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Volume 51 Issue No. 15

Anpetu Iyamni, Wednesday, April 8, 2020

Inside this Edition –

Tribe issues stay-at-home, curfew order effective last Thursday at midnight

Chairman White updates the Oyate on COVID-19 state of emergency

Vice-Chairman Johnson leading COVID-19 task force response team

Emergency Management releases color-coded signs for self-quarantined Oyate households

Report to Akicita from VSO Geri Opsal

Back page: Guidelines for coping with the COVID-19 pandemic

February 2020 SWO Tribal Council proceedings

Reminder: Deadline for receiving copy is Friday noon

President Trump approves Major Disaster Declaration for SD

Washington, DC – April 5, 2020 – FEMA announced that federal emergency aid has been made available for the state of South Dakota to supplement state, tribal and local recovery efforts in the areas affected by the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic beginning on January 20, 2020 and continuing.

Federal funding is available to state, tribal, eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency protective measures (Category B), including direct federal assistance under Public Assistance, for all areas affected by COVID-19 at a federal cost share of 75 percent.

Lee dePalo has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area. Additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the state and warranted by the results of further assessments.

Oyate: Are you a Facebook user?

Like and follow the official SWO EMS (Tribal Emergency Management) Facebook page to get as close to real-time updates on the SWO state of emergency as possible during the COVID-19 pandemic.

SWO Emergency Management: Color-coded signs for self-quarantined Oyate households

Agency Village, SD – April 1, 2020 – The SWO Emergency Management team released color-coded quarantine signs for Oyate households to use during the COVID-19 state of emergency on the Lake Traverse Reservation.

See accompanying images here, and learn what each sign means when seen hanging on the door of a Tribal member home:

*Green paper = we're doing fine

*Yellow paper = we need supplies

*Red paper = need medical attention

Chairman White: Updating the Oyate on COVID-19 state of emergency

Agency Village, SD – April 3, 2020 – Chairman White addressed the Oyate on Facebook live/KXSW/CNB this afternoon from the KXSW/CNB studio at Sisseton Wahpeton College. Also speaking were Emergency Management Coordinator Jim Pearson and Tribal Law Enforcement Chief Gary Gaikowski.

"Sorry I have not been on for a few days," said the Chairman.

"It has been very busy."

"I have been on conference call, after conference call, after conference call," he said.

"We are trying to get all of the funding figured out that's coming from DC."

"We are trying to make sure that we get everything in place, we know exactly what we are doing, so we don't miss out on any funding."

The Chairman said he had requested an accounting firm be hired to consult to help secure relief funding, and Council approved.

"We also gave one of our attorneys more hours."

Filing the correct paperwork, on time, is the key for the Tribe to bring in all that it is eligible to receive from the stimulus package.

(See the news article on highlights of the April 1st special Council meeting.)

"We cannot miss out on filing the right paperwork … to get all of this funding that we're going to be putting in for."

He said that "all of our COVID-19 expenses are supposed to be reimbursable."

Chairman White announced that Council had passed "a stay-at-home order that went in effect at midnight last night."

(See the accompanying news article.)

He said, "I know you have all seen what's happening on TV."

"The U.S. is, by far, ahead of everybody (in COVID-19 cases)."

"The reason," he said, "is because people are not taking this seriously."

"We have to start taking this seriously."

He talked about the images on TV screens, "bodies … being pushed into cold trucks with forklifts!"

"As you can see, we went from having a handful of cases at the beginning of last week to … now we're up to what?"

He consulted with Jim and Gary.

"187," said Jim. "Up 22 from yesterday."

"If you look at the numbers, it's jumping dramatically."

"What's really scary is that people are spreading it and they're not sick, they don't show any signs of being sick, and it's being spread."

He shared a recommendation that Gary made last week, that "Everybody has to move and operate nowadays thinking that everybody that you come into contact with has the disease, because you never know who has it."

"The curfew went into effect," the Chairman said.

"It is 24 hours."

"Only essential travel is going to be allowed."

Essential, he explained could be, "If you got to go to the grocery store, you got a doctor appointment…."

"It's only going to be emergency, essential travel."

"We need to start staying at home."

"You've got to keep an eye on your kids."

"You can't be letting the kids mingle."

"I mean, you are allowed to exercise, if you wanted to go run, if your kids need to get out, you live in Housing, go out in the country, go for a walk, drive up to the lake, go do something outside."

"But we cannot be mingling, people."

"We have to keep our distance."

Looking at where he stood alongside Jim and Gary in the CNB studio, he said "We are actually too close right here."

"We have really got to push for this."

"This (virus) is going to spread here."

"We have got some younger people who, I think we've been lucky so far (but) have got the virus."

"We do not want this to spread to our elders."

"We all have to start taking this more seriously.

The Chairman brought up the law enforcement budget.

"I have had Gary looking at a budget to hire more officers to start enforcing this quarantine."

"We don't want people to take advantage of this situation and then the crime starts to go up."

"It's not going to be tolerated."

The county jail, he said, "might be full but there are other jails out there we'll take you to."

On the overall issue of ensuring money to continue essential services throughout the emergency, Chairman White said "I am doing the best that I can with my staff, with the attorneys, with the finance office, to get our numbers together, get our accounts together, our finances, so we don't miss any deadlines."

He reported that Council authorized layoff "of all our gaming employees starting Monday (April 6)."

Casino management, he said, "will be helping all of our gaming employees file for unemployment."

He said Council had wanted "to extend administrative leave for one more week, but after we put the numbers together, they (dollars) were not there."

The Chairman asked Jim to give an update.

The Emergency Management Coordinator said about the conference calls, that he had sat in on "four of them today."

"One of the calls was with FEMA."

He talked about conversations with the Tribal Liaison and with FEMA Public Assistance Specialist Mark Pettit.

He said that Mark Pettit will meet with program managers, Executives and Council "to decide if we're going to go direct to FEMA with this response of mitigation and getting the dollars that we have coming back to us or do we go through the state."

FEMA will, he said, "give us what our options are."

"And Council can decide what's the best option here."

He said the meeting is set for this Tuesday (April 7) morning.

"Program managers have been invited."

Jim said the FEMA assistance could be "a huge lift for us."

"We went through it (FEMA assistance process) in 2016 with the ice storm."

"So, we are prepared."

"We are ready to go either way."

"Through FEMA direct, where we would get our own assigned FEMA ID number."

"Or we can go through the state."

"Either way, will work," he said.

Jim reminded people that "with the numbers that the Chairman talked about, that they're being up, if you do get a test and you are told ... it is not suggested, you are ... it is a have to … you have to self-isolate for three days until those test results come back in."

He said this "is really important."

"Make sure that if you do end up having a test that you do self-isolate."

"Then get the test results."

"If those come back that they're positive the next step is, I believe, it is 14 days that you have to quarantine for."

"That's the latest."

"We are keeping track of those numbers as they come into the surrounding counties."

He pointed out that the SD Department of Health has added a new column to its interactive online reporting page.

A column "of the people that are recovering."

"That is good to see, that there's a lot of numbers in the counties … people that are recovering."

Chief Gaikowski spoke next.

He brought up the subject of the curfew.

"Do what the Chairman says," said Gary.

"Watch your kids, be around your kids."

"Know who's around your kids."

"Talk to your kids."

"Really talk to them about this virus."

"I think that's where the disconnect is, you're not watching the news, you're not explaining to the kids well enough."

He recommended the Oyate "start doing that."

"Make sure they understand why they have to do what they have to do."

"Talk to your kids."

"Even some adults need to watch the news more."

"Grandparents, talk to your kids."

"Make sure they take it serious…."

He gave a hypothetical.

"Just because little Suzy wants to go drive around, and she's being naughty at home, (so) you say, 'Here's the keys, go drive around, get out of here.'"

"That's not going to be tolerated."

"The juveniles that are driving with the carloads of kids, we're going to stop them."

"We are going to stop them, we are going to send them home."

"If it comes down to it, if we have to tow the cars, we possibly have to tow the cars."

"You could be charged with child neglect."

"The curfew violations."

"We do not want to do that."

"Just be personally responsible."

"That's what the Governor is saying, that's what the Chairman is saying."

"Everybody needs to be personally responsible."

"If you have kids you got to be responsible for them too."

"That's all we're asking," said Gary.

"We are all in this together."

"We have to stick together and get through this."

"The faster we all cooperate and do what we're told to do the faster we get through this, hopefully."

"Watch the news."

"Be informed of what's going on…."

Chairman White said, "As Gary said we all have to be responsible for our kids."

"We can hire more law enforcement to do more patrolling, but we should not have to do that."

"You would want to keep your family safe."

"That means keeping an eye on your kids."

"Do not go bothering your elders."

"Leave them locked down in their home."

"We had one of the employees at Crossing come up with the virus," he reported.

"It's going to happen."

"We need to make good decisions."

"You should not be taking all your kids into the store."

"We need to be watching our distance."

"One person can go grocery shopping."

"When you get home with your groceries you need to wipe your stuff down."

"You need to spray it."

"You get a 12 pack of pop or a case of bottled water you need to spray it down."

"You need to keep things clean."

"We have to get into that routine because that quickly you can get the virus and you spread it."

"It's in the air."

"I mean it says it hangs in the air for up to eight hours."

"It is serious that we stay home."

"It is very dangerous."

(Dakota Crossing closed Friday for cleaning and sanitizing and reopened Saturday. See the news article.)

If you look at the numbers on TV it is staggering."

"We are way ahead of China, and Korea, and Italy. By far now."

"What does that tell me?"

"It tells me that we are not taking this seriously."

The Chairman said that there may be a public health directive for everyone soon, that "everybody start wearing masks."

He said there is a shortage nationally, not even enough for healthcare providers.

"But you can make your own mask."

"The Planning Department is looking at buying all of the material."

He said there is no need for masks to be imported onto the Reservation.

"We will make our own masks."

An easy way, he said, is to "make a mask with a bandana and put a coffee filter in it."

"That is going to help prevent that (virus) from spreading."

The Chairman recommended when "you go in public, you probably need to start wearing a mask."

"The problem is, like I stated earlier, is that you, I, could have the virus right now."

"I don't have any symptoms but am out there spreading it."

"That is why this is a very deadly virus."

He explained how it is unlike spreading the flu, when "you are usually sick."

"Or the cold."

"You could be spreading the virus and not have any symptoms."

He said that is why "it is so important that we stay home and do our social distancing."

He acknowledged the difficulty when you have children.

"But, you know what?"

"We live in one of the most beautiful areas in South Dakota."

"Go drive out to the lake, go park on a gravel road, and let the kids run."

"Spear fishing is going on right now."

"You can drive around, look at the creeks, but keep your distance from everybody."

"If you want to go out to the track, keep your distance."

"I understand it is important that everybody exercises...."

"We just have to be smart."

"If you are living in a Housing area it is really tough to keep an eye on your kids."

But "I would like for everybody to tough it out, and stay in the house for two weeks, and let's see what happens with these numbers."

"We do not want these numbers to keep tripling."

The Chairman referred again to the way the number of cases has escalated quickly.

"Everybody, stay smart and we can get through this."

He cautioned the Oyate not to wait "until we start dying, some of our elders start dying."

"I wish we were like Pine Ridge," said the Chairman.

"You can just put barricades up."

"We have got way too many highways here (but) we are trying to work with the county and the city."

"Everybody, just take heed of the seriousness of this."

"We really need to work together."

"We will get through this."

He asked the Oyate to "bear with us."

He shared what he called a "good thing."

"I heard today that people are already starting to receive their $1,200 checks."

That is direct assistance to middle and low income taxpayers, and some Tribal members have reported receiving theirs.

"That's good," Donovan said.

"If you did not do your taxes last year, I suggest you hurry up and do your taxes."

For the Tribe, he said, "We are putting in for COVID-19 relief, the money … as fast as we can."

"Hopefully, we can get some reimbursement for our lost gaming money."

Tom Wilson asked a question, "Can you clarify that when you say everybody stay home but then you can go out in the country, are the police going to police the Housing area? The major areas?"

Gary Gaikowski responded.

"As long as you are with a parent…."

"If you got to get out of the house, throw the kids in the car, go drive around, get some fresh air, be with your parents."

"You can still go out as long as there's a parent with the kids, directing the kids."

"What they can do and cannot do … stay away from other kids, and other families."

Tom: "So like going in the country for a drive?"

"That yes, definitely … you are with your family."

"You know your family."

"You are stuck in the house."

"You know who is sick or if someone is not sick."

"If you are with each other, that is fine," he said.

The Chairman added, "But you don't want your teenage kids to go pick up all of their friends and go cruising out in the country, because that defeats the whole purpose of keeping our families and everybody separated."

"We can't keep our family separated."

"We understand that your family is your family and you're going to be stuck together, but we don't want to be mixing families, friends, kids."

"That's how this is going to spread like wildfire, and it is."

"We know there are a lot more positive cases out there," said the Chairman.

"We know that."

"I have people that have called me, friends that have called me, that, 'Such and such a person has it.' They're tribal members, they live out of town."

"It is spreading."

Because of the limited availability of test kits, he said "everything is moving slow."

"But when the tests finally catch up with us … this is going to jump dramatically."

"Do not be alarmed here one of these days it just jumps from where we're at now to 500 in a week…."

He urged everyone "to keep an eye on your elders."

"Check on them."

"Like I said a month ago, they should have been keeping their doors locked."

"Not exposing your elders."

"Support them, call them. 'You need anything?'"

"Drop it off on their doorstep."

"Don't open the door."

 "We got to keep our distance."

"And we'll get through this."

He predicted, "It's going to get worse before it gets better."

"But let's all start taking it a lot more seriously."

"Let's come together as a tribe, text family, friends, let's all do what we have to do to keep our people alive."

Tom asked for and got more clarification on the curfew, ages and hours.

Gary said the curfew is "for 18 and under."

"24/7."

Donovan referred to the stay-at-home ordinance, which is printed in this week's Sota.

"If you know that you've been exposed to this virus and … you've been told to self-isolate, to self-quarantine … and you continue to go around out there," said the Chairman, "you can be charged with a class 1 misdemeanor."

"If you have it or if you've been exposed to it, and how you're going to know is because somebody has contacted you. Department of Health or somebody, CDC."

"They have that information."

"At that time, to protect your Oyate and your family, you might have to go into that room or move to the basement or your kids are going to get it."

"But don't get caught out and about, and at a group barbecue or whatever you're doing, because you could be charged with a class 1 misdemeanor."

"Knowingly spreading a disease, a virus, like that is a class 1 misdemeanor on the books."

Chairman White said that if "we need to come back again tomorrow or next day, something happens, we will."

"Everybody, stay safe."

"Pidamiya do."

*****

To view the video, go to the following url:

https://www.facebook.com/kxswfm.dakotahradio/videos/10157574661943477/

SWO orders shutdown, curfew across Lake Traverse Reservation

Agency Village, SD – April 2, 2020 – SWO Tribal Council has approved a shutdown and curfew ordinance.

Here is an announcement from SWO Law Enforcement posted on Facebook April 3rd:

Parents/Guardians, as of April 2, 2020, there is now a curfew in effect for those who are under the age of 18 years old which will be enforced 24 hours a day. Children are allowed outside in yards only while under the supervision of a parent or legal guardian.

In a time like this, we suggest talking with your children to help them have a better understanding of what COVID-19 is and why we are taking action to help slow the spread.

It's time for YOU to take action to help protect one another.

Stay home unless it's for an emergency/business (work) related only!

– SWO Tribal Law Enforcement

TRIBAL COUNCIL RESOLUTION NO. SW0-20-036

SWO Tribal Council Order - Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Directive

WHEREAS, The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate is organized under a Constitution and By-laws adopted by the members of the Tribe on August 1-2, 1966, and approved by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs on August 25, 1966, and last amended effective November 15, 2006; and

WHEREAS, The Constitution ARTICLE III, Section 1, states that, the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate shall be governed by a Council, and ARTICLE VII, Section 1, states that, the Council shall have the following powers: (a) to represent the Tribe in all negotiations with Federal, State and local governments; (d) to make rules governing the relationship of the members of the Tribe, to Tribal property. and to one another as members of the Tribe; (g) to take any action by ordinance, resolution, or otherwise which are reasonably necessary through committees, boards, agents or otherwise, to carry into effect the forgoing purposes; (h) to promote public health, education, charity, and such other services as may contribute to the social advancement of the members of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate; (i) adopt resolutions regulating the procedures of the Tribal Council, its officials and committees in the conduct of Tribal Affairs, and

WHEREAS, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been responding to an outbreak of respiratory disease caused by a novel (new) coronavirus that was first detected in China and has how been detected internationally, including in the United States. The virus as been names "SARS-CoV-2" and the disease it causes has been named "coronavirus disease 2019" (abbreviated 'COVID-19'); and

WHEREAS, on January 30, 2020, the International Health Regulations Emergency Committee of the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the outbreak a "public health emergency of international concern" (PHEIC); and

WHEREAS, on January 31, 2020, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex M. Azar II declared a public health emergency (PHE) for the United States to aid the nation's healthcare community in responding to COVID-19; and

WHEREAS, on March 11, 2020, the WHO publicly characterized COVID-19 as a pandemic; and

WHEREAS, on March 13, 2020, U.S. President Donald Trump declared a National Emergency in response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19); and

WHEREAS, on March 13, 2020, South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem signed a State of Emergency order for the State of South Dakota, pertaining to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19); and

WHEREAS, on March 13, 2020, the Tribal Council of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation duly enacted Tribal Council Resolution No. SWO-20-022, Declare a State of Emergency on the Lake Traverse Reservation for Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19); and

WHEREAS, Tribal Council Resolution No. SWO-20-022 made available all Tribal resources to mitigate and alleviate the possible effects of this pandemic on Lake Traverse Reservation, and authorized whatever measures necessary to respond appropriately to the emergency, and requested that all Tribal resources be utilized in response to this pandemic; and

WHEREAS, since the passage of the above mentioned Tribal Council Resolution, positive cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed in South Dakota, North Dakota, and Minnesota counties adjacent to and/or within the boundaries of the Lake

WHEREAS, COVID-19 can spread from person to person, or by contact with surfaces contaminated with the virus, and as a result, the CDC along with numerous COVID-19, experts have recommended social distancing to slow the spread of COVID-19; and

WHEREAS, the failure to successfully implement social distancing will likely result in higher numbers of infected individuals and has the potential to overwhelm the capacity of this region's health care providers; and

WHEREAS, it is important to control measures to be taken to reduce or slow down the spread of COVID-19 in order to protect the health and safety of the SWO Tribal members, especially for elders and those with underlying health conditions that make them particularly vulnerable to COVID-19; and

WHEREAS, Tribal Council wishes to adopt the attached Tribal Council Order - Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Directive, to reduce and slow down the spread of COVID-19 on the Lake Traverse Reservation.

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that in an effort to protect the health, safety, and well-being of the Tribal Members of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, the Tribal Council of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation hereby adopts the attached Tribal Council Order - Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Directive in response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic; and

FURTHER, BE IT RESOLVED, that to reduce and slow down the spread of COVID-19 on the Lake Traverse Reservation, the Tribal Council implements a Stay-at-Home/Shelter-in-Place Order, requesting all residents to stay indoors, except for essential activities, including; buying food and/or gas. seeking medical treatment, paying necessary bills, and traveling to and from places of employment; and

FURTHER, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Tribal Council hereby temporarily amends the SWO Code of Law, Chapter 38-31-01, that the curfew for all children under the age of eighteen (18) will be enforced twenty-four (24) hours a day, unless accompanied by a parent or legal guardian; and

FURTHER, BE IT RESOLVED, that these adoptions and amendments shall take effect April 2, 2020 at 12:00 AM, and shall be effective until further notice; and

FINALLY, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Tribal Council of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate hereby respectfully requests the assistance off all SWO Tribal Members to help reduce and slow the spread of COVID-19, by following the guidelines and recommendations as outlined in this Resolution and attached Order.

We, the Undersigned duly elected Tribal Chairman and Tribal Secretary of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Council, do hereby certify that the above resolution was duly adopted by the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Council, which is composed of 10 members (representing a total of 15 Tribal Council weighted votes and two Executive Committee votes for a total of 17 votes) of whom 10 constituting a quorum, were present at a Tribal Council meeting, duly noticed, called, convened and held at the TiWakan Tio Tipi, Agency Village, South Dakota, April 1, 2020 by a vote of 17 for, 0 opposed, 0 abstained, 0 absent from vote, 1 not voting, and that said Resolution has not been rescinded or amended in any way.

Dated this 1st day of April 2020.

Signed by Tribal Chairman Donovan White and Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson.

Highlights of Tribal Council April 1st special meeting

Tribal Council met in a special session last Wednesday, April 1, 2020. Due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and to encourage social distancing, Tribal Council members were allowed to participate in this meeting via conference call.

*Motion to have Tribal Lobbyist Mark Van Norman draft language to send to the North Dakota and South Dakota Senators and Congresspersons, to include gaming facilities in the Paycheck Protection Program funding.

*Motion to transfer the management and supervision of the Barker Hill Housing - Phase II Project to Sisseton-Wahpeton Housing Authority (from Dakota Nation Development Corp., which was suspended).

*Motion to select IDS+A for the initial 20% Architectural/Engineering Planning Services for the SWO Detention Center, in the not-to-exceed amount of $300,000.00, with the BIA Detention Center Grant as the funding source, and to authorize Tribal Chairman Donovan White to execute the contract pending legal review, and to submit the necessary paperwork to the BIA for the initial grant drawdown.

*Motion to hire Wipfli LLP CPAs and Consultants to assist Dakota Crossing Grocery Store with accounting needs, and to provide COVID-19 bailout relief services to the Tribe, to be managed by the Planning Director, in the not-to-exceed amount of $25,000.00 per month, with the Settlement account as the funding source, and these funds will be reimbursed with the Coronavirus Relief Funds when received, and to authorize Tribal Chairman Donovan White to execute the contract, pending legal review.

*Motion to hire Steven Gunn as a Special Attorney, to assist with the loan and grant packages for the CARES Act, to be managed by the Planning Director, in the not-to-exceed amount of $7,500.00 per month, with the Settlement account as the funding source, and these funds will be reimbursed with the Coronavirus Relief Funds when received, and to authorize Tribal Chairman Donovan White to execute the contract, pending legal review.

*Motion to hire Mark Van Norman as a Special Consultant, in addition to his lobbyist duties, to assist the Planning Director with identifying grant funding and infrastructure opportunities, in the not-to-exceed amount of $2,500.00 per month, with the Settlement account as the funding source, and these funds will be reimbursed with the Coronavirus Relief Funds when received, and to authorize Tribal Chairman Donovan White to execute the contract, pending legal review.

*Motion in resolution form, that due to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, to request from the IHS Great Plains Area Office to utilize space at the Sisseton IHS Service Unit as a hospital for COVID-19 patients, and to request the IHS Great Plains Area Office to allocate additional funding to provide staff, beds, ventilators, and other necessary equipment for this purpose.

*Motion to have the Tribal Vice-Chairman research the possibility of refinancing all SWO loans at lower interest rates.

*Motion to authorize the Tiospa Zina Tribal School, Enemy Swim Day School, Head Start, and Early Head Start to close until May 1, 2020, to protect the health and safety of the students and staff, and to authorize the schools to provide meals and continued learning for students.

*Motion to approve the SWO COVID-19 Taskforce Response Plan, with changes, and to have the Tribal Vice-Chairman in charge of this effort and to establish the SWO COVID-19 task force and meeting schedule, with daily/weekly updates to be provided to Tribal Council. (See news article from the Vice-Chairman's Facebook live/KXSW/CNB broadcast from Thursday, April 2.)

Vice-Chairman Johnson announces COVID-19 task force response team

Agency Village, SD – April 2, 2020 – In a Facebook live/KXSW broadcast today, SWO Tribal Vice-Chairman Eddie Johnson announced he is organizing a SWO COVID-19 task force and will be working with the community, providing updates over Facebook and KXSW at least weekly.

