sota on-line masthead

Picture Picks of the Week

Don't miss out -- Click here
View the best pictures from this week's Sota
In full color!

  Obituaries Editorials Editor's column Education
Legals
Trading post
 

Sota Volume 45 Issue No. 39

Anpetu Iyamni, October 1, 2014

Inside this Edition –

Final call: Vote in the 2014 Tribal Primary Election this Tuesday, September 30th

All Oyate are encouraged to register and vote; Your ballots in Tribal and County/State Elections are vitally important

SWO Tribal Chairman Robert Shepherd attends historic meeting on Indigenous rights at the United Nations

October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Oyate ride last Saturday to “Smudge the Rez”

Sota guest editorial: DNGE lobbies on Motion 24

LGBTQ “Two-Spirit” workshop held last week

Henry Red Cloud of Lakota Solar Enterprises shares renewable energy for tribal communities

Watch for election results online on the Sota website and on Facebook; Details next week in your Sota

Deadline for receipt of copy for consideration is 12:00 noon Fridays

Oyate! Last Call to cast your ballot in the 2014 SWO Primary Election

Primary election is this Tuesday, September 30th

October: National Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Submitted by Julie Watts

Wac’ang’a

Domestic violence thrives when we are silent; but if we take a stand and work together, we can end domestic violence. Throughout the month of October, help Wac'ang'a (Sweetgrass) to raise awareness about domestic violence and join in our efforts to end violence.

Wac'ang'a will be displaying the Silent Witnesses at the Woodrow Wilson Keeble Memorial Health Care Center from October 1st, 2014 through October 9th, 2014.

The Silent Witness Exhibit is: Remembering...to honor the women, children and men who were murdered in acts of domestic violence;

*Walk in honor of those in your life that has been impacted by domestic violence.

*Remember those who have lost their lives and celebrate those who have survived.

*Add your voice to the chorus of others speaking out against domestic violence.

*Wear purple -- the color of Domestic Violence Awareness Month -- during the month of October and use this as a way to tell others why ending domestic violence is important to you.

JOIN US IN OUR WALK TO RAISE AWARENESS OCTOBER 10TH, 2014 AT THE ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE LOCATED AT 417 VETERAN'S AVE. SISSETON at 10:00 A.M. 

WALKING WOUNDED

(Dedicated to women and men of abuse)

© 2013 Secret Angel & Diana Rasmussen

 

Verbal abuse, he thinks it's ok;

so destructive, done everyday.

He tears me down, to a point so low.

Fear sets in; I've no place to go.

So much hurt. So much pain.

 

"Walking Wounded", that's my name.

 

Hidden deep, where no one sees,

Scars of abuse, but who'd believe?

Behind closed doors, the truth's exposed.

His attacks, where no one knows.

The wounds are real, but he'd deny.

And I'm too scared, to testify.

So much hurt. So much pain.

 

"Walking Wounded", that's my name.

 

Hidden deep, where no one sees,

Scars of abuse, but who'd believe?

His words are swords, they cut so deep. But God sees all, and He can heal.

So much hurt. So much pain.

 

"Walking Wounded", that's my name.

 

Hidden deep, where no one sees,

Scars of abuse, but who'd believe?

 

Walking wounded, walking wounded, walking wounded.

Smudge the Rez – Prayers for the Oyate and land

Crystal Owen, SWO Meth Prevention Coordinator, and Dakotah Pride staff (Kateri Bird) organized “Smudge the Rez.” With help from many volunteers, including KXSW Announcer Tom Wilson, participants toured the Lake Traverse Reservation last Saturday, September 27th, to burn sage and say prayers. Prayers were offered to free the Oyate from addictions, for healing, and for the land.

LGBTQ, Two-Spirit workshop held last week

Lenny Hayes, SWO Tribal member, returned to the Lake Traverse Reservation last Friday, September 26, 2014, to present at a workshop on LGBTQ/Two Spirit.

What does LGBTQ stand for? What is Gay Pride? What is all this talk about Two-Spirit Society?

Why are some people uncomfortable talking about gay, lesbian, bi-sexual, transgender people? What is homophobia and how do you know if someone has it? Do you know someone who is gay or lesbian?

Do gay, lesbians or bi-sexual individuals make you feel uncomfortable?

These are questions asked of community members invited to attend last week’s workshop.

Lenny shared his story, his knowledge.

From Crystal Owen, organizer, this was a good and “safe place to listen, to talk, to ask questions, to be good relative for each other.”

Special honoring was given to the memory of Dallas Farmer and Jarrod Marks.

Here are several photos courtesy of Crystal Owen and Sierra Wolcott.

US Tribal leaders promote action on Rights of Indigenous Peoples at UN World Conference

SWO Tribal Chairman Robert Shepherd presents at the conference

New York, NY – September 22, 2014 – Thousands of Indigenous leaders from around the world gathered today at the United Nations in New York, City as the UN General Assembly convened a high-level plenary meeting known as the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples (WCIP). During the opening session of the WCIP, the General Assembly adopted an Outcome Document that provides for concrete and action-oriented measures to implement and achieve the objectives of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP). The UNDRIP was approved by the General Assembly in 2007.

A strong delegation of US tribal leaders are attending the World Conference and voiced support for their priorities addressed in the adopted Outcome Document. The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) has joined with a large group of American Indian and Alaska Native tribes and inter-tribal associations to support four priorities that promote implementation of the Declaration, establish status for Indigenous governments at the UN, prevent violence against Indigenous women and children, and protect sacred places and objects.

“Taking the steps called for in the Conference Outcome Document will mean that Indigenous voices will always be here in the UN to call for respect for our rights. Tribes, as Indigenous governments, must be here, working within the UN system to represent our peoples and achieve the promise of the UN Declaration,” said Jefferson Keel, former NCAI President and Lt. Governor of the Chickasaw Nation, who attended the events in New York as a representative for NCAI, the nation’s oldest, largest, and most representative American Indian and Alaska Native organization.

Current NCAI President Brian Cladoosby released a statement, applauding the adoption of the Outcome Document:

“The General Assembly has established pathways for implementation of the UNDRIP, a vital agreement to protect the rights of our peoples. Our tribal governments, together with our brothers and sisters around the world, will need to continue a sustained effort to work with the various UN bodies, including the Human Rights Council and the Secretary General, to ensure that the commitments made today by the UN member countries are fulfilled.”

President Cladoosby also commended the strong delegation of American Indian and Alaska Native women who traveled to the UN this week to advocate for strong and decisive action to combat violence against Native women and girls, “We stand with our sisters in the effort to ensure that all Indigenous women are able to live lives free from violence.”

Statement on the conference

Calls world conference “historic success”

By Robert Coulter

Executive Director

Indian Law Resource Center

We have just returned from a very successful United Nations World Conference on Indigenous Peoples in New York. A good number of our indigenous governments attended, as well as a strong showing of indigenous women’s advocates. Hundreds of other indigenous participants attended from all over the world. Thanks to all your support, hard work, and participation, the outcome document of the World Conference was adopted by consensus as a UN General Assembly Resolution the morning of Monday, September 22 (attached). This is the highest action we can get from the UN and it was supported by all 193 member states of the UN.

Importantly, the outcome document included all four of our proposed action items, including:

· Initiating a process to create a permanent body in the UN system that will monitor and encourage implementation of the Declaration;

· Considering options for a General Assembly decision to make it possible for Indian tribal governments and other indigenous governments to participate in UN meetings on a permanent basis;

· Giving particular attention to the epidemic of violence against indigenous women, including Indian and Alaska Native women in the United States; and

· Measures to respect and protect places sacred to Indian and other indigenous nations and peoples.

The outcome document, among many other things, also calls for a system-wide action plan to be developed for the UN system to bring greater coherence and effectiveness to the UN’s work relating to indigenous peoples. Lt. Governor of the Chickasaw Nation, Jefferson Keel, delivered remarks to the World Conference on behalf of 159 supporting indigenous nations and organizations, emphasizing the intent of indigenous governments to rejoin the world community and to realize the commitments made in the outcome document. His statement can be viewed here: www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPqjhbqF4Hw. After many long months of work, it was heartening to see so many states speak in support of our recommendations. United States Ambassador to the UN Human Rights Council, Keith Harper, leading the United States delegation, made many supporting comments toward an implementation body for the UN Declaration and increasing the participation of indigenous peoples and their governments in the UN, as well as the need to empower indigenous women and end violence against them, noting the World Conference is not an end in itself, but a call for more decisive action. This is just the beginning of our work. We now have concrete commitments by the UN and member states that protect and promote the principles of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. In short, we have reached another milestone in the movement to achieve and realize our rights. Yet, we are just as responsible as states to see to it that the commitments in the outcome document are carried into effect in the months to come. We thank you for all of your support and good work, and we look forward to working with you to bring the commitments into reality for our peoples. Please see our website for more information: www.indianlaw.org/worldconference.

On meeting with the SWO Tribal Chairman, Coulter said: “Young leaders like Robert Shepherd getting involved is so encouraging because the torch is ready to be passed and the fight for indigenous rights needs to be continued.”

"From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer"

GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov

Phone 605-698-3388

Veterans Day Pow Wow Nov. 7-9, 2014 at TZTS gym

*Today's thought for the day: "Give thanks today for those who did you wrong. They unknowingly made you strong." - Unknown

*Sunday, September 28, 2014 : Gold Star Mothers & Family's Day: To honor the 2 Mothers whose sons were Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate & gave their life in the service of our country. We honor our late Naomi Renville and family for their son and brother Arden Renville, US Army who lost his life in Vietnam. Also Barbara Anderson and family who is the Mother of CPL Stephen Bentzlin, USMC who died (1 of 11 Marines) during the 1st ground fight of the Gulf war 1/29/91.

*Dr. Clifford Chanku asked to present "POW Letters" a movie at our next UVA meeting so watch for updates. I will let you know so you can come and view the movie.

*VETERANS DAY POW WOW: Will be held at Tiospa Zina Tribal Gym on November 7-8-9, 2014. For information contact: Danielle DeCoteau @ 268-1765. Any questions can be directed to her.

*Annual Women Veterans Conference: October 17, 2014 Sioux Falls, SD. The Keynote Speaker is our very own Donna Williams, USN Veteran. I will have a copy of the flyer in this week's edition for ALL women Veterans who are interested in attending. Please call our office (698-3388) if you want to go. Our Desert Era Honor Guard has been asked to bring a Women's Honor Guard along for this day as well. So our SWO Women Veterans will be representing the Oyate in a big and proud way this day. So please check out the flyer in this week's Sota!

*TAPS: To the family of Gary Neilan, US Army Veteran - rest in peace.

*Understanding the Veterans Choice Card: In August, President Obama signed into law the Veterans Access, Choice and Accountability Act of 2014 in response to mounting concerns of access barriers for veterans seeking health care. As part of this new legislation, all veterans enrolled in the VA health care system as of Aug. 1, 2014 as well as those who served in combat will receive a "Veterans Choice Card," but the department estimates roughly 700,000 will be allowed to use it based on the criteria. As outlined, eligible veterans who experience time and distance delays such as being unable to obtain an appointment at a VA facility within 30 days or those living more than 40 miles from a VA facility would be given the opportunity to use the card and receive care under this program. The guidance states all care must be pre-authorized and coordinated by VA. Any outside care providers must also meet certain requirements, including having a provider agreement with VA and Medicare certification. Certain veterans are also expected to pay private providers any previously established VA co-pays and cost-shares, deductibles and co-pays required by their private insurance private insurance."It's important we educate veterans on this card so they know exactly how it is intended to be used and who is eligible to use it," said Washington Headquarters Executive Director Garry Augustine. "We don't want veterans to get caught in a situation where they are, once again, unable to get the care they need because of technical errors and an overburdened system." VA still has to issue the regulations that will further define this program, how it operates and how veterans can participate. Will provide updates as they become available.

*Dedication: for our Monuments is being planned for Octobet 24, 2014. Please watch the Sota for further developments. We will be inviting all family members of the Congressional Medal of Honor, Code Talker and P.O.W.'s who are acknowledged on the monument.

*Veterans: For those of you that are in the Honor Guards please make sure that your copy of the DD214 is secured here at the TVSO office. At our last UVA meeting it was asked if they were all in per previous UVA Motion. We have a locked fireproof safe and it will be guarded with the utmost confidence.

*Thank you to those of you that stop in on a regular basis. Thanks goes to Gilbert Robertson who dropped off more books for our mini library that he has created with his donations. Thank you!! Remember Veterans stop by our Office which is located in the Post Office building next to job service Office. The address is 205 East Oak Street Suite # 121. Our telephone is 698-3388.

*The best way for find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others. (Ghandi)

*WOMEN VETERANS CALL CENTER: 1-855-VA-WOMEN. Crisis Help Line: 1-800-273-8255, available 24/7, and tell them you are a veteran. All calls are confidential.

*American Legion Post #314- Delano Renville, Commander Cell:# 268-0354 / Vietnam Veterans Kit Fox Society - Dayton Seaboy, Commander Phone:# 698-3299 / Desert Era Veterans - Danielle DeCoteau, Commander Cell#: 268-1765. For GAS ASSISTANCE: Geri Opsal 698-3388

We must look for the opportunity in every difficulty instead of being paralyzed at the thought of the difficulty in every opportunity." -Walter E. Cole, Korean War Veteran.

Have a good week.

Geri Opsal, Tribal VSO.

SWO TVSO remarks at POW Remembrance Ceremony

"WELCOME"

The Governor encouraged all South Dakotans to set aside time on Sept. 19 to honor the POW/MIAs who fought to protect our freedoms and lost theirs, as well as remember those engaged in today's struggle to guard our way of life for future generations. "In their service to our country, former prisoners of war and those missing in action, have sacrificed mightily to maintain the promise of liberty that we hold dear," "Sept. 19 affords us a great opportunity to reaffirm our vow to never forget the courage of our nation's staunchest de-fenders - our former POWs and MIAs." So today, I WELCOME YOU AS we HAVE gathered TO honor our 5 former POW's and their families.

