakota Board of Regents. Currently, only officers at South Dakota State University and the University of South Dakota qualify as employees under the Board of Regents because their security forces are larger than the other campuses. By making this law apply to all Universities in the State, this bill would make it so that Campus Security officers qualify for the South Dakota Retirement System. This bill makes it so that our State is prepared for the growth of South Dakota Universities and makes it so that the people keeping our kids safe at College have the ability to be a part of the South Dakota Retirement System just like our other public servants. This bill passed unanimously, without a vote against it, through both Chambers in the Legislature.

Thank you for reading. As always, if you have any questions or concerns, feel free to call me at 605-698-7478, or email me at steven.mccleerey@gmail.com

Venture Comm's Randy Houdek elected to SDN Communications Board

Sioux Falls, SD – Aug. 16, 2019 – Highmore based Venture Communications general manager Randy Houdek has been re-elected to serve another term on SDN Communications Board of Managers; additionally, he was re-elected to lead the group on the executive committee as secretary / treasurer.

Venture is among the 17 independent phone companies in South Dakota that own SDN and also serve their own residential and business markets with internet, phone, TV, and other telecommunications services.

SDN Communications' Board of Managers also elected a new president and he's widely known in the South Dakota telecommunications industry: Denny Law, the general manager and CEO of Golden West Telecommunications in Wall.

"I'm excited about the future of SDN, not because of the role of the Board as much as because of how successful SDN has been and how bright the future is," Law said. "That's a credit to both the management as well as the member companies and board members before me."

Sioux Falls-based SDN was formed by independent telephone companies in South Dakota in 1989 and has grown to become the premier regional provider of broadband connectivity, cybersecurity and other services to businesses and institutions. Mark Shlanta has headed SDN as CEO since 2000.

Law has served on SDN's governing board since 2008 and has been the vice president for the last three years. He recently succeeded Bryan Roth as president.

Roth was Board president for 18 years. He's spent the past 20 years as general manager and CEO of TrioTel Communications in Salem and more recently also became the general manager and CEO of Interstate Telecommunications Cooperative in Clear Lake.

Roth did not seek re-election as president when the nine-member Board of Managers reorganized its leadership in July. However, Roth was elected to remain in board leadership as the vice president.

Roth said that after serving as president of SDN for nearly two decades, it was simply time for someone else to take over.

"It was time for a change. Denny will do an excellent job. I look forward to his leadership," Roth said.

Other board members include:

*Mark Benton, Midstate Communications (Kimball)

*Rod Bowar, Kennebec Telephone Company (Kennebec)

*Colle Nash, West River Cooperative Telephone Company (Bison)

*Steve Meyer, Swiftel Communications (Brookings)

*Ross Petrick, Alliance Communications (Garretson)

*Ryan Thompson, Santel Communications (Woonsocket)

Law expects challenges and opportunities in the telecommunications industry to unfold rapidly. He suspects the biggest challenge will be providing the increased bandwidth and services that organizations in commercial, wholesale, medical, educational, and governmental fields want and need.

"It will include everything from bandwidth and capacity to different locations, as well as features and services that probably haven't been invented yet, and that will be layered on top of the broadband connectivity that SDN provides today," Law said.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

America is dying

Words of Floyd Red Crow Westerman

We were told that we would see America come and go.

In a sense America is dying, from within, because they forgot the instructions of how to live on earth.

It's the Hopi belief, it's our belief, that if you are not spiritually connected to the earth, and understand the spiritual reality of how to live on earth, it's likely that you will not make it.

Everything is spiritual, everything has a spirit, everything was brought here by the creator, the one creator.

Some people call him God, some people call him Buddha, some people call him Allah, some people call him other names. We call him Tunkaschila ... Grandfather.

We are here on earth only a few winters, then we go to the spirit world.

The spirit world is more real than most of us believe.

The spirit world is everything.

Over 95% of our body is water.

In order to stay healthy you've got to drink good water.

Water is sacred, air is sacred.

Our DNA is made out of the same DNA as the tree, the tree breathes what we exhale, we need what the tree exhales.

So we have a common destiny with the tree.

We are all from the earth, and when earth, the water, the atmosphere is corrupted then it will create its own reaction.

The mother is reacting.

In the Hopi prophecy they say the storms and floods will become greater.

To me it's not a negative thing to know that there will be great changes.

It's not negative, it's evolution.

When you look at it as evolution, it's time, nothing stays the same.

You should learn how to plant something.

That is the first connection.

You should treat all things as spirit, realize that we are one family.

It's never something like the end.

It's like life, there is no end to life.

Brief editorial comments from the editor's desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

The case of rabies at Agency Village needs to be considered a community health emergency.

If you notice signs and symptoms in people or dogs, contact health officials immediately.

There are already 21 persons being treated for exposure, and officials have not yet tracked down all children who may have been exposed.

See the front page news article.

Check out the Sota online, KXSW, and Facebook for updates.

*****

The positive E. coli tests at Peever Flats are being considered an isolated case.

The drinking water is clean going into and out of the housing area.

Final lab results were not received by press deadline, so watch for updates on the Sota website and over KXSW.

*****

Pidamiya all who are working constructively to help your Tribal government overturn years of secret deals, which have led to the current budget crisis and criminal investigations.

We advise being patient and refusing to believe gayapi being spread especially on Facebook.

Ask what agenda people might have for making inflammatory posts.