Tribal Council passed the following motion to have the Vice-Chairman create the task force:

Motion no. 16 (April 1, 2020): made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Myrna Thompson, question by Francis Crawford, to approve the SWO COVID-19 Taskforce Response Plan, with changes, and to have the Tribal Vice-Chairman in charge of this effort and to establish the SWO COVID-19 Taskforce and meeting schedule, with daily/weekly updates to be provided to Tribal Council.

Weighted vote: 9 for – Milton Owen (2), Louis Johnson (1), Francis Crawford (2), Curtis Bissonette (2), Tribal Vice-Chairman (1), Tribal Secretary (1); 8 opposed – Cheryl Owen (3), Winfield Rondell Jr. (3), Lisa Jackson (2).

Here are highlights/excerpts from the broadcast.

The Vice-Chairman wished the Oyate "good afternoon" and apologized.

"I'm sorry, I was supposed to be on yesterday," he said, and explained that Council had run late in the afternoon.

He said he "wanted to come on to try and answer some questions."

"I know there's questions that haven't been answered and people have concerns and I just wanted to come on and give you some information and also that there's a task force that's going to be coming up to keep the community more informed and also involved."

"As of right now, it's new."

"I'll be working on that."

Vice-Chairman Johnson said there was a meeting planned Friday afternoon to put the team in place.

He reported that Tom Wilson "will be on that team so that any information that we talk about at this meeting … he can broadcast or bring it on afterwards."

The Vice-Chairman said that he had contacted Community Health Education to have someone from that program designated to serve on the taskforce.

He invited those listening (on the radio) or viewing on Facebook or the CNB TV channel to ask questions.

"Tom will be reading them to me."

He said that while waiting for questions, he had information to "get this started."

He acknowledged "information overload … that everybody's been having, but it's … so it sticks with people and it gets to be a habit of doing things such as self distancing, self quarantining, self monitoring, practic(ing) social distancing."

"I know it's getting tiring and people want to be outside, especially the past few days when it's been really nice out, but all this information that I have here is going to be sent to Tom. He'll be putting it on the radio station website and (information) from Coteau … also from South Dakota (Dept. of Health), but all this information will be put on Tom's Facebook site."

Eddie talked about the task force.

"Our main objective is having our essential travel plan for Tribal government and also the community plan so it's two emergency plans that we'll be working on … we'll have the essential people working on this."

"But … we'll be asking for some community members and their help too and input during these meetings so that the community can ask questions and we can answer them as we keep going, or after the meeting, just so that people's questions get answered."

"Some of the questions that came up (are about) overflow."

"We are talking with IHS to see if we can do that … (utilize the WWKMHCC) as an overflow."

"Have not heard anything back yet."

"Test kits."

"I believe is at 37 that the Secretary reported for IHS."

"And I believe Coteau is up to about 60."

Eddie explained there are certain requirements that must be met before a person can get tested, and these he said would be available on Tom's Facebook page.

But "you can call in 605-698-7681 if you are experiencing extreme difficulty breathing, constant chest pain or pressure, severe constant dizziness or lightheadedness, slurred speech, difficult waking up…."

"These are some of the symptoms that you should call in first to see what's going on, if they want you to come in and be tested."

He acknowledged the lack of enough test kits to check everyone.

"Why can't we just test everybody?"

"There is a shortage out there."

He said he had "been on calls with IHS and I know we have a Telehealth program that's going through IHS right now."

"I did ask if some of the dollars that are coming from HHS can be used to upgrade our Telehealth so that people don't have to be coming in."

He said these issues will be discussed by the task force team.

"What I'd like to see, is … we can start delivering essentials to (those) in need, where they're quarantined, or elders that don't want to go out in the public to get their stuff."

The Vice-Chairman said he would like to have a process for Oyate to place orders.

"They can just order what they need and (have) it be delivered."

"That is something that we're going to be discussing on this team … (getting this and other issues) resolved … so we do not have people being in groups in public places or businesses."

Vice-Chairman read from the Sisseton IHS Healthcare Center Response plan for patient services and said that information will be on Facebook.

(See the plan elsewhere in this issue of your Sota.)

He told the Oyate that if anyone wants this, or other information, they can call his office.

At this point, Eddie was joined by Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson.

"I would like to thank the Secretary for joining."

"I know she had a conference call."

"We have been on conference calls every day that last a couple of hours at a time."

He acknowledged still more remained scheduled that afternoon.

The Vice-Chairman brought up a "self-isolation questionnaire."

He said it is on Facebook but could be sent to emails if requested.

He said that Community Health Educator Gypsy Wanna "said she'd be able to set up a survey monkey to do … this questionnaire."

"That would be … their name, address and district."

"Do you live alone?"

"Do you have a phone?"

"Does anyone come in and out of your home?"

"Are you self isolated without direct contact with anyone?"

"If you're not provided with food and supplies, would be willing to self isolate with other elders?"

"Are there children under 13 in your household?"

"Are you the primary caregiver?"

"Would you need to bring children under 13 with you if you were to self isolate?"

"If you are choosing not to self isolate for your own protection, what are your reasons?"

He described it as "a simple basic questionnaire so we can get … a screenshot of what we need to be working on and dealing with."

"There's also a COVID emergency application for food distribution, and volunteer work forms."

"I will have more information on the volunteer work forms," he said, and said that the task force will be looking for volunteers.

"We'll have to set up a phone line or email to get all the people that want to … volunteer so we can get them these forms."

"Mainly," he said, "this project is just to help (EMT Coordinator) Jim Pearson and the Tribal Police and the community so that we can all stay informed and keep ourselves safe and free from the spread of COVID."

"Last but not least, this is sort of a touchy one I know for people, and I'm sorry to hear from all those that are grieving right now, but there is the chance of having deaths and there is information on it."

"We will putting it out on Facebook, but it's just protecting ourselves and our loved ones during vulnerable times."

"It touches on common practices that are going on because we're accustomed to certain things, with gathering, with distant relatives, feeding, giveaway, gatherings, but this pretty much tells you what's recommended."

"Feeding and cleaning, create a team of less than 10 people to prepare and serve food, reminding them to wash hands and wear gloves."

"Serve plates instead of serving lines."

"Consider delivering food to elderly."

"Eating area should allow for people to be safe distance apart, at least six feet."

"Small team to disinfect all areas consistently, remove all others hand sanitizer pumps."

"Funerals should have a 20 to 25 person limit at one time."

"Consider live streaming services."

"Consider giving viewing times for high risk in increments of five people at a time."

"Multiple night wake, different days, high risk elderly on one day, others on a different day."

"Keep overnight wake services to immediate family."

"Shorter services, no giveaway ... focus on the one year memorial."

"Limit children attendance and do not allow for children to run around."

"These are just recommendations," he said.

"It's not telling you, you have to do this."

"It's just giving you info on how it can slow down the spread."

"Of course, we don't want to infect anybody in large group areas to spread it even more."

"But this will be put on Facebook and I'm putting the information in the Sota."

"I'd like to ask the Secretary if she's wanting to give us an update on her conference calls or whatever she may have for information."

"Good afternoon, Oyate," the Secretary began.

"Thank you for listening in today."

She said that she had a couple of updates and did not "want to reiterate what the Vice-Chairman already said."

"But," she reminded everyone, "self isolation is the best defense that we have against the coronavirus at this time, which is why we're encouraging the social distancing and implementing regulations…."

She said now that children are out of school, she would like to have families "keep them on their normal schedules and the bedtimes still the same."

The Tribal Secretary acknowledged that sometimes families are "cohabitating in one unit."

"And if there's neighbors coming over all hours of the night, whatever, and these children aren't getting the sleep that they need, it's going to lower those immune systems."

"That goes for the elders in your families also, the grandparents, because if people are out and about in the community and then they're coming back to see their grandma or they're coming home, whatever the case may be, we don't know what is being brought back as far as the germs…."

She urged the Oyate "to take those precautions when you do come home to sanitize, wash your hands for 20 seconds with soap and water and they're saying to even change your clothing and take a shower."

She emphasized that "this coronavirus is very real."

"I cannot stress that enough."

"This is a very serious matter and it is in the community and what I'm afraid of that it could explode."

"It could explode and once it does, are we prepared?"

"I don't think we are prepared at this time and we don't have everything that we need at this time."

To slow spreading the virus, she encouraged "the social distancing and all the precautions that we need to take."

"We need to take them very seriously and to keep your children safe because it's attacking all ages. It's not just one age group that is being attacked by this virus."

"And social distancing, that's our best defense…."

"We need to take all of these recommendations seriously and to do whatever you need to do to keep your own family safe."

"There's personal responsibility here that we need to take seriously and as parents and grandparents, we need to protect our children, our grandchildren and people, you need to protect your grandparents, your families, and not to be going out and about and coming in contact with all these people."

"The safest thing to do is when you're sneezing or coughing to do so in a Kleenex and then throw that away and then sanitize your hands."

"The social distancing is to prevent the spread of the virus."

"They talk about the flattening the curve."

"So if the curve is up like this, and here's the line," she gestured showing a tall spike, "without any social distancing or any precautions, that virus could hit us way up here."

"But if we flatten the curve by doing all the things that we need to do with the social distancing and sanitary mechanisms, then we can flatten that curve."

"Here's the line, we can just stay under the line, a lot of people don't need to get infected."

By not following the guidelines, she said "We could get infection way up here in our population."

"But if we do all the social distancing and everything else that's recommended, we can keep that down below this line where not so many people are affected."

"Because once it hits it seems to go really fast and many of you probably have been watching the news."

The Secretary shared what Tiospa Zina Tribal School is doing.

"Middle school and high school packets are going to be mailed out April 6th."

"Elementary packets will be delivered by elementary staff who volunteered to help on Monday, April 6th."

"Sack lunches are still going to be handed out on Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 11 to 1 in the back of Tiospa Zina Tribal School."

"Families get enough for two lunches and two breakfasts."

"A lot of the teachers are reaching out on Facebook to provide online resources and to be available for the students."

"The teachers turned in lesson plans for packets and the teachers also sent home explanations of activities in the packets for students."

"The teachers are required to reach out to their students through the phone, Facebook online."

She reported that "Enemy Swim is still helping their families with food."

"Head Start may be making some food baskets for their head Start students and families."

She said that on a call that morning, she reached out to Sisseton IHS CEO Randy Jordan requesting "masks and thermometers so we can implement some of these mechanisms in our House of Hope shelter and the warming house and to help our security at the Tribal building to keep them safe."

"Because we're still getting traffic of course, because business still has to get conducted."

"We're doing our part to try to keep the staff safe."

"We have instituted mechanisms at the Tribal office and you'll see that if you come there, there's questionnaires that security is giving you and then applications are at the front."

"If you need to fill out an application to help with food … you can do that."

"The elderly food coupons are on schedule," she said.

"The Vice-Chairman was given the responsibility to organize a COVID-19 task force."

"They (task force) are going to be helping to get those processes in place for the food coupons because we want to keep the social distancing as much as possible."

"We are doing our very best to keep the community informed and to keep that help coming to those that need the help."

"So if you need help, the applications are at the front at the Tribal administration building and they will call us, so we will respond," she said.

The Vice-Chairman spoke, saying "The Tribe is moving forward as best they can with the applications."

"They are in the front entrance."

"They have dropboxes for … TANF, medical appointments, etc."

He said, "Hopefully tomorrow, we'll start having more point of contacts for this task force and the information that we'll be handing out a point of contacts to hand in the surveys…."

"Biggest thing is, ask questions."

"Like I said before, I asked Tom to be on this team so that he can get questions and information from people that on this task force might not think of and it's coming from the community and we understand the community's concerns."

He said he hoped that by Friday afternoon there would be a list of persons serving on the task force.

"We will keep you updated on a regular basis."

"Number one on that list is communications, and that's why I asked Tom to be on there."

He said the task force will be expanding food distribution "not just for elders, but for even 18 to 54."

He said Council had talked about it.

"What can we start doing to help these people that are in need … 18 to 54."

Secretary Myrna Thompson added that "If you have access to the internet, you can go to CDC.GOV or FEMA.GOV and seek out your own information because everything that we're telling you is on (there) and a lot more."

She expressed thanks to the Community Health Education program for getting out information, specifically Gypsy Wanna and Audrey German.

Tom brought up the question of hospital bed "overflow."

The Secretary said that in a conference call that morning with Coteau des Prairie and IHS, use of the WWKHCC for overflow was discussed.

She said, "Mr. Jordan (IHS CEO) said "there is a process to follow to cut through the red tape' so (it) is in the initial discussion phase right now."

"It is," she said, "a discussion that we must have."

Tom asked the Vice-Chairman to explain what is meant by "an essential employee."

Eddie explained, "An essential employee right now is one that needs to…"

"We have Workplace and Time Matrix, and certain software and programs on our computers."

"They are able to work remotely, but there's some employees that need to come in, because there's work that has to be done at the Tribe."

"Processing checks, because we don't have portable printers for processing checks (and) for … deliveries coming in. That has slowed down though, because we did a freezing on our spending right now."

He gave an example, "Essential employees would include Jim, Emergency Management."

Eddie said that "it's keeping our employees safe too … we rotate them on a daily basis."

Essential, he said "is considered what keeps the Tribe running, and so that we can still get the services that our Tribe has to the membership."

The Tribal Secretary added, "And law enforcement is an essential function."

"Child Protection."

"The managers were identified as essential employees because of the business that has to be conducted, the TANF checks, the child support checks, all those needs."

"The foster parent payments."

Tom asked a question about what the Tribe would do with "people … coming on the Res from different places, visiting, or doing fishing, or whatever."

"Should we report them?"

Tom continued "There should come … a point where we should be doing something like that, to keep people from coming up and bringing stuff here, or vice versa."

"They could be taking things here, taking it back to wherever they're coming from."

Eddie replied, "I believe that it's not really spelled out in the resolution … just stop and question them, I guess, is what we can do right now."

"I understand everybody's concern," said the Vice-Chairman.

"And I don't know if you really want to report them."

"But this can be something that can go into the plan that we will be starting, on how we're going to address visitors."

"Are we going to keep them from coming in?"

"Do a test first before they come?"

"Where they come from?"

He encouraged more questions to be brought to the station that "we can address … with our management plan, our emergency central staff … that's going to be developed."

Myrna Thompson added, "I think one thing we have to remember, is that we're all in this together, and the community of Sisseton, the city council, the commissioners, there's discussions with them also."

"We have to all be working together because we all live in the same community."

"And we need to help them, and they need to help us, because a lot of the people that come in from other states or communities, they could be non-Indian, too."

"We don't have jurisdiction over the non-Indians."

She called it "a discussion I think that needs to take place with the city council and the county commissioners."

Tom suggested that badges be printed for the essential workers to wear, to identify them when they go to work.

He asked if there is a list of names of people wo are the essential workers.

The Vice-Chairman consulted his aide Sonny LaBlanc, who confirmed that yes, there is a list.

Eddie said it is on the website and is "always changing, so we'll be updating."

He talked about the website link for essential employees.

"It's mainly all our program managers with their phone numbers, so that anybody still needs any travel resources, that they can go to our website, and look up the essential employees and phone them."

He mentioned what if people do not have access and said, "That's why we're starting this team."

"We've had many comments of having flyers, doing the radio."

"Tom said he could set up the radio while we do things like this so that people that don't have Facebook or internet can listen on the radio, and it's all part of the plan right now."

"And like I said, number one on that plan is our communication."

The Tribal Secretary added, "The Tribe does have this COVID-19 pandemic plan, overall plan, and then also all the programs under the administration of the Tribal Secretary and the (inaudible)."

"They submitted a continuation plan of operations for their programs."

"I'm pretty proud of all the managers because they submitted their plans."

"So, they all have their own plans in here and so, if they are working from home, they all got their computers modified by IT, so they can work from home."

"So, the Vice-Chairman said that there's basically a rotation of staff right now."

"There's usually a manager, and then essential staff that they identified, and then the manager will rotate with that essential staff."

"So, the work is progressing, the community is getting the services, and the travel and the medical checks are being done."

The Vice-Chairman said that the COVID-19 plan had been developed by Emergency Management Coordinator Jim Pearson.

Eddie said what he and the task force will be doing is modifying the plan, making it "geared towards … getting the people more information … getting (them) … answers, or know where to go to get the answers."

Tom brought up another question, about the elderly gift cards, "are they in the mail?"

"As of right now," said Eddie, "we have Property and Supply going to get the cards today."

"So, they're not in the mail yet, but they will be getting out shortly, hopefully Monday."

The Tribal Secretary confirmed, "Yes, Monday."

"Next week."

Tom asked about the curfew.

He wanted to know if it is "just aimed towards young adults or is it going to be for everybody?"

"And what if somebody is caught past curfew, are they ticketed?"

There was a discussion of penalties.

The Tribal Secretary said, "They will get a warning, a verbal warning to get home."

"And if it is the same person violating the curfew, then the second one will be a fine."

"And the third one," she explained, "would be a fine and incarceration."

The Vice-Chairman added, "Potential (incarceration)."

He said the "biggest reason" for the curfew is "a lot of youth running around."

"We do not know if they are going into homes.…"

"It is tough to say, 'You can't go do this, you can't do that.'"

"But us, as Council and Executives, our main objective is to keep you informed, and try and keep this minimal as possible, and we need your help to do that."

He referred to "steps trying to keep our community safe, and our elders safe."

And "it is an unknown … how far this will go and how long it will be."

"We just want to take precautions now before, so it won't get to be severe as say New York, or the other countries…."

Tom asked another question, how it would be "if we shut down the incoming to Housing areas to just the tenants, and not open it up to everybody."

The Vice-Chairman said that the task force would look into that issue.

"Maybe with the volunteers we have, that can be set up."

He again encouraged "bringing us the questions and when this plan gets started, we will get the ball rolling … trying to answer all these questions."

Tribal Secretary commented, "I want to stress that this is a personal responsibility of families."

"To slow the spread of this virus, we need not to be going into each other's homes at this time, at least for the next 30 days."

"That's the only way we're going to slow the spread … the social distancing."

"That's our best defense right now."

"So, people, if you can refrain from going into each other's houses, and visiting late at night. …"

"I'm especially worried about the children."

"They should be staying on schedule, and getting to bed on time."

"When you're tired and run down that your immune system goes down."

"Everybody needs to take responsibility and self police themselves, police themselves and try not to be going out and about and then taking it home."

"Try not to be going out and about and going to see your grandma because we have to help keep our families safe."

"And it's up to the families to do that."

She said, "Part of the curfew is for people not to be traveling during the night and going from house to house…."

"I want to stress that, because this is very serious, people need to realize that this is serious."

"You are not prisoners in your house, because you can still go out and about and do your business, go to your medical appointments, go mail your bills, go get groceries."

"When your children are home playing in the yard, that's fine."

"But other children, from other homes, should not be coming and playing with your children in the yard, and they should not be going to those homes."

The kids are out of school for a reason, and they should not be at somebody else's house playing video games."

"They should be in their own house or in their own yard."

"The social distancing applies to families, to keep their families safe."

"That means in your own house."

And too, if you get to the extreme states, then they designate one person in the family to go to the store to go do your business, unless it's a medical appointment."

"We need to take this serious."

"This is very serious."

"And if it gets here and it's already here, it could rapidly spread."

"That's what we're afraid of."

"This could explode and I'm not being panicky, but this is realistic because it's based on … (as) Governor Noem says, scientific data, and it shows that it can spread fast."

"We have to take the necessary precautions to prevent that from spreading on our reservations, because the reservations could be potentially a place where it can spread fast and affect a lot of our families."

The Vice-Chairman added, "This is a community wide effort and pandemic that we're dealing with and you guys need to be informed with everything that we got going on."

The Secretary said, "This pandemic is very serious and the more informed you get by reaching out and seeking information yourself from cdc.gov, fema.gov World Health Organization, you'll become more informed and you'll really see the seriousness of this situation."

She read off a check list "of the 30 days to slow the spread."

"Listen and follow directions of your local authorities, Tribal authorities, county."

"If you feel sick, stay home. Do not go to work."

"Contact your medical provider."

"If your children are sick, keep them at home."

"If someone in your household has tested positive for the coronavirus, keep the entire household at home."

"Do not go to work."

"Contact your medical provider."

"If you are an older person, stay home and away from other people."

"If you are a person with a serious underlying health condition that can put you at increased risk, for example, a condition that impairs your lung or heart function or weakens your system, stay home and away from other people."

"That's just for your own safety."

Tom thanked the two Executives "for coming on today and we'll plan on this next week some time."

"I think it was very informative for the COVID-19 pandemic."

*****

To view the entire broadcast online, go to the following url:

https://www.facebook.com/kxswfm.dakotahradio/videos/10157570215498477/

SWO member reports positive coronavirus test

Facebook post – April 2, 2020 – Urgent!

I have a story to tell! Read all the through!

Tuesday, I went into IHS for a Diabetic check up. They did the normal A1c testing and since I'm Diabetic with underlying conditions they tested for COVID-19.

Today at 2:09 p.m. central time I received a call that I tested positive for COVID-19.

It took me a bit to find a way to make this post, I had to secure my family first, made a few phone calls, set up appointment and such.

I am only going public as I do not know how, who, when or where I contracted it from!

I do know I have come in contact with many individuals in the last few weeks.

I do not have any answers for anyone if you ask.

I do ask you do not say anything bad, threaten my family, my kids, or anything.

I do not have the symptoms normally stated on the flyers.

Three weeks ago I did begin getting headaches with dizzy spells, an ear ache, sore throat, which drained into my chest!

I did go to Coteau clinic on March 24th, 2020 and was given antibiotics because the doctor assumed I only had an ear infection and sinus infection.

I had a day of my legs aching from the bones out and low energy.

My breathing is okay at the moment, no coughing.

So due to HIPPA laws my name could not be released or anything, just another confirmed case on the website.

I am taking the initiative to let it be known to the public to show the seriousness of this infection, and give anyone who possibly came in contact with me in the last three weeks to go in and get checked! (I am assuming three weeks since that's when I felt the earache.)

I have to self quarantine myself for the next 12 days by doctors order as there is no cure or medication for this; via today's phone call.

So no rude comments or death threats or whatever!

I feel I am doing a public service and only fair thing to do.

Instead of keeping silent and just seeing another number increase on the Roberts County numbers!

Follow-up to the Sota:

I debated and thought hard about posting it!

But I know it would not be fair to remain quiet since I have no idea when or where I contracted it.

The State of SD even thought it might have even gone as far back as late February – meaning I came across of thousands of people.

I think it is only fair to let them know, if they came in contact with me and feel symptoms they should can go in and or quarantine and settle for dealing with this virus.

I hope I did not infect anyone else or anyone with health issues like mine.

(Editor's note: Many thanks to Darrell for sharing with the public; without his coming forward others of our community could unknowingly be walking around with the virus.)

Dakota Crossing closes Friday for cleaning

Sisseton, SD – April 2, 2020 – Dakota Crossing will be closed to the public all day tomorrow, one day only.

Purpose is to clean and sanitize the store after learning that an employee had tested positive for coronavirus.

Manager Todd O'Riley posted the following message on Facebook Thursday night:

I work at Dakota Crossing.

I have just got off the phone with the CDC and EMS.

Dakota Crossing will be closed for Friday and reopen Saturday.

According to this phone call Dakota Crossing has taken the correct steps.

It will be completed when new air exchange filters for HVAC are installed tomorrow and a deep Sanitizer … will be misted into the air removing and stopping any present COVID-19

*****

The Tribe's grocery reopened Saturday morning, April 4.

Hours, as of April 1st, are from 7:00 a.m. until 8:00 p.m. daily.

From the official SWO Emergency Management Facebook page:

Saturday, April 4, 2020

11:30 a.m.

Tips: Stay at home!

If you must venture out to the store, make it quick, wear a mask and gloves, and dispose of them before you get back into your vehicle.

Wash your clothes when you get home and wipe products and your keys down with disinfectant.

Lastly, Shop Local! Our local economy depends on it!

Dakota Crossing has been thoroughly disinfected and is open for business!

Stay Safe and Healthy Oyate!

SWHA Director addresses Oyate via Facebook live/KXSW

Agency Village, SD – April 3, 2020 – Sisseton-Wahpeton Housing Authority Director Eric Shepherd addressed the Oyate in a Facebook live/KXSW/CNB broadcast this afternoon.

Announcer Tom Wilson introduced the Housing Director.