I WANT TO THANK BUTCH FELIX OUR MC WHO HAS BEEN DOING THIS EACH YEAR FOR US AND TO KOREY BERTSCH WHO FIRST BROUGHT THIS TO OUR ATTENTION - THE NATIONAL P.O.W DAY. I ALSO WOULD LIKE TO RECOGNIZE THE HONOR GUARDS WHO ARE HERE. AMERICAN LEGION POST #314, DELANO RENVILLE, COMMANDER; KIT FOX SOCIETY, DAYTON SEABOY, COMMANDER; DESERT ERA VETERANS, DANIELLE DECOTEAU, COMMANDER.

WE LOOK UP TO THIS FLAG - THE POW FLAG: The words "You are not forgotten" are prominently displayed on the black and white flag that honors American prisoners of war (POWs) and those in the military who became missing in action (MIAs). The flag is stark in its simplicity. In the forefront is a silhouette of a man's head, bowed, in front of a guard tower and piece of barbed wire. Aside from the sentence "You are not forgotten" and the acronym "POW MIA," no other words appear on the flag. THIS FLAG WILL ALWAYS HOLD A NEAR AND DEAR MEANING TO EACH AND EVERY ONE OF YOU HERE TODAY AS FAMILY MEMBERS OF OUR P.O.W'S.

Today allows us to Honor the families of the Veterans who are AMONG A SPECIAL CLASS OF PEOPLE FOR THEY HAVE CARRIED THE PAIN OF WHAT THEIR FATHERS ENDURED-1 OF OUR POW'S WAS FROM THE KOREAN WAR; THE OTHER 4 WERE WWII. THE PICTURE ON THE FRONT OF THIS MONUMENT SHOWS A MAP OF THE BATAAN DEATH MARCH. During World War II, after the three-month Battle of Bataan, thousands of American and Filipino soldiers surrendered to Japanese forces on April 9, 1942. What followed next is known as the Bataan Death March, when Japanese soldiers forced the American and Filipino prisoners of war to march 90 miles through the blazing heat of the Philippine jungles 72,000 prisoners made the march, 54,000 survived.

AS ALL OF OUR POW'S ARE NOW DECEASED WE NEVER WILL FULLY COMPREHEND WHAT THEY ENDURED FOR OUR FREEDOM BUT WE DO KNOW THAT THEY ARE ALL HERO'S IN OUR EYES. THEY WERE TRUE AKICITA. FIGHTING FOR OUR COUNTRY AND AS NATIVE AMERICANS IT WAS FOR OUR HOMELAND. WE ALSO RECOGNIZE THAT THE CATEGORY WHO SUFFERS THE MOST IS THE FAMILY OF OUR POW'S. THEY WILL ALWAYS CARRY IN THEIR HEARTS THE BURDEN OF WHAT THEIR LOVED ONES ENDURED AS FORMER POW'S. IT'S A PART OF THEM THEY PROBABLY COULD NEVER FULLY UNDERSTAND OR COMPREHEND BUT KNEW EXISTED AND KNEW IT WAS A VERY PAINFUL MEMORY FOR THEM TO CARRY. WE ARE GRATEFUL EACH OF THEM SOMEHOW MANAGED TO GO ON WITH THEIR LIVES AND HAVE FAMILIES - SO TODAY WE WANT TO HONOR EACH OF YOU FAMILY MEMBERS AS WELL AND TELL YOU HOW GRATEFUL WE ARE THAT YOU ARE HERE TODAY TO SHARE IN THIS DAY OF HONORING OF THESE 5 AKICITA - YOUR FATHERS OR GRANDFATHERS.

WE SALUTE YOU DEDICATED FAMILY MEMBERS WHO CONTINUE TO HONOR OUR P.O.W'S BY SHARING IN THIS DAY WITH US EACH YEAR.

PIDAMAYA.

Geri Opsal, TVSO.

Gov. Daugaard proclaims Gold Star Mother’s and Family’s Day in SD

Pierre, SD – Gov. Dennis Daugaard has signed an Executive Proclamation proclaiming Sunday, Sept. 28, 2014, as "Gold Star Mother's and Family's Day" in South Dakota. In his proclamation, the Governor encourages South Dakotans to become aware of the South Dakota's Gold Star Mothers and their efforts to continue to honor our sons and daughters who paid the ultimate sacrifice for all our freedoms.

Since 1936, the last Sunday in September has been designated by Congress as Gold Star Mother's Day. During World War I, military families would hang a flag in the window of their home - a red bordered banner with one blue star for each family member fighting in the armed forces. They would replace the blue star with a gold star if a family member died in the line of duty.

South Dakota joins in this annual tribute to honor the Gold Star Mothers and Families and will uphold the tradition of displaying the flag of the United States over government buildings on this special day. Gov. Daugaard encourages South Dakotans to display the flag as a public expression of sympathy, gratitude and respect for South Dakota's Gold Star Mothers and Families.

The Gold Star mothers instilled the values that led these brave men and women to service. These families have sacrificed more that most can ever imagine, and yet they still find the courage and strength to comfort other families and support our veterans.

"Families are the support for all of our service members," said Larry Zimmerman, Secretary of the South Dakota Department of Veterans Affairs. "The Gold Star Families have given their all and fill a special place in all of our hearts. Their sacrifice is incomprehensible to us, and their dedication and allegiance is unfailing."

"We are honored that the Honor and Remember Flag will be flying at the Soldiers and Sailors Building in Pierre on Sept. 28," said Zimmerman. "It serves as a reminder of those who made the ultimate sacrifice in service to America."

Funds to prevent Violence Against Women across ND and on MHA Nation

Washington, DC – September 23, 2014 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced a total of more than $650,000 in federal funding to combat and prevent violent crimes against women and children throughout North Dakota and on MHA Nation.

“To truly stop domestic violence, we must continue to support organizations and programs that are committed to combating these violent crimes and providing victims services so women across North Dakotans can feel safe in their homes and communities,” said Heitkamp. “Since I first implemented the Violence Against Women Act in North Dakota as the state’s Attorney General in the 1990s, we’ve come a long way - but there’s still a great deal to do. These funds reaffirm the government’s commitment to providing much needed resources to those on the front line of this issue, in particular in Indian Country where tribes are trying to implement new programs that are a result of last year’s reauthorization of VAWA. This is a top priority for me and I will continue to be a fearless advocate in the fight to end violence against women.”

These funds are distributed as follows:

· Three Affiliated Tribes - $449,480. These funds will be used to help decrease the incidence of violent crimes against Indian women, strengthen the capacity of Indian tribes to exercise their sovereign authority to respond to violent crimes committed against Indian women and to make sure perpetrators of violent crimes against Indian women are held accountable for their criminal behavior.

· North Dakota Council on Abused Women’s Services in Bismarck - $207,840. These funds will be used to support the programs and services offered to victims of domestic abuse and sexual assault. It can be used to conduct meetings or workshops, coordinate activities to fill gaps in service and to coordinate federal, state and/or local law enforcement agencies to develop or enhance strategies to address violent crimes against women.

These grants are authorized through the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Violence Against Women.

Earlier this month, Heitkamp launched her new Strong and Safe Communities Initiative to help address some of the emerging challenges facing the state by bringing a greater focus to keeping North Dakota’s communities strong and families safe in their homes. Local law enforcement from across North Dakota are taking part in Heitkamp’s Strong and Safe Communities Task Force that will focus on making sure local law enforcement have the resources needed to make sure our families and communities are safe. Two key areas the Task Force aims to look into are the rise of domestic violence and the emerging challenges facing Indian Country.

Since joining the Senate, Heitkamp has built on her work as Attorney General to combat domestic violence and stop those who seek to harm adults and children. The first bill she co-sponsored in the Senate was the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), which she then played a key role in pushing through Congress. Heitkamp authored a key provision in VAWA to address the continuing crisis of violence against women in tribal communities. The provision strengthens the existing programs and provides tribal governments with the force they need to prosecute non-Indian perpetrators who commit these crimes on tribal land. It is through the provisions Heitkamp pushed for that these funds were made available to more tribal organizations that work to combat domestic violence.

Art Crawl is coming

Music and Brats at the Thollehaug Commons

Kick-Off the Art Crawl with Music in the Lobby of the Thollehaug Commons, Sisseton, by Steve Eneboe and Brats on the grill Friday, October 3rd. Time: 5:00-6:30 p.m.

It is free will for brats.

The art displays will be Friday, October 3, 4:00-8:00 p.m.; Saturday, October 4, 10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.; and Sunday, October 5, 12:00 noon-3:00 p.m.

Artwork by Sisseton Middle and High School will be on display at the Thollehaug Commons all three days of the Art Crawl.

There are five locations to visit and all are free.

Printed maps of the Crawl will be available at all locations and at Art Crawl on Facebook.

Funding for Artistic, Entrepreneurial program in Turtle Mountain

Washington, DC – September 26, 2014 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced more than $136,000 in federal funding to support local artists in Turtle Mountain in becoming self-sufficient entrepreneurs by helping them develop their craft, gain access to new markets, and protect the intellectual property of their work.

“In order to foster an entrepreneurial spirit in our tribal communities, we must support the integrity of our Native artists,” said Heitkamp. “Funding from our federal government for Turtle Mountain artists who are working to develop their craft, and enter a broader marketplace is a wonderful message to our tribal communities. Over the years, I have championed opportunities for both economic growth as well as programs that maintain tribal identity and integrity. This program will help our artists in Turtle Mountain hone their own creative abilities, while giving them the confidence and the skills they need to protect and market their work.”

These funds are authorized by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services for the Turtle Mountain Tribal Arts Association.

Since joining the Senate, Heitkamp has fought to support Native American families. Recently, Heitkamp’s bipartisan bill to support tribal sovereignty and end unfair treatment of Native tribes by the IRS passed in the U.S. House and Senate and now awaits the President’s signature.

The first bill Heitkamp introduced in the Senate would create a Commission on Native Children. Specifically, the bill would improve the lives of Native American children by examining and addressing high poverty rates, unemployment, child abuse, domestic violence, substance abuse, and few economic opportunities – and make tangible recommendations on how to make sure they are protected and supported. Heitkamp’s bipartisan bill passed a Senate Committee, the final step before the legislation goes to the full Senate.

Heitkamp has been advocating for more investments to help grow the local economies in Indian county. This summer, Turtle Mountain, Sisseton-Wahpeton, Spirit Lake and the Three Affiliated tribes received a total of nearly $200,000 in federal funds to help develop economic regional strategies, grow the local economies, and create jobs.  The Senate Agriculture Subcommittee on Jobs, Rural Economic Growth and Energy Innovation – which Heitkamp chairs– oversees the authorization of these funds. 

Announce $554 million settlement of tribal trust accounting, management lawsuit filed by Navajo Nation

Washington, DC – September 26, 2014 – Attorney General Eric Holder and Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell today announced the settlement of a lawsuit filed by the Navajo Nation regarding the U.S. government’s management of funds and natural resources that it holds in trust for the Navajo Nation. The settlement resolves a long-standing dispute, with some of the claims dating back more than 50 years, and brings to an end protracted litigation that has burdened both the Navajo Nation and the United States.

Secretary Jewell joined Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly, Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs Kevin Washburn, Acting Assistant Attorney General for the Justice Department’s Environment and Natural Resource Division Sam Hirsch, and numerous tribal officials at a commemorative signing ceremony held in Window Rock, Arizona today.

“This settlement reflects our continuing commitment to upholding the federal trust responsibility to Indian Country and to building strong, prosperous and resilient tribal communities,” said Secretary Jewell. “The historic agreement strengthens the government-to-government relationship between the United States and the Navajo Nation, helps restore a positive working relationship with the Nation’s leaders and empowers Navajo communities. The landmark Cobell settlement and resolution of 80 other tribal trust management lawsuits under President Obama has opened a new chapter in federal trust relations with tribes and individual Indian beneficiaries.”

“This historic agreement resolves a longstanding dispute between the United States and the Navajo Nation, including some claims that have been sources of tension for generations,” said Attorney General Holder. “The Department of Justice has made it a top priority to honor and foster the trust relationship between the United States and American Indian tribes. This landmark resolution ends protracted and burdensome litigation. It will provide important resources to the Navajo Nation. And it fairly and honorably resolves a legal conflict over the accounting and management of tribal resources. This demonstrates the Justice Department’s firm commitment to strengthening our partnerships with tribal nations -- so we can expand cooperation, empower sovereign tribes, and keep moving forward together with mutual respect and shared purpose.”

“This historic settlement demonstrates how President Obama and his administration remain deeply committed to the federal trust relationship and improving the United States’ relationship with the tribes,” said Assistant Secretary Kevin K. Washburn. “The Bureau of Indian Affairs will work even more closely with the Navajo Nation through improved cooperation, consultation and communication to ensure proper management and protection of its trust funds and resources.”

The Navajo Nation is the largest Indian tribe in the United States, with over 300,000 members. The Nation has the largest reservation in the United States, encompassing over 27,000 square miles of land in the states of Arizona, New Mexico and Utah. The reservation includes more than 14 million acres of trust lands, which are leased for various productive uses, including farming; grazing; oil, gas, and other mineral development; businesses; rights-of-way; timber harvesting; and housing. The Navajo Nation also owns or has ownership interests in over 100 trust accounts.

Under the agreement, the United States will pay the Navajo Nation $554 million in settlement of its claims. In return, the Navajo Nation will dismiss its current lawsuit and forego further litigation regarding the United States’ historic management or accounting of Navajo funds or resources held in the trust by the United States. The Navajo Nation and the United States will undertake prospectively information-sharing procedures that will lead to improved communication concerning the management of Navajo’s trust funds and resources, and also the parties will abide by alternative dispute resolution procedures to reduce the likelihood of future litigation.

In addition to the negotiations that led to this historic settlement with the Navajo Nation, the Departments of Justice, the Interior, and the Treasury have been diligently engaged in settlement conversations involving other litigating tribes. On April 11, 2012, the United States announced settlements with 41 tribes for about $1 billion. Since that time, the federal government has focused considerable dedicated effort on the remaining tribal trust accounting and trust mismanagement cases and has been able to resolve “breach of trust” claims, without the need for further extended litigation, of almost 40 additional tribes, for over $1.5 billion.