Also, ask as we do, why many districts and DCA are calling for removal of select officials, including the Chairman, and termination of legal and business consultants who are valuable assets in the constructive work.

What's going on?

There are Tribal members impeding ongoing investigations.

What's going on?

*****

Watch next week for highlights from the Pya Canku Akan Maujnipi "On the Healing Road We Walk" conference.

The two-day event was held last Friday and Saturday, August 16-17 at SWO Memorial Park.

From the parts we saw, it was a great turnout and sharing of hope and resources for our people.

Our thanks to Shannon White for helping with news coverage of this and other events of importance to our Oyate.

*****

We are sad to report the passing of Pastor Robert Beasely last Friday, August 16, in Indiana.

Funeral services are Tuesday in Greenwood, Indiana.

He was well known for many years in Sisseton not only for his ministerial role but for his involvement in community organizations – working to strengthen the community.

*****

Our thanks to Jim Smoger and the Wheaton Gazette for sharing their article and photos on the Standing Buffalo Wacipi held two weeks ago at Browns Valley.

We appreciate very much your coverage and sharing with our readers.

*****

Elder's meditation:

"If a child hasn't been given spiritual values within the family setting, they have no familiarity with the values that are necessary for the just and peaceful functioning in society."

–Eunice Baumann-Nelson, Ph.D, PENOBSCOT

When we are born, we start with a beautiful empty mind ready to be given our beliefs, attitudes, habits and expectations. Most of our true learning comes from watching the actions of others. As we watch our family or relatives, whatever their actions and values are, so will be the children's values and acts. If we see our families living a just and peaceful way of life, so then will the children. If we see our family shouting, arguing, and hateful, so will it be for the children. The cycle of life – baby, youth, adult and Elder is all connected. If the older ones have good values, it will be connected to the children.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake. - Napoleon Bonaparte (1769 - 1821)

Any fool can tell the truth, but it requires a man of some sense to know how to lie well. - Samuel Butler (1835 - 1902)

I know that there are people who do not love their fellow man, and I hate people like that! - Tom Lehrer (1928 - )

There's no trick to being a humorist when you have the whole government working for you. - Will Rogers (1879 - 1935)

The stupid neither forgive nor forget; the naive forgive and forget; the wise forgive but do not forget. - Thomas Szasz, The Second Sin (1973) "Personal Conduct"

Art is either plagiarism or revolution. - Paul Gauguin (1848 - 1903)

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

CDF

Obituaries –

Funeral notice for Pastor Robert Beasley

Robert E. Beasley, 69, of Greenwood, Indiana, passed away early Friday morning, August 16, 2019, at St. Francis Hospital, Greenwood.

Robert Beasley was a long-time pastor and active member of the Sisseton community.

Family and friends are invited to call from 11:00 a.m. until the time of service at 1:00 p.m. on Tuesday, August 20, 2019, at Miller, Moster, Robbins Funeral Home in Connersville, Indiana.

Pastor Ryan Beasley will officiate.

Burial will follow in Everton Cemetery.

Online condolences may be made at millermosterrobbins.com.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and should be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Open letter to the Oyate

Dear all and to whom it does concern:

Even if my email has been prevented from reaching an swo-nsn.gov email address.

Oh my!

Did any of you read the Sota Tribal newspaper this week?

It's like listening to CNN, Fox News, HLN, ABC, CBS News nothing but government news and politics in there.

I'm not quite sure which is worse the big news of the country or the news of the Sota and Tribal politics.

Good God you all ... what is it any of you need in a political chair much less a title....

I'm grateful I'm an enrolled member and my name only appears in the open letter aspect not one of those Tribal Humans in political disputes.

*Responsible

*Accountable

*Courteous

*Ethics

RACE for what ... some of you can't even be Human much less any other RACE … and this is my Copy Right Registered Trademark.

Laura J. White.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

Staff preparing for a new academic year at ESDS

By Rebecca Dargatz

School Community Director

Toka Nuwan Wayawa Tipi staff have had a busy week preparing for the first day of school on Monday, August 19th!

We have many wonderful staff returning, and also many new staff that we are excited to have in our school family.

Staff are also preparing for some Dakotah language immersion. Not only will our kindergarten classroom be taking part in immersion, but the hallways will also be flowing with Dakotah language.

We are all definitely ready for new school year!

Toksta ake waci'ya' kte.

Bringing in a new school year

By Governor Kristi Noem

August 9, 2019

Can you believe the summer is almost over? The launch of the school year is a little different for my family this year. Booker is beginning his senior year of high school in a few days and will be starting football soon (Go Chargers!). Kassidy and Kennedy are done with college now, so school supply shopping is a much easier task… though I have to admit I miss the days of picking out boxes of crayons and spiral notebooks.

With one in high school and two having gone all the way through our state's public schools, I've been privileged to have a front-row ticket to the continuum of our education system. And from this perspective, one thing is abundantly clear: we do a lot of things right in our South Dakota schools.

Earlier this year, I visited Todd County Middle School in Mission, South Dakota – a school that is doing a lot of things right. Their work has been bolstered in recent years by a state-funded Native American Achievement Grant, a 3-year project to jumpstart improvements in academic outcomes for Native American students and increase student success. The project requires schools to build cultural identities, encourage academic perseverance, and develop student leadership skills. Schools that received these funds are expected to integrate Native American culture and language throughout their curriculum. It's truly a remarkable program.