Eric began, saying "I just got this email not within the past hour here getting into the office … and checking on some things with our maintenance guys, making sure people are safe…."

"I want to reassure everybody that we are doing everything we possibly can with our funding partners and our technical assistance providers regarding the COVID-19 and the uncertainty of that in our area."

"On the bright side," he said, "I just wanted to make this announcement to our membership out there, all of our stakeholders."

He said the email had come from the office of South Dakota HUD Field Office Director Roger Jacobs, Sioux Falls, and is "tied to our NAHASDA funding."

Eric had Tom put up a photo of a funding chart.

Pointing to the numbers, Eric said it shows "everybody what the Sisseton-Wahpeton Housing Authority … the amount awarded to us … tied to our block grant."

"That's the amount … $1,125,675 … is what Sisseton-Wahpeton Housing Authority will see."

He called it "relief from our HUD funding."

"As soon as I opened up that email I messaged Tom … because I think this is news that our people deserve to hear and … showing our membership also that we are on top of this."

"We have been on top of this with our funding agency and the relief that was coming towards us and that should be hitting into our coffers within the next 30 days, if not sooner."

Eric asked if there were questions.

Tom: "What does this mean for the SWHA housing tenant?"

"The first thing that comes into mind here … there's a lot of losses and expenses and relief that we can provide to our tenants."

"And this is to help provide relief for our tenants."

"We manage over 638 units across our communities … our scattered sites of Housing."

The stimulus money, he reported, "is in addition to help with those costs and those are annual expenses."

Tom: "Will it be in effect in the next few months or so or how long will that take?"

The Housing Director explained, "We will be (using) our Housing block grant."

"Primarily, it benefits all of our low-income Tribal member families in our formula…."

Eric talked about the formula and how it "considers all of our local needs and Housing units that are managed by us…."

He gave a long list of services to which the stimulus funds may be applied.

Tom asked if it included "upgrading some of the houses."

"Absolutely," said the Housing Director, and he asked the Oyate to watch for more announcement to "be made soon."

Tom: "So, some of the Housing tenants can expect some improvements on their houses, right?"

"This is going to help us do even more than what we were going to do this coming year," Eric answered.

"So, yes."

Eric said he had requested "a wish list" from Maintenance supervisors and said some of their vehicle, "our fleet … many of them have close to … 300,000 miles."

"I cannot accommodate the whole thing," he said.

"But we will chip away at it as time comes."

"There's a number of allowable expenses."

Tom asked about "rent for this month and maybe next month too."

"The best way to send in rent right now," Eric said, "is through mail."

"A money order through the mail.

"We don't have a drop box here yet, but that's coming soon."

Eric gave the address:

605 Lydia Goodsell Street

Sisseton, South Dakota 57262

"So, that's the best way (by mail)."

There was a discussion of rent levels for different units and what relief might be available.

Tom asked about Barker Hill.

Eric said (about Barker Hill), "We are working towards solutions."

"That's a whole different funding stream there."

"Well, that is great news," said Tom.

"I am glad you came on and passed that forward, because it is always great news for our Housing (areas/tenants)."

"Thank you, Tom, for always being right there for us too," said Eric.

From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer

*VETERANS: You will not be charged by the VA if you have symptoms associated with the Coronavirus and go to the local ER; you need to call ahead and state you're a Veteran. But if you have all the symptoms that are identified below and are at the Emergency room stage please go – your life is not worth worrying about payment etc. Please take heed! If you are experiencing symptoms of fever, cough and shortness of breath and others. CDP stresses the importance to call first, 698-7681 so that they can prepare for you to arrive. Here are some websites for you to view: www.cd.gov or www.doh.sd.gov. For the latest VA updates on COVID-19, visit www.va.gov/coronavirus and of course the South Dakota Department of Health 1-800-997-2880 COVID 19 info.

*Temporary Extensions Granted For Driver License Expiration Date. Pierre, SD – Gov. Kristi Noem has signed legislation that gives allows for the extension as well tags for your vehicles. State driver license exam stations are currently closed statewide through May 2. For online renewals, click onto https://dps.sd.gov/driver-licensing/renew-and-duplicate/renew-online.

*VA NADL (NATIVE AMERICAN DIRECT HOME LOAN): NADL loans fall under the CARES act which means NADL borrowers are eligible for forbearance. But from what I can tell, no guidance has been issued specific to NADL.

*SISSETON WAHPETON SIOUX VETERANS CEMETERY: SWVC.ORG: The cemetery is open for families that are going up to visit their loved ones final resting place. We did close the administrative office as well as the bathroom facilities. We left the gates open for you and Gabe or myself are driving up daily to ensure its kept to National guideline standards. I will be sending a letter to all of the funeral homes that we do business with, with our email and cell phone as well as National Cemetery updates. I have been in contact with the NCA out of Washington DC and they are working with us, we had 2 headstone deliveries this week, they do have our cell numbers, they will continue to process headstone orders as well as cooperation with us as we continue to serve our Veterans should they need. We have been fortunate in that we haven't lost anyone during this Covid-19 pandemic. Please call either of us if you have any questions.

*3565, leave a message and they will call you back- if you have any questions of interruptions during the Covid-19 pandemic.

*VOC REHAB: Effective immediately the Dept. of VA will accept a typed signature on all forms related to the VR&E program. This includes application forms, as well as those used to request counseling and additional monthly benefits for veterans with qualifying dependents. This will make it easier for Veterans to get their benefits in a timely manner without having to leave their homes to find a fax machine. Additionally, there will be tele counseling available to meet with your counselor virtually through video connect. You will continue to receive your benefits even if the school changes classes to online campus. You will also be able to keep your VHA benefits if you go online as it's through no fault of your own, if you have any questions please call me and I can help direct you if I cannot answer your questions.

*Pandemic Prompts An Increase In Calls To Vets Crisis Line Please we encourage you or your families contact the Veterans Crisis Line: Dial: 1-800-273-8255, Press 1 or test the crisis line at 838255 also a chat online option is available: veteranscrisisline.net.

*WE ARE STILL WORKING VIA TECHNOLOGY: Gabe and I are available for you on our cell phones. I have contacted the VA regarding Veteran Appointments, all cardia rehab, physical therapy has been postponed, if you have appointments coming up please call me at 268-0502 and I will call the VA and find out the status of the appointment, we want to keep you all safe and adhere to all of the safety orders

*SWO EXECUTIVES passed a STAY AT HOME RESOLUTION ORDER unless it's for groceries, hospital services. Please do not take your children in the grocery stores keep their exposure to the most minimal amount possible. Now that Sisseton has a few positive cases we must take heed. Wear a mask out if you have one, use old grocery plastic bags to wear like a glove when you put gas in and dispose after each use. Call your elderly to check on them and to visit they are missing you all too. We are in this together so let's please keep each other safe. We can all do our part in flattening the curve, i.e. social distancing, washing your hands, self-isolate if sick. The higher the curve rises, the quicker the local health care system gets overloaded, a flatter curve on the other hand, assumes the same number of people who get infected but over a longer period of time, a slower infection rate means a less stressed health care system. Enjoy the time with your family and loved ones play cards, board games, do that mundane work at home that you never had time for. But most of all say your prayers, we will all get through this together. If you can listen to Pastor Vern Donnell, he is amazing and has such wonderful messages. His online Sunday Church is at 10:30. http://Sissetonfamilylifechurch.com/ tune in you won't be sorry. Also you can watch his Daily Word messages a few times a week M-W-F at Emily Brooks page on Facebook she shares it or friend FLAG Family Life Assembly of God church on FB.

*KIA WALL IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS: We are still working on this - We have picture for most of them but we do need photos for the following: Adolph BlueDog, Korea, Norman Crawford, Korea, Elmer Feather. WWII, Stanley Goodbird, WWI, Henry Greybuffalo, WWII, Ole Johnson, WWII, Norman Redthunder, WWII, Herman Thompson, WWII, and Jacob Wood, WWII. Please call me and I can come and get them scanned and returned to you for your safekeeping. OR email them to me at: GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov

*Again, please pray for our Veterans that are ill or fighting some sort of battle at this time. We have so many that are having health issues that need our prayers.

*PLEASE CALL ANY OF THE COMMANDERS AS WELL AS MYSELF OR GABE IF WE CAN HELP OR YOU NEED TO TALK.

*Mental Health resources for veterans and family members

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/covid/

http://maketheconnection.net/

https://www.vets4warriors.com/

VETERAN/ELDERLY EMERGENCY CONTACTS

*Kit Fox Society: Duane "Doc" Wanna 1-605-237-2168

*American Legion Post #314: Clayton Ellingson 1-605-924-1266

*Desert Era Veterans: Jesse Chanku 1-605-956-0197

*Gabe Fischer 1-605-419-1007

*Geri Opsal 268-0502

SWO GIS links to COVID-19 interactive maps

Regional Dashboard Map of Tri-State Totals

https://arcg.is/0rmCCG

 

Regional Map COVID-19

https://arcg.is/T9vem

 

Worldwide Map COVID-19

https://arcg.is/Pji0n

SWHA posts signs at elderly complexes

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Housing Authority (SWHA) maintenance staff have been posting signs at the elderly complexes:

RESIDENTS ONLY.

Housing Director Eric Shepherd writes on Facebook:

Doing our part in the community to keep our elders safe from this pandemic.

We are also providing a case of water at each unit compliments of Dakota Magic.

Buffalo meat was also donated by Gerald German to our elders who accepted.

Pidamiya for all the combined efforts.

Memo to SWO Tribal for-profit business managers

Agency Village, SD – April 3, 2020 – Planning Director Michael Roberts submitted the following memo to the for-profit businesses offering assistance in applying for SBA guaranteed paycheck loans. According to the CARES Act, these loans are forgiven if used for businesses to keep employees working during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The CARES Act set aside $349 billion for PPP loans through the Small Business Administration. The SBA issued its Final Interim Rule last night on the Paycheck Protection Program. Tribal businesses are eligible for forgivable loans under the program. Beginning today, April 3, tribal businesses can apply for loans through the PPP. The loan amount is up to 250% of average monthly payroll. The interest rate is 1%. The maturity date is 2 years. Loans are intended to fund payroll for 8-weeks and certain other qualifying expenses. As long as tribal business uses at least 75% of the loan proceeds for payroll and the other 25% for other qualifying expenses, the loan will be forgiven at the end of the 8-week period following issuance of the loan. (Any amounts not used for qualifying expenses must be paid back at 1% interest.)

Attached to this Memo are the following documents:

SBA FAQs on PPP (including how to apply).

Sample application form for PPP.

Chamber of Commerce Guide and Checklist on PPP

Checklist

1.  Identify Tribal Businesses for PPP Loans.

Tribal businesses with fewer than 500 employees are eligible, but for now, according to the SBA's rules, gaming businesses are not eligible. Casino restaurants and casino hotels are eligible as long as they are separate from the casino. Mark Van Norman is working to get the SBA to amend its rules on casino eligibility to confirm to the plain language of the CARES Act, which indicates an intent by Congress to make PPP loans available to all small businesses, without exclusions.

2.  Identify Banks Making PPP Loans.

PPP loans are made by local banks. We will want to confirm that the Tribe's regular lenders are willing and able to make PPP loans. We are available to assist in reaching out to banks to see if they are participating in the PPP.

3.  Complete PPP Loan Applications for Each Tribal Business

A sample application for PPP loans is attached. It is very short and very easy to complete. Lenders are directed to rely on borrower certifications. The normal procedures for SBA loans have been suspended for this program.

4.  Compile Supporting Documentation for Each Tribal Business

For each tribal business applying for a loan under the Paycheck Protection Program, we will need the following documentation:

*IRS Form W3 for 2019

*IRS Forms W2 for 2019

*IRS Form 941 for 2019 (all 4 quarters) and 2020 (1st quarter)

*Payroll summaries (or payroll data) for the last year (April 1, 2019, to March 31, 2020)

We may also need documentation of the following, if they are applicable for each business:

*mortgage interest payments

*rent payments

*utility payments

*interest payments on debts incurred before Feb. 15, 2020

Banks will begin making PPP loans on April 3, 2020, and the loans will be approved on a first come, first served basis until the money runs out.

Please email everything to: michaelroberts@swo-nsn.gov

Summary of tribal resources in US Congressional stimulus package

By A. Gay Kingman

Executive Director

Great Plains Tribal Chairman's Association

Here is a brief summary for Tribal Nations, of what is in the Legislation that was just passed and signed into Law. H.R. 748 - Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act.

On March 27, 2020, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, H.R. 748, was signed into law. The bill is the third COVID-19 legislative package and includes $2 billion in relief to address the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. The original introduced version of H.R. 748 (S. 3548) had very few provisions for tribal nations. However, in response to Indian Country's tireless, unified advocacy, the final legislation included an unprecedented level of investment in and resources for tribal response and recovery efforts. The following is a summary of the tribal provisions:

Economic Development & Employment

Provides $454 billion for loans, loan guarantees, and investments in support of the Federal Reserve's lending facilities to eligible businesses, states, tribal nations, and municipalities

Provides an $8 billion set-aside for tribal nations from the Coronavirus Relief Fund to use for expenditures incurred due to the COVID-19 public health emergency

Makes Tribal Business Concerns eligible for the Small Business Act Section 7(a) program, which will provide 100 percent federal loan guarantees up to $10 million to cover costs such as employee salaries, paid sick leave/medical leave, mortgages/rents, and employee health insurance premiums

Authorizes the federal government to provide a 50 percent reimbursement for the cost of unemployment compensation to tribal nations that are reimbursement-option employers

Makes tribal fishery participants eligible for assistance from the Department of Commerce, including direct relief payments

Tribal Governance & Housing / Community Development

$453 million for Indian Affairs Operation of Indian Programs until September 30, 2021

$300 million authorized through September 30, 2024 for Department of Housing and Urban Development Native American Programs:

$200 million for the Indian Housing Block Grants (IHBG) formula

$100 million for Indian Community Development Block Grants (ICDBG)

Health, Education, & Nutrition

Health

$1.032 billion for Indian Health Services

Up to $65 million is for electronic health record stabilization and support

Not less than $450 million will be distributed through IHS directly operated programs and to tribes and tribal organizations under the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act, and through contracts with or grants to urban Indian organizations under Title V of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act

$125 million may be transferred to and merged with the "Indian Health Service, Indian Health Facilities" account

Not less than $15 million from the Health Resources and Services Administration for telehealth and rural health activities

Not less than $15 million for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Health Surveillance Program

Not less than $15 million from the Public Health Service and Social Services Emergency Fund for essential medical resources

Not less than $125 million set aside from the Centers for Disease Control - Wide Activities and Program Support account

Extension of the Special Diabetes Program for Indians through November 30, 2020

$4.5 million for tribal domestic violence shelters through the Family Violence and Prevention Services Act (10 percent tribal set-aside from $45 million overall)

Extension of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program through November 30, 2020

$20 million for the Older Americans Act, Tribal Nutrition Program, which provides funds for the delivery of nutrition services to American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian elders

$900 million for Low Income Home Energy Assistance (LIHEAP), which includes Tribal LIHEAP

Education

$69 million for Operation of Indian Education Programs until September 30, 2021

Not less than $20 million shall be for Tribal Colleges and Universities

$78,000 for the Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and Arts Development

Education Stabilization Fund:

$153.75 million set aside for programs operated or funded by the Bureau of Indian Education

$1.046 billion for Minority Serving Institutions, which include but are not limited to, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions, and Native American Serving Non-tribal Institutions

Access to Institute of Museum and Library Services grants:

$50 million to states, territories, and tribal nations to expand digital network access, purchase internet accessible devices, and provide technical support services

Any matching funds requirements for tribal nations are waived for grants

Bureau of Indian Education and tribally-controlled schools are eligible for Department of Education waivers for statutory and regulatory requirements related to assessments, accountability, and reporting requirements, in addition to grant requirements such as restrictions on carryover funding and certain requirements under the Student Supports and Academic Enrichment Grants program, including the needs assessment, certain spending restrictions, and the limitation on technology spending

Nutrition

$100 million for the Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR):

$50 million for facility improvements and equipment upgrades

$50 million for costs relating to additional food purchases

$8.8 billion for Child Nutrition Programs

Homeland Security

REAL ID Act deadline has been extended to September 30, 2021

COVID-19 relief for SD families and businesses

Launches COVID-19 Resources Page on website

Sioux Falls, SD – April 2, 2020 – U.S. Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.) today launched a microsite to provide South Dakotans with important up-to-date information about the COVID-19 pandemic. The microsite features news and updates from Thune, and it includes informative documents and resources related to the recently enacted CARES Act. It also features links to South Dakota-specific information to help workers, families, and small businesses better navigate this crisis. The microsite will continue to highlight the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's latest information, updates, and guidelines.

"This newly launched resources page will hopefully serve as a one-stop-shop for South Dakotans who are looking for tools and information to help them through this highly uncertain time," said Thune. "In addition to South Dakota-specific information related to support and relief efforts, it will also serve as a hub for news and updates from me and my staff in Washington and throughout South Dakota. The site highlights relevant information regarding the ongoing pandemic, including how the federal government is working to provide folks in our state with critically important assistance to weather this storm."

You can access the microsite at www.thune.senate.gov/COVID19, www.thune.senate.gov/coronavirus, or by clicking on the "important update" banner on the homepage of his website, www.thune.senate.gov.

CARES Act assistance information available on Rounds' website

Pierre, SD – April 2, 2020 – U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) has created an online hub where South Dakotans can access information about COVID-19 relief available to them through the CARES Act, which was signed into law last week.

The webpage can be found by visiting www.rounds.senate.gov/covid19. Up-to-date information about COVID-19 from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) is also available on Rounds' website.

"South Dakotans have many questions about the type of federal assistance they can get to make it through the COVID-19 outbreak, and how they should access it," said Rounds. "Through our online hub, we've attempted to create a one-stop-shop for folks to find answers to their questions. Many of the programs authorized by the CARES Act are in the process of being implemented by the federal government. As the various departments issue guidance for their specific programs, we will update the information on our webpage. In the meantime, if South Dakotans have specific questions that aren't answered on our webpage, they are welcome to call our office and we'll work to find the answer. We want to be sure that families and businesses have the resources they need during this uncertain time."

South Dakotans can contact Sen. Rounds by calling his Aberdeen, Rapid City, Sioux Falls and Pierre offices. Contact information for each office is below:

Aberdeen: (605) 225-0366

Rapid City: (605) 343-5035

Sioux Falls: (605) 336-0486

Pierre: (605) 224-1450

Working through COVID-19 together

By Rep. Dusty Johnson

April 3, 2020

Like other businesses across the country, my office has had to dramatically shift how we operate as we fight COVID-19 as a nation. Congress began implementing teleworking procedures nearly a month ago and my office is following social distancing and work-from-home protocols that the CDC has recommended.

Thankfully, modern technology allows us to keep our phone lines on, our emails open, and our casework operations functioning. I've been able to host a tele-town hall focused on your questions about COVID-19 every single week since the CDC began implementing social distancing. I want to be clear – if you need assistance during COVID-19, we are up and running, and we can help you if you contact our office.

I recognize the ability to telework is not available to everyone, especially in states like South Dakota, where many of our businesses are in rural locations without access to quality internet. That's why I felt it was important to support the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, which will provide relief to businesses facing hard times during this pandemic.

The CARES Act is geared toward American families and small businesses. During my recent tele-town hall, more than two hundred South Dakotans had a specific question about their job or business. The CARES Act was passed with the goal of ensuring small businesses, non-profits, tribal businesses, and veterans organizations keep folks on their payroll. If your business is struggling because of COVID-19's impact, you are likely eligible for a Small Business Administration (SBA) Paycheck Protection Program loan. If you use this "loan" to cover the cost of your payroll, rent, mortgage interest, or utilities for an eight-week period, the loan will be forgiven if you keep employees on payroll. During this time of economic uncertainty, it's crucial businesses utilize this program and keep folks on the payroll.

As of today, you can apply through any existing SBA 7(a) lender or through any federally insured depository institution, federally insured credit union, and Farm Credit System institution that is participating in the Paycheck Protection Program.

Small businesses aren't the only ones being impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Our farmers and ranchers are feeling it too. I've taken this period of tele-working to host conference calls with our producer groups like the South Dakota Cattlemen, South Dakota Stockgrowers, and South Dakota Ag & Rural Leadership Alumni. They've all told me times are tough. Just like I'm fighting for South Dakota's small businesses, I'm fighting for our ag producers – that's why along with 140 Members of Congress, including Senator Thune and Senator Rounds, I led a letter to Secretary Perdue requesting swift assistance to cattle producers with resources we worked to get included in the CARES Act.

Most of us have never faced times like this before, but when times get tough, South Dakotans get tougher. We will get through this together, and if you need assistance please do not hesitate to contact one of my offices.

Together, we can do this

By Governor Kristi Noem

April 3, 2020

With the COVID-19 situation continuing to be very fluid in South Dakota, it is important for us to remember that this a marathon, not a sprint. In today's 24/7 news cycle, the information coming at us on TV or social media can easily overwhelm us.

By now, many of you have heard me say that I'm relying on the science, facts, and data to drive the state's response to the virus. Our team's decision-making is guided by the realities on the ground in South Dakota, rather than trying to apply a one-size-fits-all approach.

My role with respect to public safety is something I take very seriously. But it's also important for us to remember that it's the people themselves who are primarily responsible for their safety. Under our Constitutions at the state and federal levels, the people have expansive freedoms - they are free to exercise their rights to work, worship, and play - or to stay at home, or to conduct social distancing.

Since the middle of February, I have been very clear that our people need to take their responsibility for personal health and safety seriously – that they should be practicing good public hygiene and social distancing. And, with few exceptions, the people of South Dakota are doing a tremendous job. We have bent the curve a great deal. We have kept our hospital capacity at a manageable level. And we continue to push out our peak infection day far into the future.

This is great news, and we must stay the course.

We must remember that the objective here is not to stop the spread of COVID-19; the science tells us that is not possible. What we are trying to accomplish is to slow the spread, and flatten the curve, so that our people and our healthcare system are not overwhelmed. This will give us more time to develop successful treatments and, hopefully, an effective vaccine.

South Dakota is not New York City, and our sense of personal responsibility, our resiliency, and our already sparse population density put us in a great position to manage the spread of the virus without needing to resort to the kinds of draconian shutdowns adopted by big coastal cities or even other countries.

Jointly, with Department of Health officials as well as officials from each of the three hospital systems (Avera, Monument Health, and Sanford Health), our team has illustrated exactly what our projections look like for the next several months. Now, given the fluidity of the situation, our estimates are dynamic, not static. As the situation on the ground changes, we will continue to be flexible in our response to that new information.

My team has been thoughtful, strategic, and guided by the science, facts and data from what is happening on the ground here, in South Dakota, since January. These new estimates are a guide. We will continue to refine them as we learn more about this virus and it's impact on our state.

Again, I want to thank the people of South Dakota for doing everything they have thus far. Together, we will get through this.

[To review our current projections for COVID-19 in South Dakota, please visit Covid.SD.Gov]

President grants Burgum's request for major disaster declaration related to COVID-19 response

Bismarck, ND – April 1, 2020 – Gov. Doug Burgum today announced that President Donald Trump has granted the governor's request for a major presidential disaster declaration to make federal assistance available to support North Dakota's response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

"We are deeply grateful to the President and his administration for making this assistance available to help us expand our response efforts and protect public health as the COVID-19 pandemic rapidly evolves," Burgum said. "We also appreciate the support from our state's congressional delegation and the many local, state, federal and tribal partners contributing to this unprecedented effort."

In declaring that a major disaster exists in North Dakota, President Trump ordered federal assistance to supplement state, tribal and local recovery efforts in areas affected by the coronavirus disease, COVID-19. The declaration makes federal funding available to state, tribal and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations for emergency protective measures, including direct federal assistance.

Burgum declared a state of emergency on March 13 and activated the state's Unified Command to coordinate a whole-of-government and whole-of-community approach to the COVID-19 response. He has since signed more than a dozen executive orders aimed at combating the spread of the novel coronavirus and providing relief to North Dakota citizens, employees and employers, health care workers, first responders and others.