The United States will continue settlement discussions in numerous other cases that are still pending and is committed to resolving the litigating tribes’ trust accounting and trust mismanagement claims in a manner that is fair and reasonable to the tribes and the United States.

Remarks by Acting Assistant Attorney General Sam Hirsch

September 26, 2014

Window Rock, Arizona

I am deeply honored to stand here today with the leaders and members of the Navajo Nation and my colleagues from the Department of the Interior to share in this momentous occasion, one that marks a new era in the enduring trust relationship between the United States and the Navajo Nation.

I want to thank President Ben Shelly, Speaker Pro Tempore [LoRenzo] Bates, Attorney General [D. Harrison] Tsosie, and Trust Mismanagement Litigation Task Force Chair Lorenzo Curley, as well as all the tribal officials and members who have joined us today. Thank you all for welcoming us to your beautiful home. I’m also delighted to be here with Secretary Jewell and Assistant Secretary Washburn, who are leading great efforts to support and strengthen American Indian tribal sovereignty and to fulfill the historic trust responsibility of the United States.

For decades, the United States and Indian tribes have struggled — sometimes side-by-side and sometimes at odds — to resolve, with finality, long-standing problems related to the United States’ management of tribal funds and resources. In that context, the Navajo Nation pursued its own claims for past failures, most recently in a lawsuit raising deficiencies that spanned decades and addressed the entire breadth of the Navajo Nation’s funds and resources. That litigation, unfortunately, stood in the way of furthering the relationship between the United States and the Navajo Nation.

As the novelist James Baldwin once wrote: “People are trapped in history, and history is trapped in them.” In some ways, this statement might characterize the greater part of the historical relationship between the United States and Indian country. But today we come together to move beyond the worst parts of that history and to embrace the future.

Another man, at the founding of the United States, took pen in hand and wrote, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” But for more than a century after these words marked the foundation of this nation and the launch of constitutional democracy in the world, those same words proved empty for American Indians, who watched their numbers, their power, and their traditions erode as the United States expanded from the Atlantic to the Pacific.

As the United States grew, it entered into treaties that exchanged territory for peace and promises to hold in trust the sacred lands and natural resources of American Indians. Until recently, too many of these promises were broken. The trust responsibility that the United States government had assumed was viewed as a burden, as a “problem” to be “solved,” not as a sacred vow to be upheld.

The Navajo people know this narrative all too well, beginning with the “Long Walk” when your ancestors were forced to march away from this beautiful home to an internment camp in the Bosque Redondo. In 1868, once the reservation proved to be a failure, the Dine returned to their homeland under a treaty with the United States. But the cycle of history continued, with promises made and promises broken, and in many ways American Indians became “trapped” in a cycle of distrust, disenfranchisement, and disappointment.

As Attorney General Holder told tribal leaders last November at the White House Tribal Nations Conference: “Far too much of our history has been defined by violence and deprivation. Far too many promises have been broken. Far too many tribes have been told that their lands, religions, cultures, and languages were somehow not theirs to keep. That their rights could be abridged or denied without the guarantee of due process. That they could not vote. And that the only course of action available to them would be to move on, to give up, and — quite simply — to forget.”

But in the last five and a half years, under the leadership of President Obama, Attorney General Holder, and Secretaries Salazar and Jewell, we have seen the dawn of an era of unprecedented partnership, of unparalleled support and respect for tribal sovereignty.

Part of this effort is an attempt to fairly and honorably put some of our history behind us. As the Attorney General said in a statement today, the Department of Justice has made honoring and fostering the trust relationship between the United States and American Indian tribes a top priority. Resolving the claims in these trust accounting and management cases, he said, “strengthens this relationship and allows us to move ahead into a future embodied by mutual respect and partnership.”

In this Administration we are striving to break the cycle of history, to relieve future generations of a dispute that has sorely burdened both of our sovereign governments. We recognize that the journey we are on together constitutes a future, a fortune and fate that we all share, and leads us toward a new day in the government-to-government relationship between the United States and the Navajo Nation. And it does so through a fair and honorable resolution of the Navajo Nation’s claims concerning the federal government’s management of the Nation’s trust funds and resources.

From his first days in office, President Obama has worked to honor the government-to-government relationships between the United States and tribal governments. Truly, this settlement is yet another example of the Administration’s promise to strengthen the ties between the United States and the Navajo Nation. And it reflects my personal commitment to resolving long-standing lawsuits rather than wasting the time and resources of both the United States and Indian tribes in contentious litigation.

By providing fair compensation for the Navajo Nation’s “breach of trust” claims, this settlement will provide substantial tangible benefits to the Navajo Nation and its members. These benefits include monetary relief, as well as commitments by the United States government to improve the way in which it carries out the trust relationship with the Navajo Nation.

This resolution, however, benefits not only the Navajo Nation; it benefits all Americans. By amicably settling these claims on terms that are fair and reasonable, we avoid the expense and drain on federal resources resulting from unnecessary litigation.

There are many people who deserve recognition for achieving such a meaningful resolution:

Most importantly, I am immensely grateful for the hard work of the Navajo Nation, President Shelly, Attorney General Tsosie, Deputy Attorney General Bobroff and the Nation’s outside counsel in engaging with the United States in meaningful mediation of the Nation’s claims and working toward this successful settlement.

Also I would like to thank our colleagues at the Department of the Interior — including Secretary Jewell, Assistant Secretary Washburn, Acting Principal Deputy Solicitor Jack Haugrud, and Acting Director of the Solicitor’s Indian Trust Litigation Division, Ken Dalton, who is also here with us today. The commitment from Interior — at the highest levels — to resolve tribal trust claims expeditiously has been reflected in the hard work and dedication of countless Interior Department staff.

Finally, I would like to thank my predecessor Bob Dreher, the Chief and Deputy Chief of our Natural Resources Section, Lisa Russell and Jim Gette, and the other dedicated attorneys in the Justice Department’s Environment and Natural Resources Division who worked so hard to reach this historic settlement.

This settlement between the United States and the Navajo Nation, while unique, is not unprecedented. From the beginning of this Administration until today, the United States has reached settlements with 80 federally recognized Indian tribes. Yet I am keenly aware that we haven’t concluded our work. So, while we celebrate a significant milestone today, we know that there are other cases still pending that require our continued attention.

Today’s settlement is yet another significant step toward closing a long and difficult chapter of our history, and demonstrates the Administration’s unwavering commitment to moving forward through a more constructive relationship with millions of Native Americans. In that context, I look forward to working with the Navajo Nation and its leaders and members to achieve our broader shared goals.

Thank you very much.

Funding for law enforcement, victims services involving violent crimes against women in ND

Bismarck, ND – September 25, 2014 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced more than $840,000 in federal funding for the North Dakota Department of Health to develop and implement effective, victim-centered law enforcement, prosecution, and court strategies to address violent crimes against women across North Dakota.

“Combatting violence against women is an ‘all-in’ proposition and that means showing our strength and support as a community for victims, as well as for the law enforcement and court strategies that prosecute these crimes,” said Heitkamp. “The road to recovery means consistently recommitting ourselves to saying ‘no’ to violence against women, and I’m proud that we have continued to do that time and time again since I first implemented the original Violence Against Women Act in North Dakota as our state’s Attorney General in 1994. These funds are part of our continued pledge to build an infrastructure of support for the victims of these horrific acts, and help law enforcement and the criminal justice system effectively prosecute such crimes.”

The funds are authorized through the U.S. Department of Justice Office on Violence Against Women’s STOP Violence Against Women Formula Grant.

Earlier this month, Heitkamp launched her new Strong and Safe Communities Initiative to help address some of the emerging challenges facing the state by bringing a greater focus to keeping North Dakota’s communities strong and families safe in their homes. Local law enforcement from across North Dakota are taking part in Heitkamp’s Strong and Safe Communities Task Force that will focus on making sure local law enforcement have the resources needed to make sure our families and communities are safe. Two key areas the Task Force aims to look into are the rise of domestic violence and the emerging challenges facing Indian Country.

Since joining the Senate, Heitkamp has built on her work as Attorney General to combat domestic violence and stop those who seek to harm adults and children. The first bill she co-sponsored in the Senate was the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), which she then played a key role in pushing through Congress. Heitkamp authored a key provision in VAWA to address the continuing crisis of violence against women in tribal communities. The provision strengthens the existing programs and provides tribal governments with the force they need to prosecute non-Indian perpetrators who commit these crimes on tribal land. It is through the provisions pushed by Heitkamp that these funds were made available to more tribal organizations that work to combat domestic violence.

Funding to support Social Services, Research in ND

Bismarck, ND – September 25, 2014 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced more than $860,000 in federal funding to help North Dakota communities and families tackle the challenges they are facing by connecting them with key social services, as well as support scientific research in Fargo.

“Building strong and safe communities in North Dakota begins with making sure folks have access to the services they need to support themselves and their families,” said Heitkamp. “These funds are an important part of that effort, enabling individuals to lead healthy, safe, and productive lives in communities big and small across our state. The funds will also help support the innovative scientific research that’s happening every day in North Dakota, which is an important part of our state’s long-term success.”

The funds will be distributed as follows:

· Standing Rock Sioux Tribe – $300,000. The funds will be used to support the development of a foster care program for tribal homes.

· Mountain Plains Youth Services – $103,093. The funds will be used for the organization’s Street Outreach project in Fargo to proactively connect at-risk youth with important services and information to help address the challenges they’re facing.

Additionally, the Neuropsychiatric Research Institute in Fargo will receive more than $450,000 in federal funding for an ongoing research study:

· Neuropsychiatric Research Institute in Fargo – $457,040. The funds will be used to study psychosocial issues in patients who have undergone bariatric surgery, including their eating behaviors, interpersonal relationships, quality of life, moods, and anxiety levels.

The funds are authorized through the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services.

Earlier this month, Heitkamp launched her new Strong and Safe Communities Initiative to help address some of the emerging challenges facing the state by bringing a greater focus to keeping North Dakota’s communities strong and families safe in their homes. Included in her efforts is a focus on making sure communities have access to quality health services.

$59 Million in loans, grants to increase economic opportunity, rural microenterprises

Huron, SD – September 24, 2014 – USDA Rural Development Acting Under Secretary Doug O'Brien today announced the selection of 85 utilities and development organizations for loans and grants to support rural business activities that will boost economic growth in rural communities.

"These USDA investments capitalize rural small businesses, which allows the owners to expand operations, enter into new markets and increase hiring," O'Brien said. "The investments we are announcing today include financing to development organizations for microlending to very small rural businesses. Funds are also being provided to utilities to pass on to local businesses for development projects. These innovative programs increase economic opportunities in rural areas – a top priority of Secretary Vilsack and President Obama."

O’Brien announced the rural business investments while in Kentucky with Governor Steve Beshear, Congressman Hal Rogers, and the executive board of Shaping Our Appalachian Region (SOAR) to discuss investment opportunities in eastern Kentucky, including Promise Zones and regional SOAR initiatives.

Funds are being provided through the Rural Economic Development Loan and Grant Program (REDLG) and the Rural Microentrepreneur Assistance Program (RMAP). Under the REDLG program, USDA provides zero-interest loans to local utilities which then, in turn, relend the funds to local businesses (ultimate recipients) for projects that will create and retain employment in rural areas. The program funds business start-up or expansion, business incubators, education and training facilities and equipment, community development assistance, health care and other projects that support rural jobs.

Under RMAP, USDA provides loans to Microenterprise Development Organizations (MDOs) that, in turn, make microloans for business start-up or development to eligible microentrepreneurs defined as very small businesses with 10 or fewer employees. Grants are available for MDOs to provide technical assistance and training, particularly in rural areas experiencing persistent poverty or significant outmigration. USDA does not directly provide funds to the ultimate recipients.

The Rural Microentrepreneur Assistance Program was created under the 2008 Farm Bill and recently reauthorized through the 2014 Farm Bill.

In South Dakota:

· Central Electric Cooperative, Inc. based in Mitchell is receiving $300,000 Rural Economic Development Grant to create an economic development revolving loan fund to help Horizon Health Care, Inc., construct a medical clinic in Woonsocket.

· Glacial Lakes Area Development based in Britton is receiving $400,000 RMAP Loan to capitalize a rural microloan revolving loan fund to make microloans to very small businesses in Marshall, Day and Robert Counties.

· GROW South Dakota based in Sisseton is receiving a RMAP Loan of $500,000 and a RMAP Grant of $100,000 to capitalize a rural microloan revolving loan fund to make microloans to very small businesses.

· First Ponca Financial Inc. based in Lincoln and Grand Island, NE is receiving a RMAP Loan of $300,000 and a RMAP Grant of $75,000 to make microloans and provide technical assistance to very small businesses in 12 Nebraska counties, two counties in Iowa and one in South Dakota.

The Rural Economic Development Loan and Grant program directly supports the Obama Administration's Investing in Manufacturing Communities Partnership (IMCP) initiative to boost the manufacturing sector and create well-paying manufacturing jobs, using economic development resources available through existing Federal programs.

Through today’s announcement, USDA is providing over $59 million in loans and grants to 78 organizations in 31 states, including the District of Columbia, to strengthen rural businesses and promote economic development. The funding is contingent upon the recipients meeting the terms of their loan or grant agreements.

President Obama’s historic investments in rural America have made our rural communities stronger. Under his leadership, these investments in housing, community facilities, businesses and infrastructure have empowered rural America to continue leading the way – strengthening America’s economy, small towns and rural communities.

Special Trustee Vincent G. Logan delivers remarks to Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians convention

Washington, DC – September 24, 2014 – Special Trustee Vincent G. Logan, who leads the Department of the Interior’s Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians, this week delivered remarks on financial education, probate reform and trust investment policy at the annual convention of the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians in Pendleton, Oregon.

Special Trustee Logan’s remarks are part of an ongoing dialogue with tribal leaders across Indian Country on issues of concern to their communities and possible options for improvements, including reform initiatives recommended by the Secretary’s Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform.

The text of Special Trustee Logan’s remarks follows:

Good morning, it is a pleasure to be here with you. While I have visited this region of the country before, this marks my first visit since the U.S. Senate confirmed me to become the Special Trustee for American Indians, just 90 days ago. So, thank you for allowing my staff and I the opportunity to join you today.