Because of this grant, Todd County Middle School has implemented several changes that are benefitting both the students and their community. They are incorporating Lakota language and culture into their school, addressing mental health, and meeting students where they are at for both behavior and academic needs.

It is a student-centered environment. Each morning, teachers and students start the day with wellness activities to get kids in the mindset for school. They make sure every student has had something to eat. Teachers collaborate and work together to instruct and support students. In addition to traditional counseling services, they have implemented a recovery room where students can go to work through anxiety or take time to sort through a difficult situation. These rooms are staffed with counselors and have proven successful in curbing violence in the school and helping students be ready to learn in the classroom.

And the results speak for themselves. The 8th grade class I talked with went from 78 acts of violence in their 5th grade year to only four incidents of violence as 8th graders. Academic gains are emerging as well. The students are articulate, confident, and optimistic – a reflection of the atmosphere throughout the school.

I was incredibly impressed by Todd County Middle School, and I know that successes like this are mirrored all over our state. Teachers are working to inspire students and prepare them for the workforce. I'm committed to further expanding opportunities in this arena, too. In a few months, we'll launch our "South Dakota Week of Work," which will expose students to high-demand careers and innovative businesses right here in South Dakota.

So as another summer comes to an end, let me leave our students (and teachers too!) with this back-to-school encouragement: Find things you are passionate about and act on them. Be bold. See the good in people. Focus each day on leaving this world a little better than you found it.

Legals

Request for Bids

Requesting sealed proposals for:

Individual(s) to complete sewing project for 18" dolls to be used in the SWO immersion classrooms at the tribal schools and head start. We are seeking the completion of 16 traditional women's regalia, 16 jingle dresses, 16 fancy shawl dance regalia, 16 sweat dresses, 16 ribbon skirts, 16 tops for the 18 inch dolls:

1.  Some materials (ribbon, thread, fabric, jingles, elastic will be provided)

2.  Must have an approved picture or drawing prior to the construction of the outfit.

3.  Outfits must include appropriate accessories, beadwork, moccasins, and hair pieces.

4.  Each outfit must resemble authentic Dakota regalia.

All sealed bids must include and be submitted by August 23rd, 2019

Applicants must submit the following as a part of their proposal:

1.  Cover letter or Statement of Intent.

2.  Please submit a pictures of previous sewing.

3.  Detailed Scope of Work plan.

4.  Two signed references that highlight the applicant's ability to perform the scope of work.

5.  Itemized budget for work to be completed.

Required Documentation:

1.  Abide by the laws, policies and courts of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation shall govern proposal, contracts and work.

2.  Copy of SWO Business License, if proposal is approved.

3.  Documentation for Indian Preference, if applicable.

4.  Completed W-9 Form, if proposal is chosen.

Contact the Procurement Office for specifications: colletteh@swo-nsn.gov

Please submit sealed proposals to:

SWO Procurement Office

Attn: Collette Haase

PO Box 509

Agency Village, SD 57262

By 4:00 pm on Tuesday, August 23rd , 2019

All interested parties acknowledge that any Agreement executed and performed within the Tribe's exclusive jurisdiction is subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the Tribal Court of Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation. All interested parties acknowledge that they must comply with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Ordinances: TERO Chapter 59 Requirements, Wage Rates & Compliance Plan; Business License Ordinance Chapter 53 and Tax Ordinance Chapter 67; and Chapter 75 Sex Offender Registration.

33-2tc

 

Request for Bids

Requesting sealed proposals for:

A consultant to provide professional services. The consultant shall provide evaluation, assessment, monitoring and guidance for the Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi Project utilizing the approved implementation plan. Review all works, tasks, and plans on a monthly basis. Provide monthly analysis and guidance of monthly tasks and goals. Provide at least one on-site visit.

All sealed bids must include and be submitted by August 20th, 2019:

Applicants must submit the following as a part of their proposal:

1.  Resume of academic and/or professional credentials, experience, and expertise.

2.  Cover letter or Statement of Intent.

3.  Two signed references that highlight the applicant's ability to perform the scope of work.

4.  Itemized budget needed to perform the scope of work, including all fees and reimbursable expenses (such as supplies, travel, and overhead. Contract should not exceed 16,000).

5.  Incremental payment schedule that is based on completion of deliverables delineated in the work plan.

Required Documentation:

1.  Able to pass background checks, if proposal is chosen.

2.  Abide by the laws, policies and courts of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation shall govern proposal, contracts and work.

3.  Copy of SWO Business License, if proposal is approved.

4.  Documentation for Indian Preference, if applicable.

5.  Signed W-9 form, if proposal is chosen.

Contact the Procurement Office for specifications: colletteh@swo-nsn.gov

Please submit sealed proposals to:

SWO Procurement Office

Attn: Collette Haase

PO Box 509

Agency Village, SD 57262

By 4:00 pm on Tuesday, August 20th, 2019

All interested parties acknowledge that any Agreement executed and performed within the Tribe's exclusive jurisdiction is subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the Tribal Court of Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation. All interested parties acknowledge that they must comply with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Ordinances: TERO Chapter 59 Requirements, Wage Rates & Compliance Plan; Business License Ordinance Chapter 53 and Tax Ordinance Chapter 67; and Chapter 75 Sex Offender Registration.