From ND Joint Information Center -

Burgum waives waiting period for unemployment benefits, extends business closures

Bismarck, ND – April 1, 2020 – Gov. Doug Burgum today signed an executive order waiving the mandatory one-week waiting period for unemployment benefits as claims continue to increase in North Dakota during the COVID-19 pandemic.

"Waiving the one-week waiting period doesn't increase the amount of money an individual will be eligible to receive, but it does help to get benefit payments into the hands of claimants sooner," Burgum said. "This is critical to helping out-of-work North Dakotans who are struggling to make ends meet during the COVID-19 crisis. Using a whole-of-government approach, we continue to seek out ways to provide relief to our citizens during this pandemic."

North Dakota saw an additional 2,574 unemployment claims filed Tuesday, bringing the total for March 16-31 to 27,241 claims – more than were filed during all of 2019. Burgum noted that by waiving the mandatory waiting week, the state will be reimbursed by the federal government for that first week of benefits, which could amount to an estimated $10 million to $20 million.

The waiting week waiver applies to all individuals filing claims with a week ending date of March 14 and going forward through the duration of the state emergency. No action is necessary by the individual who has a claim. Those who have served a waiting week for the week ending March 14 to the present time will have their waiting week paid to them automatically. The programming associated with the waiver should be completed this week, and payment of these weeks should be made next week.

Burgum also announced that existing business closures mandated by executive order will be extended by two weeks, from April 6 to April 20, to further slow the spread of the novel coronavirus. An announcement will be made by April 15 on whether closures will be extended beyond April 20. Affected businesses are listed in the amended executive order here. The extension to April 20 also applies to restrictions on access to state facilities, including the Capitol.

The North Dakota Department of Health today confirmed 21 additional cases of COVID-19, bringing the state's total to 147 confirmed cases. Twenty-six individuals have been hospitalized, 39 have recovered, and three people have died. A total of 4,627 tests have been completed.

For more information on the state's COVID-19 response, visit www.health.nd.gov/coronavirus or www.ndresponse.gov.

POSITIVE TEST RESULTS – April 3

Woman in her 20s from Burleigh County, under investigation

Woman in her 20s from Burleigh County, under investigation

Man in his 40s from Cass County, close contact

Man in his 60s from Cass County, under investigation

Woman in her 40s from Grand Forks County, possible travel

Male age 10-19 from Grand Forks County, close contact

Male age 10-19 from Grand Forks County, close contact

Woman in her 60s from Grand Forks County, under investigation

Female age 0-9 from Mountrail County, close contact

Man in his 60s from Stark County, under investigation

Woman in her 50s from Stark County, possible travel

Woman in her 60s from Stark County, under investigation

Man in his 40s from Ward County, community spread

Categories: Travel, Possible Travel, Community Spread, Close Contact, Under Investigation

BY THE NUMBERS

6207 – Total Tested (+409 individuals from yesterday)

6021 – Negative (+396 individuals from yesterday)

186 – Positive (+13 individuals from yesterday)

30 – Hospitalized (+1 individuals from yesterday)

63 – Recovered (+8 individual from yesterday)

3 – Death (+0 individuals from yesterday)

For descriptions of these categories, visit the NDDoH dashboard.

For the most updated and timely information and updates related to COVID-19, visit the NDDoH website at www.health.nd.gov/coronavirus, follow on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and visit the CDC website at www.cdc.gov/coronavirus.

ND protocols for workers arriving from other countries, states

Bismarck, ND – April 3, 2020 – Employers should follow certain protocols if they have workers coming from other countries and/or states during this pandemic. Agriculture, construction, and other seasonal workers will soon enter North Dakota for spring employment, and state agencies and associations urge them to protect themselves and others from COVID-19.

"Agriculture producers are ramping up for spring's work and getting ready to get out into their fields. Many of these producers rely on H-2A workers and workers from other states to fill employment gaps," Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring said. "Producers who have workers arriving from other countries or states should follow proper procedures upon their arrival."

"We encourage all employers who have workers coming into North Dakota from other states and countries to familiarize themselves with the North Dakota Department of Health's Travel Quarantine Orders specific to their industry," said ND Associated General Contractors Executive Vice President Russ Hanson. "Most importantly, we encourage everyone to exercise good judgment and be safe."

The following protocols should be followed:

• From the time of arrival, workers should fill out the North Dakota Department of Health travel survey at health.nd.gov/travel-survey, have no contact with anyone in the community and quarantine for 14 days.

• The employer should provide them essentials while they are quarantined such as food, cleaning products, sanitizer, toothpaste, toiletries, etc.

• The employer should monitor the health and welfare of employees quarantined and ensure they are healthy before they are released to work.

• Everyone should practice every day preventative behaviors, such as staying home when sick, avoiding contact with sick people, covering coughs and sneezes, frequently washing hands with soap and water and cleaning frequently touched surfaces.

"All employees arriving from out of state for seasonal work at Medora will enter a 14-day quarantine upon their arrival," Theodore Roosevelt Medora Foundation President, Randy Hatzenbuhler said. "While quarantined, those employees will be paid their normal wage and will have meal delivery available to them."

Roberts Co. closes walk-in business in bars and restaurants

Sisseton, SD – April 1, 2020 – The Roberts County Commission passed a resolution yesterday, 2020-12.

The resolution primarily affects bars and restaurants located outside of municipalities of Roberts County. Cities have the authority to regulate within their own city limits.

Taverns licensed by Roberts County, restaurants, wineries, clubs, etc., by this resolution are requested to discontinue walk-in traffic to their establishment.

Virtually all of these businesses have acted on their own ahead of this action, and the Commission is grateful for self-regulating.

Restaurants are offering menu items for "take out."

These establishments concur with the Governor's executive order and guidelines as it pertains to "enclosed retail business that promotes public gatherings."

On a roll call vote the resolution passed by unanimous support.

ROBERTS COUNTY RESOLUTION NO. 2020-12

AN EMERGENCY RESOLUTION TO ADDRESS A PUBLIC HEALTH CRISIS BY IMPLEMENTING CERTAIN MEASURES WHICH HAVE BEEN DEEMED NECESSARY TO SLOW THE COMMUNITY SPREAD OF CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19).

WHEREAS, the Roberts County Commission has the authority to pass Resolutions, per

SDCL§7-8-20 (8) and (10), for the purpose of promoting the health, safety, morals and general welfare, of the community and the promotion of health and the suppression of disease; and

WHEREAS, an outbreak of the disease COVID-19, which is caused by the novel coronavirus, has been confirmed in more than 100 countries, including the United States; and

WHEREAS, COVID-19 is a severe respiratory disease transmitted by person-to-person contact, or by contact with surfaces contaminated by the virus. In some cases, especially among older adults and persons with serious underlying health conditions, COVID-19 can result in serious illness requiring hospitalization, admission to an intensive care unit, and death; and

WHEREAS, the World Health Organization (WHO), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services have declared the outbreak of COVID-19 as a public health emergency; and

WHEREAS, on March 13, 2020, the President of the United States declared a national emergency in response to the global pandemic of COVID-19; and

WHEREAS, on the same day, Governor Kristi Noem, issued Executive Order 2020-04 which declared a state of emergency to exist in the State of South Dakota in response to the spread of COVID-19; and

WHEREAS, a case of COVID-19 has been confirmed in thirty counties in South Dakota; and

WHEREAS, the CDC and health experts have recommended social distancing to slow the spread of COVID-19; and

WHEREAS, social distancing is a method of slowing down or stopping the spread of a contagious disease by reducing the probability of contact between infected persons and those not infected in order to minimize disease transmission; and

WHEREAS, in response to the need to implement social distancing all schools in the state have been closed until May 1, 2020; and

WHEREAS, on March 16th, 2020, the White House issued guidance recommending that social gatherings of more than ten people be avoided and that people avoid eating or drinking at bars, restaurants, and food courts; and

WHEREAS, the guidance issued by the White House further recommended that in states with evidence of community transmission, bars, restaurants, food courts, gyms, and other indoor and outdoor venues where people congregate should be closed; and

WHEREAS, many states and communities across the country have already implemented the White House recommendations by ordering all bars, restaurants, food courts, gyms, and other indoor and outdoor venues where people congregate be closed until the public health emergency is over; and

WHEREAS, the failure to successfully implement social distancing will likely result in higher numbers of infected individuals and has the potential to overwhelm the capacity of the County's health care providers; and

WHEREAS, it is important that control measures be taken to reduce or slow down the spread of COVID-19 in order to protect the health and safety of the County's residents, especially for seniors and those with underlying health conditions that make them particularly vulnerable to COVID-19.

NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, by the Roberts County Commission that:

1.  Effective at 12:01 on April 1, 2020, all Roberts County Facilities (described in number 3 below) are closed to the general public. County and Unified Judicial System offices will continue to operate and conduct business by mail, email, online, by phone or by arranging to work face-to-face/in person on a case-by-case basis. (SDCL 6-1-18)

2.  Effective immediately, in cases when a member(s) of the public displays symptoms of COVID-19, as specified by the South Dakota Department of Health, the County offices are directed to refuse face-to-face/in person service and encourage the individual(s) to seek medical attention as specifed by public health authorities.

3.  Effective at 12:01 a.m. on April 1, 2020, all restaurants, bars, wineries, clubs, cafes and other similar places of public accommodation offering food or beverages for on-site consumption, including any alcohol licensees with on-sale privileges, are closed to on-site/on-sale patrons. These businesses may continue to operate in order to provide take-out, delivery, curbside service, drive-thru service. Any business continuing to operate in order to provide off-site service should implement procedures to ensure social distancing and operate in compliance with federal and state health guidance in order to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

4.  Effective at 12:01 a.m. on April 1, 2020, all recreational facilities and music or entertainment venues are directed to close and cease operations.

5.  Effective at 12:01 a.m. on April 1, 2020, all hookah lounges, cigar bars, vaping lounges or other similar business which allow for on-site consumption are directed to cease allowing on-site consumption, but may continue to offer products for sale to consume off-site under the same conditions as bars and restaurants outlined in paragraph #1.

6.  Effective at 12:01 a.m. on April 1, 2020, all arcades, bingo halls, bowling alleys, skating rinks, and other similar recreational or entertainment facilities are directed to close and cease operations.

7.  The prohibitions and closures in this order do not apply to the following businesses:

a.  Places of public accommodation that offer food and beverages for off-site consumption, including grocery stores, markets, retail stores that offer food, convenience stores, pharmacies, drug stores, and food pantries, other than any portion of such business which would be subject to the requirements of paragraph #1.

b.  Room service in hotels.

c.  Health care facilities, residential care facilities, congregate care facilities, and correctional facilities.

d.  Crisis shelters, homeless shelters, soup kitchens, or other similar institutions.

e.  Airport concessionaires.

f.   Any emergency facilities necessary for the response to the current public health emergency or any other community emergency or disaster.

g.  Any Incorporated municipality; they are self-regulated.

8.  This Resolution shall remain in effect until such time as it is amended or repealed.

9.  Any violation of this Resolution is subject to the general penalty provision in SDCL 7-18A-32. Each day a violation of this Resolution is allowed to occur is considered a separate offense.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that this Resolution is necessary for the immediate preservation

of the public peace, health, safety, and welfare of Roberts County and shall become effective at

12:01 a.m. on April 1, 2020.

Dated this 31st day of March, 2020.

Dennis Jensen, Chairman Roberts County Commission

ATTEST: Dawn Sattler, Roberts County Auditor

During this time of uncertainty, remember to reflect

By Governor Kristi Noem

March 27, 2020

For weeks, we've all been glued to the news searching for updates about COVID-19. Since March 10, 2020, I have provided almost daily updates about the science, data, and facts that are informing my decision-making, not just on a day-to-day basis, but sometimes on an hour-by-hour basis. Our team is doing its absolute best, and our best is very good.

It's important to remember, this is not an ancient plague – we have the knowledge and the resources of modern medicine that give us the tools to defeat this, as we have so many other illnesses that we've dealt with in the past from polio to flu. Rest assured that we will do so.

Earlier this week, I addressed the people of South Dakota, not as my bosses, but as my neighbors. I asked each and every one of you to pause and to take a step back. Let me tell you why.

One of my staffers was recently trying to pick up groceries. She asked the cashier when she went through the line how she was doing, and unprompted, this woman got very emotional. She started to get tears in her eyes, and she said, "I'm really scared." Then for several minutes, the cashier outlined all of her fears and what was keeping her awake at night.

I understand that. I've heard from many of you myself – from my family, my friends, and some total strangers – who feel exactly the same way. I've spoken about how we're in this for the long-haul. For South Dakota, we expect this to take many, many weeks – perhaps even months – to run its course.

I have state employees who are – quite literally – working around the clock. I recently had a young man who passed out in the middle of a meeting from dehydration. He is doing well now, after some much needed rest.

But I share that with you because what you need to know is that the folks who are helping me – the faceless state employees, who are doing everything they can to get information to you, to help those who have questions, who need guidance about what kind of resources there are or how they can help people, they are working 60, 70, and 80 hours a week. The same is true for EMS workers, hospital workers, and many volunteers in your communities.

Friends and neighbors may be sick. Family members may be worried about how their bills are going to be paid this month, how they're going to put food on the table, and how they're going to keep a roof over their head, if this continues much longer.

So my message to you is please take time to press pause. Put down your smartphones, turn off your TVs, maybe go for a walk. Spend time with your family. Call a loved one. Just take a break. Focus on the good things that you have in your life - the blessings. Reflect with gratitude on how fortunate we are in this country to live in the modern world. A threat like this can break us down – or it can make us truly appreciate the many blessings that we do have.

If there's anything that we all can rally around today, it's that we all have a common enemy – and that's this virus.

It's okay to be uncertain at times. But at the same time, we can also pour ourselves into our families, into our neighbors, and into our communities. People are afraid, and they're worried. And some may be losing hope. But my message to you is hang in there. We will get through this, and we will persevere.

So, even if it's just for a little bit, would you please consider taking a step back. Press pause. Go for a walk. Just be quiet for a little bit, and really reflect on the good things that we do have.

My hope is that, despite this situation, we all find a way to allow this to help bring us all together. To remind us of what is truly important in life. To remind us of three things: faith, hope and love, and the greatest of these is love.

American spirit is unbreakable

By Sen. John Thune

March 27, 2020

Throughout the coronavirus outbreak, I've continually encouraged South Dakotans to follow the common-sense and consistent recommendations of health care professionals around the country: avoid crowds; stay home if you can, especially if you're not feeling well; and cover your mouth when you cough or sneeze.

I've always believed in leading by example, which is why when I recently felt under the weather, I decided it was best to avoid my colleagues on Capitol Hill. It unfortunately meant that I had to miss a few votes, but given the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, it was the responsible thing to do. Practice what you preach, after all.

Over the last several weeks, my colleagues and I have been focused on supporting the American people during this national emergency. The Senate recently approved a significant coronavirus relief bill – the third piece of bipartisan legislation we've considered since the beginning of the outbreak. The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act is the product of numerous bipartisan ideas, all aimed at providing relief to American families, workers, and small businesses.

The CARES Act will help get emergency cash into the hands of the American people quickly. Once this bill becomes law, individual taxpayers who earn $75,000 or less per year are eligible to receive $1,200 from the federal government. Married couples who file jointly and earn $150,000 or less per year are eligible to receive $2,400. Parents will also receive an additional $500 per qualifying child. It's cash, there are no strings attached, it doesn't matter what your employment situation is, and it's not taxed.

One of our top priorities with the CARES Act is to help bridge the gap between this crisis and when life eventually returns to normal. It sets aside billions of dollars to assist small businesses that are trying to stay afloat and keep people employed. It delays payments for employer-side payroll taxes and offers forgivable loans to small businesses that retain their employees throughout this crisis. It also sets aside billions of dollars so states, whose battle needs are different in this crisis, have the resources they need to respond to the outbreak.

For people who lost their job as a result of this crisis, the CARES Act makes a significant investment in states' unemployment programs. Under this bill, most Americans who file for unemployment insurance benefits will receive an additional $600 per week, and eligibility for benefits is extended for an additional 13 weeks.

The bill will also temporarily enact provisions of the bipartisan Employer Participation in Repayment Act, legislation I introduced last year with Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.), which will allow employees to receive up to $5,250 tax-free from participating employers to help pay down their student loan debt. The bill also waives the 10-percent early withdrawal penalty for distributions up to $100,000 from qualified retirement accounts for coronavirus-related purposes. And for the already struggling agriculture community, the CARES Act includes targeted funding that I worked hard to secure that will provide assistance to farmers and ranchers in South Dakota, including livestock producers, who have been hit hard by market volatility.

Most importantly, though, the CARES Act will help ensure the nation's medical professionals have the tools and resources they need to fight this battle on the front lines. It provides $117 billion for our nation's health care community, including veterans' health, to support doctors, hospitals, and other health care professionals. It also increases access to much-needed telehealth services, which we know are critical in rural South Dakota. These services are needed now more than ever across the nation to help keep patients and health care workers safe.

These are tough times. Staying home is inconvenient. Canceling vacations isn't fun. Encountering empty grocery store shelves can be alarming. We're going to get through this, though. And when this outbreak is over, we will have learned a lot of things – not the least of which will be that the American spirit is unbreakable. It's unbreakable, especially when we stand together. We can do this.

Six former tribal officials plead guilty to Embezzlement

Sioux Falls, SD – March 26, 2020 – Six former tribal officials have pleaded guilty to Embezzlement from an Indian tribal organization and aiding and abetting.

The defendants were prosecuted as part of the Guardians Project, a federal law enforcement initiative to combat corruption, fraud, and abuse in South Dakota.

United States Attorney Ron Parsons announced today that all six of the former Crow Creek Sioux Tribe councilmembers charged in the superseding indictment have now pleaded guilty to embezzling tribal funds, including two former Chairs of the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe.

All of the defendants were charged in federal court for their respective conduct involving Embezzlement and Theft from an Indian tribal organization, and Aiding and Abetting.

The final defendant pleaded guilty on March 25, 2020, when Brandon Sazue appeared before U.S. District Judge Roberto A. Lange and pled guilty to the embezzlement and theft charge contained in the superseding indictment.

"Crow Creek citizens need to know that their government works and that theft and embezzlement will not be tolerated. This case should go a long way toward restoring that confidence," said U.S. Attorney Parsons.

According to the superseding indictment, in about March 2014 through February 2019, Roland Robert Hawk, Sr., Francine Maria Middletent, Roxanne Lynette Sazue, Jacquelyn Ernestine Pease, and Brandon Sazue embezzled, stole, willfully misapplied, willfully permitted to misapplied, and converted to their own use over $1,000 of monies, funds, credit, goods, assets, and other property belonging to the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe.

During times relevant to each defendant's case, Brandon Sazue served as Chair of the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe, Hawk served as the elected Treasurer of the tribe, Roxanne Sazue was also chair, and Middletent and Grey Owl were elected councilpersons.

When not serving in their respective leadership positions, all defendants, except for Brandon Sazue, worked for Hawk in the tribe's finance office.

In their respective leadership roles and employment positions, the defendants had the access and opportunity to the funds that were embezzled from the tribe.

The maximum penalties for each defendant upon conviction are as follows: 5 years imprisonment and/or a $250,000 fine; 3 years of supervised release; $100 to the Federal Crime Victims Fund; and restitution may be ordered.

All of the defendants were released on bond pending sentencing.

The investigation is being conducted by the U.S. Attorney's Office and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Assistant U.S. Attorney Jeremy R. Jehangiri is prosecuting the case.

The case was brought pursuant to the Guardians Project, a federal law enforcement initiative to coordinate efforts between participating agencies, to promote citizen disclosure of public corruption, fraud, and embezzlement involving federal program funds, contracts, and grants, and to hold accountable those who are responsible for adversely affecting those living in South Dakota's Indian country communities.

The Guardians Project is another step of federal law enforcement's on-going efforts to increase engagement, coordination, and positive action on behalf of tribal communities. Led by the U.S. Attorney's Office, the participating agencies include: Federal Bureau of Investigation; the Offices of Inspector General for the Departments of Interior, Health and Human Services, Social Security Administration, Agriculture, Transportation, Education, Justice, and Housing and Urban Development; Internal Revenue Service, Criminal Investigation Division; U.S. Postal Inspector Service; U.S. Postal Service, Office of Inspector General.

For additional information about the Guardians Project, please contact the U.S. Attorney's Office at (605) 330-4400.

To report a suspected crime, please contact law enforcement at the federal agency's locally listed telephone number.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

Navajo Nation President: U.S. government ignoring Native Americans amid Coronavirus

There are over 170 confirmed cases of COVID-19 on the American Indian reservation … at least seven people have died.

By Hayley Miller

Huffington Post – April 1, 2020 – Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez said Tuesday that the U.S. government "once again has ignored" the country's Indigenous people, accusing federal officials of failing to deliver enough much-needed resources to help fight the coronavirus.

During a town hall that aired live on Facebook, Nez urged residents of his nation, the largest American Indian territory in the U.S., to remain "strong" and take care of each other during the pandemic despite the lack of support.

"There's frustration from leadership – not just here on Navajo but all of Indian Country," Nez said. "We feel that the United States government once again has ignored or even left out the first residents, the first people, the first citizens of this country: Indigenous people."

He said tribal nations haven't yet seen any of the resources allocated in the three coronavirus relief bills signed into law by President Donald Trump last month.

"But you know what? We're strong people, ladies and gentleman," Nez told the Navajo Nation during his town hall. "We have overcome tough times and we're utilizing our resources to help our people out there. Government can't do everything."

"I'm hearing about people hauling water for their grandparents, people helping get water and hay for their elders out there. That's Navajo right there – helping each other out to overcome this," he continued. "And we will overcome this."

The Navajo Nation spans roughly 25,000 square miles – about the size of West Virginia – across portions of Arizona, New Mexico and Utah. About 350,000 members are enrolled in the nation, making it the second most populous Native American tribe, after the Cherokee Nation.

As of Wednesday, there have been at least 174 confirmed cases of the virus in the Navajo Nation and at least seven deaths. The numbers account for those living on the reservation – both members of the tribe and nonmembers – and do not include Navajo who reside outside of the territory.

During his town hall on Tuesday, Nez said the nation had received "some" supplies from the Strategic National Stockpile, but much more are needed.

"It's quite alarming to hear that some of the shipment that we get won't even last a week," he said, adding that all 50 states are also dealing with this issue. "So we're trying to find resources out there."

The $2 trillion stimulus bill enacted Friday carved out an additional $1 billion for the Indian Health Service, a notoriously underfunded agency that provides health services to federally recognized tribes. The legislation also includes $8 billion in relief funds for tribal governments, though Nez suggested in his town hall Tuesday that the Navajo Nation had not yet received its share.

He told The Los Angeles Times last week that he was concerned about individual tribes having to apply for the aid. A representative for the Navajo Nation did not immediately respond to HuffPost's request for comment.

Conner Swanson, a spokesman for the Interior Department, called Nez's accusation that the U.S. government is ignoring tribes "false," pointing to communications sent to tribal leaders from Bureau of Indian Affairs officials.

"The topline fact is, since day one of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Department, including Indian Affairs, the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Bureau of Indian Education, the Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians, along with our emergency management professionals and other agencies in the Federal government, has been communicating and working with the Tribes to assist Tribal communities," Swanson said in a statement.

Swanson noted that the third coronavirus relief bill, which includes the $2 trillion stimulus package, was signed into law just four days before Nez's comments. The federal government has 30 days to disburse the funds, he said.

He said the Interior and Treasury are hosting two national consultation calls with tribal governments ? one scheduled for Thursday and another next week ? and will accept written comments to "ensure Tribes have ample opportunity to engage in the process and provide meaningful guidance to the Federal government."

"This process is thorough, inclusive and aims to effectively allocate funds to Tribes across the country," he added.

Experts worry native populations are especially vulnerable to COVID-19 given their high rates of diabetes, heart disease and other underlying conditions that make individuals more at risk to the disease.

What's more, some Navajo have been reluctant to heed the warnings of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, due to what the LA Times described as "a long-standing distrust of the federal government." Frequent hand-washing, as advised by medical experts, can also prove difficult in some areas of the reservation where there's a lack of running water.