While my time in this position has been brief, my experience with issues important to Indian Country spans a lifetime. My Osage, or Wah-zha-zhe, name is Hunka-zhe-na-zhe. I am a trust beneficiary - an IIM accountholder - with assets held in trust and administered by the Office of Special Trustee. I have seen over the years how OST has improved processes, finding innovative and efficient ways to accomplish its primary fiduciary responsibility to manage both tribal trust funds and IIM accounts. And, I believe we can make it better still.

I would like to share with you three important areas of focus during my time as the Special Trustee.

First, I believe it is the statutory duty of this office to empower those we serve with lifetime financial skills. Promoting financial education, particularly to Native youth, has been the cornerstone of both my professional and private life, and the scope of this mission expands to a wider audience than ever before.

I have directed my Chief of Staff to reach out to other agencies and oversight bodies involved in consumer financial literacy such as the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA), the Securities & Exchange Commission, the FDIC, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the US Treasury and the Financial Literacy and Education Commission in an effort to gather the best educational material, streamline the data that we provide to the beneficiaries, and build coalitions with potential partners so that OST serves as not only financial education provider to Indian Country, but a central platform for tribes seeking to empower their communities with the kind of lifetime financial knowledge that positively impacts families for generations.

Our Fiduciary Trust Officers will be equipped with the necessary training to not only share what is current and useful in their outreach efforts, but also be trained in the most impactful teaching methods which results in positive financial actions taken sooner rather than later.

As you all know, the claims administrator began mailing the second stage Cobell payments last Monday. Combined, there will be close to $1 billion dollars in payments made to eligible individuals across the country. It is imperative, in my mind, that each of us carefully consider what can be done with these funds as this is a once in a lifetime opportunity. So it is important we carefully consider the options available and how these funds can positively impact the futures of our children.

Financial education is the key to informed decision making and I see my role as the Special Trustee as central to getting the information out to our beneficiaries.

The second area of focus is related to financial education in that we look to educate our beneficiaries about estate planning options - so they have the knowledge to potentially avoid probate. Current law provides that Indian trust assets, regardless of value, are subject to probate administration, which is the process for distributing real and personal property to heirs of those who are deceased. The average cost of a single probate administration, which currently takes an average of more than two years, is in excess of $3,000.

As of September 2014, there are approximately 53,000 Individual Indian Money (IIM) accounts with balances between one cent and one dollar. The aggregate value of these small balance accounts is about $15,000. Under the current probate administrative process, the estimated cost to probate these accounts could be over $159 million. I think it is time we carefully and seriously consider the recommendations made by the Secretary’s Commission on Trust Administration that President Sharp recently chaired.

There are many options available to the rest of the country with regard to probate and estate administration that have not been made available to Indian trust beneficiaries. I believe it is time to explore some of the options mentioned in the Commission’s report that would streamline the probate process and improve the time it takes to distribute assets to heirs. The Secretary recently mentioned that probate reform is important so it will be an important item I will be carefully considering with the full support of the Secretary. In her recent reaffirmation of the Trust Principles, the accompanying paper specifically stated:

In general and with respect to probate, the Department has begun promoting the use of estate planning to avoid time and expense of current formal Federal probate process. Several options the Department is currently exploring to address probate concerns are as follows:

Non-Probate Transfers on Death. Provide Indian trust beneficiaries with ability to execute Payable on Death or Transferable on Death beneficiary designations.

Revocable Trusts/Family Limited Partnerships. Allow common private-sector estate planning entities (e.g., revocable trusts, family limited partnerships, etc.) to hold title to Indian trust assets to: (i) avoid probate; (ii) reduce fractionation; and (iii) provide better lifetime management options.

Gift Deeds. Streamline and simplify the current inter vivos transfer process for Indian trust assets (i.e., gift deeds).

Small Estate Affidavit. Adopt private-sector small estate process to significantly reduce the length, complexity and cost of transferring Indian trust assets at death.

I have assembled a team at OST to work with BIA and the Office of Hearings and Appeals to look into the steps we can take to improve this process and bring the recommendations of the Commission into reality. Obviously, we will not be able to accomplish this without your support and assistance so we will also be reaching out to you for input on ways to effectively implement these recommendations.

Lastly, I am reviewing OST’s Investment Policy. Between tribal trust accounts and IIM accounts OST is responsible for nearly $5 billion. It is important that we constantly look for ways we can create efficiencies, safely get the best return on your money, and fully understand your investment objectives.

We have a fiduciary responsibility, one we take very seriously. I have assigned current staff and recently brought on additional staff dedicated to this very issue. In an era of very low interest rates, fixed income portfolios managers need to look into every possibility. And we are doing just that.

As tribal leaders, I look to you for assistance in these three areas of focus. I need your help in promoting financial education in your communities. Let us work with you to help identify topics specific to your community, and let us provide workshops, classes, and materials. I encourage you to work with the Fiduciary Trust Officer in your area.

I need your help with probate reform efforts. I will be reaching out to you through our Field Operations staff to keep you informed of our efforts and seeking your assistance in contacting elected leaders.

And, I will look to consult with you once we have identified ways we can improve investment performance.

Once again, I thank you for this opportunity to appear before you today. It is my honor to serve as the Special Trustee and it is my honor to serve you.

Thank you.

Funds to fight crime on Turtle Mountain, Spirit Lake Indian Reservations

Washington, DC – September 22, 2014 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced a total of more than $2.7 million in federal funding to combat and prevent crime, including violent crimes against women and children, on the Turtle Mountain and Spirit Lake Indian Reservations.

“We have treaty obligations to the tribes in our country that reflect a promise to help provide for the health and safety of tribal members. Our reservations in North Dakota have suffered for years from higher crime rates, incidents of domestic and sexual violence against women and children, and substance abuse. It’s imperative that we provide our tribes the necessary resources to tackle these issues,” said Heitkamp. “The unprecedented growth and investment in our state continues to change the outlook for the future of citizens across North Dakota, but it’s important to remember that there are certain longstanding issues affecting Indian Country, some exacerbated by the growth, that must be addressed. These funds will assist tribal law enforcement, victims services organizations, and tribal courts and government to help combat the unfortunate rise in crime and violent crime against women, and put in place strategic and comprehensive approaches that will protect tribal members well into the future.”

The grants are authorized by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) and will be distributed as follows:

· Spirit Lake Sioux Tribe - $899,901. These funds will be used to help decrease the incidence of violent crimes against Indian women, strengthen the capacity of Indian tribes to exercise their sovereign authority to respond to violent crimes committed against Indian women and to make sure perpetrators of violent crimes against Indian women are held accountable for their criminal behavior.

· Turtle Mountain Band Of Chippewa Indians - $749,462. These funds we be used to plan, implement, or enhance tribal justice strategies that address crime related to alcohol and substance abuse.

· Spirit Lake Sioux Tribe - $588,810. These funds will be used to develop a new comprehensive and coordinated approach for tribal governments to apply for funding to reduce and prevent crime and victimization.

· Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians - $531,522. These funds, distributed through the DOJ Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, will be used to enhance law enforcement, bolster justice systems, prevent youth substance abuse, address violence against women, service crime victims and support other efforts to combat crime.

Earlier this month, Heitkamp launched her new Strong and Safe Communities Initiative to help address some of the emerging challenges facing the state by bringing a greater focus to keeping North Dakota’s communities strong and families safe in their homes. Heitkamp’s initiative will help focus on addressing the new safety challenges the state faces – such as increases in drug-related crimes, human trafficking, infrastructure stress, the movement of crude by rail through North Dakota towns, and issues in Indian Country.

DOJ awards $87 million to enhance, support tribal justice and safety

Grant program offers financial assistance with Indian Tribes’ Prevention and Law Enforcement efforts, Victim Services and Youth programs

Pendleton, OR – September 22, 2014 – The Department of Justice today announced the awarding of 169 grants to American Indian tribes, Alaska Native villages, tribal consortia and tribal designees. The grants will provide more than $87 million to enhance law enforcement practices and sustain crime prevention and intervention efforts in nine purpose areas including public safety and community policing; justice systems planning; alcohol and substance abuse; corrections and correctional alternatives; violence against women; juvenile justice; and tribal youth programs.

Assistant Attorney General Karol V. Mason for the Office of Justice Programs, Principal Deputy Director Bea Hanson for the Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) and Director Ron Davis for the Office of Community Oriented Policing (COPS) made the announcement while attending the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) Annual Convention hosted by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. ATNI represents 57 northwest tribal governments from Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Northern California, Southeast Alaska, and Western Montana. This year’s announcement includes awards to 22 of the represented tribes at the convention. The awards are made through the department’s Coordinated Tribal Assistance Solicitation (CTAS), a single application for tribal-specific grant programs.

“This work covers every area of public safety in Indian country, from supporting children and youth to protecting and serving native women to the hiring of tribal police officers to strengthening tribal criminal and juvenile justice systems,” said Assistant Attorney General Mason. “The CTAS programs are not only critical to reversing crime in Indian country but are integral strengthening and sustaining healthy communities.”

The safety of American Indian and Alaska Native women is a top priority of OVW, and a clear priority of the entire Department of Justice. With funding from OVW’s Tribal Governments Program, tribes are able to develop and strengthen the tribal justice system’s response to violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women that meets the specific needs of their tribe. This funding has played a significant role in increasing programs and services available to tribes, and has both improved and increased the effectiveness of services provided by tribal court systems. This coordinated approach allows OVW and its sister grant-making components to consider the totality of a tribal community’s overall public safety needs in making award decisions.

“We know from our work across Indian country and elsewhere, that early intervention that interrupts or deters a pattern of escalating violence is the key to avoiding more serious and deadly violence in the future,” said Principal Deputy Director Hanson. “And it is the key to saving more women’s lives and protecting more children from growing up in a home where violence is the norm.”

COPS funding through CTAS improves public safety and enhances community policing in federally recognized tribal jurisdictions. These funds will allow tribal jurisdictions to expand the implementation of community policing and meet the most serious needs of law enforcement. With this funding, 21 tribal agencies will be able to hire or re-hire career law enforcement officers and village public safety officers. Funds awarded today may also be used to procure basic equipment and training to assist in the initiation or enhancement of tribal community policing efforts.

“I am pleased that COPS can help tribal jurisdictions hire more officers to help control crime through community policing,” said Director Davis. “These funds also support tribal jurisdictions by covering the costs of basic equipment and training. It’s a comprehensive package of support that delivers much needed help to tribal communities.”

The department developed CTAS through its Office of Community Oriented Policing, Office of Justice Programs and Office on Violence against Women, and administered the first round of consolidated grants in September 2010. Over the past five years, it has awarded over 1,100 grants totaling more than $530 million.

Information about the consolidated solicitation is available at www.justice.gov/tribal/. A fact sheet on CTAS is available at www.justice.gov/tribal/ctas2014/ctas-factsheet.pdf

Today’s announcement is part of the Justice Department’s ongoing initiative to increase engagement, coordination and action on public safety in tribal communities.

Funding to support UTTC and combat Violence Against Women in Grand Forks

Bismarck, ND – September 22, 2014 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced more than $1 million in federal funding to help prevent and combat violent crimes against women and help Native American students achieve academic success throughout North Dakota.

“There is absolutely no place for domestic violence and crimes against women in our society,” said Heitkamp. “Since implementing the Violence Against Women Act in North Dakota when I was the state’s Attorney General, combatting these crimes has been one of my top priorities. These funds will play a big role in supporting essential programs and efforts in both the Grand Forks and Bismarck communities to help make sure women, including Native American women, and their families are safe. In addition, funds will also help support the long-term success of Native students starting at a young age by giving them the tools they need to thrive.”

The funds are distributed as follows:

· Community Violence Intervention Center in Grand Forks – $450,000. The funds will be used to improve safety for victims of domestic violence and their children through supervised visitation, safe exchange services, and safety planning and referral services for victims. The funds will also be used to respond to training needs of courts and affiliated personnel, improve the court system’s response to victims, develop new guidelines to track domestic violence offenders, and improve the criminal court’s response to offenders who are non-compliant with court-ordered services. The funds are authorized through the U.S. Department of Justice Office on Violence Against Women.

· United Tribes Technical College (UTTC) in Bismarck – $299,872. The funds will be used to provide training, help identify and respond to violent crimes on campus, implement educational programs aimed toward prevention, strengthen victim services, and improve coordination between campus administrators, safety personnel, and local law enforcement. The funds are authorized through the U.S. Department of Justice Office on Violence Against Women.

Additionally, UTTC will receive nearly $300,000 in federal funding for school readiness and preparatory programs:

· United Tribes Technical College (UTTC) in Bismarck – $297,138. The funds will be used for projects that provide educational programs and language skills to prepare Native children for kindergarten. The funds will also be used for college preparatory programs for Native students to help them successfully transition to postsecondary education. The funds are authorized through the U.S. Department of Education.

Earlier this month, Heitkamp launched her new Strong and Safe Communities Initiative to help address some of the emerging challenges facing the state by bringing a greater focus to keeping North Dakota’s communities strong and families safe in their homes. Local law enforcement from across North Dakota are taking part in Heitkamp’s Strong and Safe Communities Task Force that will focus on making sure local law enforcement have the resources needed to make sure our families and communities are safe. Two key areas the Task Force aims to look into are the rise of domestic violence and the emerging challenges facing Indian Country.

Since joining the Senate, Heitkamp has built on her work as Attorney General to combat domestic violence and stop those who seek to harm adults and children. The first bill she co-sponsored in the Senate was the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), which she then played a key role in pushing through Congress. Heitkamp authored a key provision in VAWA to address the continuing crisis of violence against women in tribal communities. The provision strengthens the existing programs and provides tribal governments with the force they need to prosecute non-Indian perpetrators who commit these crimes on tribal land. It is through the provisions Heitkamp pushed for that these funds were made available to more tribal organizations that work to combat domestic violence.

Funds to combat Violence Against Women in the Bakken Region

Bismarck, ND – September 22, 2014 –U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced a total of more than $1.5 million in federal funding to combat and prevent violent crimes against women in western North Dakota, including on MHA Nation.