33-2tc

 

Sisseton-Wahpeton Tribal Court news

July 1-31, 2019

1-5 MPH Over Limit

HERRARA, LEXY - Guilty - Fine- $40.00

16-25 MPH Over Limit

DUMARCE, MARYSSA - Guilty - Fine- $25, Cost- $25

6-10 MPH Over Limit

CLOUD, NATHAN - Guilty - Fine- $50.00

Assault and Battery

JOHNSON, NICOLAUS - Guilty - Fine- $75, Costs- $50, LE- $25 10 days, 4 credit, 6 suspended

WARHOL, WYNDE - Guilty - Fine- $100, Costs- $25, LE- $25 (paid directly to Law Enforcement) 30 days in jail, 20 days suspended, 3 days credit, 7 days to serve concurrent with other charges

Assault on Public Official

ROBERTS, BODEAN - Guilty - Fine- $50.00, Costs- $25.00

Child Neglect

BIDDELL, ALICIA - Guilty - Costs- $25.00 30 days in jail, 30 days suspended.

BIDDELL, JALYNN - Guilty - Fine- $50.00, Costs- $25, LE- $25.00

EAGLE, DAWNELLE - Guilty - Fine- $50, Costs- $25 30 days in jail, with 20 days suspended, 10 days to serve with current sentence

Child Restraint Violation

DUMARCE, MARYSSA - Guilty - Fine- $37.50, Costs- $25

RED BUFFALO, JERALD - Guilty - Fine- $37.50, Costs- $25, LE- $25

Disobedience to Lawful Order of Court

ROBERTSON, CAIN - Guilty - 30 days in jail with work release. 4 days credit, 26 to serve

THENNIS, CHRISTOPHER - Guilty - Fine- $50, costs- $25 30 days, 3 and 1/2 credit, 26 and 1/2 to serve

Disorderly Conduct

AMOS, STACY - Guilty - Fine- $75, Cost- $25 10 days, 1/2 credit, 9 and 1/2 suspended

BLUE, GAGE - Guilty - Fine- $75, Costs- $25

BLUE, GAGE - Guilty - Fine- $75, Costs- $25

DEMARRIAS, DYLAN - Guilty - Fine- $75, Costs- $25 30 days, 1/2 day credit, 29 days to serve

ROBERTS, BODEAN - Guilty - Fine- $75.00, Costs- $25.00

WOLCOTT, SIERRA - Guilty - Fine- $75, Costs- $40, LE- $25

Domestic Abuse

ROBERTS, BODEAN - Guilty - Fine- $100.00, Costs- $25.00, LE fee- $ 90 days, 60 suspended, 30 days to serve concurrent with state pen time.

Driving Under the Influence of Alcohol or Drugs

BLUE, GAGE - Guilty - Fine- $100, Costs- $25.00 30 days in jail, 2 days credit, 27 suspended, 1 days to serve

DERBY, RODNEY - Guilty - Fine- $100, Costs- $25 30 days in jail, 27 suspended, 3 to serve

DERBY, RODNEY - Guilty - Fine- $100.00, Costs- $25.00

DOW, BRETT - Guilty - Fine- $100.00. Costs- $25 30 days in jail, 25 suspended, 4 to serve

GREY, WYATT - Guilty - Fine- $100, Costs- $25, LE Fee- $25 (paid direclty to Law Enforcement). 30 days in jail, with 1 and 3/4 credit, 27 suspended, 1 and 1/4 day to serve.

OWENS, WILLIAM - Guilty - Fine- $100, Costs- $25, LE- $25 30 days, 1 credit, 27 suspended, 2 days to serve house arrest or jail.

WARHOL, WYNDE - Guilty - Fine- $100.00, Costs- $25.00, $25.00 (paid directly to Law Enfrocement) 30 days, 5 daysc redit, 25 days suspended

Duty to Stop After Accident

LUFKINS, RAY - Guilty - FINE- $50, COSTS- $25 30 DAYS, 27 SUSPENDED, 3 TO SERVE CONSECUTIVE

Escape

BOYD, RISE - Guilty - Costs- $25, LE- $25 30 days, 20 suspended, 10 days to serve

CADOTTE, ROBERT - Guilty - Fine- $75, Costs- $25, LE- $25 60 days, 50 suspended, 10 to serve consecutive to 31 and 1/2 days currently serving (total 41 and 1/2 days)

LAFONTAINE, BRITNEY - Guilty - Fine- $100, Costs- $25 30 days in jail, 30 days credit for treatment and aftercare SHEPHERD, IVY - Guilty - Fine- $50, Costs- $25, LE- $25 30 days, 20 suspended, 10 days to serve

WARHOL, WYNDE - Guilty - Fine- $100.00, Costs- $25.00, LE- $25 ( paid directly to Law Enforcement) 30 daysin jail with 30 days credit.

Failure to Stop on Signal or Eluding an Officer-1 yr Jail, $5000

YANKTON, BENJAMIN - Guilty - Fine- $50, Costs- $35, LE- $25, Restitution- $500 120 days, 50 credit, 60 suspended, 10 to server

Filing False Report

DERBY, RODNEY - Guilty - Fine- $50, Costs- $25 30 days, 27 suspended, 3 to serve con secutive

GREY, WYATT - Guilty - Fine- $50, Costs- $25 30 days, 27 suspended, 3 to serve consecutive to other charges

Furnishing Alcohol

HEMINGER, TERRY - Guilty - Fine- $100, Costs- $25 30 days, concurrent with Roberts County Time

Hit and Run Accident Resulting in Property Damage

DOW, BRETT - Guilty - Fine- $50.00, Costs- $25.00, Restitution - $153.00 10 days in jail, 10 days suspended.