New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham (D) reportedly warned Trump during a phone call Monday that the virus could "wipe out" some tribal nations.

"We're seeing incredible spikes in the Navajo Nation," Grisham said. "This is going to be an issue where we're going to have to figure that out and think about maybe testing and surveillance opportunities."

She said New Mexico is seeing a higher rate of infection among younger people as well as a more immediate need for ventilators compared to other populations.

In response, Trump reportedly directed other officials in the room to look into the issue and quickly build a hospital requested by Grisham.

"Boy, that's too bad for the Navajo Nation – I've been hearing that," Trump said.

The Navajo Nation declared a public health state of emergency on March 11. Nez has ordered all residents to stay at home unless they are deemed essential workers or need to seek medical care or obtain provisions. On Sunday, Nez announced a curfew from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. daily that went into effect on Monday.

"We've got to think of our future," Nez said during the town hall Tuesday. "We can't let our elders leave us earlier. ... We are overcomers, we are resilient and we'll be able to get through this COVID-19."

Sota guest editorial –

'We need clarification now': Indian gaming industry being shut out of coronavirus relief program

By Acee Agoyo

Indianz.com – April 3, 2020 – With the $33.7 billion Indian gaming industry at a standstill in the midst of the worst public health crisis in decades, tribal casino operations are in danger of being left out of a major coronavirus relief program.

The Trump administration on Friday morning began accepting applications for the new Paycheck Protection Program. But conflicting guidelines issued by the Small Business Administration the day prior are preventing tribes from accessing billions of dollars in funds that would enable them to keep thousands of casino workers on their payrolls.

"We need clarification now," Dante Desiderio (Saponny), the executive director of the Native American Finance Officers Association, told Indianz.Com.

The matter is extremely time sensitive. The Paycheck Protection Program is open to millions of small businesses across America, and the fear is that Indian Country won't get a fair shot with the guidelines affecting tribal gaming operations in dispute.

"They need to clarify this for tribes," Desiderio said.

Some tribes already started working with lending institutions in hopes of securing backing through the Paycheck Protection Program. But the uncertainty from Washington, D.C., has put a hold on efforts to keep their economies -- which are often the major driver in their regions -- up and running amid the coronavirus crisis.

"We want to keep our employees, and we want them to keep the health insurance we provide," President Bryan Newland of the Bay Mills Indian Community told Indianz.Com. "It is going to be a real challenge if we can't access paycheck protection loans like other businesses can."

The impact is significant in Indian Country. Newland said a loan covered by the Paycheck Protection Program would enable the tribe to continue paying 400 gaming employees -- including benefits, such as health care, that have become even more critical during the pandemic -- for at least the next two months in Michigan.

"The new guidance has upended our plan, leaving us to scramble for answers with one week left in our pay period," said Newland.

The exclusion of gaming operations from the Paycheck Protection Program is also of national importance. The American Gaming Association blamed outdated and "discriminatory" regulations in Washington that will hurt "hundreds of thousands" of people unless the Trump administration changes course.

"This decision will affect hard-working Americans from Pennsylvania to Nevada, Ohio to Colorado, and everywhere in between who need and deserve the same level of support as anyone across the country during these unprecedented times," President and CEO Bill Miller said in a statement on Friday, calling on Jovita Carranza, the head of the Small Business Administration, to take action before it's too late.

The conflicting information from the executive branch comes after Congress, through H.R.748, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, authorized the Paycheck Protection Program. The bipartisan law set aside $349 billion for small businesses to stay afloat during the crisis, which has already put millions of Americans out of work.

But while the application for the program states that loans are available to any "tribal business" leaders and advocates in Indian Country found out that a pre-existing definition -- buried elsewhere in thousands of pages of federal regulations -- excludes gaming establishments.

"It is really a big deal," Desiderio told Indianz.Com. "This is the relief that tribes needed."

The Trump administration has pitched the "unprecedented" program as a way for small businesses to secure loans quickly in a time of crisis. Administrator Carranza, who has addressed tribes at meetings like the National Congress of American Indians and previously represented the Department of the Treasury on the Tribal Advisory Committee, announced outlines on Tuesday.

"Speed is the operative word; applications for the emergency capital can begin as early as this week, with lenders using their own systems and processes to make these loans," Carranza said in a news release. "We remain committed to supporting our nation's more than 30 million small businesses and their employees, so that they can continue to be the fuel for our nation's economic engine."

Secretary of the Treasury Steven T. Mnuchin also boasted that Paycheck Protection Program loans could be "approved on the same day" as paperwork being submitted.

It wasn't until Thursday, however, when the "interim" guidelines were released by official Washington. That happened to be the same day the Bay Mills Indian Community began putting together its loan application with a local bank, President Newland said.

The SBA, where Shawn Pensoneau, a citizen of the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma, serves as the Assistant Administrator for the Office of Native American Affairs, is set to discuss the conflicting guidance on Friday, according to advocates. A request for comment about the Paycheck Protection Program and tribal casinos has been placed with the agency.

According to the National Indian Gaming Association, 100 percent of casinos run by member tribes have closed as a result of the coronavirus. Some have laid off employees while others are keeping them on the payroll as long as possible.

"Kewadin Casinos is a committed community partner and, as such, we take our responsibility in assisting the stop of coronavirus seriously," Allen Kerridge, the interim chief executive officer of the gaming enterprise for the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, the largest Indian nation east of the Mississippi. Kerridge said the tribe continues to pay 900 full-time and part-time employees at five establishments in Michigan.

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is in a more precarious situation. Workers at the Harrah's Cherokee Casino Resort and the Harrah's Cherokee Valley River Casino and Hotel in North Carolina are only set to be paid through April 15, with furloughs for the "majority of employees" set to kick in on the following day, the operation said on Wednesday.

"Furloughed employees will continue to receive medical benefits which will be provided and paid for by the company through reopening or June 30, whichever comes first," Harrah's Cherokee Casinos said in a statement. June 30 happens to be the final date for which the loans obtained through the Paycheck Protection Program can be used to cover payroll costs.

As of 2018, the tribal casino industry employed more than 670,000 people, with more than $36 billion in wages paid to employees, according to a comprehensive study released by the American Gaming Association at the time.

Overall, the American gaming industry, including operations in Indian Country, supported a total economic impact of $261.4 billion of output, with 1.8 million jobs and $40.8 billion in tax revenue, according to the AGA.

Sota guest editorial –

Rounds: Gaming impacted by COVID-29 should be eligible for Small Business Relief

Pierre, SD – April 4, 2020 – U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) today urged the Small Business Administration (SBA) and Treasury Department to allow gaming operations to participate in the newly-created Paycheck Protection Program (PPP). The PPP was part of the recently-passed CARES Act, which seeks to provide immediate, direct relief to all businesses and families impacted by the effects of COVID-19.

Currently, the SBA is not accepting PPP applications from gaming facilities, such as tribally-owned casinos and gaming operations in Deadwood, despite no specific statute in the CARES Act preventing them from doing so.

"As you move forward with the implementation of the CARES Act, it is imperative that every type of small business have the opportunity to seek funding under the newly-created Paycheck Protection Program (PPP)," wrote Rounds in the letter. "To that end, as your agencies implement the PPP, the Small Business Administration (SBA) and Department of the Treasury (Treasury) should affirm that businesses that receive income from legal gaming operations are eligible to apply for PPP loans, regardless of how much of their income can be attributed to gaming activity."

"Leaving these types of small businesses out of important federal recovery efforts would prove to be crippling for South Dakota."

Full Text of the Letter:

 

The Honorable Jovita Carranza

Administrator

U.S. Small Business Administration

409 3rd Street, SW

Washington, DC 20416

 

The Honorable Steven Mnuchin

Secretary of the Treasury

U.S. Department of the Treasury

1500 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW

Washington, DC 20220

 

Dear Administrator Carranza and Secretary Mnuchin:

Thank you for your tireless and dedicated work to assist America's small businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic. These are extraordinary times for our country and our economy. Small businesses represent 99 percent of all private businesses and nearly 60 percent of the workforce in South Dakota. Providing relief for each and every one of these businesses will be critical in the weeks and months ahead.

As you move forward with the implementation of the CARES Act, it is imperative that every type of small business have the opportunity to seek funding under the newly-created Paycheck Protection Program (PPP). To that end, as your agencies implement the PPP, the Small Business Administration (SBA) and Department of the Treasury (Treasury) should affirm that businesses that receive income from legal gaming operations are eligible to apply for PPP loans, regardless of how much of their income can be attributed to gaming activity.

Small businesses in the gaming industry create over 350,000 jobs in our country across 43 states. In my state, over 1,200 jobs can be directly attributed to the gaming industry in Deadwood, South Dakota, alone, with hundreds of additional jobs being created through tribal gaming enterprises. Leaving these types of small businesses out of important federal recovery efforts would prove to be crippling for South Dakota.

I understand that existing SBA policy as it relates to Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDL) under 13 C.F.R. § 123.301 prohibits any business that derives more than one-third of its gross annual revenue from legal gambling activities from applying for EIDL loans. However, the PPP is a totally new program that is separate and distinct from EIDL lending. Given the expansive nature of the PPP and the intent for every small business that wanted it to receive PPP assistance, it would make no sense to apply the one-third annual revenue from gambling threshold to small businesses under the PPP.

Furthermore, the intent of Congress to leave no small business out of the PPP is apparent in numerous parts of the bill. The legislation clearly states in Section 1102 under the heading "Increased Eligibility" that, "During the covered period, in addition to small business concerns, any business concern, nonprofit organization, veterans organization, or Tribal business concern described in section 31(b)(2)(C) shall be eligible to receive a covered loan" provided that the business employs not more than 500 workers. The legislation also allows tribal gaming concerns to receive assistance.

I commend your efforts to develop a critical program like the Paycheck Protection Program in as short of a timeframe as you have. As the SBA and Treasury begin to execute on your vital mission to provide relief for our nation's small businesses, it is imperative that every small business – including those in the gaming industry – be eligible for assistance under the Paycheck Protection Program.

(Editor's note: The SWO Tribe took a lead on this issue, and Senator Rounds responded as well as Rep. Dusty Johnson. Rosebud, Spirit Lake Nation, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Flandreau, Oglala and others have weighed in as well. Discussions with Senator Thune indicate that he will write a letter on Monday. Senator Hoeven is favorable, also Senator Cramer.)

Brief editorial comments from the editor's desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

The best time to take seriously the call to heed CDC guidelines for protecting ourselves, our families, and our communities from this novel coronavirus was back in February.

That's when we heard that call not only from media sources but from our Tribal Chairman.

We cannot pause the tape and press rewind.

That means the second best time to heed the call is right now.

Today.

This time today.

Help do everything possible to keep all of us safe and mitigate the COVID-19 outbreak which is now on our Reservation.

Please follow the safety guidelines provided by the CDC and our SWO Community Health Education program.

Remain in self-quarantine.

Maintain social distancing.

(See more tips below.)

We encourage readers to check out SWO Emergency Management's updated Facebook page, KXSW Radio and the Sota website for updates as they become available – including updates from Chairman White and now also by Vice-Chairman Johnson, who has been tasked by Tribal Council to lead the Tribe's COVID-19 response task force.

See our article on last Thursday's Facebook live/CNB/KXSW broadcast, in which the Vice-Chairman and Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson gave the first of what are expected to be ongoing updates as needed, at least weekly, during the remainder of the current state of emergency.

Readers may also view the recorded broadcast at the following url:

https://www.facebook.com/kxswfm.dakotahradio/videos/10157570215498477/

Also, to keep up with current changes in the COVID-19 cases across the state/region and worldwide, check out our SWO GIS online maps:

Regional Map COVID-19:

https://arcg.is/T9vem

Worldwide Map COVID-19:

https://arcg.is/Pji0n

Our thanks to GIS Program Manager Mike LaBatte for sharing with the Oyate.

Link to the Sota website:

www.earthskyweb.com/sota

Direct link to the Sota news page:

www.earthskyweb.com/news.htm

*****

We will repeat these brief common sense tips that came from a Tribal Council meeting two weeks ago, tips to help protect ourselves from the spread of this or other viral infections:

Each individual must take responsibility for their own health and circumstances.

Wash your hands, keep your distance from people, stay home if you are sick.

The CDC recommends those over 60 take precautions and consider staying away from large public gatherings.

Visit websites for the South Dakota Dept. of Public Health, World Center for Disease Control.

Take time to educate yourselves.

And try not to touch your eyes, nose or mouth, as individuals, we have to introduce the virus to our bodies by touching our eyes, nose or mouth.

So again, wash your hands and use the hand sanitizers.

*****

Elder's meditation:

"People think other things are more important than prayer, but they are mistaken."

–Thomas Yellowtail, CROW

An Elder once said the most important thing you can do in the course of a day is to pray. If we get up late or oversleep, which is more important? Rush to work without praying or pray first and then go to work? The Elders say it's more important to pray. If we get angry, should we act on our anger or should we pray first? The Elders say it's more important to pray first. If, during the day, we face indecision, what should we do? PRAY. If, during the day, we become irritated or we experience fear, what should we do first? PRAY. The Warrior who prays first will lead a different life from those who pray last.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

False fears are a plague, a modern plague! - Michael Crichton, State of Fear

If I only had a little humility, I'd be perfect. - Ted Turner

I'm not sure I want popular opinion on my side -- I've noticed those with the most opinions often have the fewest facts. - Bethania McKenstry

Until you've lost your reputation, you never realize what a burden it was. - Margaret Mitchell (1900 - 1949)

It was beautiful and simple, as truly great swindles are. - O. Henry (1862 - 1910)

It is a paradoxical but profoundly true and important principle of life that the most likely way to reach a goal is to be aiming not at that goal itself but at some more ambitious goal beyond it. - Arnold Toynbee (1889 - 1975)

Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you to recognize a mistake when you make it again. - Franklin P. Jones

A man is not idle because he is absorbed in thought. There is a visible labor and there is an invisible labor. - Victor Hugo (1802 - 1885)

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

CDF

Obituaries –

Services for Prairie Doc Richard Holm

Dr. Richard Powell Holm, age 71, passed away Sunday, March 22, 2020, at home under hospice care. Visitations and memorial services will be held in the future as soon as public gatherings are permitted. Eidsness Funeral Home is assisting the family with arrangements.

Rick Holm was born near midnight, February 1, 1949 in Minneapolis, MN and died March 22, during his 71st year. On the night of his birth, the story goes that the temp was way below zero, and the car (which wouldn't start earlier) grumbled to life after Jody told Earl "It is time." Rick was their second child after Susan, both boomers born after WWII.

Moving to De Smet, SD in 1954, he grew up with the great De Smet HS class of '67. So many of the 54 people who graduated with him, and many others in that wonderful town, remained dear friends throughout Rick's life. He lost his sister from a motor vehicle crash just before his junior year and had especially unforgettable and heartwarming support from the people of De Smet during that time. He played Will Parker in Oklahoma, played football all four years, participated in track and debate, was president of the junior class, and student body president his senior year. Throughout his life, he savored the experience and joy of growing up in that small prairie town.

Jeannie Vandyke moved into the Holm family home after Susan's death, and Jeannie's presence gave great solace to everyone. Jody and Earl raised Rick to play fair. He was also raised and guided with the help of many family friends including the Bells, Hyinks, Stalheims, Purringtons, Purintuns, McKibbens and more. Jody and Earl taught kindness, discipline, honesty, creative thinking, and the work-ethic.

Rick attended USD and joined the Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity. He conducted the brothers for three years in the Mother's Day Sing, and was vice president of the house his senior year. Friends made in college have lasted these many years. Despite a great deal of celebration during those years, he did get into medical school. The first two years at USD School of Medicine (which only offered the first two years at the time) opened the door to admission for the second two years at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta. There he finished in 1975, did his residency, and taught for three years. He met Joanie on the cancer ward of Grady Hospital in Atlanta, and, after three years of dating, he married that Floridian. She married Rick even after realizing that it would likely mean moving to South Dakota from the south.

After a year of married life in Atlanta, the two moved to Brookings, where they settled into a home on 11th Ave. They became members of the First United Methodist Church of Brookings, and a few years later they restored and remodeled their home on 5th street, where the family still resides. Their four children have been the blessings of their lives and have always made each day just that much more interesting. In his practice of internal medicine and geriatrics, Dr. Holm became involved with hospice (acting as the hospice medical director until the time of his death), which helped to teach him how to value every moment of life, and, eventually, to teach him how to face his pancreatic cancer. With the help and wisdom of his partners in the Brookings Medical Clinic, he evolved, aspiring to be an ethically-based physician, perhaps not always reaching the peak of medical excellence, but always trying. He has loved his involvement with local health care, and also with state-wide and national groups of health care providers, who have pushed him to balance caring and camaraderie with excellence. Professional groups he has loved include: the state and national chapters of the American College of Physicians (ACP), the state and national chapters of the American Medical Association (AMA), the Gold Humanism Honor Society, and many others. He was inducted into the South Dakota Hall Of Fame in 2016, and was recently awarded the National Volunteer Of The Year award from the ACP.

He became a physician-journalist, writing newspaper articles (Prairie Doc Perspectives), hosting radio shows (Prairie Doc Radio at KBRK Brookings) and TV shows (On Call With the Prairie Doc). In 2010, he became founder and conductor of the Hopeful Spirit Chorale, an acapella, hospice-oriented volunteer choir, which sings weekly for those in need of a hopeful spirit. He enjoyed writing books: The Picture of Health: A View From the

Prairie with Judith Peterson MD, and, recently, Life's Final Season: A Guide for Aging and Dying with Grace.

He was preceded in death by his sister Susan Diane Holm, his father Earl Ernest Holm, his mother Joanne Powell Holm, and several close aunts, uncles, and cousins.

He is survived by his life-partner Joanie Smith Holm, and their children Eric, Carter, Preston, and Julia Holm. He is also survived by dear cousin-brothers Bob McDonald (and Marge) of Waterman, IL and Mark Powell (and Joey) of Springfield, MO.

He writes: "I send my sincere love to my family, and to you, and I would leave the following advice: exercise every day (walk at least a mile if you can), eat fewer calories (especially less carbohydrates), do a Snoopy Dance every day and, finally, listen and watch intensely for the Holy Spirit in the hearts of your friends, family, and the world around you."

Memorials may be designated to The Healing Words Foundation, which supports both The Prairie Doc Media and the Hopeful Spirit Chorale.

Healing Words Foundation

P.O. Box 752

Brookings, SD 57006

https://www.healingwordsfoundation.org/donate.html

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and should be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Recommended: Keep updated fax numbers for landline use

April 5, 2020

Recommendation for public service agencies, businesses, employees, and individuals who need access to critical services and information:

Maintain a current list of fax numbers that can be accessed by landline telephone.

There have been verified reports of area internet service going off and on, and lowered bandwidth connections.

This is a precaution, hopefully there will be no outages, not only for public service but for the many homes where children are connecting to their teachers to continue their lessons during the COVID-19 pandemic.

– cdf

Update on Elderly nutrition center quarantine

Linda Obago Facebook post

April 2, 2020

Day 10: Brief sunrise, then we were covered with clouds.

Liz and Diana "Young Guns" helping make our days easier, but soon they will need to stay home. I will miss them; the Young Guns is still in college and Liz's grandson will be home.

When I was out this morning I thought that all pipe holders should pray in the mornings, as well as the churches. Without prayer we are nothing.

We really need volunteer drivers.

Today we had extra bread so the drivers delivered the bread with the meals.

People do not realize the hard work that is involved in delivering meals.

With the regular meal, most time there is a milk, dessert and the meal to drop off.

The routes have grown so much, which I'm thankful we can feed, but the drivers need help.

We are to the point that two drivers per route would be best.

Can hardly wait till COVID19 is gone; there will be a complete reorganizing of the kitchen.

Our volume of meals has grown so much, the work has pretty much tripled in all aspects.

I try to rest, so I can do the admin work in the evenings.

Make sure to watch over the Elders, all we can do is provide a meal, make an effort to help them.

Call them, write a letter/card, drop off books, word games, etc.

We would really appreciate masks for the Elderly.

We stand without fear.

(Editor's note: What is happening at our elderly nutrition center demonstrates the "good news" that our community is resilient and even though we are physically distancing ourselves, we really are not, and never will "social distance" from one another. Whoever came up with that slogan – social distancing – rather than to use physical distancing, probably deserves to be grouped in the media bunch that came up with the recent South Dakota slogan: "Meth – We're On It.")

CDP Health Care guidelines

Sisseton, SD – March 24, 2020 – If you think you may have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive or is being tested for Coronavirus (COVID-19), self quarantine, self monitor, do not go directly to the ER or to your clinic.

Call first.

Our healthcare providers will evaluate your symptoms and explain your best course of action to determine if you need to be tested.

Call first at 605-698-7681.

WWKMHC patient response plan

Sisseton, SD – March 24, 2020 – Sisseton IHS Health Center has announced the following Response Plan for Patient Services during COVID-19 effective March 30, 2020/

We submit the following plan for clinical departments to meet the needs of the patients and also consider the work requirements of our employees. We firmly believe that we must address the potential for a significant impact on the public health, in the event the outbreak spreads further in the community.

1. Dental Clinic - Emergency Visits only will be seen. The dentists will use telephone triage to screen patients for any emergent issues before coming to the facility. Routine dental care will be postponed and rescheduled as needed. Patients with pending appointments will be called by the Dentist to ensure their need is not emergent in nature, and a telephonic consultation will be used to document the call and visit with the patient. If necessary, re-allocate staff to assist other departments (housekeeping, triage, escorts, phones, etc.).

2. Optometry Clinic - Emergency visits only will be seen. An Optometrist will be available for telephone triage to screen patients. Routine eye care visits will be postponed and rescheduled as needed. Patients with pending appointments will be called by the Optometrist to ensure their need is not emergent in nature. If necessary, re-allocate staff to assist other departments (housekeeping, triage, escorts, phones, etc.).

3. Pharmacy - Prescriptions will be filled up to 90 days at the patient's request, excluding controlled substances. Pain Management Visits, including urine drug screens will be increased from every 90 days to every 6 months. Chronic pharmacy clinic appointments will be rescheduled except for anticoag patients who will still need routine labs. Vaccines will not be provided in the pharmacy. Refills should be requested at least 24 hours in advance. Staff will encourage patients to use the prescription mailing program for refills. Staff will deliver medications to patients using the curb side pick-up option.

4. Outpatient Clinic - Routine visits will be rescheduled for 6-9 weeks out, depending on the patient's status. Some patients may still be asked to come monthly, or every 3 months based on the provider's assessment and treatment plan. Providers will call each patient to conduct a telephonic consultation with each patient and either inform them of their need to keep their appointment as scheduled or implement a new appointment schedule.

5. Nutrition - Cease all group therapy, including the "Basics" classes (diabetes/nutrition). Stop the grocery store tours, cooking demonstrations, and community events at the Tribal diabetes programs and schools. Limit visits to high nutrition risk patients or telephone visits. Re-allocate staff, if necessary to assist other departments (housekeeping, triage, escorts, phones, etc.).

6. Physical Therapy - Visits will be limited to post-surgical patients and all other consults will be screened to determine urgency of care. If necessary, re-allocate staff to assist other departments (housekeeping, triage, escorts, phones, etc.).

7. PHN - Reduce outreach to only those critical elders with prescreening over the phone before making physical contact. If necessary, re-allocate staff to assist other departments (clinic nursing, triage, etc.).

8. B/H - Cease group therapy. No other planned changes yet.

9. PRC - Referrals will be pushed back to 6-9 weeks. Patients will be contacted beforehand.

10. Radiology - No mammogram or dexa services. We will continue with radiology and ultrasound appointments.

11. Lab - No changes.

We do not have any contracted specialty services such as ENT, Podiatry, MRI, etc.

We are screening all patients and visitors including temperature upon entering the facility through main entrance only. Patients are limited to only one visitor/escort with them, if needed. Screening all employees as they enter the designated West entrance. All vendors and contractors are designated to enter through the west loading/receiving dock and are screened before entering the facility.

The daily hours of operation will not change.

These proposed changes will take effect Monday, March 30, 2020 and will be reassessed by Friday, May 1, 2020 to determine if they may stop or if they need to continue.