“Making sure all North Dakotans are safe in their homes and communities should always be our top priority,” said Heitkamp. “The funds will help expand services and programs to combat the rise of domestic violence and sexual abuse of women and children in the Bakken region – an area where the services and support infrastructure has been overwhelmed by the dramatic increase in victims seeking help. I have discussed these issues with the Administration from day one, and have brought numerous top Administration officials out to North Dakota to see firsthand the challenges our state is facing. Because of this, they have committed resources to law enforcement, victim services, treatment programs and the criminal justice system as a whole so that the region can meet these challenges head on. Their understanding and support to help North Dakota maintain our treasured quality of life is greatly appreciated. Combined with my Strong and Safe Communities, which I announced earlier this month, we can work together to make sure we focus on the safety of our families and communities, and these funds will play an important role in helping do that.”

The funds, made possible through the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) Office of Violence Against Women (OVW) Bakken Regional Initiative, are distributed as follows:

Bakken Region Initiative: Enhanced Responses to Victims - The funds are a part of the Bakken Region Initiative: Enhanced Responses to Victims project that supports programs that are designed to address the unique challenges faced by victims, responders, and service providers within the Bakken region. It will be used to identify, assess, and appropriately respond to victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking in the Bakken region. This initiative will establish and expand nonprofit, nongovernmental, state, tribal, territorial, and local government victim services organizations, and create and implement strategies to increase awareness and prevention.

· North Dakota Council on Abused Women’s Services in Bismarck – $606,000.

· Three Affiliated Tribes - $343,391.

· First Nations Women’s Alliance in Devils Lake - $150,000.

Bakken Region Initiative: Tribal Special Assistant U.S. Attorney Initiative – The funds will be used to support cross-designated prosecutors within the Bakken region. It will be used to improve the quality of violence against women cases, better coordinate resources, and improve communication of priorities within and between the various law enforcement agencies working in this area.

· Three Affiliated Tribes – $450,000.

Additionally, more than $6,500 in federal funds will be used to help better understand adolescent behavior and provide proper support for youth in juvenile facilities.

· North Dakota Department of Corrections Division of Juvenile Services - $6,690. These funds will be used to help county juvenile detention facilities to maintain training facility staff to better understand adolescent behavior, including behavior associated with trauma, in order to assist with managing behavior without the use of disciplinary isolation.

Heitkamp announced the $3 million initiative in April 2014 in response to the drastic increase in crime in the Bakken region, including incidents of domestic and sexual violence. Last month, it was announced which organizations will receive the funds.

Since taking office, Heitkamp has continually urged the Administration to place stronger focus on increasing resources for law enforcement the Bakken region, including on the Fort Berthold reservation, to make sure North Dakota communities are safe.

To better support Indian Country, Heitkamp has worked to bring together law enforcement from the Bureau of Indian Affairs and local police forces to discuss jurisdictional issues, such as drugs, crime, and domestic violence, which have increased in the state and on reservations. Heitkamp met with former U.S. Associate Attorney General Tony West in May 2014 to push for law enforcement and judicial improvements in Indian Country, and they spoke about the increase of violence against women in Indian Country.

Heitkamp has long been a vocal advocate to combat domestic violence. As North Dakota’s Attorney General in the 1990s, Heitkamp worked to implement the initial Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) at a state level. Since joining the Senate, Heitkamp has built on her work as Attorney General to combat domestic violence and stop those who seek to harm adults and children. The first bill she co-sponsored and helped pass was the reauthorization of VAWA which she then played a key role in pushing through Congress.

Heitkamp has also been working since last year to bring more federal resources to North Dakota to address the increase in drug crime in the state. In July, Heitkamp brought White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) Acting Director Michael Botticelli in North Dakota to release a new national strategy to combat drug crime and trafficking across the country, with a particular focus on addressing the growing problems in the Bakken Region. Last year, Heitkamp brought the former White House Drug Czar visit to North Dakota to hear from federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement and other officials about the major increase in drug crimes occurring in the oil patch and spreading to other areas of the state. Both visits led to increases in federal support to address drug crime and trafficking in North Dakota.

(Editor’s note: We cannot resist noting that the unholy energy alliance opened up the Bakkens to rape of the land and water resources and also our women and girls. Who benefits)

Weatherization, home improvement funds available through Grow SD

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Weatherization Assistance Program, South Dakota Housing Development Authority (SDHDA) HOME and Housing Opportunity Funds (HOF) , Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB) and our local GROW South Dakota office work together to help reduce the energy burden on low to moderate-income families by installing cost-effective, energy efficiency measures and assisting with needed home repairs. 

GROW South Dakota currently has several home improvement funds available to help make your home more energy efficient or repair such items as roof, siding, plumbing electrical, handicap accessible features, etc.

Current funding sources available through GROW South Dakota include the SDHDA HOME funds, Housing Opportunity Funds, Federal Home Loan Bank and Department of Energy Weatherization Assistance Programs which all have open slots. Service area and income guidelines vary for each of these programs. Slots are limited and will be served on a first come first served basis, so please submit your applications within 45 days to determine your eligibility. For more information or to apply please visit our website at www.growsd.org or call 605-698-7654.

The SDHDA HOME funds income eligibility is limited to 80% Area Median Income (AMI), while the SDHDA HOF funds are limited to 115% AMI. FHLB follows the Mortgage Revenue Bond guidelines of 50%. DOE income eligibility is a household maximum of 200% of poverty.

GROW South Dakota provides home rehabilitation loans without regards to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, handicap or familial status. GROW SOUTH DAKOTA is an Equal Opportunity Lender, Provider, and Employer.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

"What Does Motion 24 Cost Your Casinos"

With the advent of Tribal Council establishing Motion 24, (the District Days paid for by the Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise) the cost may not be readily obvious, but here is what the cost will be to your casinos:

Decreased advertising to customers from outer markets, to draw to Dakota Magic, Dakota Connection and Dakota Sioux.

Reduced number of new slot machines purchased for all three casinos.

Reduced or elimination of the Social Media campaigns that have begun with the DNGE, that has far more than doubled the likes and exposure of the DNGE casinos.

The weekly corporate coin offers will be reduced or eliminated, which draws existing customers back again and again.

No supplementing of the Oyate Tourism, which will stop the exhibiting at the many shows that they participate in throughout the year, again attracting people to the region, especially for hotel and restaurants at the casinos, not including gaming

No advertising in the Regional and Statewide Travel Guides and on their websites, which draws people state and nationwide to the Oyate.

Additional marketing and advertising that attracts the masses to your casinos.

As you can see, the mere $200.00 for a District Day will cost you dearly, and will cause your Tribal Casinos a great deal of trouble in the future.

If this Motion 24 is not rescinded, the future of your casinos will be harmed due to lack of ability to grow. This would be an utter embarrassment as you have come so far, to be stagnated for such a small reward that will be over in less than one day.

I realize many of the Tribal Members, as you are reading this, may feel I have no right to speak this way, but I have toiled for the past 22 months to improve the casino's position in the community, the marketplace and within the States they reside. I feel I have accomplished this with the help of my fellow corporate associates, and felt I was leaving them with a strong foundation. This motion removes the foundation I felt I had built, and is going to cause the further struggles for your casinos and for the soon to arrive CEO that has yet to join the DNGE.

As many heard me say in June of 2013, "If you give DNGE a $1,000, we will give you back $2,500, if you give us $10,000 we will give you $25,000. If you take a million dollars ($1,000,000) away from the DNGE, what can we give back.

Sincerely Yours, Anthony "Bert" Bertino, Corporate Marketing Officer, Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise.

Sota guest editorial –

Sex, Drugs and Blood Money on the Rez

By Ruth Hopkins

As a judge for the Spirit Lake Nation and the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe and a new resident on southwestern North Dakota, I'm witnessing a frightening trend in Indian country. The oil boom is harming Native communities far beyond the Bakken.

Impoverished reservations are flooded with cash thanks to lease money distributed to land beneficiaries on the Fort Berthold Reservation and their descendants living in outlying Native communities.

Western society would tell us that this influx of money should solve all our problems. Native communities in the Dakotas are plagued with extreme poverty and financial support is desperately needed, but on the whole the dirty money spewing from oil wells and flowing onto local reservations is not being invested. It's not being used to build new roads or schools, to start businesses or to fund vital language-revitalization projects. Instead, it's going to individual tribal members-some of whom suffer from mental illness and addiction, or simply never learned how to handle large sums of cash. They're blowing through thousands of dollars a day.

They may be homeless, but they throw parties that end with them being broke after they pass out and get rolled by relatives. A brand-new vehicle is bought and totaled within a week. What could amount to millions received over a short period of time provides no guarantee that the beneficiary's own children will have their basic needs met. Even worse, predatory outsiders happily take advantage of the situation and reservations do not currently have the infrastructure in place to combat the looming, inevitable crime wave. Tribal law enforcement and courts don't hold the necessary jurisdiction to keep out, to incarcerate and to punish these outsiders who bring poison and disease into our traditional homelands.

Everyone knows everyone on the Rez, so newcomers stick out. Elders come to me pleading for help-afraid of these dangerous non-Natives from the city. Easily recognizable, they wear flashy clothing and drive high-end vehicles. They sell illicit drugs in the community and when tribal members owe them money, the drug dealers hunt them down on tribal lands, follow them into tribal businesses, and drive onto trust land to threaten their family members. According to reports, tribal police are hesitant to interact with these men. As a judge I wish I could do more to help, other than to call the Feds. We are sovereign nations and should be able to protect our own.

Some of the outsiders coming onto our reservations are pimps and sex offenders. Sexual violence against Native women is already an epidemic. One Native woman in three is sexually assaulted in her lifetime, and although it's seldom discussed, sex trafficking has been a problem in the Dakotas for years. The oil boom has amplified it. Native women and girls who fall between the cracks are lured by men into sex work, or even sold by male relatives.

Thankfully, Senators Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND) and Jon Tester (D-MT) have called attention to sex trafficking and taken action to combat it, but prevention can't happen soon enough. As camps brought by Big Oil spring up on treaty lands, we'll see more sexual violence perpetrated against Native women. The reauthorized Violence against Women Act, which includes provisions for Natives, will assist tribes in fighting domestic abuse and sex crimes, but it doesn't take full effect until March 7, 2015. Tribes cannot prosecute non-Indian abusers until that date and even then participation is not mandatory.

The Department of Justice's Office on Violence against Women recently announced the release of three million dollars in grants to aid VAWA with Native provisions. That is seed money, but it won't be enough, especially if the Keystone XL pipeline is implemented. South Dakota legislators must step up to the plate for Native women and take a strong stance in support of fighting sex trafficking in their state. Sen. Heitkamp (D-ND), Sen. Tester (D-MT), and Sen. Thune (R-SD) should all be questioned as to how they justify backing the Transcanada Keystone XL pipeline when it's implementation will only make sex trafficking throughout the Northern Plains worse.

Politicians talk out of both sides of their mouths all the time, but that doesn't mean Natives can't call them on it and use our voting power to influence their decisions. As the Bakken oil boom peaks and fades, we will continue to see a rise in crime, in substance abuse, in sex trafficking, and in violence against Native women. We must act now to protect Native communities, and work toward educating tribal members on finance management. Above all, we must remember that no amount of money is worth the lives of our sisters.

 *****

Ruth Hopkins (Sisseton-Wahpeton and Mdewakanton Dakota, Hunkpapa Lakota) is an author, blogger, biologist, activist, judge, columnist for Indian Country Today Media Network, and founding writer with Lastrealindians.com.

(Editor’s note: Pidamiya Ruth for sharing. What is happening in the Bakken Region and on our sister reservations in North Dakota have great impact upon our Oyate on the Lake Traverse Reservation. We appreciate your insight on what is happening … and how inadequate the resources being offered.)

 

Brief editorial comments from the editor’s desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

We are writing our weekly column on the news deadline and encourage everyone to go to your District polling places and cast your ballot. Make your decision, vote for the Oyate members who’ve put their names out there and who you believe will best represent your interests in Tribal Council and in the Executive positions.

Preliminary results will be available online on the Sota website and also posted on Facebook. We are finding beneficial our increased use of this social media.

*****

Please join in the Wac’ang’a observance of National Domestic Violence Awareness Month this October.

See Julie Watts’ front page invitation and schedule of activities.

We also are posting a photo from last week’s Remembrance of Murder Victims on page one.

It will take everyone to make real change in our communities.

*****

We apologize for printing the Sota late last week.

The central plant press went down most of the day on Tuesday.

After mailing we were informed that the pressmen bundled some of the “bad run” papers with our good copies.

So, for any subscribers or those who purchased bad copies from our counter sales sites, we are sorry.

*****

Roberts County Auditor Dawn Sattler has notified our SWO officials that their request to have a satellite voting center for county elections has been denied.

Still, we need everyone to get registered and get out and vote!

Voter registration is underway until Monday, October 20th at 5:00 p.m. to be eligible to vote in the November General Election.

Early and absentee voting is underway now (as of last Friday, September 19th).

You can cast an early ballot at your county courthouse now.

*****

Pidamiya Wac’ang’a and supporters for organizing last week’s observance of the National Day of Remembrance for Murdered Victims in downtown Sisseton.

And also for all who came and supported the "Empty Chair Display" along with a candlelight vigil, offering of prayers, and releasing of balloons.

We must remember these victims, our family members and relatives, and be part of ending the violence in our communities.

*****

Time to get ready for the Holidays: Calling all Arts and Crafts Vendors.

Set up in the SWO Administration Building Rotunda Thursday, October 9th and Thursday, October 23rd from 10 am until 4 pm.

Please contact Ella Robertson in Planning to reserve your table, 605.698-8215.

*****

On Friday, September 26, 2014, the President signed into law:

H.R. 3043, the "Tribal General Welfare Exclusion Act of 2014," which excludes Indian general welfare benefits from gross income in calculating income tax; and establishes a Tribal Advisory Committee to advise the Treasury Department on matters relating to the taxation of Indians.

*****

Our 147th annual SWO Wacipi photo gallery is online.

Check it out on our website:

http://www.earthskyweb.com/news.htm

*****

Please read our Legal notices section.

The Reservation Election Board has posted important information about the process for the primary and general elections. (Primary is being held on Tuesday of this week.)