Ingestion

DERBY, RODNEY - Guilty - Fine- $50, Costs- $25 10 days, 10 suspended

GREY, WYATT - Guilty - Fine- $50, Costs- $25 10 days, 10 suspended

ST JOHN GERMAN, BRANDON - Guilty - Fine- $50.00, Costs- $25.00 10 days in jail, with 10 days suspended, 5 days credit

Injury to Public Property

ROBERTS, BODEAN - Guilty - Restitution - $50.00, Costs- $25.00

Liability of Dog Owner

RONDELL, JOHN - Guilty - Cost- $25, Restitution - $400

Malicious Mischief

DEMARRIAS, DYLAN - Guilty - Restitution - 10 days, 10 suspended

Open Container

BLUE, GAGE - Guilty - Fine- $50, Costs- $25

KEEBLE, JONAS - Guilty - Fine- $50.00, Costs- $25.00, LE- $25.00 ( paid directly to Law Enforcement)

Possession of Drug Paraphernalia

WHITE, KERRI - Guilty - Fine- $50, Costs- $25 10 DAYS, 10 SUSPENDED

Possession of Illicit Drug

WHITE, KERRI - Guilty - Fine- $100, Costs- $50, LE- $25 90 days, 30 credit, 60 suspended

Possession/Distribution of Marijuana

GREY, WYATT - Guilty - Fine- $50, Costs- $25 10 days, 10 suspended

Prohibition Against Driving Without a License

DERBY, RODNEY - Guilty - Fine- $75, Costs- $25

DERBY, RODNEY - Guilty - Fine- $75, Costs- $25

DOW, BRETT - Guilty - Fine- $75.00, Costs- $25.00

FRYER, ALISSA - Guilty - Fine- $50, Costs- $25

KEEBLE, JONAS - Guilty - Fine- $75.00, Costs- $25.00, LE- $25 (to be paid directly to Law Enforcement)

KEEBLE, JONAS - Guilty - Fine- $75.00, Costs- 25.00

KEEBLE, JONAS - Guilty - Fine- $75.00, Costs- $25.00, LE- $25 ( paid directly to Law Enforcement)

OWENS, WILLIAM - Guilty - Fine- $75, Costs- $25 - (Suspended $50 off the fine if he gets license in 30 days)

SPIDER, JERLYN - Guilty - Fine- $75.00, Costs- $25.00

YANKTON, BENJAMIN - Guilty - Fine- $75, Costs- $25

Receiving Stolen Property

YANKTON, BENJAMIN - Guilty - 90 days, 30 suspended, 60 to serve concurrent with state sentence

Reckless Driving-(3 mos in Jail)

DOW, BRETT - Guilty - Fine- $50.00, Costs- $25.00 30 days in jail, 27 suspended, 3 to serve consecutive.

LUFKINS, RAY - Guilty - FINE- $100, COSTS- $25, LE- $25, RESTITUTION FOR VEHICLE TO BE DETERMINED. 30 DAYS, 2 AND 1/2 CREDIT, 25 SUSPENDED, 2 AND 1/2 TO SERVE

Resisting Arrest

EAGLE, DAWNELLE - Guilty - Fine- $50.00, Costs- $25 30 days in jail; concurrent with present sentence

Seat Belt Violation

BIDDELL, JALYNN - Guilty - Fine- $37.50, Costs- $25.00

Theft

SHEPHERD, TRISTAN - Guilty - Restitution - $8.43, Costs- $25, LE- $25 10 days, 10 suspended

Unauthorized Tampering with Motor Vehcile

RICHOTTE, TYRELL - Guilty - Fine- $100, Costs- $25, LE- $25 30 days, 25 suspended, 5 credit -

WARHOL, WYNDE - Guilty - 40 days in jail, 27 days suspended, 13 days to serve concurrent with other charges

YANKTON, BENJAMIN - Guilty - Fine- $50, Costs- $30, LE- $25, Restitution - $920.71 90 days, 30 suspended, 60 to serve concurrent with State time

Underage Consumption

BIDDELL, ALICIA - Guilty - Fine- $100.00, Costs- $25.00 30 days, 4 crdit, 20 suspended, 6 days to serve.

DEUTSCH, KYLEE - Guilty - Fine- $50, CC- $25, LE- $25 10 days in jail, 10 suspended

HOLY BEAR, KOBE - Guilty - Fine- $50, Costs- $25, LE- $25 10 days, 10 suspended

IYARPEYA, DION - Guilty - Fine- $50, Costs- $25, LE- $25 10 days in jail, 10 suspended

IYARPEYA, MEGAN - Guilty - Fine- $50, Costs- $25, LE- $25 10 days in jail, 10 suspended

LUFKINS, RAY - Guilty - 10 days, 10 suspended

LUFKINS, RAY - Guilty - Fine- $50.00, Costs- $25, Le- $25 20 days in jail, 15 suspended, 5 to serve jail or house arrest

Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following position(s):