Implementation of these changes will limit the health patient's potential for exposure to the COVID-19 virus, while meeting the needs of the patients. It will also address any needs of the employees.

IHS frequently asked questions regarding COVID-19

General Information

Q: Where can I find the most-up-to-date information?

A: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's website is the best place to find comprehensive updated information and guidance on COVID-19, including information on symptoms, treatment, schools, quarantine, travel, etc. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

Q: How is the Indian Health Service (IHS) working with IHS facilities, tribal, and urban Indian health facilities to promote awareness of changing guidelines, protocols, and processes related to COVID-19?

A: IHS headquarters is holding weekly conference calls with tribal and urban Indian health organization leaders from across the country to provide updates, answer questions, and hear concerns from tribal communities. Additionally, IHS area offices provide technical assistance and support to tribal and urban Indian programs. For federal staff, IHS headquarters is holding regular all-employee conference calls and communicating through email updates. Area chief medical officers are in regular communication with clinical directors at all IHS facilities. We are actively extending outreach to all within the federal, tribal and urban clinical communities regarding webinar and similar resources as they become available from the CDC, with 3 such national webinars promoted and held since March 5. In addition, the IHS will host a national call on Tuesday, March 17, addressing practical clinical readiness and patient care regarding COVID-19.

Q: How is IHS working across the Departments of the federal government to ensure a comprehensive holistic approach to addressing COVID-19 in Indian Country?

A: The IHS is in constant communication with the CDC and other operating divisions across the Department of Health and Human Services. In addition, the IHS is in close communication with the White House and other non-HHS Departments across the federal government to ensure comprehensive communication is shared with Indian Country.

Q: What is IHS doing to ensure the protection of their providers as they test and treat individuals for COVID-19?

A: The IHS is following CDC guidance for health care professionals. Many of our service units are screening individuals for COVID-19 prior to entering our health facilities to determine their risk for COVID-19 and to prevent additional infections within our facilities. Individuals suspected of having COVID-19 will be given a mask and cared for separately from other patients in a designated area with a provider. The National Supply Service Center is distributing personal protective equipment (PPE) and other supplies to regional centers and to IHS, tribal, and urban facilities as quickly as possible to address supply shortages. We are exploring every avenue to acquire more supplies.

Testing

Q: Are IHS, tribal, and urban facilities able to test for COVID-19?

A: All IHS facilities have access to testing for individuals who may have COVID-19. There is no cost to individuals for this testing. Following guidance established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, clinicians, including those at IHS, collect samples with standard specimen collections swabs and access laboratory testing through public health laboratories in their jurisdictions. The IHS will also utilize commercial and other approved laboratories to test specimens as those services become available.

Q: Can tribes, tribal organizations, and urban Indian organizations request test kits for their clinics?

A: "Test kits" are not needed at a clinic to test for COVID-19. Samples are collected using standard, readily available swabs. The samples are then submitted to outside laboratories for testing. This is the standard testing procedure across the country, and is not unique to IHS. Test swabs are available from commercial suppliers for next-day delivery.

Q: What protocols or instructions are IHS following to test for COVID-19?

A: The IHS relies on CDC guidance and/or consultation with public health departments to determine patients suitable for testing for COVID-19. Current CDC testing guidance says clinicians should use their judgment to determine if an individual has signs and symptoms compatible with COVID-19 and whether the person should be tested. Decisions on which individuals receive testing should be based on the local epidemiology of COVID-19, patient risk or exposures, history of travel from an area with sustained transmission within 14 days of symptom onset, as well as the clinical course of illness. Clinicians are strongly encouraged to test for other causes of respiratory illness, including influenza and strep throat.

Q: How long does it take to test for COVID-19?

A: Currently, test results may be available in as little as one day, but timing may vary by location. As commercial labs begin to offer testing services, we expect the time to decrease.

Q: What should individuals do while they wait for their test results?

A: Individuals should follow the advice of their health care provider. For a majority of individuals with mild symptoms, the CDC generally recommends staying home, using a separate bathroom, and as much as possible, staying in a separate room and away from other people in the home. Patients with more severe symptoms may be hospitalized for care while awaiting test results.

Access to Personal Protective Equipment

Q: How can tribes, tribal organizations, and urban Indian organizations acquire materials such as personal protective equipment and sanitizers?

A: Tribes, tribal organizations, and urban Indian organizations can access supplies through the IHS National Supply Service Center. The IHS has disseminated PPE and other supplies out to regional supply centers to expedite distribution to facilities. IHS is utilizing every available option to continue to obtain additional supplies as needed.

Q: What is the Strategic National Stockpile and do tribes have access to it?

A: The Strategic National Stockpile is the nation's largest supply of pharmaceuticals and medical supplies for use in a public health emergency severe enough to cause local supplies to run out. When state, local, tribal, and territorial responders request federal assistance to support their response efforts, the stockpile ensures that the right medicines and supplies get to those who need them most during an emergency. Organized for scalable response to a variety of public health threats, this repository contains enough supplies to respond to multiple large-scale emergencies simultaneously.

Funding

Q: What funds are available to tribes to address COVID-19?

A: The Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2020, includes resources to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for tribes, tribal organizations, urban Indian health organizations, or health service providers to tribes, to carry out surveillance, epidemiology, laboratory capacity, infection control, mitigation, communications, and other preparedness and response activities. The IHS is working closely with the Department of Health and Human Services and CDC to determine how best to allocate the resources included in the supplemental appropriation. The IHS has a limited reserve of existing funding that may be available to tribes through the IHS Director's Emergency Funds. Tribes may contact their respective area directors and area office contacts regarding access to the IHS Director's Emergency Fund.

Q: What is the IHS Director's Emergency Fund?

A: The IHS Director's Emergency Fund provides a limited reserve to address some of the emergencies involving IHS facilities and IHS/tribal delivery of health services. The funds are not intended for administration, maintenance, construction, or for any other purposes that are not related to emergencies within IHS facilities or the delivery of IHS/tribal health services. The current annual allocation for the Director's Emergency Fund is nearly $4 million.

Q: Does the $8.3 billion emergency response supplemental funding bill include funding for tribes?

A: $40 million is set aside specifically for tribes, tribal organizations, and urban Indian health organizations. This money was allocated to CDC. IHS is working closely with HHS and CDC to determine how the funds will be allocated and to distribute these funds to I/T/U facilities in a timely manner.

Q: What financial resources will be available to help tribes and urban Indian organizations recoup administrative costs associated with closures and overtime costs for our providers? A: We encourage tribes, tribal organizations, and urban Indian organizations to work through all local, state, and federal avenues for any potential resources. We also encourage tracking costs associated with COVID-19 response activities. This information will help identify needs across the Indian health system and inform discussions about any potential resources that may become available.

Emergency Planning

Q: What technical support is available for tribes to develop Emergency Planning protocols?

A: The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has developed a Frequently Asked Questions tool for tribes to use in determining how to request a presidential emergency or major disaster declaration independently of a state. https://www.fema.gov/frequently-asked-questions-current-process-tribal-governments-request-presidential-declaration

Additionally, Ready.gov, an official website of the Department of Homeland Security includes specific content geared toward Indian Country for general emergency preparedness, including ready-made resources that may be of value: https://www.ready.gov/indian-country

Q: What resources are available to tribal communities for technical assistance in disinfection and/or sanitation protocols?

A: CDC has developed recommendations around environmental cleaning and disinfection protocols for health departments and other employers. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/organizations/cleaning-disinfection.html

Q: How can my community issue communications about COVID-19?

A: CDC has prepared guidance on how to develop a communications plan before an outbreak of COVID-19 in your community, during an outbreak, as well as post-outbreak communications.

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/php/public-health-communicators-get-your-community-ready.html

Service Delivery during a Pandemic

Q: Can tribes and urban Indian organizations utilize PRC to pay for quarantining, testing, or hospitalization of COVID-19 patients?

A: All Indian Health Service Purchased Referred Care programs are treating COVID-19 testing and treatment as medical priority one (emergent or acutely urgent care services) until further notice. Tribal health programs are not required to follow IHS medical priorities, but may choose to use them as guidelines. Urban Indian organizations do not participate in the PRC program but, consistent with the terms of their agreements with IHS, may use their existing funds for awards to subcontractors.

Q: How many Commissioned Corps officers from I/T/U programs have been cleared to deploy and how many have deployed?

A: As of March 13, 2020, 74 Corps officers have deployed and returned. Approximately 50 officers are currently deployed or staged for imminent deployment.

Q: Who pays for the Commissioned Corps while they are deployed?

A: The salary and benefits for a deployed Corps officer will continue to be paid by the federal, tribal, or urban Indian program to which the officer is assigned. The Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) pays for the travel and transportation costs of the officer to and from the location of the deployment.

Q: What is the process for screening and quarantining Commissioned Corps personnel before they return to active duty at ITU sites?

A: Officers who are returning or have returned from COVID-19 field missions must be monitored appropriately and receive medical and other assistance as needed. Commissioned Corps Headquarters has delegated administrative control to the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness as the incident commander to monitor the health conditions of officers and provide assistance as needed. Additionally, if an officer is returning to work in a healthcare setting, the officer must adhere to the CDC guidance for healthcare providers, which is available at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/guidance-risk-assesment-hcp.html. This guidance requires a 14-day quarantine before returning to their official duty station.

Q: What is the plan for ensuring individuals living in remote areas still have access to their medication?

A: At this time, there is no indication that IHS pharmacies will need to alter their current practices. Should the CDC recommend reducing the number of people visiting their local healthcare facilities, the IHS Pharmacy Program will explore alternative delivery options for medications, such as the Consolidated Mail Outpatient Pharmacy Program.

Q: Can I order medications two months out? And if so, can they be mailed to my home address?

A: You would need to check with your local IHS facility to determine their refill policies and participation with the Consolidated Mail Outpatient Pharmacy Program. A tribal health facility may have its own mail out program. Patients of tribal health facilities are encouraged to contact them about this refill request.

Q: Are Community Health Representatives (CHR) trained on how to look for COVID-19 symptoms? Are CHRs equipped with personal protective equipment?

A: Given that this is a new virus, the impact on Community Health Representative activities is dependent on public health guidance from individual state departments of health and CDC guidance on identification of COVID-19 signs and symptoms and appropriate use of PPE.

Q: Are there codes in the IHS Resource Patient Management System (RPMS) for COVID-19?

A: Following the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and Centers for Disease Control and Preventions guidance, IHS is adding diagnostic and testing codes to RPMS to capture data regarding COVID-19 as they become available. Pending the release of specific International Classification of Diseases 10th modification (ICD-10) coding for COVID-19, the CDC has issued interim ICD coding guidance to guide current efforts.

Health coverage options if you're unemployed

For more information: www.healthcare.gov

If you're unemployed you may be able to get an affordable health insurance plan through the Marketplace, with savings based on your income and household size. You may also qualify for free or low-cost coverage through Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

Your household size and income, not your employment status, determine what health coverage you're eligible for and how much help you'll get paying for coverage.

If you just lost your job and your job-based insurance

If you have just left your job for any reason and lost your job-based health coverage, you qualify for a Special Enrollment Period. This means you can enroll in a Marketplace insurance plan any time of year. You usually have 60 days from the day you lose your coverage to enroll. Learn how to apply for a Special Enrollment Period.

There is no limited enrollment period for Medicaid or CHIP. If you qualify, you can enroll in these programs any time of year. You'll find out if you qualify when you fill out your Marketplace application.

Your options depend on your household income.

When you apply for Marketplace coverage you'll estimate your income for the current calendar year.

Reservations will be among the first to get the 15-minutes tests; here's why

By Michael Geheren

Sioux Falls, SD – KELO – April 3, 2020 – On the floor of an emergency department bathroom on the Rosebud Sioux Reservation, a woman delivered her premature baby. No one was around. The doctor didn't arrive for 20 or 30 minutes and none of the staff told the doctor what had happened.

That was just a few years ago, according to a report from U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Inspector General. It was just one of many examples that led to a temporary shut-down of the Emergency Department and a call from Congressional leaders to reform the Indian Health Service.

Now that hospital is one of several IHS hospitals in the area with an estimated 100 beds to fight the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a KELOLAND News analysis of hospital bed counts.

On the Rosebud Indian Reservation, a shelter in place order is in effect. A similar measure is in effect for Oglala Sioux Tribe members on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.

"The Tribal Council recognizes that Indian tribes and Reservations are among the most vulnerable populations and locations for this COVID-19 pandemic…. in light of the extraordinary threat posed by COVID-19, the Oglala Sioux Tribe must take extraordinary measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19," the tribal council wrote in its shelter-in-place order.

Crow Creek Sioux Tribal Chairman Lester Thompson, Jr. wrote in a letter to state and federal leaders about concerns of people coming to the reservation to use boats and possibly spreading the virus.

"As you are very well aware, I.H.S clinics and hospitals are in no shape to handle any COVID-19 outbreak that could hit a tribal community," Thompson Jr. wrote.

On Friday, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers closed the boat ramps near Big Bend Dam, near Fort Thompson, South Dakota. This request coming from both Thompson's tribe and the Lower Brule Sioux tribe.

Pandemics haven't been good for Indian Country.

In the 2009 H1N1 flu pandemic, the mortality rate was 0.9 deaths per 100,000 people, but for Native Americans it was 3.7 per 100,000 people.

Looking at 12 states, including South Dakota, nearly 10 percent of the deaths were among the Native American population, yet they only accounted for three percent of the population in those states.

"Ensuring IHS facilities are adequately supporting South Dakota tribes throughout this crisis is critical, and it's something my staff and I have been discussing since this outbreak began," Sen. John Thune (R-SD) said in a statement. "As tribal members know all too well, IHS often struggles to provide requisite care even during the best of times."

Just last year, a New York Times analysis found a quarter of the medical positions at IHS were vacant.

However, there appears to be extra funding and resources to fight the pandemic at these remote and understaffed hospitals and clinics, both from Congress and the executive branch.

In a Thursday briefing, Dr. Deborah Birx, the Coronavirus Response Coordinator for the White House's task force, announced the rapid 15-minute tests developed by Abbott Labs would be heading first to Indian Health Service locations because they are in remote and rural areas.

"We've prioritized the presidential 15-minute test to the Indian Health Service and public health labs so that they can support nursing home testing and other areas where we think surveillance is absolutely key," Birx said. "So at this moment they're prioritized in that way."

The same testing platform is being used to screen anyone who goes near President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence to ensure continuity of government.

"These rapid tests don't need to be sent into a lab—patients can receive their results within 15 minutes," Sen. Mike Rounds (R-SD) said in a statement. "These are good steps to help prepare for COVID-19 on tribal lands. We're continuing to be in contact with South Dakota's tribal leaders as they work to identify needs in their communities at this time."

This comes on top of an influx of money in the record-setting third aid package approved by Congress last week. $8 billion will be going to tribal governments and $1 billion will support IHS.

"Now is the time for IHS to rise to the occasion and ensure that the $1 billion in relief it received from the CARES Act goes to providing the support tribal communities deserve," Thune said.

The leader of the IHS said a COVID Response Team is with working with the White House, CDC and FEMA to coordinate a response. Rear Adm. Michael D. Weahkee, Principal Deputy Director, Indian Health Service also said his agency is hosting weekly calls with tribal leaders.

"I want to recognize the people across the Indian health system who are working tirelessly," Weahkee said in a statement. "We are fortunate to have a team of professionals dedicated to the health and well-being of our patients and tribal communities across the nation. Your commitment has never been more important or more appreciated than it is today."

IHS has worked to use telehealth and postpone non-emergency procedures. He sent a letter to tribes across the country outlining what's to come in funding.

"While many IHS facilities focus on outpatient primary care, IHS also has the capacity to provide care to patients in need of higher levels of care. We also have existing purchased/referred care agreements with a vast network of specialty care providers across the country, with multiple such contracts in place at each facility. IHS facilities are communicating and coordinating with their local and regional partners to ensure continued access to care for our patients," he said.

In the Great Plains region of IHS, which includes South Dakota, North Dakota, Iowa and Nebraska, there have been 130 tests administered, with six coming back positive, as of Friday.

Any tests administered in South Dakota are reported to the Department of Health and included in the state's official daily numbers.

In a Friday media briefing, Gov. Kristi Noem (R-SD) confirmed the state was accounting for IHS facilities in its surge planning. The state projects it will need 5,000 beds and 1,300 ventilators at its peak.

The state believes that peak will be in mid-June and between 30 to 70% of the population will become infected. A majority of the cases will be mild.

IHS has developed a website specifically for tribal communities on the federal response. The agency also partnered with Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health to develop specific information and public awareness information with IHS information.

Whether IHS will be able to handle the pandemic remains to be seen.

Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez, which is already seeing an outbreak, held a town hall this week on Facebook and said he was afraid of what's to come.

"There's frustration from leadership – not just here on Navajo but all of Indian Country," Nez said. "We feel that the United States government once again has ignored or even left out the first residents, the first people, the first citizens of this country: Indigenous people."

KELOLAND News reached out to IHS to get information on plans to surge capacity. The agency did not respond. We will update this story when they do.

Be informed: COVID-19 Myth vs. Fact

TRICARE MILITARY HEALTH – April 3, 2020 – As the Military Health System responds to meet the health care demands of COVID-19, it's important to stay informed. TRICARE can help you separate rumors from truth. Here are a few COVID-19 myths and facts:

MYTH: Military hospitals and clinics aren't isolating COVID-19 patients.

FACT: Infection prevention and control protocols are in place at all military medical facilities. These practices are for any infectious disease, and not just COVID-19. Patients who test positive are either isolated within the facility, or sent home to self-isolate.

MYTH: Social distancing is only for high-risk populations.

FACT: Social distancing protects individuals, especially the most vulnerable. This is the best way to slow transmission rates. Anyone can become infected and pass the virus to others. It's important to stay away from crowded places, reduce contact with others, and avoid people who are coughing or sneezing.

MYTH: It's unsafe to donate blood at military blood donor centers.

FACT: Service members still need blood products, including deployed forces. Extra safety and screening protocols are in effect in the Armed Services Blood Program. This protects the health and safety of donors and staff. Both groups undergo health screenings. They practice social distancing and follow protocols to ensure the blood supply is safe. Sign up to donate online.

Consider sharing Myth vs. Fact infographics and spread the truth, not the virus. Stay safe and learn more about COVID-19.

Website for kids during COVID-19 pandemic

CovidKidsHelp.org is a new website by South Dakota's Center for the Prevention of Child Maltreatment (CPCM) to give families and professionals a one-stop shop to find answers to their questions, resources and take part in Facebook Live sessions with experts in child wellbeing.

CovidKidsHelp.org has been launched by South Dakota's Center for the Prevention of Child Maltreatment (CPCM). With a mission centered on keeping children and families healthy and resilient, CovidKidsHelp.org provides resources for parents and professionals during this challenging time as well as providing live Q&A opportunities with experts. It's a place to find information about parenting, answering questions children may have, and materials to help a range of professionals, including social workers, mental health staff and faith communities.

There will also be upcoming Facebook Live and livestream events where people can ask questions from experts in areas such as how to talk to kids about COVID-19, what to know regarding internet safety for children at this time and how to keep families mentally and physically well.

CovidKidsHelp.org includes:

Resources for Families

Resources for Professionals

Share Resources - A Place for Professionals to Submit Resources to be Included in CovidKidsHelp.org

Ask A Question - Submit questions for professionals to answer during Facebook Live or the Question & Answer page

"We must protect our children. Providing hope and resiliency for families in the face of the trauma brought on by COVID-19 will be essential to our state's recovery and to help create the great childhood every South Dakotan deserves. CPCM is proud to partner with the Helpline Center and organizations across South Dakota in providing COVID-19 resources for families and professionals," Carrie Sanderson, Executive Director of CPCM says.

Judge: Rosebud tribal members have treaty claim for health care

By Jonathan Ellis

Argus Leader – March 31, 2020 – The federal government is required to provide the Rosebud Sioux Tribe with "competent physician-led health care," a federal judge in South Dakota has ruled.

That requirement is a component of the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie, of which the Rosebud Sioux was a signatory, Judge Roberto Lange ruled on Monday. The treaty, "in exchange for mutual peace and vast forfeiture of land by the Sioux Nation," Lange wrote, guaranteed that the federal government would provide some level of health care to the tribes.

The tribe sued the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and Indian Health Service in 2016 after the Rosebud IHS Hospital emergency room was shut down following a host of problems at the hospital. Tribal members were being diverted to hospitals in Winner or Valentine, Nebraska, both about 50 miles away.

In addition to diverting patients because the Rosebud hospital didn't have enough doctors and nurses, IHS reduced the hours of operation at its urgent care.

While problems at Rosebud were ongoing, the troubles that IHS had in providing decent health care across its system were well documented in congressional testimony and government watchdog audits.

Some of the claims in the original lawsuit had already been dismissed by Lange in a previous ruling. The government sought judgment on the remaining portion of the lawsuit, arguing that it was not required to provide health care, despite the treaty and federal legislation. It also suggested that Lange should take the literal meaning of the words contained in the treaty, which said the government would "furnish annually to the Indians the physician," and also make appropriations "as will be sufficient to employ such persons."

Lange noted that the language in treaties is supposed to be construed in favor of Indians, and he said the meaning at the time of its signing to Indians and the government was that the United States would provide physician-led health care.

"If this court were to adopt a truly literal interpretation as the government suggests, the government could satisfy its duty by employing and furnishing a physician and housing him on the reservation without the physician providing any sort of services," Lange wrote. "This interpretation could not have been the intended result of the negotiating parties."

Ace Crawford, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney's Office in South Dakota, declined to comment.

Brendan Johnson*, a lawyer representing the tribe, said he was pleased that Lange ruled the government has a treaty duty to provide medical care to the tribe.

"This is a significant victory," Johnson wrote in an email. "The finding that there is a judicially enforceable treaty duty is a win for the tribe."

The ruling didn't go as far as the tribe had hoped. The tribe had argued that federal legislation used a standard of health care to the "highest level." Lange called that language use by Congress "aspirational."

"This court," he wrote, "cannot accept the tribe's conclusion because it overstates the government's duty."

*Brendan Johnson is former U.S. Attorney for the District of South Dakota.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

Comments about providing education to students at home during pandemic

By Mindy Crawford

April 5, 2020

How do I really feel about the obligation we have as schools to continue to provide education for our students that attend our schools during this pandemic?

Education as far as the book curriculums we teach in our schools?

Do I think that is the education that is most important to them right now ... no.

Do I feel we have an obligation to provide learning at home that resembles school, somewhat, so they have a little sense of normalcy during the day ... yes.

Our brains are pattern seeking.

Our daily patterns have been thrown for a loop.

So schools across the country are doing their best.

Our school is not one-to-one in regards to chrome books/tablets etc., and only 60 % or fewer of our homes have Internet.

So we decided to be realistic, we serve 500-plus families and our teachers have created learning packets.

These will go out once again this week.

They are not being sent and delivered so your child can sit for hours and do "school work" at home but so they can pull out the work, text their friends to talk about the assignment, inbox their teachers or snap their friends to talk about how much they miss school.

We want to give them a little sense of normal.

We don't want our families stressing over the work they receive.

Yes, if you are able to sit down and work with them and let them show you what they have learned this year … do it.

Your kids are amazing!

Do we want the packets back ... yes (although we just have to figure out a safe way to return everything).

But your families well-being comes first.

The most important thing we have talked about as staff is to reach out to our families.

Let them know we miss their child.

Let them know we pray for them every day.

Let them know that we are going to all come together when this is over and celebrate our amazing school family.

During this time our children are going to learn hundreds of things we can't teach them at school.

They are also going to watch how we the adults handle each new day.

If your house is anything like mine our schedules are a bit screwed up.

But I know that when I peek at them at 12:00, 1:00 and yes even 2:00 p.m. in the afternoon as they are still sleeping, that I am soooo thankful for them.

We need to find our calm as parents so our homes can reflect that calm.

It's 2:27 a.m. I am laying here on my phone … with tears running down my face, thinking I'm not going to post this anyway, lol.

I know for me, lately, I have to cry before I find my calm.

Down deep I know everything is going to be okay, yet I get scared.

So I pray, pray and pray some more.