This week there is a link to election forms available online on the Tribe’s website:

http://www.swo-nsn.gov

Please note that for the first time, there is automated balloting for the Tribe’s elections.

*****

Candidates:

Also note that the Sota is returning to a former policy of ONLY PUBLISHING PAID IN ADVANCE POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENTS.

This policy must be followed because of not being able to collect on outstanding invoices.

Because we do not accept credit cards, checks must be made at the time of ordering a political ad.

Our political ad rate is discounted at $2.50 per column inch in order to make it less painful on candidates’ pocketbooks.

Please specify size desired when ordering:

Examples –

2 columns x 5 inches, for 10 col. inches @ 2.50 = 25.00

3 columns x 11 inches [quarter page] 33 col. inches @ 2.50 = 82.50

6 columns x 11 inches [half page] 66 col. inches @ 2.50 = 165

6 columns x 22 inches [full page] 132 col. inches @ 2.50 = 330

Submit payment to the Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279

Copy may be submitted electronically to earthskyweb@cs.com

We urge you to plan accordingly so that you are not telephoning or messaging at the last minute to have an ad placed without pre-payment.

Pidamiya!

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"Love is something that you can leave behind you when you die. It's that powerful." -- John (Fire) Lame Deer, ROSEBUD LAKOTA

The Old Ones say, love is all anyone needs. Love doesn't go away nor can love be divided. Once you commit an act of love, you'll find it continues. Love is like setting up dominos one behind the other. Once you hit the first domino, it will touch the second one which will touch the third one and so on. Every love act or love thought has an affect on each person as well as touching the whole world. If you live a life filled with love, the results will affect your friends, relatives, and other people, even after you go to the other side. So... Love.

My Creator, let me love. Let me put into action the love dominos.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

Nothing takes the taste out of peanut butter quite like unrequited love. Charles M. Schulz (1922 - 2000), Charlie Brown in "Peanuts"

I hope that when I die, people say about me, 'Boy, that guy sure owed me a lot of money.' Jack Handey (1949 - ), Deep Thoughts

It is a curious thing... that every creed promises a paradise which will be absolutely uninhabitable for anyone of civilized taste. Evelyn Waugh (1903 - 1966)

There are sadistic scientists who hurry to hunt down errors instead of establishing the truth. Marie Curie (1867 - 1934)

There's no secret about success. Did you ever know a successful man who didn't tell you about it? Kin Hubbard (1868 - 1930)

Never confuse movement with action. Ernest Hemingway (1899 - 1961)

Before I got married I had six theories about bringing up children; now I have six children and no theories. John Wilmot

If you don't know where you are going, any road will take you there. Lewis Carroll (1832 - 1898)

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Services for Garry Neilan

Funeral service for Garry Lee Neilan, 50 of Peever, SD was held on Friday afternoon, September 26, 2014 at Ascension Presbyterian Church, Peever, SD with Pastor Don Lykins, Jr. Heminger and CLP Mary Beth Kirk officiating.

Pianist was Billy Kohl and special music by Kim Lawrence and Mary Beth Kirk.

Pallbearers were Waylon Brown, Josh Cunningham, Adrian Williams, Richard Williams, Darrell Renville, and Dave Christensen.

Honorary pallbearers were Rick and Patty Norris, Dave Wallenstein, Robert and Peggy Fisher and family, Lawson Renville, Bobby Kohl, Josh Kohl, Gilbert Kohl, Dennis Owen, Jr., Dave and Greg Stillson, Tom Adams, Robert and Faye Johnston, Gail Williams, Tami Seiber, Jessie Chanku, Russell LeBeau, Will Wilkie, Kevin Wegehaupt, Owen Dean German, Ion Szaktor, The David, Virgil, Duane and Leroy Lewandowski Families, Jon Young, Marsha Renville, Valinda Redwing-White, Art Lewis Sr. and Mike Shaffer.

Burial was in Ascension Presbyterian Cemetery with Military Rites by Desert Era Veterans.

There was a wake service at Big Coulee District Center on Thursday.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD was in charge of arrangements.

Garry Lee Neilan was born to George and Mabel (Amos) Neilan in Sisseton, SD, on December 4, 1963. He grew up in Big Coulee and attended and graduated from Wilmot High School in May 1982. On June 6, 1987, he married Betty Spider at Ascension Presbyterian Church in Big Coulee. To this union, they were blessed with 4 children: Chelsey, Kylee, Dustin, and Dirk, and made their home near Big Coulee for over 22 years. Garry served in the Army National Guard from February 6, 1982 until April 1, 1994. He also served in the U.S. Army from November 17, 1990 until July 25, 1991. He received the Army Service Ribbon, Non-Commissioned Officer Professional Development Ribbon w/Numeral 2, Army Reserve Component Achievement Medal w/2 Oak Leaf Clusters, Army Reserve Component overseas Training Ribbon w/Numeral 4, National Defense Service Medal, Overseas Service Ribbon, Army Achievement Medal, Meritorious Unit Citation Ribbon, Southwest Asia Service Medal w/3 Bronze Stars, Southwest Asia Kuwait Liberation Medal, Armed Forces Reserve Medal, SD National Guard Service Ribbon w/1 Oak Leaf Cluster, Army Lapel Button, Sharpshooter Badge (M16), Driver/Mechanic Badge w/W-Bar, and the Marksmanship Badge (Hand Grenade).

Garry worked hard all of his life, rain or shine, since he was 8 years old. He helped his dad pour concrete as his dad was a union bricklayer, and helped him raise cows, pigs, and hauled hay.

Through the years Garry worked as truck driver for Art Argo & Sons Trucking rural Peever, SD, Plant Manager at Lynch’s Foods in Browns Valley, MN, Huron Dressed Beef in Huron, SD, finish carpenter at Dakota Sioux Casino in Watertown, SD, heavy equipment operator for BIA Roads in Sisseton, SD, Plant Manager for over 11 years at Dakota Western Corporation in Agency Village, SD, Plant Manager at Blackbird, Inc. in Sisseton, SD, and was currently employed as the Facilities Manager at the Woodrow Keeble Health Care Center (Indian Health Service) in Sisseton, SD, for the past 4 years.

Garry was very skilled and knowledgeable in being an electrician, plumber, carpenter, mechanic, welder, rancher, and anything he could put his hands on. He wasn’t afraid to jump right in and learn how to do things, and always did his best because he truly cared.

His ultimate dream was to raise cows and buffalo and build a new house for his family.

He enjoyed working with his brothers and was happiest when working in the fields.

Garry was a very loving husband, father, brother, nephew, cousin, and friend, and thought the world of his kids. They were his pride and joy and he was so proud of them. Garry was the kind of man who would help anyone in need and go out of his way to help. His sense of humor, smile, jokes, pranks, and laugh were contagious and he knew how to make you feel better. Someone recently asked him what the secret was to a long and happy marriage and his reply was, “Keep her laughing”, and that he did. He was a great mentor and advocate to many with his knowledge, skills, and experience and will forever be in our hearts.

Grateful for sharing his life are his wife Betty; children Chelsey, Kylee, Dustin, and Dirk; brothers Jimmy and Kyleen, Ronnie and Karena, Danny and Theresa; aunt/mother Geraldine (Amos) Cole; uncles Charles Amos, Sr. and Harlan Amos; adopted sisters Rhonda Fancher, Patty Williams, and Caril Amos; adopted brothers Waylon Brown, Adrian Williams, and Dennis Owen, Jr.; adopted grandmother Doris Burshiem; mother-in-law Joan Spider; brothers-in-law Albert Spider, Jr. and David and Lynette Spider; sister-in-law Roxanne (Spider) and Keith Henderson; goddaughter Shalyn Spider; and several nieces, nephews, and cousins. Preceding him in death were his parents, 1 infant brother, grandparents Norby and Flora (Phelps) Amos and George and Edith Neilan; aunts Sabina (Amos) Shaffer and LaVelva (Amos) Williams; Uncles Gaylord “John” Amos, Melvin “Bose” Amos, Harold Neilan, and Dale Neilan; and special cousin Mike Williams.

For Garry’s obituary and on-line registry please visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com/.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor’s note: The following comes from the editor’s column and the Sota “deadlines and policies” statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Lakota Solar Enterprises comes to Lake Traverse Reservation

Henry Red Cloud, of Pine Ridge, brought displays of renewable energy products from his company, Lakota Solar Enterprises, to the parking lot of TiWakan Tio Tipi, Agency Village, last Tuesday and Wednesday, September 23-24.

Lakota Solar Enterprises (LSE), located on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota, is one of the nation's first 100% Native American-owned and operated renewable energy companies. Founded in 2006 by Pine Ridge resident Henry Red Cloud, with nonprofit partner Trees, Water & People, Lakota Solar Enterprises offers many services, including:

*Manufacturing of solar air collectors and complete supplemental solar heating systems

*Employment and green jobs training for Native Americans

*Providing affordable heat sources to families living at life-or-death poverty rates

*Reducing the dependency on polluting and destructive sources of energy, with a goal of helping this nation's First Peoples become energy independent

About Henry Red Cloud

Henry Red Cloud is the direct 5th generation descendent of Chief Red Cloud, one of the last Lakota war chiefs and one of the most famous Native Americans in history. Henry was born and raised on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota, home of the Oglala Lakota Nation, where living conditions are extremely difficult.

For more than a decade, Henry has devoted himself to developing his expertise with renewable energy applications that are environmentally sound, economically beneficial, and culturally appropriate. Today, Henry is a twenty-first century Lakota Warrior, bringing green technology and employment to Native American communities. He reminds tribes that they can live sustainably and shows them that by embracing clean, renewable energy applications there is a way to get back to a traditional relationship with Mother Earth. As Henry says, “This is a new way to honor the old ways.”

Henry’s efforts to bring renewable energy to tribal lands have been recognized nationally. In 2009, he was named an Innovative Idea Champion by the Corporation for Enterprise Development (CFED) and had the opportunity to share his work with hundreds of people at the 2009 Innovation Summit in Washington, D.C. Henry has also received special recognition by the Nuclear-Free Future Awards (NFFA), which honor the ongoing work of individuals and initiatives struggling to bring an end to the Nuclear Age.

Social “helper” column dedicated to young generation Oyate –

Wawokiyape

By Sherielle “Shay” DuMarce

Shay, seeing as how it is getting closer to the "WHITE MANS" holiday of THANKSGIVING, I would like all the REAL NATIVES to abstain from celebrating this holiday! Why should we be thankful for the white man stealing our land and murdering our people? Why the [explicit deleted] should we celebrate things such as Easter? That isn’t our ways, see this is why we are failing as a people and culture because we are to busy following the white man’s ways! There isn’t too many of us REAL NATIVES left now days man. These younger generations don’t know nothing cause they want to follow the white man’s ways and traditions.

Signed, A REAL NATIVE!

Dear, "A REAL NATIVE"

Thank you for the letter, though I don't agree with some statements, I will answer this with an opinion letter.

In reference to your statement regarding Thanksgiving I will this, Thanksgiving may have a dark background in history but this is 2014 not the 1600's and the meaning of Thanksgiving has changed in the last 400 years. Yes, bad things have happened in our history as Native Americans but that was in back in 1622. Now, Thanksgiving is a time to celebrate family, the blessings that were bestowed upon you, and the lives you live.

 

What happened in the past can NEVER be changed or forgotten. We can remember our ancestors for their struggles, battles and hardships but to try and cling to a hatred and bitterness over something that happened hundreds of years ago is just wallowing in sorrow that you didn’t personally endure! It is a backing of sorts that is overused when one is complaining or condemning something they don't like. But regardless of that, what gives someone the right to tell others that they should abstain from being thankful? To me that is a preposterous request because not all native people believe that way I'm sorry to inform you.

As to the question you asked about: "Why do you have to celebrate these holidays because they are not yours?" The answer to that is ...YOU DON'T HAVE TO.

You see, there is this great thing that we as human beings possess, called Free-will! Meaning that we can CHOOSE to celebrate these traditions and holidays if that is our belief or we can CHOOSE not to. There is no law or dictating force that says you have to believe, participate in or acknowledge theses ways or beliefs. This is a country of many different religions, origins and cultures whether we like it or not.

In addition, I find the term that you have used throughout this letter to be very offensive not only to me but others who may read this article.

What does that term mean anyways ..."REAL NATIVE"?

I have had to hear this throughout my life from individuals who assumed they were better than others for whatever the reasons may be. I don't find this to be a term of empowerment because of the hate that seems to emanate from it. When I hear it the only thing that comes to mind is … Pretentious, meaning you try to place more importance, talent or culture on something than what is really possessed because in actuality who are you to say whose a "real native" or not? A few questions I have when I hear this term being tossed around are as follows:

What makes one more native then someone else? Who are you or anyone else to say that anyone who celebrates "white holidays" aren’t real natives? Does going to powwows, being traditional, or immersing one’s self in native styles/activities make you "REAL NATIVES"? What is it because I must have missed the booklet on how to be a "REAL NATIVE"

I am just as much native as anyone else, my mother and father are full-blooded, and my great grandmother, who was born 1909, spoke only Dakota up until the day she passed away in December 2000. I say all this because I have been told this before many times because I was raised the "Wasicu" way so to speak. I didn’t go to powwow,s weat or sundances but I don’t judge anyone for their beliefs and traditions. I, along with countless others on the reservation, were brought up believing in God, holidays, going to church and this whole way of life for decades. They have a CHOICE to believe in Christianity or traditional ways and whatever they choose is their choice alone! This is not why we are "failing as a culture" as you put it....its failing because of drugs, gangs, corruption, native on native violence and numerous self-inflicted behaviors, not church and holidays.

In conclusion, we all possess the free will to choose the lives we lead, to choose our religion/beliefs we want to follow. Regardless of the past, this is a new era, a new age and we now have the choice to do as we please. Though you may be at odds with how one chooses to life. but you wouldn’t want someone telling you what to do so always remember the quote:

"To each his own..."

THANK YOU, SHAY.