Program Manager, Tribal Elderly

Domestic Violence Case Manager, Behavioral Health

Chief Judge, Tribal Court

Associate Judge, Tribal Court

Closing Date August 23rd, 2019 @ 04:30PM

Biology Technician, Fish & Wildlife

Cultural and Spiritual Case Manager, Youth & Family TREE

Cook, Head Start

Special Needs/Mental Health Manager, Head Start

Closing Date August 30th, 2019 @ 04:30PM

Teacher (2 positions), Head Start

Bus Driver/Custodian, Head Start

Teacher, Early Head Start

Teacher Aide, Early Head Start

Young Child Wellness Behavioral Specialist (half-time), LAUNCH

In-House Attorney, Tribal Executive Committee

Parole Agent, Department of Parole

Sexual Assault Advocate, Sexual Assault Services

Positions Open Until Filled

Application and job description information can be seen at SWO Human Resources Office or http://www.swo-nsn.gov/contact/employment. Application can be downloaded from "Apply Now" and emailed to ArnoldW@SWO-NSN.GOV or DeniseH@SWO-NSN.GOV. Contact can also be at Arnold Williams 698-8238 or Denise Hill 698-8251 with questions. (Tribal preference will apply).

 

TIOSPA ZINA TRIBAL SCHOOL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

K-5 Special Education Paraprofessional:

Education and/or Experience: AA Degree; or 48 college credits; Paraprofessional Praxis

For additional qualification requirements please notify Jennifer, Human Resources Director.

Immersion Dakota Language Teacher

Education and/or Experience: Certified Teacher

For additional qualification requirements please notify Jennifer, Human Resources Director.

Application Materials can be found at the TZTS Documents link: All applicants are required to complete both the Application and *Background check forms.

Tiospa Zina is an Indian Preference employer.

*All applicants and employees are subject to both 25 U.S.C. 3207: The Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act and the 42 U.S.C. 13041: Crime Control Act

 

DNGE Job Announcement

POSITION: General Manager

PROPERTY: Dakota Magic Casino, Hankinson, ND

REPORTS TO: Chief Executive Officer, Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise

GENERAL FUNCTION:

The General Manager (GM) works with Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise (DNGE) by profitably managing the daily gaming and business operation of the Dakota Magic Casino; more specifically, to provide overall planning and management of profit centers and various support functions, to maximize departmental productivity and meet the growth objectives of the DNGE.

RESPONSIBILITIES/DUTIES:

1.  Overall responsibility for the management of all components of Dakota Magic Casino, including casino operations, food and beverage, convenience store, finance, marketing, maintenance, hotel, convention center, and any other new and supporting departments.

2.  Provides regular reports to the DNGE CEO to assist the development of business objectives, organizational policies and coordination between appropriate departments.

3.  Provides monthly financial and department reports to the DNGE CEO and the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Council.

4.  Analyze activity reports and financial statements to determine progress towards objectives.

5.  Provide oversight of renovation/construction projects.

6.  Ensure adherence to corporate accounting procedures.

7.  Direct and coordinate new or continuing operations to maximize returns on investments and increase productivity.

8.  Other duties and responsibilities as necessary to fulfill the requirements and function of this position.

EDUCATION/EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENTS:

*B.S./B.A. degree in a business related major and ten (10) years of upper management casino experience in a casino

*All applicants must have a minimum of five (5) years experience in a management position in a class III gaming facility over the following departments: Slots, Table Games, Marketing, and Finance

*Professional knowledge of management concepts, principles and practices of the Indian Gaming industry.

*Knowledge of developing and implementing organizational plans.

*Eligible for a Primary Management Official (PMO) Gaming License

*Display strong interpersonal and facilitator skills

*Proven writing and computer skills

CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENT

*Must satisfactorily complete a 90 day probationary period

*Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission

*Must obtain a PMO Gaming License

OTHER:

*Excellent people skills

*Ability to hire, provide direction and develop short/long range plans

*Ability to provide direction and manage department heads and related personnel

*Ability to budget prioritized workload

*Must identify key factors impacting personnel and develop effective programs to maximize performance

*Appropriate dress code

*Able to handle pressure as well as diverse conditions

*Repetitious computer work

SALARY: Negotiable

Closing Date: Open until filled

Send resume to:

Heather Williams

Email: heatherw@dakotamagic.com

 

DNGE JOB DESCRIPTION

POSITION: General Manager

PROPERTY: Dakota Sioux Casino, Watertown, SD

REPORTS TO: Chief Executive Officer, Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise

GENERAL FUNCTION:

The General Manager (GM) works with Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise (DNGE) by profitably managing the daily gaming and business operation of the Dakota Sioux Casino; more specifically, to provide overall planning and management of profit centers and various support functions, to maximize departmental productivity and meet the growth objectives of the DNGE.

RESPONSIBILITIES/DUTIES:

1.  Overall responsibility for the management of all components of Dakota Sioux Casino, including casino operations, food and beverage, convenience store, finance, marketing, maintenance, hotel, and any other new and supporting departments.

2.  Provides regular reports to the DNGE CEO to assist the development of business objectives, organizational policies and coordination between appropriate departments.

3.  Provides monthly financial and department reports to the DNGE CEO and the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Council.

4.  Analyze activity reports and financial statements to determine progress towards objectives.

5.  Provide oversight of renovation/construction projects.

6.  Ensure adherence to corporate accounting procedures.

7.  Direct and coordinate new or continuing operations to maximize returns on investments and increase productivity.

8.  Other duties and responsibilities as necessary to fulfill the requirements and function of this position.

EDUCATION/EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENTS:

*B.S./B.A. degree in a business related major and ten (10) years of upper management casino experience

*All applicants must have a minimum of five (5) years experience in a management position in a class III gaming facility over the following departments: Slots, Table Games, Marketing, and Finance

*Professional knowledge of management concepts, principles and practices of the Indian Gaming industry.