I know the Creator has a plan.

My faith in the Creator and my way of life are a part of what helps me find my calm when I am scared.

So yes our kids are going to learn ...ten years from now they aren't going to remember the learning packets during this time or the assignment on their distant learning assignment.

They are going to remember the things they saw us do as parents during a time that was scary for all of us.

The values we hang in the hallways of our schools seeing those happen in our families and amongst all of in our communities that's the learning/education that will always be most important.

Well, both Isaiah and Maya have walked in my room as I'm laying in the dark deciding if I should even post this or not and asked, "Why are you crying?"

I just told them because I love them and that it's okay to cry especially during all this crazy that is happening in the world.

So I better go smudge and try and send these kids and dogs to bed.

I love the kids in our community and our families.

My prayer is for each of you.

Notice from Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Agency Village, SD – April 1, 2020 – Tiospa Zina Tribal School will be closed through May 1, 2020.

Please continue to be safe.

Sending prayers to all of our school families and communities.

Update from TZTS

Agency Village, SD – April 2, 2020 – Learning Packets for all K-12 students will be disbursed on Monday, April 6, 2020.

Middle/School and High School packets will be mailed.

If your child is a middle school or high school art student their packet will be delivered as art supplies are being included in their packet.

K-5 packets will be delivered. Staff will be using health precautions when delivering. We will knock and put the packet in-between the screen door and inside door.

All previous packets need to be kept by each family as we are still working at a safe plan for handling all returned packets.

Please be patient with us as a school, yourselves and children as we all adjust to a different learning and home environment.

We are here to answer any questions or you have a different address please contact your principal.

Our numbers are below.

HS Principal Mabel Picotte (605) 268-0421

MS Principal Jasmin A Zetina (605) 880-5141

K-5 Principal Mindy Crawford (605) 268-023

K-5 Special Education Director Kara German (605) 268-0194

MS/HS Special Education Director Heather Bainbridge (701) 640-3754

ESDS update from SWO Education Director Dr. Johnson

Agency Village, SD – April 2, 2020 – Enemy Swim Day School almost has 100% of their students with wifi and online.

Their educational Plan for distance learning was submitted to the State, and students are actually working on line and can see their teachers.

This is really working wonderfully!

The school staff has been delivering food from the start of all of this to all of their families and more.

Now they are dropping off boxes of food portioned to last two weeks at a time.

Included are items such as toilet paper, and needs of FACE youngsters, like Pampers!

ESDS is taking a spring break from April 10-14, and the school will remain closed through the remainder of April.

See photos of the students at work from their "home classrooms!"

FACE Center-based students working hard with their parents on their homework packets!

See photos of the FACE students working at home!

Sisseton High School honor rolls

SHS 3RD QUARTER HONOR ROLL

Students achieving a GPA of 3.5 or Higher with no grade lower than a B in any subject.

Freshmen:

Anderson, Averee

Estwick, Annika

Fritz, Evelyn

Johnson, Tyan

Karst, Kathryn

Medenwald, Sadie

Tchida, Mackenzie

Sophomore:

Chaudhari, Jay

DeSpiegler, Avery

Dumarce/White, Sage

Hornis, Paul

Long, Heath

Nelson, Hailey

Rice, Veronica

Steen, Riley

Swanson, Brooklyn

Juniors:

Aguirre, Xavier

Azure, Tatiana

Barse, Kaycee

Bartz, Raif

Bellonger, Teagan

Duffield, Madeline

Goodsell, Kye

Greseth, Levi

Gruby, Wyatt

Heath, Kelsey

Kranhold, Andrew

Meland, Anne

Metz, Ali

Nielsen, Blake

Pistorius, Carter

Pistorius, Madisyn

Silk, Kierra

Tchida, Anthony

Seniors:

Albright, Daniel

Bochat,

stwick, Talia

Fisher, Kaitlyn

Halfaday, Maycee

Hansen, Ashlyn

Hull, Jaylona

Johnson, Joshua

Karst, Kellie

Keller, Brandon

Redthunder, Lexus

Sahnow, Savannah

Swanson, Sheridan

Weyand, Martina

SHS 3nd QUARTER MERIT ROLL

Students achieving a GPA of 3.0-3.499 with no grade lower than a C in any subject.

Freshmen:

Ceroll, Alexis

Gray, Mason

Hanson, Colter

LaFromboise, Ashlynn

McCleerey, Spencer

Renville, Kelcee

Shultz III, Dean

Silk, Linnea

Zetina, Zion

Sophomore:

Benda, Constance

Chanku, Jairus

Chavez, Jose

Christopherson, Allison

Guy, Kasey

Hanson, Mikala

Hanson, Parker

Janssen, Raegan

Johnson, Tate

Langager, Ty

Moen, Mitchell

Perez Sucuqui, Jose

Syverson, Brock

Young, Shiane

Juniors:

Appel, Devan

Bertsch, Wakanyan Inazin

Dykstra, Tessa

EaglePambrun, Jeremiah

Goodhart, Dylan

Goodhart, Hannah

Gregg, Ryan

Harrison, Isaiah

Long, Abigail

Morales, Beniclo

Neilan, Dirk

Stone, Maleena

Seniors:

Anderson, Trevor

Beaudreau, Alexander

Ceroll, Tyler

Chanku, Ayianna

Jensen, Pete

Myrum, Sidney

Neilan, Dustin

Nieland, Parker

Peterson, Ty

Syverson, Wyatt

Wanna, Marcel

Yammerino, Taryn

Legals

Enemy Swim Day School

Request for Proposals

Creation and Maintenance of FACE Electronic Data System

OPENING DATE: April 8, 2020

CLOSING DATE: May 12, 2020 @ 3:00 P.M.

SUBMITTAL NAME & LOCATION:    Enemy Swim Day School- Administration Office

Attn: Dr. Nadine Eastman, Superintendent

13525 446th Avenue

Waubay, SD 57273

INSTRUCTIONS FOR SUBMITTING A PROPOSAL

1.  Submit Proposal via email or in a sealed envelope.

2.  The bid quotation must list the individual(s) and provide resumes of who will perform the services.

3.  At least 3 references (name, phone number, and address) must be included.

4.  The total cost for each specified service must be included.

5.  Any Conflict of Interest with ESDS Administrative/Business staff or School Board members must be declared.

Any questions related to this Request for Proposal shall be directed to the contact person whose name(s) appear below.

CONTACT: Dr. Eastman, Superintendent - (605) 947-4605, ext. 3008

Email: neastman@esds.us

REASON FOR RFP AND SCOPE TO BE SERVED: CREATION AND MAINTENANCE OF FACE ELECTRONIC DATA MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

The Enemy Swim Day School is seeking proposals from a qualified individual to assist Enemy Swim Day School administration and FACE staff to improve student file management through the creation and maintenance of an electronic file management systems. This would include periodic file checks on site.

See ESDS.US for Full Proposal.

15-2tc

 

NOTICE TO PREPARE A PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE GREAT PLAINS REGIONAL OFFICE'S WILDLAND SPATIAL FIRE MANAGEMENT PLAN

The United States Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Great Plains Regional Office (GPRO) is preparing a programmatic environmental assessment (PEA) in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Council on Environmental Quality regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR]1500-1508), the Department of the Interior requirements listed in Department Manual Part 516, Chapters 1-15; BIA NEPA Handbook 2012 and Wildland Fire Policies for the development/implementation of the GPRO's Wildland Spatial Fire Management Plan, as implemented under the National Fire Plan, pursuant to 25 CFR Part 163.28, on trust lands located within the Great Plains Region which includes the Cheyenne River, Crow Creek, Fort Berthold, Spirt Lake, Lake Traverse, Lower Brule, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, Standing Rock, Ponca, Omaha, Santee, Winnebago, and Yankton Sioux Indian Reservations and the trust lands associated with the Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe and the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa in North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, and Iowa. The PEA will analyze the potential impacts associated with the BIA's development/implementation of the GPRO's Wildland Spatial Fire Management Plan, including wildfire suppression, urban interface fire suppression, and the use of prescribed burning, prevention, and mechanical treatment as hazard fuel reduction methods. All of the land (fee and trust) within the exterior boundaries of each reservation and the trust lands associated with the Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe and the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa are considered the Fire Management Planning Area by the BIA GRPO and are also known as the Project Area. The Project Area includes over 15 million acres. There is a section specific to the Lake Traverse Indian Reservation, which accounts for approximately 6% of the Project Area, in the PEA.

The BIA is seeking your input as part of the NEPA scoping process. Comments might include reasonable alternatives, mitigation measures, probable or possible adverse impacts, and other considerations. The public comment period will begin on April 6, 2020. The BIA will accept written comments until close of business May 6, 2020. Please include the "GPRO Wildland Spatial Fire Management Plan PEA - Lake Traverse" in the subject line of any correspondence. Comments should be submitted via email or post delivery to the environmental consultant assisting the BIA with the development of the PEA:

Ms. Juli Anna McNutt / C&C Environmental, Inc.

P.O. Box 654 / Evansville, Wyoming 82636

Juliannamcnutt@outlook.com

15-17c

February 2020 SWO Tribal Council proceedings

REGULAR TRIBAL COUNCIL MEETING

Tuesday, February 4, 2020, 9:00 AM

TiWakan Tio Tipi Council Chambers

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT:

BIG COULEE:                      Lisa Jackson

BUFFALO LAKE:                 Louis Johnson

ENEMY SWIM:                     Cheryl Owen

HEIPA/VEBLEN:                  Winfield Rondell Jr.

LAKE TRAVERSE:               Francis Crawford

LONG HOLLOW:                 Curtis Bissonette

OLD AGENCY:                     Milton Owen

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES PRESENT: Tribal Chairman Donovan White (9:14), Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr., and Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson

 

CALL TO ORDER: Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr. called the meeting to order at 9:11 AM with two (2) Executives and seven (7) Council members from seven (7) Districts answering Roll Call. Opening Prayer for the Tribal Secretary said by Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson.

 

MOTION NO. 1: made by Francis Crawford, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Curtis Bissonette, to approve the Regular Tribal Council Meeting Minutes of Tuesday, January 7, 2020.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 1: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 2: made by Francis Crawford, second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Milton Owen, to approve the Regular Tribal Council Meeting Minutes of Wednesday, January 8, 2020.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 2: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 3: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Curtis Bissonette, to approve the Special Tribal Council Meeting Minutes of Monday, January 27, 2020.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 3: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 4: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Cheryl Owen, question by Myrna Thompson, to amend Tribal Council Motion No. 57, of 1/29/20, to change the payee, to now read: "to authorize the payment to the Corporation for Native Broadcasting, in the amount of $18,724.00, for hardware, parts, and installation/repair services for the KXSW Radio tower/transmitter, with the Capitol Improvement budget as the funding source, as presented by Station Manager Garryl Rousseau Sr."

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 4: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 5: made by Myrna Thompson, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Regular Tribal Council Meeting Minutes of Wednesday, January 29, 2020.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 5: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 6: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Cheryl Owen, question by Myrna Thompson, to approve the Tribal Chairman report, as presented by Tribal Chairman Donovan White.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 6: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 7: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Myrna Thompson, question by Milton Owen, to approve the following carryover budgets for FY 2020: MSPI Youth & Family TREE; MSPI Generation Grant; MSPI Behavioral Health; and Tribal Veterans Service Office, as presented by Budget Supervisor Lexie Fancher.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 7: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 8: made by Milton Owen, second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Edmund Johnson Jr., to hire Kristy Johnson as a Consultant to compile financial and tax reports for the EDA/DNI and the I-29 Motel.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 8: 9 For: Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 8 Opposed: Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Cheryl Owen (3); Lisa Jackson (2). 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 9: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Milton Owen, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Tribal Vice-Chairman report, as presented by Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 9: 16 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 1 Abstained: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 10: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to extend the temporary Legal Services Agreement with Alexander Vian, to serve as Prosecutor for the SWO Tribal Court, for two (2) more months, and to authorize Tribal Chairman Donovan White to execute the Addendum/Agreement, pending legal review, and to re-advertise for this position.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 10: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2). 1 Opposed: Tribal Secretary (1). 1 Abstained: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 11: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to authorize the Youth Department to purchase a dormitory building from the Sisseton Wahpeton College, in the amount of $25,000.00, with the Youth budget as the funding source, as submitted by Youth Coordinator Derrick McCauley, and as presented by Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 11: 13 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Secretary (1). 3 Opposed: Francis Crawford (2); Louis Johnson (1). 1 Abstained: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 12: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Myrna Thompson, to approve the Elderly Advisory Board report, as presented by Board Members; Mike Greeley, Karen Joseph, and Janell Cook.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 12: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 13: made by Cheryl Owen, second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Francis Crawford, to approve Tribal Secretary report, as presented by Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 13: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 3 Absent From Vote: Winfield Rondell Jr. (3). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 14: made by Myrna Thompson, second by Francis Crawford, question by Lisa Jackson, to approve the resolution, "Authorizes Development of Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Health Plan (2021-2025) in 2020", as presented by Health Coordinator Sara DeCoteau.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 14: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Resolution No. SWO-20-011

 

MOTION NO. 15: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Lisa Jackson, question by Francis Crawford, to approve the Professional Workforce Development Services Agreement with Massachusetts General Hospital, for Opioid Use Disorder Care, as presented by Health Coordinator Sara DeCoteau.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 15: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 16: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Professional Services Agreement with Aliive Roberts County for Botvin Lifeskills Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Training, as presented by Health Coordinator Sara DeCoteau.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 16: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 17: made by Francis Crawford, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Professional Services Agreement with Aliive Roberts County for A Safe Medication Storage & Disposal Multi-Media Campaign, for the Tribal Opioid Response Program, as presented by Health Coordinator Sara DeCoteau.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 17: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 18: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Curtis Bissonette, to approve the Professional Services Agreement with Aliive Roberts County for Community Coalition Development and Mobilization, for the Tribal Opioid Response Program, as presented by Health Coordinator Sara DeCoteau.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 18: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 19: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Curtis Bissonette, to approve the Tribal Health Administration report, as presented by Health Coordinator Sara DeCoteau.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 19: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 20: made by Francis Crawford, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Curtis Bissonette, to approve the Consultant Services Agreement renewal with Abhijit Chatterjee, to host the Early Childhood Intervention Program (ECIP) database and website, in the amount of $2,656.00, with the ECIP budget as the funding source, and to authorize the Tribal Chairman to execute the Contract, pending legal review, as presented by ECIP Office Manager Terra Haug.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 20: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 21: made by Francis Crawford, second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Early Childhood Intervention Program report, as presented by Office Manager Terra Haug.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 21: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 22: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Milton Owen, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Sand and Gravel Feasibility Study Project budget, in the amount of $65,940.00, with the Division of Energy and Mineral Development Award as the funding source, and to authorize Tribal Chairman Donovan White to execute the documents, as presented by DOT Director Cliff Eberhardt.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 22: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 23: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Cheryl Owen, question by Curtis Bissonette, to approve the resolution, "Recognition and Adoption of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Transportation Safety Plan", as presented by DOT Director Cliff Eberhardt.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 23: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Resolution No. SWO-20-012

 

MOTION NO. 24: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Cheryl Owen, question by Milton Owen, to approve the SWO DOT Grant Applications Task Order #1911-02098-1 and budget modification, in the amount of $19,881.00, and to authorize Tribal Chairman Donovan White to execute the documents, as presented by DOT Director Cliff Eberhardt.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 24: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 25: made by Francis Crawford, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Curtis Bissonette, to approve the Department of Transportation report, as presented by Director Cliff Eberhardt.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 25: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 26: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Milton Owen, to authorize the Veterans Service Office to purchase a 2018 John Deere 312GR Skid Steer, from Kibble Equipment, in the amount of $29,900.00, with the VSO Equipment grant as the funding source, as presented by VSO Driver/Cemetery Director Gabe Fischer.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 26: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 27: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., to retrocede our Law Enforcement to the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA).

MOTION DIED. Lack of Second.

 

MOTION NO. 28: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Cheryl Owen, question by Milton Owen, to acknowledge the receipt of the Heipa District Minutes for the meeting held January 19, 2020.

Heipa District Minutes for meeting held January 19, 2020:

1.             Direct the Tribal Chairman to take the issue of Tim Ellestad to the federal level and DCI.

2.             Direct the Tribal Chairman to have the tribal attorney's start working on our tribal penal codes as soon as possible.

3.             Dis-enroll Tim Ellestad from Heipa District.

4.             Councilman Rondell takes back to Tribal Council that SWO adopt a resolution for the protection of our tribal members.

5.             Tribal Council by-pass the process and update the penal codes for the protection of our tribal members.

6.             Turn over the letter pertaining to Dakota Crossing from Bobbi Jo Dumarce to Tribal Chairman.

7.             Councilman Rondell makes motion in Tribal Council to retrocede our law enforcement to BIA.

8.             Tribal taxes be deducted from contractors checks for all tribal projects.

9.             Buffalo Lanes do not get a waiver or extension on tribal taxes.

10.          Tribal Council makes medicinal marijuana and hemp use legal and that the judicial committee starts working on the code.

11.          Have MBA Engineering work on the issues at the clerk of courts and parole office in the tribal administration building. Ankle monitors are not working and cannot be tracked.

12.          Youth Center Coordinator Derrick McCauley give a detailed financial report within the next 2 weeks for the SWO youth center for the past 7 years.

13.          All pass through taxes for tribal, district, for-profit and consultant businesses need to be collected immediately and all extensions and waivers be discontinued unless all financial reports are submitted showing they need the waiver or extension.

14.          The tribe uses a well system for the new jail and other new projects instead of BDM rural water.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 28: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 2 Absent From Vote: Lisa Jackson (2). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

Note:      Tribal Chairman Donovan White briefly left the meeting. Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr. now chairing the meeting.

 

MOTION NO. 29: made by Louis Johnson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Curtis Bissonette, to acknowledge the receipt of the Buffalo Lake District Minutes for the meeting held January 26, 2020.

Buffalo Lake District Minutes for meeting held January 26, 2020:

1.             Approve Youth Membership: Johnni Adams.

2.             Approve Adult Membership: Ethan J. LaRue DeMarrias.

3.             Reaffirm the motion by BLD, to establish a 7- member gaming board.

4.             The CEO and General Manager at Dakota Magic Casino and the General Manager at Dakota Connection Casino need to be advertised as soon as possible.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 29: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 2 Absent From Vote: Lisa Jackson (2). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

Note:      Tribal Chairman Donovan White returned to chair the meeting.

 

MOTION NO. 30: made by Milton Owen, second by Myrna Thompson, question by Francis Crawford, to change the Tribal Programs that are under all three Tribal Executives to be under only one Executive, with the I.T. Department to be placed under the supervision of the Tribal Vice-Chairman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 30: 10 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2). 3 Opposed: Winfield Rondell Jr. (3). 1 Abstained: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 3 Absent From Vote: Lisa Jackson (2); Tribal Secretary (1). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 31: made by Milton Owen, second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Cheryl Owen, to acknowledge the receipt of the Old Agency District Minutes for the meeting held January 27, 2020.

Old Agency District Minutes for meeting held January 27, 2020:

1.             Approve Relinquishment: Marcos Ortiz Morales.

2.             Approve Adult Memberships: Jace Eastman, Dayton Zgodava, Mason Labatte, Cerina Pratt, Destiny Walker, Alberta Abraham, Daylene Bernard, Jaiden Snow.

3.             Approve Youth Memberships: Brooks Bursheim, Jace Drum, Chasten Gerry, Lyla Goodsell, Jacelee Hill, Zayanna Shepherd, Phillip Payne, Gabriel Payne, Brice Renville.

4.             Advertise the Human Services Board position.

5.             Direct our Councilman to make a motion, in council, to change the programs that are under three Executives to under one Executive.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 31: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 2 Absent From Vote: Lisa Jackson (2). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 32: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Cheryl Owen, in resolution form, to direct the Indian Health Service to remove Holly Rice and Gail Williams from their positions at the Sisseton Indian Health Service.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 32: 10 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Curtis Bissonette (2). 5 Opposed: Francis Crawford (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Abstained. 2 Absent From Vote: Lisa Jackson (2). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Resolution No. SWO-20-013

 

MOTION NO. 33: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Myrna Thompson, to terminate the Contract with MBA Engineering, Inc.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 33: 4 For: Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 8 Opposed: Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Louis Johnson (1). 0 Abstained. 5 Absent From Vote: Cheryl Owen (3); Milton Owen (2). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION DEFEATED.

 

MOTION NO. 34: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Francis Crawford, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to acknowledge the receipt of the Long Hollow District Minutes for the meeting held January 29, 2020.

Long Hollow District Minutes for meeting held January 29, 2020:

1.             The lease's that are up are changed to 3 years that includes pasture, hay lands, and agriculture.

2.             Council to secure funding for THPO to maintain the archives.

3.             Reaffirm the removal of Randy Jordan, Holly Rice, and Gail Williams.

4.             Have an audit done on section 7 for the past 10 years.

5.             Pursue the contract with our insurance to fix I.T. programs and to terminate MBA contract.

6.             Have the tribe take back the Sota.

7.             Approve Youth Membership: Zuriyah Barse.

8.             Approve Youth-to-Adult Membership: Winter Laughter.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 34: 12 For: Louis Johnson (1); Lisa Jackson (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 5 Absent From Vote: Cheryl Owen (3); Milton Owen (2). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 35: made by Francis Crawford, second by Louis Johnson, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to acknowledge the receipt of the Lake Traverse District Minutes for the meeting held January 25, 2020.

Lake Traverse District Minutes for meeting held January 25, 2020:

1.             Accept Shannon White resignation from the Police Commission and to have an election next month.

2.             Donate $1000.00 to our repatriation and as DCA representative that Darwin challenge the other districts to do the same and then ask Council to match.

3.             The Tribe cut the SWC's stipend to $150.00 per meeting and $75.00 for a special meeting.

4.             Stipends apply to all boards and committees: $150.00 stipend for the first meeting and $75 for special meeting and the $250.00 Christmas bonus.

5.             Mabel Picotte be terminated as principal and if she is not terminated then TZTS not renew her contract.

6.             Approve Membership: Troy Redday, Curtis Emery, Judy Buyck, Clayton Dauphinais.

7.             Approve Relinquishment: Jerica Brown, Dominic Brown, Denise Keeble (Flute).

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 35: 12 For: Louis Johnson (1); Lisa Jackson (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 5 Absent From Vote: Cheryl Owen (3); Milton Owen (2). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 36: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Francis Crawford, question by Louis Johnson, to acknowledge the receipt of the Big Coulee District Minutes for the meeting held January 26, 2020.

Big Coulee District Minutes for meeting held January 26, 2020:

1.             Give the authority to the seven (7) member SWO Elderly Advisory Board to set the amount and have them decide how much to distribute the monthly elderly coupons.

2.             Approve Adult Membership: Jerilyn Traversie.

3.             Approve Youth Membership: Hanhepi Maphiya Phelps, Xavius Provincial.

4.             The Sisseton-Wahpeton Housing Authority present a housing site for the Big Coulee District to SWO Realty.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 36: 9 For: Louis Johnson (1); Lisa Jackson (2); Francis Crawford (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 2 Abstained: Milton Owen (2). 6 Absent From Vote: Cheryl Owen (3); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 37: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Milton Owen, to acknowledge the receipt of the Enemy Swim District Minutes for the meeting held January 25, 2020.

Enemy Swim District Minutes for meeting held January 25, 2020:

1.             Approve Adult Membership: Luia DeLoera, Makasitomni Dumarce, Owemaza Owen, Katriel Peterson, Jeanette Huffslutler, Brooklynn McGarry, Christopher McGarry.

2.             Approve Youth Membership: Kyson Fayant, Connor Hagenson, Meleana Hagenson, Taelor Hagenson, Hazelee Hopkins, Ezekiel Gill, Mahpiya Gill, Wicahpi Gill, Mathias Grant.

3.             Boards, Committees, and Commissions do not have authorization to take SWO Tribal Council or SWO Executives to court and must. Judicial Committee needs to clarify separation of powers and legal review is needed.