IHS eligible individuals will be able to claim exemption through tax filing process

Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia M. Burwell announced last week that individuals eligible to receive health care from an Indian Health Service (IHS), tribal, or urban Indian health program provider will be able to claim an exemption from the shared responsibility payment through the tax filing process starting with the 2014 tax year. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and the Treasury Department intend to publish guidance later this year confirming that individuals who are eligible for this exemption may claim it through the tax filing process.

This benefit gives individuals who are eligible to receive services from an Indian health care provider, including the IHS, the same filing option as members of federally recognized tribes (including Alaska Native shareholders). Both groups will continue to have the option of submitting the exemption application through the Health Insurance Marketplace.

Prior to this week's announcement, exemptions were available both to individuals who were members of a federally recognized tribe and to individuals who are eligible to receive services from an Indian health care provider. But members of a tribe were able to claim an exemption through the federal tax filing process, while individuals who are eligible to receive services from an Indian health care provider were required to obtain this exemption through the Health Insurance Marketplace by filing a paper application.

The availability of the online tax filing process to apply for the Indian health care exemption will save time and reduce duplication of effort. Individuals intending to claim this exemption through the tax filing process should retain the same documentation that they would otherwise submit to the Marketplace as part of their exemption application.

Secretary Burwell first announced this updated rule at the Secretary's Tribal Advisory Committee meeting on September 18, 2014. This simplified process for claiming the exemption through the tax filing process was initiated based on requests by tribal leaders. The IHS worked closely with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the IRS to extend these options to individuals eligible to receive services from an Indian health care provider.

The IHS, an agency in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, provides a comprehensive health service delivery system for approximately 2.2 million American Indians and Alaska Natives.

Can you learn a new thing?

By Richard P. Holm MD

Dementia is at once a huge diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for any physician, and a terribly devastating and dreaded condition for any patient and family.

Something like 6.8 million people in the US have dementia and almost one-half of all people greater than 85 years old have the diagnosis. Take hope, however, since that means almost one-half of those greater than 85 are NOT demented.

This is not a simple topic. Dementia is not a specific disease but rather a term for a number of symptoms that can be caused by a number of brain disorders. The National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke defines people with dementia as having "impaired intellectual functioning that interferes with normal activities and relationships."

The cardinal sign for dementia is the loss of antegrade memory, or rather losing the ability to learn a new thing, and to hang on to it. A simple test for antegrade memory is to ask the patient to remember three objects, and then ask later to recall those three things. Sometimes people with significant dementia can remember much of their past, but cannot learn a new thing.

Memory testing is not all of what defines dementia, however, since intellect involves other faculties such as language, perception, reasoning, judgment, and behavior. Learning, or antegrade memory, pulls these other brain activities together, however, and therefore is the crucial element for brain function.

More than 60 percent of all dementias are caused by Alzheimer's disease (AD) and are characterized by a gradual antegrade memory loss, preservation of gait, subtle personality change, and a steady general deterioration over time. About 20 percent of dementias are called vascular dementia and are caused by small or large strokes. These generally happen quite abruptly, affect gait, preserve personality, and may or may not progress over time.

Some other causes of dementia include Lewy body dementia, which acts like or is associated with Parkinson's disease; Frontotemporal dementia, which can cause huge personality changes; and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which follows repeated severe head trauma in boxers, football players, and soldiers. The differential diagnosis also includes memory loss from thyroid and B12 deficiency, brain tumors, and depression.

It is my sincere hope that you the reader, and including me too, can continue for a very long time to learn a new thing.

Ripple Effect –

To Bee or Not to Bee

Most of us spend little time noticing the roles bees play in our lives. If we do recognize the contributions of bees, we may think of hives full of bees producing honey.

But honey bees are just one of many species of bees. And bees’ work as honey makers, while important, pales in light of their work as pollinators.

It may be time to review a few facts about the underappreciated native bee, whose work keeps our favorite flowers—not to mention fruits and vegetables—abundant:

· Honey bees are one of 19,200 species of bees that have been identified to this point. Over 400 of these varieties have been spotted in Minnesota.

· Most native bees are solitary and are more likely to live in the ground than a hive. If you notice “big” ants around small mounds on the ground, you may have found bee homes.

· Almost all bees are vegetarians—they shouldn’t be confused with the yellow wasps trying to get a bite of your picnic brat. And most bees are not aggressive stingers.

· Without pollination, we would have few of the vegetables and fruits we enjoy. From onions, cabbage and sweet potatoes to watermelon, lemons, kiwi and avocadoes, among others, produce stores would be largely empty without the work of bees.

· In addition, vanilla, coffee—and chocolate—all depend on pollination!

· Although there are other pollinators than bees, butterflies and bats for instance, bees are “extreme pollinators.” Their “messy” ways and physiology make bees the best.

· Some bees are better pollinators than others. Although we associate honey bees with alfalfa pollination, they are less effective (30%) than wild bumble bees (90%).

· Attracting and nourishing bees has become more difficult with severe fragmentation of their habitat. If we wish to add habitat in our backyards and/or surrounding fields, it is important to create as much adjoining habitat as possible.

· Some plants provide more pollen than others for bees to work with. For instance, simple flowers offer far more pollen activity than showier varieties.

· Pesticides containing neonicotinoids are particularly dangerous to bees, interfering with memory and suppressing their immune systems. Neonicotinoids become systemic in the plants they contact and thus can’t be washed off.

For more information, contact the Xerces Society (www.xerces.org).

Until the next Ripple Effect,The Red River Basin Commission (RRBC).

*****

The RRBC is a grassroots organization that is chartered not-for-profit corporation under the provisions of Manitoba, North Dakota, Minnesota, and South Dakota law. Our offices in Fargo, ND and Winnipeg, MB can be reached at 701-356-3183 and 204-982-7250, or you can check out our website at http://redriverbasincommision.org

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

TZTS High School Student Council selling t-shirts

The Tiospa Zina High School Student Council is selling t-shirts to coincide with Homecoming and Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October. Shirts are available for purchase in pink, black, and royal blue sizes Adult (Small-3x). The cost per shirt is $20. Student Council members will have a table set up to sell shirts at Coronation on October 5, during the VB game against Sisseton on October 7, and before the football game on October 10. For more information, please contact Dr. Jen Heath at Tiospa Zina 698-3953 ext. 209.

Sioux Voices Club off to the start of a new year

Submitted by Joy Lohre

Here we are at the start of another school year. The Sioux Voices club held their elections and the following students will be representing the Sioux Voices club for the upcoming 2014-15 school year.

Sioux Voices officers: President Jerrica Donnell; Vice President Dominic White; Secretary Cassie Haubris.

Class Representatives: Senior class Nathan Nigg & Doralynn LaCroix; Junior class Fiona White Eagle; Sophomore class Chaunce Peltier; Freshman class Halie Williams.

The Club members sold walking tacos during SHS Homecoming Sept. 19th and at the 3rd Annual SWO Arts in the Park Festival on Sept. 13th.

Preparing Vegetables for Frost or Freezing

Brookings, SD – It is mid-September and gardeners raising tomatoes know what that means. "One of these next nights it is going to freeze and kill all the tomato plants," said Mary Roduner, SDSU Extension Consumer Horticulture Field Specialist.

"Unfortunately for the plants, a light frost or freeze is often followed by several days or weeks of lovely warm weather that would have allowed the tomatoes and peppers to finish maturing," Roduner, said. "Providing protection for the plants may get you a slightly longer growing season."

Before we look at ways to protect the plants, Roduner said it is important to understand the difference between a frost and freeze. "Frost occurs when water vapor freezes on a surface when the temperature reaches 32 degrees Fahrenheit or below. It usually occurs on a clear night when heat radiates up from the ground," Roduner said.

She explained that tiny ice crystals form when water vapor condenses. "Similar to dew, the temperature at ground level is the key," she said. "The temperature there is often colder than the air temperature just a few feet higher. This lower ground temperature is why the air temperature can read 35 to 37 degrees Fahrenheit and there is frost on the ground."

To protect small plants from frost, Roduner said they need to be covered.

A freeze, Roduner explained involves a 32 degree Fahrenheit surface temperature that lasts for a significant length of time. "Frost is not necessarily present. Freezing is a function of temperature not humidity. Vegetation damage is usually a result," she said.

The terms "killing freeze" or "frost" depends upon the hardiness of the plant, low temperature reached and length of time at that temperature.

Roduner provides a breakdown of freeze temperatures: Light Freeze: Damage depends upon length of freeze duration. 29 to 32 degrees Fahrenheit - tender plants killed with little destructive effect on other vegetation. Moderate Freeze: 25 to 28 degrees Fahrenheit - wide spread destruction on most vegetation with heavy damage to fruit blossoms and tender semi-hardy plants. This is a killing freeze when temperatures reach this point or lower for three hours or longer. Severe Freeze: 24 degrees Fahrenheit and colder, heavy damage to most plants.

When plants freeze, ice crystals form inside the individual cells. "These crystals are very sharply pointed and poke through cell walls. When the plant warms up, water in the cells leaks out and the cells die," Roduner said. "If there is too much of this type of damage the entire plant will die."

To see this happen, Roduner said to simply place an apple in the freezer. "When it is frozen solid, remove it from the freezer and set it in a bowl at room temperature. In a short while the apple will collapse into a pile of mushy flesh and be sitting in a pool of liquid," she said.

As we get closer to fall, gardeners should make an obsessive habit of watching the weather, said Roduner. "Find your favorite source that seems to be the most accurate and pay special attention to the forecast for nighttime low temperatures," she said. "Temperatures can change quickly at this time of year so it is important to be prepared to cover plants."

Protection techniques:

When covering plants it is best to use cloth like old sheets or blankets. Roduner explained that the blankets provide insulation and hold a few extra degrees of warmth close to the plants. She added that plastic is not a good insulator and loses heat rapidly. If plastic touches leaf or fruit surfaces it acts like a conductor, allowing the cold to still damage any plant material it touches.

"Cardboard and newspaper between the plants and any plastic you may need to use will prevent the leaves and plastic making contact and provide and extra layer of insulation," she said.

Roduner explained that gardeners should cover the plants early in the evening to capture and hold heat. "If the next day is going to be borderline cold, the covering can be left on. It won't hurt plants to be covered for several days if conditions warrant," she said. "Be sure that there are no gaps in the covering because this will allow cold air to get inside and damage the plants."

Wind can cause additional problems with covered plants, blowing the covering material away and potentially breaking off plants in the process.

Most sensitive vegetables & plants: Basil: Does not tolerate temperatures below 37 degrees Fahrenheit. Below 45 degrees it shows stress with leaf bronzing and edge drying. To protect, cut plants down and remove leaves. Basil can be stored in an airtight container in the freezer instead of drying it.

Tomatoes, peppers and eggplant: These vegetables are all tropical plants and do not tolerate cold temperatures. Cover them well with thick blankets. Often a light frost or freeze will damage only the outer leaves and the inside leaves and fruits are fine. This minor damage won't kill the plants or stop the tomatoes from ripening.

Squash: Summer squash will die back and the soft skinned fruits will be damaged with a light to moderate freeze. Winter squash and pumpkins will be damaged depending on how mature they are when it freezes, Roduner explained.

To test the maturity, Roduner said gardeners can use the thumbnail test. "Press your thumbnail into the rind. If the rind is soft and the nail pierces it easily, it is not mature, will have little flavor and will not survive freezing. If the rind is moderately firm and your nail makes a deep dent but does not break the skin, it is almost mature and should be picked and stored in a garage or shed and used quickly," she said. "A mature squash has rind that leaves only a shallow or no dent. While at this stage they can take a light freeze, it is best to harvest them and cure for storing."

Melons and cucumbers: Like summer squash, cucumbers and melons die back with a mild freeze. Cucumbers become translucent and watery. Melons will have soft spots where frost lays on them. Harvest all cucumbers and melons that appear to be ripe. Cover melons that are close to ripe. Water melon does not continue to ripen after it is picked.

Onions: Mature onions that have flesh above the ground will freeze and not store well. Any frozen areas will soften and rot leading to rot in the other onions in the storage container. Pull all onions and put them in a warm dry area to dry down or cure for long term storage. Onions kept in the ground past maturity, when the tops fall over, are prone to insect damage and then rotting.

Beans: Snap beans will freeze and plants will not recover. Pick all beans before it freezes.

Potatoes: Harvest now. Potatoes cannot take even a light freeze without damaging tubers that are close to the soil surface.

These vegetables can tolerate frost and freezing: Lettuce: Loose leaf lettuce will survive down to 20 degrees Fahrenheit. In the morning it will be frozen solid. Do not touch the leaves and by noon they will be as good as new. Harvest before the first prediction of 19 degrees Fahrenheit or colder.

Broccoli, kale, cabbage and cauliflower: These plants will survive very cold temperatures. They will all immediately flower the next spring so they are best removed this fall when you are finished harvesting. Kale is able to over winter if the temperatures don't get too far below zero and can be harvested through the winter.

Spinach: Cover fall planted spinach with a 6-inch layer of straw and allow it to overwinter. Larger leaves can be harvested through the winter and the first early leaves in the spring will be very tender and sweet.

Carrots and beets: These can take a lot of cold. To over winter and harvest before spring, cover with a foot or more of straw or place straw bales over them. This will prevent the soil from freezing too hard and make a February run to the garden for fresh carrots easier.

To learn more, visit iGrow.org.

Garden Corner

By Eric Hanssen

Browns Valley, Minnesota

Lots of people are noticing 3-leaved vines and groundcovers this time of year. What they may be looking at is poison ivy. This plant contains an oily substance that is very poisonous and can cause a painful dermatitis. You have to touch the leaves or other plant part to produce the irritation and the symptoms may not appear until hours after contact. Gloves or boots, if not cleaned, will hold the oil and someone touching them even several days or a month or more later may develop blistering and other symptoms from the contact. Poison ivy is either a woody groundcover or vine, though the vine form is most commonly found in the southeastern part of our state when the plant can grow up along a tree or pole to twenty feet or more. Poison ivy has three-leaflets and white berry-like fruit. The fruit is out now so the plant can be easily recognized. Control of this plant is difficult. Herbicide treatments are best applied at about the time the plant flowers (early summer) and then reapplied a couple of weeks later. Fall applications are ineffective. Glyphosate will provide good control if several treatments are made. This herbicide will kill all vegetation so care must be used in its application. Triclopyr will also work but will kill most surrounding deciduous woody vegetation so again any adjacent desirable trees and shrubs may be injured or killed.