*Knowledge of developing and implementing organizational plans.

*Eligible for a Primary Management Official (PMO) Gaming License

*Display strong interpersonal and facilitator skills

*Proven writing and computer skills

CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENT

*Must satisfactorily complete a 90 day probationary period

*Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission

*Must obtain a PMO Gaming License

OTHER:

*Excellent people skills

*Ability to hire, provide direction and develop short/long range plans

*Ability to provide direction and manage department heads and related personnel

*Ability to budget prioritized workload

*Must identify key factors impacting personnel and develop effective programs to maximize performance

*Appropriate dress code

*Able to handle pressure as well as diverse conditions

*Repetitious computer work

SALARY: Negotiable

Closing Date: Open until filled

Send resume to:

Heather Williams

Email: heatherw@dakotamagic.com

 

DNGE Job Announcement

POSITION: General Manager

PROPERTY: Dakota Connection Bingo & Casino, Sisseton, SD

REPORTS TO: Chief Executive Officer, Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise

GENERAL FUNCTION: The General Manager (GM) works with Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise (DNGE) by profitably managing the daily gaming and business operation of the Dakota Connection Bingo & Casino; more specifically, to provide overall planning and management of profit centers and various support functions, to maximize departmental productivity and meet the growth objectives of the DNGE.

RESPONSIBILITIES/DUTIES:

1.  Overall responsibility for the management of all components of Dakota Connection Bingo & Casino, including casino operations, food and beverage, convenience store, finance, marketing, maintenance, and any other new and supporting departments.

2.  Provides regular reports to the DNGE CEO to assist the development of business objectives, organizational policies and coordination between appropriate departments.

3.  Provides monthly financial and department reports to the DNGE CEO and the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Council.

4.  Analyze activity reports and financial statements to determine progress towards objectives.

5.  Provide oversight of renovation/construction projects.

6.  Ensure adherence to corporate accounting procedures.

7.  Direct and coordinate new or continuing operations to maximize returns on investments and increase productivity.

8.  Other duties and responsibilities as necessary to fulfill the requirements and function of this position.

EDUCATION/EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENTS:

*B.S./B.A. degree in a business related major and five (5) years of upper management casino experience in a casino or an A.A degree with 10 years of upper management casino experience.

*All applicants must have a minimum of five (5) years experience in a management position in a class III gaming facility over the following departments: Slots, Bingo, Marketing, and Finance

*Professional knowledge of management concepts, principles and practices of the Indian Gaming industry.

*Knowledge of developing and implementing organizational plans.

*Eligible for a Primary Management Official (PMO) Gaming License

*Display strong interpersonal and facilitator skills

*Proven writing and computer skills

CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENT

*Must satisfactorily complete a 90 day probationary period

*Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission

*Must obtain a PMO Gaming License

OTHER:

*Excellent people skills

*Ability to hire, provide direction and develop short/long range plans

*Ability to provide direction and manage department heads and related personnel

*Ability to budget prioritized workload

*Must identify key factors impacting personnel and develop effective programs to maximize performance

*Appropriate dress code

*Able to handle pressure as well as diverse conditions

*Repetitious computer work

SALARY: Negotiable

Closing Date: Open until filled

Send resume to:

Heather Williams

Email: heatherw@dakotamagic.com

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Opening

The Administration Department Is Now Accepting Applications For

Position: Associate Manager (Full-Time)

Job Description: Manage casino operations on an assigned shift. Be responsible for all departments, personnel and policies and procedures on assigned shift. In addition, handle customer relations, complimentary and any other management decision necessary for immediate resolution within scope of their authority.

Closing Date: August 29, 2019

Starting Wage: D. O. E.

Required:

High School Diploma/GED.

Extensive knowledge of all areas of gaming.

Supervisory and managerial experience.

Minimum 5 years in Native American gaming.

Required to maintain confidentiality.

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department

16849 102nd Street SE Hankinson ND 58041

For complete Job Description contact James Neconish @ 701-634-3000 ext. 2582

Indian Preference will apply / EEO (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment) Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Opening

The Administration Department Is Now Accepting Applications For

Position: Compliance Manager (Full-Time)

Job Description: Direct & oversee all operations of the Compliance Office. Ensure compliance with governing rules, regulations and company policies. Perform Investigative functions, Monitor Compliance with Title 31/BSA. Ensure compliance with reporting requirements. Perform office work as it directly relates to the general business of compliance with governing rules, regulations, and company policies. Must exercise discretion and independent judgment as it relates to the overall structure of DMC. Compliance systems, investigations, and the evaluation of instances on non-compliance and providing effective recommendations for corrective action.

Closing Date: August 29, 2019

Starting Wage: D. O. E.

Required:

High School Diploma/GED.

2 year Criminal Justice degree or 4 years Collage degree (BA) in Social Science field.

Experience or Training in Security, Law Enforcement, loss preventions and/or other related field.

Knowledge of procedures and legal requirements on developing criminal case through collection and documentation of evidence.

Experience in conducting investigations and documenting the results for criminal proceedings.

Counseling or work relates experience.

Some computer knowledge or equivalent combination of education and experience.

Required to maintain confidentiality.