4.             Have the elderly gift cards be distributed to elders living within a 100-mile radius from the SWO tribal administration building this will help alleviate mailing the cards for the off-reservation elders.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 37: 11 For: Milton Owen (2); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 6 Absent From Vote: Cheryl Owen (3); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 38: made by Edmund Johnson Jr., second by Lisa Jackson, question by Francis Crawford, to approve the District Chairman's Association (DCA) report, as presented by DCA Members; Kenneth Johnson, Brenda Bellonger, Jesse Larsen, Jessie Chanku, and Darwin James.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 38: 14 For: Milton Owen (2); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 3 Absent From Vote: Cheryl Owen (3). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 39: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to accept the resignation of Billy Canku from the Gaming Commission, effective January 31, 2020.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 39: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 40: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Edmund Johnson Jr., to authorize payment to AT&T Fleet Complete, in the amount of $9,922.38, for GPS tracking/monitoring systems for the SWO Tribal Vehicles, with the General Fund as the funding source, as presented by Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 40: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 41: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, to adjourn.

MEETING ADJOURNED 3:34PM.

Respectfully Submitted, Lindsey Abraham, Recording Secretary Asst.

 

REGULAR TRIBAL COUNCIL MEETING

Wednesday, February 5, 2020, 9:00 AM

TiWakan Tio Tipi Council Chambers

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT:

BIG COULEE:                      Lisa Jackson

BUFFALO LAKE:                 Louis Johnson

ENEMY SWIM:                     Cheryl Owen

HEIPA/VEBLEN:                  Winfield Rondell Jr.

LAKE TRAVERSE:               Francis Crawford (9:15)

LONG HOLLOW:                 Curtis Bissonette

OLD AGENCY:                     Milton Owen

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES PRESENT: Tribal Chairman Donovan White (9:17), Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr., and Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson

 

CALL TO ORDER: Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr. called the meeting to order at 9:12 AM with two (2) Executives and six (6) Council members from seven (7) Districts answering Roll Call. Opening Prayer for the Tribal Secretary said by Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson.

 

MOTION NO. 42: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Lisa Jackson, question by Milton Owen, to approve the revised Use Permit for the SWO Head Start, Enemy Swim Site, for 2.5 acres of land, as recommended by the Reservation Planning Commission, and as presented by Realty Manager Jerry Eastman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 42: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 43: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Francis Crawford, to approve the temporary Use Permit for Clausen & Sons Construction LLC, for 5 acres of land, as recommended by the Reservation Planning Commission, and as presented by Realty Manager Jerry Eastman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 43: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 44: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Cheryl Owen, question by Myrna Thompson, to approve the 1.93-acre Home Site Lease for Perry Mahpiyasna, as recommended by the Reservation Planning Commission, and as presented by Realty Director Jerry Eastman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 44: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 45: made by Myrna Thompson, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to approve the cancellation of the Land Lease with Wayne Goodhart, as recommended and presented by Realty Director Jerry Eastman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 45: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 46: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Francis Crawford, question by Lisa Jackson, to authorize the purchase of the tracts of land offered for sale by: Vanessa Driver - 2.64 acres, in the amount of $4,233.83; David Louis - 22.10 acres, in the amount of $7,450.41; Dennis Keeble - 0.22 acres, in the amount of $332.36; June Hitcher - 0.0009 acres, in the amount of $1.66; and Marvin Hisgun - 17.49 acres, in the amount of $22,404.25; with the Cobell Lease Account as the funding source, as recommended by the Reservation Planning Commission, and as presented by Realty Manager Jerry Eastman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 46: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 47: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Milton Owen, to approve the Realty Office report, as presented by Realty Manager Jerry Eastman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 47: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 48: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to authorize the Planning Department to advertise for Project Coordinator/Owner's Representative for the SWO Justice/Detention Center Project, as presented by Planning Director Michael Roberts.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 48: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 49: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to have the Planning Department draft a letter to the State of South Dakota, for the Tribal Secretary's signature, requesting that they recognize the Tribe's numbers pertaining to our most recent census count of Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Members.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 49: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 50: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Milton Owen, to approve the Planning Department report, as presented by Director Michael Roberts.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 50: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 51: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Lisa Jackson, question by Francis Crawford, to approve the Attorney Contact with Steven Gunn, to provide legal services in relation to the Dakota Crossing Grocery Store, and to authorize the Tribal Chairman to execute the Contract, pending legal review, as presented by Tribal Chairman Donovan White.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 51: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Tribal Secretary (1). 2 Opposed: Curtis Bissonette (2). 1 Abstained: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 52: made by Francis Crawford, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Lisa Jackson, to donate $5,000.00 to the United Tribes Technical College, to be utilized for scholarships for SWO Tribal Members only, with the Tribal Vice-Chairman to determine the funding source, as requested by Todd Goodsell of UTTC.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 52: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 53: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Curtis Bissonette, to approve the Native Voices Endowment budget for FY 2020, as presented by Education Director Dr. Sherry Johnson.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 53: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 54: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Cheryl Owen, question by Curtis Bissonette, to approve reimbursement to Enemy Swim Day School, for CKLA Reading Materials from Amplify, in the amount of $6,431.04, with the Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi Grant as the funding source, as presented by Education Director Dr. Sherry Johnson.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 54: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 55: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Milton Owen, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Consultant Services Agreement with Dustina Gill, Nis'to Incorporated, to provide youth mentoring, cultural workshops, and activities, in the amount of $13,400.00, with the Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi Grant as the funding source, and to authorize Tribal Chairman Donovan White to execute the Agreement, pending legal review, as presented by Education Director Dr. Sherry Johnson.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 55: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 56: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Milton Owen, question by Lisa Jackson, to approve the Education Office report, as presented by Education Director Dr. Sherry Johnson.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 56: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 57: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the January 2020 CACFP Food report for Head Start and Early Head Start, as presented by Director Lynn Halbert.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 57: 16 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Secretary (1). 1 Opposed: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 58: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the January 2020 Attendance Report for Head Start and Early Head Start, as presented by Director Lynn Halbert.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 58: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 59: made by Francis Crawford, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Myrna Thompson, in resolution form, to support South Dakota House Bills: 1134 - permit certain acts at a school honoring or graduation ceremony; 1145 - authorize certain Tribal members to attend certain institutions of higher education or postsecondary technical institutes without paying of tuition; 1185 - limit public employer consideration of certain criminal backgrounds; 1196 - authorize revival of certain civil claims, and to oppose SD House Bills: 1093 - establish a pipeline liability fund, to authorize a special fee for extraordinary expenses, and to make a continuous appropriation therefor; 1194 - authorize federally recognized Indian Tribes to receive PEACE funds, and to have the Tribal Secretary send letters to the SD State Senators and Representatives stating our support and opposition to these bills.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 59: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Resolution No. SWO-20-014

 

Note:      Tribal Chairman Donovan White briefly left the meeting. Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr. now chairing the meeting.

 

MOTION NO. 60: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Cheryl Owen, in resolution form, to enroll into the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate the three (3) applicants as listed in Exhibit A, as presented by Recording Secretary Verlyn Beaudreau.

Flute, Faith Janel                 Thennis, Kyren Elijah

White, Caysen Race

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 60: 16 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Resolution No. SWO-20-015

 

MOTION NO. 61: made by Milton Owen, second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Cheryl Owen, in resolution form, to enroll into the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate the six (6) applicants as listed in Exhibit B, as presented by Recording Secretary Verlyn Beaudreau.

Andrews, Dustin Cole, Jr.   Felicia, Cary Joseph

Irwin, Alexandre Francis     Pratt, Kyvan Grey

Pumpkinseed, Josiah Conway         Williams, Austin James Raymond

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 61: 16 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Resolution No. SWO-20-016

 

MOTION NO. 62: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Milton Owen, in resolution form, to enroll into the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate the eleven (11) applicants as listed in Exhibit C, as presented by Recording Secretary Verlyn Beaudreau.

Bluedog, Maverick Grayson               Casiano, Vahna Soliece

Greeley, Melani Rose         Lawrence, Kasen Dean

Lovejoy, Khaleesi Aurora   Pink, Cynthia Leigh

Springer, Dakota Evelyn-Brightstar  Stachowski, Jr., Brian Robert Vance

Tol, Emiliana Esmeralda    Tol, Zavyn Spencer Jonathan

Wilson, Terelee Mary

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 62: 16 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Resolution No. SWO-20-017

 

MOTION NO. 63: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Cheryl Owen, question by Lisa Jackson, to approve the Enrollment Office report, as presented by Recording Secretary Verlyn Beaudreau.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 63: 16 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 64: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Francis Crawford, to approve the Legal Services Agreement with David Geyer of Delaney, Nielsen & Sannes P.C., with changes, to serve as a Public Defender for SWO Tribal Court, on an as-needed basis, in the not-to-exceed amount of $10,000.00, and to authorize Tribal Chairman Donovan White to execute the Agreement, pending legal review, as recommended and presented by Chief Judge Gina Ruggieri.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 64: 16 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 65: made by Francis Crawford, second by Louis Johnson, question by Cheryl Owen, to go into Executive Session, at 1:44pm.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 65: 16 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

Note:      Tribal Chairman Donovan White returned to chair the meeting.

 

MOTION NO. 66: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to come out of Executive Session, at 2:19pm.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 66: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 67: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to reaffirm Amended Tribal Council Motion No. 4, of 1/3/03, "to accept Daniel White's resignation as a Sisseton-Wahpeton Gaming Commissioner."

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 67: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 68: made by Francis Crawford, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Lisa Jackson, to appoint Buffalo Lake Tribal Council Member Louis Johnson as the Ex-officio for the TERO Commission.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 68: 16 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 1 Abstained: Louis Johnson (1). 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 69: made by Myrna Thompson, second by Milton Owen, question by Edmund Johnson Jr., to table the Legal Counsel Agreement with Delaney, Nielsen & Sannes P.C. until Steven Campbell is contacted to see if he is interested in the position.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 69: 6 For: Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 11 Opposed: Louis Johnson (1); Cheryl Owen (3); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2). 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION DEFEATED.

 

MOTION NO. 70: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Legal Counsel Agreement with Delaney, Nielsen & Sannes P.C. to serve as temporary In-house Legal Counsel, on a part-time basis, and to authorize the Tribal Chairman to execute the Agreement, pending legal review, as presented by Tribal Chairman Donovan White.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 70: 9 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Lisa Jackson (2). 8 Opposed: Francis Crawford (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Milton Owen (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 71: made by Francis Crawford, second by Curtis Bissonette, to adjourn.

MEETING ADJOURNED 2:30PM.

Respectfully Submitted, Lindsey Abraham, Recording Secretary Asst.

 

REGULAR TRIBAL COUNCIL EDUCATION MEETING

Monday, February 10, 2020, 9:30 AM

TiWakan Tio Tipi Council Chambers

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT:

BIG COULEE:                      Lisa Jackson

BUFFALO LAKE:                 Louis Johnson

ENEMY SWIM:                     Cheryl Owen

HEIPA/VEBLEN:                  Winfield Rondell Jr.

LAKE TRAVERSE:               Francis Crawford (10:56)

LONG HOLLOW:                 Curtis Bissonette

OLD AGENCY:                     Milton Owen

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES PRESENT: Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr.

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES ABSENT: Tribal Chairman Donovan White (travel) and Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson (travel)

 

CALL TO ORDER: Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr. called the meeting to order at 9:40 AM with one (1) Executive and six (6) Council members from seven (7) Districts answering Roll Call. Opening Prayer for the Tribal Secretary said by Old Agency Tribal Council Member Milton Owen.

 

MOTION NO. 72: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Sisseton-Wahpeton College report, as presented by SWC President Dr. Lane Azure.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 72: 13 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 73: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Milton Owen, question by Louis Johnson, to approve the Sisseton Public Schools report, as presented by Superintendent Tammy Meyer.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 73: 13 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 74: made by Milton Owen, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Browns Valley Public School report, as presented by Superintendent Brenda Reed.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 74: 13 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 75: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Louis Johnson, to approve the Circle of Nations School written report, as submitted by CEO Tanner Rabbithead.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 75: 13 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 76: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Tiospa Zina Tribal School report, as presented by Superintendent Gabe Kampeska.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 76: 13 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

Note:      Lake Traverse Tribal Council Member Francis Crawford now present at meeting.

 

MOTION NO. 77: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., in resolution form, to authorize the Youth Department, in collaboration with the Education Office, to apply for grant funding from the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community for playground equipment.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 77: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Resolution No. SWO-20-018

 

MOTION NO. 78: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Milton Owen, question by Lisa Jackson, that the Heipa District will forgo their playground equipment for this fiscal year, in order for the Youth Department to reallocate those funds to provide sponsorships to SWO Youth, with the understanding that the basketball court at the Heipa District Center will be repaired as soon as possible, and that the Heipa District will be first on the list for playground equipment for the next funding cycle.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 78: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

Note: Old Agency Tribal Council Member Milton Owed excused from the meeting.

 

MOTION NO. 79: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Enemy Swim Day School report, as presented by Superintendent Nadine Eastman and Principal Mark Mindt.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 79: 13 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 80: made by Louis Johnson, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Treaty Day Celebration Powwow budget, in the amount of $6,800.00, with the Executive Committee budget as the funding source, as presented by Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 80: 13 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 81: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Francis Crawford, question by Louis Johnson, to approve the following carryover budgets for FY 2020: Early Childhood Intervention Program; SORO - Parole; Finance - Income; and Fish & Wildlife Invasive Species, as presented by Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 81: 13 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 82: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Curtis Bissonette, to designate the Industrial Hemp Code as a priority for the Judicial Committee to review and initiate the process to enact the code into law.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 82: 13 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 83: made by Francis Crawford, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., to adjourn.

MEETING ADJOURNED 12:43PM.

Respectfully Submitted, Lindsey Abraham, Recording Secretary Asst.

 

SPECIAL TRIBAL COUNCIL MEETING

Thursday, February 20, 2020, 11:25 AM

TiWakan Tio Tipi Council Chambers

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT:

BIG COULEE:                      Lisa Jackson

ENEMY SWIM:                     Cheryl Owen

HEIPA/VEBLEN:                  Winfield Rondell Jr.

LONG HOLLOW:                 Curtis Bissonette

OLD AGENCY:                     Milton Owen

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT:

BUFFALO LAKE:                 Louis Johnson

LAKE TRAVERSE:               Francis Crawford

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES PRESENT: Tribal Chairman Donovan White, Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr., and Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson.

 

CALL TO ORDER: Tribal Chairman Donovan White called the meeting to order at 11:25 AM with three (3) Executives and five (5) Council members from seven (7) Districts answering Roll Call.

 

MOTION NO. 84: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to approve the resolution, "Authorization to Submit the Industrial Hemp Code to the USDA for Final Approval", as presented by Planning Director Michael Roberts.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 84: 10 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Lisa Jackson (2). 4 Opposed: Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Resolution No. SWO-20-019

 

MOTION NO. 85: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Cheryl Owen, to select Avisen Legal, P.A. to assist the Planning Department in developing various for-profit hemp enterprises, and to direct Legal Counsel to draft an Attorney/Consultant Agreement for these services, in the not-to-exceed amount of $30,000.00, with the Section 7 budget as the funding source, and to authorize Tribal Chairman Donovan White to execute the Agreement, pending final legal review, as presented by Planning Director Michael Roberts.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 85: 12 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2). 2 Opposed: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 86: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to select HKG Architects to provide the Planning Department with preliminary architectural and engineering services for proposed projects, and to direct Legal Counsel to draft a Consultant Agreement for these services, in the not-to-exceed amount of $30,000.00, with the Section 7 budget as the funding source, and to authorize Tribal Chairman Donovan White to execute the Agreement, pending final legal review, as presented by Planning Director Michael Roberts.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 86: 8 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Lisa Jackson (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3). 6 Opposed: Curtis Bissonette (2); Milton Owen (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 87: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Milton Owen, to adjourn.

MEETING ADJOURNED 12:32PM.

Respectfully Submitted, Verlyn Beaudreau, Recording Secretary

 

REGULAR TRIBAL COUNCIL MEETING

Wednesday, February 26, 2020, 9:00 AM

TiWakan Tio Tipi Council Chambers

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT:

BIG COULEE:                      Lisa Jackson

BUFFALO LAKE:                 Louis Johnson

ENEMY SWIM:                     Cheryl Owen

HEIPA/VEBLEN:                  Winfield Rondell Jr.

LAKE TRAVERSE:               Francis Crawford (9:14)

LONG HOLLOW:                 Curtis Bissonette

OLD AGENCY:                     Milton Owen

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES PRESENT: Tribal Chairman Donovan White (9:18), Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr., and Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson (9:10)

 

CALL TO ORDER: Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr. called the meeting to order at 9:04 AM with one (1) Executive and six (6) Council members from seven (7) Districts answering Roll Call. Opening Prayer for the Tribal Secretary said by Heipa Tribal Council Member Winfield Rondell Jr.

 

MOTION NO. 88: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Lisa Jackson, to approve the resolution, "Inter-Tribal Buffalo Council Herd Development Grant Phase II", as presented by Realty Manager Jerry Eastman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 88: 13 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Resolution No. SWO-20-020

 

Note:      Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson now present at meeting.

 

Note:      Lake Traverse Tribal Council Member Francis Crawford now present at meeting.

 

MOTION NO. 89: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Cheryl Owen, to select Tucker Volesky as First Associate Judge for the SWO Tribal Court, and to authorize Tribal Chairman Donovan White to execute the Contract for Judicial Services, pending legal review, as presented by Chief Judge Gina Ruggieri.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 89: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 2 Abstained: Francis Crawford (2). 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

Note:      Tribal Chairman Donovan White now present at meeting.

 

MOTION NO. 90: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Myrna Thompson, question by Lisa Jackson, to approve the revisions to the Office of Child Support Policies, and to authorize Tribal Chairman Donovan White to execute the Plan Amendment, as presented by Director Diana Canku.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 90: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 91: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the revisions to the Employment Training Services Center TANF Policy, and to authorize Tribal Chairman Donovan White to execute the Plan Amendment, as presented by Manager DeVon Bursheim.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 91: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 92: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to authorize the purchase of cooling units and accessories for the computer server rooms in the SWO Admin Building, from Trane, in the amount of $41,150.00, with the Indirect Cost budget as the funding source, and to authorize Tribal Chairman Donovan White to execute the Addendum to the Contract with Trane, as presented by Admin Building Manager Jerome Renville Sr. and Facilities Manager Breon Lake.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 92: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 2 Absent From Vote: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 93: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Milton Owen, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to approve the Dakota Western Corporation report, as presented by General Manager Robert Huff.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 93: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 94: made by Milton Owen, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Myrna Thompson, to approve the SWO Fuel, Inc. and Agency C-Store report, as presented by General Manager James Bird.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 94: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 2 Abstained: Lisa Jackson (2). 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 95: made by Francis Crawford, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Curtis Bissonette, to add I-29 Manager Nicole Wanna to the Dacotah Bank signature cards for the I-29 Motel.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 95: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 96: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Milton Owen, to approve the I-29 Motel report, as presented by Manager Nicole Wanna.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 96: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 97: made by Francis Crawford, second by Edmund Johnson Jr., question by Myrna Thompson, to reimburse Dakota Crossing Grocery Store, in the amount of $217,490.21, for overpayment to SWO Fuel, Inc., with Section 7 carryover as the funding source, as recommended by Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 97: 9 For: Milton Owen (2); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 8 Opposed: Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Cheryl Owen (3); Lisa Jackson (2). 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 98: made by Milton Owen, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Curtis Bissonette, to approve the Dakota Crossing Grocery Store report, as presented by General Manager Todd O'Riley and Assistant Manager Christylee Jensen.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 98: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 99: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Francis Crawford, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to approve the joint venture with the Spirit Lake Tribe for sports betting in North Dakota, as presented by DNGE CFO Weston Quinn.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 99: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 100: made by Francis Crawford, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Curtis Bissonette, to approve the Employment Agreement renewal with Brenda Uses Arrow, to serve as the DNGE Employment Assistance Program Counselor, as presented by DNGE CFO Weston Quinn.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 100: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 101: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to authorize Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise (DNGE) to match the 401k contributions of DNGE employees up to 3%, with an additional 1% match for SWO Tribal Members, for calendar year 2019, as presented by DNGE CFO Weston Quinn.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 101: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 102: made by Milton Owen, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Lisa Jackson, to authorize Dakota Connection Casino to purchase four (4) Gilbarco Gas Dispensers including installation, from Westmor Industries, in the amount of $87,248.00, as presented by DNGE CFO Weston Quinn.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 102: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 103: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to approve the proposals with Energy Solution Partners to provide Cenex branding and services to Dakota Magic Casino and Dakota Connection Casino, and to authorize Tribal Chairman Donovan White to execute the Contracts/Agreements, pending legal review, as presented by DNGE CFO Weston Quinn.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 103: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 104: made by Francis Crawford, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Milton Owen, to authorize Dakota Sioux Casino to advertise for a General Manager Trainee, as presented by DSC General Manager Robert Mudd.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 104: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 105: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Francis Crawford, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Mutual Confidentiality and Non-Disclosure Agreements with Spectra Food Services & Hospitality, and with Famous Dave's of America, Inc., to evaluate the DNGE restaurant/food service departments, and to authorize Tribal Chairman Donovan White to execute the Agreements, pending legal review, as presented by DSC General Manager Robert Mudd.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 105: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 106: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Milton Owen, to authorize Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise to advertise for a Chief Human Resources Officer.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 106: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 107: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Dakota Magic Casino report, as presented by Interim General Manager Wanda Varns; Dakota Connection Casino report, as presented by Interim General Manager Chris Seaboy; Dakota Sioux Casino report, as presented by General Manager Robert Mudd; and the Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise report, as presented by DNGE CFO Weston Quinn.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 107: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 108: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Cheryl Owen, to have a roundtable meeting with SWO CFO Greg Benidt, Budget Supervisor Lexie Fancher, Planning Director Michael Roberts, SWHA Executive Director Eric Shepherd, and the Reservation Planning Commission to discuss the Section 7 budget.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 108: 8 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Lisa Jackson (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3). 9 Opposed: Curtis Bissonette (2); Milton Owen (2); Francis Crawford (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION DEFEATED.

 

MOTION NO. 109: made by Myrna Thompson, second by Milton Owen, to amend the SWO Administrative Flow Chart to transfer the Planning Department under the supervision of the Tribal Vice-Chairman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 109: 7 For: Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Tribal Secretary (1). 9 Opposed: Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Cheryl Owen (3); Lisa Jackson (2); Louis Johnson (1). 1 Abstained: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION DEFEATED.

 

MOTION NO. 110: made by Myrna Thompson, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Edmund Johnson Jr., to go into Executive Session, at 2:20pm.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 110: 9 For: Milton Owen (2); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 8 Opposed: Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Cheryl Owen (3); Lisa Jackson (2). 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

Note: Heipa Tribal Council Member Winfield Rondell Jr. excused from the meeting.

 

MOTION NO. 111: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Curtis Bissonette, to come out of Executive Session, at 2:57pm.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 111: 12 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 2 Absent From Vote: Curtis Bissonette (2). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 112: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Francis Crawford, question by Cheryl Owen, to have the Executive Committee gather information pertaining to the matter discussed in Executive Session.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 112: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 113: made by Francis Crawford, second by Milton Owen, question by Lisa Jackson, to approve the Reservation Planning Commission report, as presented by RPC Members: Angie Johnson, Lisa RedWing, Helena LaBatte, Rose Gaikowski, Todd O'Riley, and Gerald German Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 113: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 114: made by Louis Johnson, second by Francis Crawford, question by Milton Owen, to approve the request of the Buffalo Lake District Economic Board for $150,000.00, with the Section 7 budget as the funding source, as recommended and presented by the Reservation Planning Commission.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 114: 9 For: Milton Owen (2); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 5 Opposed: Cheryl Owen (3); Lisa Jackson (2). 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 115: made by Francis Crawford, second by Louis Johnson, question by Francis Crawford, to approve the Political Contributions proposal, in the amount of $32,500.00, with the Executive Committee budget as the funding source, as presented by Tribal Chairman Donovan White.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 115: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 116: made by Francis Crawford, second by Cheryl Owen, to adjourn.

MEETING ADJOURNED 3:11PM.

Respectfully Submitted, Lindsey Abraham, Recording Secretary Asst.

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