Earwigs are appearing everywhere and apparently causing some concern to folks that find them. While earwigs do feed on dead insects and plant debris, they can also be found feeding on the roots (and occasionally leaves) of many herbaceous annuals such as marigolds and zinnias as well as strawberries and lettuce. They will also feed on corn tassels. They feed mostly at night so often the damage and earwigs are not connected. The best control is prevention, keeping hiding spots and food sources to a minimum by clearing out any debris and waste from flower beds and gardens. Earwig traps can be made by setting shallow cans – tuna cans work great – in the garden at dusk filled with about 1/2-inch of vegetable oil and empty out the dead earwigs in the morning.

However I recently got a picture of brown felt blight which is a fungal disease that occurred on spruce branches that were buried in the snow last winter. I had a picture sent in of some lower branches of a spruce out in the Black Hills with the characteristic grayish brown mats of needles infected by this fungus. Brown felt disease is a form of snow mold, a disease that develops in the subfreezing temperatures during winter. The dormant branches of spruce branches covered with snow, or entire seedlings covered by the snow, can become infected during this time period. Many of the snow molds disappear from the plant surface with the coming of warmer weather but the brown felt blight fungus persists and the damage is visible late into the summer. There are no chemical controls for this disease. This article comes from professor John Ball, SDSU Forestry Specialist in his Pest Update publication available online at http://sdda.sd.gov/legacydocs/Forestry/educational-information/PDF/Pest-alert-2014-Aug-20.pdf.

Legals

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-14-744-540; D-14-745-541

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE

OF NAME OF:

ISABELL CESAR, ROSELYNN CRAWFORD-CESAR, Minor Children,

And concerning:

HEIDI J. HAYNES, Petitioner.

ORDER AND NOTICE OF  HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from ISABELL JULANE CESAR TO ISABELL JULANE CRAWFORD AND ROSELYNN YAHAIRA JC CRAWFORD CESAR TO ROSELYNN YAHAIRA JC CRAWFORD  shall be heard before the Honorable B.J. Jones, Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at _10:30 A.M. on the  _8th    day of _OCTOBER, 2014.

Dated this 11th day of September, 2014.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST:

E. Pfeiffer. CLERK OF COURTS

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

IN TRIBAL COURT CASE: D-14-746-542

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE OF NAME OF: MANDI JO STRUTZ, Petitioner.

ORDER AND NOTICE OF HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from MANDI JO STRUTZ TO MANDI JO LABELLE shall be heard before the Honorable B.J. Jones, Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at 3:00 P.M. on the 20th day of OCTOBER, 2014. Dated this 24th day of September, 2014.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

 /s/ B.J. Jones CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST: E. Pfeiffer CLERK OF COURTS

39-3tc

Trading Post ads

FOR SALE

2008 GEHL 5250 HYDROSTATIC SKIDSTER WITH 2 BUCKETS $13,000 MINIMUM BID OAD MEMBERS AND SWO ENTITIES ONLY. CLOSING DATE: THURSDAY - OCTOBER 2, 2014 @ 4:30 PM. FULL PAYMENT AND PICK UP OF PROPERTY WITHIN ONE WEEK OF AWARDED BID. CASHIER'S CHECK OR MONEY ORDER ONLY.

38-2tc

 

GPTCHB Vacancy

Great Plains Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board (GPTCHB) is hiring a Health Insurance Exchange Navigator and Community Health Worker in your community. This is a great opportunity to join a great organization! Apply online at www.gptchb.org or contact Kristine Watts at 605.721.1922 or kristine.watts@gptchb.org for more information.

 

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Job Openings

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Program Aide, JOM

School Resource Officer (Enemy Swim Day School), Law Enforcement

Peer Tutor (High School Student), JOM

Motor Pool Attendant, Property & Supply

Closing Date: October 03, 2014 @ 04:30 PM.

All interested applicants may obtain application and job description information at the Human Resource Department, of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate or contact Arnold Williams at (605) 698-8238 or Denise Hill at (605) 698-8362. (Tribal preference will apply)

 

JOB OPENING

OFFICE MANAGER - TRIBAL EMPLOYMENT RIGHTS OFFICE SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE AGENCY VILLAGE, SD

FUNCTIONS: To provide bookkeeping/technical assistance to the TERO Director. In addition to administrative duties, the Office Manager will also assist the Director in advocating Indian rights under the TERO law.

WAGE: Depending on experience.

Indian preference will apply. Please submit the following: Resume, verification of Tribal enrollment, and three (3) letters of reference to the T.E.R.O. Office between the hours of 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., Monday thru Friday.

All interested applicants may obtain a complete job description from TERO office. Please contact Robert Starr @ the TERO office at: 605-698-8266.

Closing Date: October 3, 2014 at 4:30 p.m.

 

SWO Higher Education Program

Scholarship Opportunity!

 Leo A Daly Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Architecture/Engineering Scholarship:

*Applicants must be provide Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Enrollment Verification

*Must be Third or Fourth year undergraduate students with a declared major in Architecture or Engineering

*Must have a cumulative GPA of 2.5

Deadline to apply is October 3, 2014

For more information and the application you may contact Janell Williams, SWO Higher Education Program at 605-742-0150 or via email janellb@swo-nsn.gov

 

SISSETON WAHPETON COLLEGE

OFFICIAL JOB DESCRIPTION

TITLE: Library Assistant

REPORTS TO:  Librarian

SALARY: D.O.E.

TOUR OF DUTY: Monday - Friday (20-25 hours Part-Time) Summary Interacts directly with library users at the circulation desk, performing a variety of clerical tasks dealing primarily with the circulation of materials to library users. Responsibilities/Duties

1.  Maintains good relations with public and staff.

2.  Greets library users, answers telephone and performs a wide range of clerical public contact duties.

3.  Uses library automated circulation system to circulate materials to library users including checking materials in and out, registering borrowers, explains computer policy.

4.  Performs activities involved in retrieval of overdue notices. Tells users if overdoes appear on the computer screen.

5.  Attends to public use of equipment; Adds paper, assists library users with machine problems, contacts IT regarding service needs.

6.  Provides users with general information about library services directing them to other personnel as needed.\

7.  Checks in periodicals, maintains subscription records, claims missing issues.

8.  Prepares periodicals and other materials for circulation; Applies stamps, labels, etc.

9.  Complies with all College, Tribal, and Federal policies, regulations and laws that govern the College.

10. Participates on College committees and in faculty/staff meetings.

11. May be required to assist with events.

12. Performs other duties as assigned.

Education. AA degree in Accounting or business administration. Minimum Qualifications. Planning, organizational, and time management skills. Ability to work as a team player. Proficient with office software, Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, etc. Proficient with office machinery. Other: Must have excellent verbal and written communication skills to coordinate with other departments, answer public inquiries, and interact with significant and influential individuals. Ability to maintain high levels of confidentiality. Displays high standards of ethical conduct. Exhibits honesty and integrity. Refrains from theft related, dishonest and unethical behavior. Works with minimal supervision. Demonstrates responsible behavior and attention to detail.

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Employment Opportunities

2014-2015 School Year Vacancies:

Vacancy: Special Education Teacher (High School) Sign-on Bonus Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Special Education Teacher Opening Date: March 7, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Art Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a K-12 Art Teacher Opening Date: July 1, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Alternative Learning Center Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Secondary Teacher Opening Date: July 1, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: School Counselor Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a School Service Specialist School Counselor Opening Date: May 23, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Administrative Assistant (Elementary) Qualifications: High School Diploma/GED and Associate's degree (A. A.) or equivalent from two-year college or technical school; or one year to three years of related experience and/or training; or equivalent combination of education and experience. Opening Date: September 8, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Parent Liaison Qualifications: Associates of Arts degree in directly related feild; or GED/High School Diploma and 2-4 years directly related experience; or any combination of directly related education and experience. Opening Date: September 10, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Special Education Paraprofessional Qualifications: Associates of Arts degree or GED/High School Diploma and 48+ college credits or GED/High School Diplima and Qualifying Paraprofessional Praxis Score of 461+; 1 year directly related experience. Opening Date: September 16, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

2014-2015 Extra Curricular Vacancies:

Vacancy: 7th/8th Grade Girls Basketball Coach Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and coaching applicant questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: April 8, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: 7th/8th Grade Volleyball Coach Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and coaching applicant questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: August 25, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: AISES Advisor (American Indian Science and Engineering Society) Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: April 11, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Destination Imagination Advisor Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: April 11, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Rodeo & Riding Club Advisor Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: May 8, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Web Master Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma, familiar with and can assist staff in administration of their Adobe Dreamweaver CS4 web page software, able to keep school web pages updated and efficient. Opening Date: August 25, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

If you would like to apply to be a part of the TZ tiwahe you may pick up an application from the TZTS HR office located at #2 Tiospa Zina Dr. Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications may also be printed off the HR web page by downloading from links under employment forms to the left. Completed applications may be sent to PO Box 719, Agency Village, SD 57262. Faxed to: 605-698-7686. For further information call 605-698-3953 ext. 208. Indian Preference employer. At will employer. All applicants are subject to a Background Check and Pre-Employment Drug Test, pursuant to SWSB policy.

 

PARA EDUCATOR

The Enemy Swim Day School has an immediate opening for a Para-Educator. Duties include assisting in the classroom, assisting the teaching staff, meeting with SpEd staff, reporting and other duties. The minimum of an AA degree or equivalent, Para Pro Certification is preferred or willing to work toward certification. Wage is dependent upon experience. Position is open until filled. Indian preference policies apply. Visit www.esds.us for an application and job description. Call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 and ask for Virginia Dolney to inquire about the position.

38-2tc

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Cage Department Cashier (2 Full-Time) Rotating

C-Store Department Clerk (2 Full-Time) Day, Swing

Count Department Team Member (2 Full-Time) 3:00am to finish

Foods Department Bus Person (2 Full-Time) Day, Swing

Cook I (2 Full-Time) Swing Cook II (2 Full-Time) Swing

Hotel Department Front Desk Clerk (Full-Time) 4pm-12am

Housekeeping Department Porter (8 Full-Time) Day, Swing, & Graveyard

Lounge Department Cocktail Server (Full-Time) 6pm-2am

Closing Date: October 3, 2014 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions

Two identifications documents required upon hire

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE, Hankinson ND 58041.For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO. (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment). Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

M.I.S. (Management Information Systems): COMPUTER SPECIALIST/PROGRAMMER (1 Full-Time) GENERAL FUNCTION: Your level of responsibility will assist end-users with computer issues. You are also responsible for computer maintenance. You will design and write code for programs as needed. You will also write custom reports for end-users when needed. You will be responsible for assisting end-users with computer issues, computer maintenance, and other IT tasks as designated by M.I.S. Manager or Supervisor. REQUIREMENTS: Excellent interpersonal and written communication skills. Flexibility and ability to work in a team environment. Associates degree in computer science, information systems, 2+ years experience in computer science, computer programming, information systems, or a related field or 6+ years experience in a related position; A+ Certification in beneficial. Extensive knowledge of Windows XP, Windows 7, 2000, 2003, 2008, MSSql Databases, Active Directory, VMWare, Crystal Reports, Visual Studio, Java and other programming languages. Ability to lift equipment in excess of 30lbs. Proficiency in Linux, IIS, POS systems, RAID technology, computer hardware, AS/400, networking and anti-virus methods is beneficial. Knowledge of servers if beneficial. Must obtain Key Gaming License upon hire.

This position will be advertised until it is filled.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

CAGE: WINDOW CAHIER (FULL-TIME) GRAVEYARD GENERAL FUNCTION: Assists in providing quality services to all customers and efficient operation of the Cage. REQUIREMENTS: Able to lift 25 lb., several times throughout shift. Available to work all shifts (Day, Swing and Graveyard). Total accountability for imprest bank. Computer knowledge helpful. Customer services a must. Must obtain a Key Gaming License upon hire.

ACCOUNTING: COUNT TEAM MEMBER (FULL-TIME) GENERAL FUNCTION: Responsible for the inventory of Cage/Casino coin and chip assets. Assist in providing and accurate count for daily service drops. Work in accordance with all applicable policies and procedures as stated in the Dakota Sioux Casino Cage Employee Manual. REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. Accounting background, the ability to work well with numbers and computer knowledge is required as well as willingness to be trained in these areas. Detail orientated, self-starter with ability to work well with others. Ability to lift 40 lbs. or more. Must have telephone. Heavy lifting, moving, bending, stretching and standing for long periods of time. Must obtain Key Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on October 1, 2014 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

SECURITY: SECURITY OFFICER (4 Full-Time) ROTATING GENERAL FUNCTION: The security officer protects company assets and provides a safe environment for customers and employees. Exhibit a friendly, helpful and courteous manner when dealing with the customers and employees. Maintains security activities and performs credit transactions adhering to company, Tribal, State and Federal guidelines. Work closely with Casino & Hotel Management. REQUIREMENTS: High School Diploma or GED equivalent. Must have basic computer skills. Ongoing training through Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise and respective security department policy and procedures. Medical aid training in CPR and First Aid. Complete departmental training program including CPR, first aid, and TAM. Must complete a 90 day probation period. Must be licensable by SWO Gaming Commission. Must be able to work irregular hours. Must be dependable, punctual, some knowledge in handheld radios, and writing reports. Law Enforcement or Security background useful. Must not have a felony on your record. Must be physically fit and able to lift 40+ lbs. Must complete all security certifications within a year of hire in accordance with the Gaming Commissions rules and regulations.

This position will close on October 1, 2014 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

SECURITY: ASSISTANT SECURITY MANAGER (Full-Time) GENERAL FUNCTION: Administers all security activity for assigned shifts and special events. Implementation of all security policies as directed by the Security Manager. REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or GED equivalent. Security or law enforcement background a must. Physically fit and ability to lift 40+ lbs. Must complete all security certifications within a year of hire in accordance with the Gaming Commissions rules and regulations. Supervisory experience is necessary, in-house security background will be considered. Must obtain Key Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on October 8, 2014 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.