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department

16849 102nd Street SE Hankinson ND 58041

For complete Job Description contact James Neconish @ 701-634-3000 ext. 2582

Indian Preference will apply / EEO (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment) Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

C-Store Department:

Clerk (Full-Time) where needed

Golf Course Department:

Cook II (Full-Time Seasonal) where needed

Hotel Department:

Room/Laundry Attendant (6 Full-Time) 8:00 am to finish

Human Resources Department:

Training Coordinator (Full-Time) Day-occasional evenings

Closing Date: August 23, 2019 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions.

Two identifications documents required upon hire.

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department 16849 102nd Street SE Hankinson ND 58041 For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment) Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

ADMINISTRATION: COMPLIANCE-SAFTEY OFFICER (1 Full-Time)

GENERAL FUNCTION: Monitor casino activities, observes customers, employees, transactions and reporting requirements to ensure compliance with Federal, State and Tribal gaming laws and regulations. Reports deficiencies or violations and conducts follow-up to ensure implementation of appropriate corrective action. This position requires the understanding of internal control policy and procedures. When required will investigate any and all issues that arise.

Safety Officer shall be responsible to inspect property to ensure safety compliance with Tribal, State and Federal regulations. Implements employee safety and risk management programs.

REQUIREMENTS: AA degree in Criminal Justice is preferred and/or 3-5 years of security with investigation experience or equivalent. Communication and motivational skills - both verbal and written. Excellent people skills. Excellent computer skill. Excellent math skills. On the job training is ongoing. Knowledge and experience in conducting investigations and documents of such. Experience or training in Security, Law Enforcement, loss prevention and/or other related field. Must obtain Key-Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on August 21, 2019 at 4pm.

Indian Preference will apply / EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

HOTEL: HOUSEKEEPER (1 Full-Time)

GENERAL FUNCTION: Clean rooms, halls, restrooms, elevators, and stairways according to standards.

REQUIREMENTS: 1-3 months related experience. Must have the ability to move or lift up to 25 lbs. Must obtain Non-Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on August 21, 2019 at 4pm.

Indian Preference will apply / EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

FOOD SERVICE: LINE COOK (2 Full-Time)

GENERAL FUNCTION: The purpose for this position is to assist the Cook I, Cook III, and shift supervisor. Safely prepare quality food products for customers and employees. Maintain positive communications to ensure the smooth operation of the department and promote the highest degree of customer satisfaction.

REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. One year of cooking experience in operating fryers, broilers, and grills. Must have the ability to stoop, bend, and stand for long periods of time and lift up to 35 lbs. Must be flexible, must work weekends and holidays. Must obtain Non-Gaming license upon hire.

These positions will close on August 21, 2019 at 4pm.

Indian Preference will apply / EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

FOOD SERVICE:

*BUFFET CASHIER (1 Full-Time) ROTATING SHIFTS

GENERAL FUNCTION: To seat Buffet customers and operate cash register.

REQUIREMENTS: High School Diploma or GED required, total responsibility for cash bank and cash receipts for you shift. Able to stand for prolonged periods of time. Customer courtesy is a must. Must obtain Non-Gaming license upon hire.

*BUFFET WAIT STAFF (3 Full-Time) ROTATING SHIFTS

GENERAL FUNCTION: To greet customers immediately, provide excellent customer

service, and to make sure the customer has a wonderful dining experience.

REQUIREMENTS: High School Diploma or GED required. Customer Service experience. Operate cash register, wait tables and counting money. Must obtain Non-Gaming license upon hire. Stooping, bending, standing for long periods of time, or lifting up to 50lbs. Required to rotate shifts, work holidays and weekends.

This position will close on August 21, 2019 at 4pm.

Indian Preference will apply / EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

PORTER: PORTER (2 Full-Time)

GENERAL FUNCTION: Serves as janitorial/housekeeping staff for guests and casino operations.

REQUIREMENTS: Physical mobility throughout the facility and surrounding grounds. Able to lift 40 to 50 lbs. Must be able to bend, stoop, stand and walk a 8 hour shift. Weekends are mandatory, Must obtain a Non-Gaming License upon hire. Must be 21 years of age.

These positions will close on August 21, 2019 at 4pm.

Indian Preference will apply / EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

LOUNGE: SERVER (1 Full-Time)

GENERAL FUNCTION: Acts as host/hostess for all Lounge and Casino patrons.

REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or GED equivalent. Must be able to stand and/or walk for prolonged periods of time. Able to reach, bend, lift, carry, stoop and wipe. Able to carry up to 20 lbs. on a continual basis. Able to lift 50-60 lbs. Basic math skills is a must for money handling responsibilities. Excellent communication skills. Good organizational skills. Must obtain Non-Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on August 21, 2019 at 4pm.

Indian Preference will apply / EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Position: Restaurant Manager

Qualifications:  Must have a high school diploma/GED, a graduate of Culinary Arts School is preferred. At least 5 years previous supervisory experience, 5 years cooking experience and 3 years food supervisory experience is        required. Applicants should have excellent leadership, organizational and motivational skills, communications skills (oral and written), customer service skills, and comprehensive knowledge of food products and cost of sales, conflict resolution skills, computer program skills, the ability to work closely with other departments and the ability to work   flexible hours. Must have a telephone within 30 days of hire and must be able to obtain a Non-Gaming License upon hire.

Opening Date: Thursday, August 1, 2019

Closing Date: Wednesday, August 21, 2019 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke.

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 
 

 

Return to Sota Home Page