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Vol. 47 Issue No. 25

Anpetu Iyamni, June 22, 2016

Inside this Edition –

Calling all Oyate: June 2016 General Council this Thursday and Friday, June 23-24

Self-Governance update to be provided at General Council

Chairman's Corner: Update from SWO Tribal Chairman Dave Flute

Oyate in Sisseton school district: Don't forget to vote Tuesday, June 21st!

SD Senators introduce amendment aimed at helping tribes upgrade detention facilities

Report to Akicita: Veteran Services office vandalized

SWO hosts regional elder summit

SWC hosts Dakota Language Symposium

Note to candidates: New Sota discounted rates, pre-payment policy

Deadline for receipt of copy is Friday noon

Chairman's Corner –

Update from SWO Tribal Chairman Dave Flute

My friends and relatives:

I would like to first take this time to send my thoughts and prayers to the families that have lost loved ones over the last month. We lost some good Dakota people and my heart goes out to the families. I have a special request to remember Harold Johnson and his family. My good friend was a cho moccasin player and singer and many of us younger players learned so much from him and his father Ephraim Johnson. I take this moment of silence to remember a very good moccasin player and a good man.

Aho!

I just want to share a couple short updates that I participated in over the last four weeks. My legislative aide Justin Chanku and I traveled to Pierre to meet with the Great Plains Region Tribal Chairman's Association and Health Board. Their concerns were the lack of communication between Aberdeen Area and Rosebud, Winnebago, and Pine Ridge. I was asked to attend to hear and share our concerns with the region. This was a one day turn around trip as we left at 0500 in the morning and returned at 2030 at night; it was a very long day. This leads me in to my next topic, our own local service unit.

I visited the Woodrow Wilson Keeble service unit this past week and was accompanied by Old Agency Councilman Eddie Johnson. We met with service unit director Rose Gakowski and she shared with us some of her thoughts and ideas she would like to see happen while she is the acting director for Sisseton, but we will leave that for her to discuss in one of the upcoming editions. Ms. Gaikowski introduced us to many staff members whereupon Mr. Johnson and I shared an update with everyone on the self-governance planning phase. We received some really good questions and we had really good answers. I am confident once we all get settled in and establish a good working relationship and communication with our local Service Unit we will be able to establish a better health care system. During the General Council this Friday, a team of self-governance planners will be here to discuss and answer any questions on how and why this transition is being considered.

I was invited to Shakopee to give testimony in regard to the Indian Land Consolidation Act. There were at least fifteen to twenty tribes from across the mid-west that provided testimony. I testified that we are a treaty tribe and how the Dawes Act cut up our lands and divided them into pieces and that we currently still feel the negative impact today. I testified that there are no minerals or other desirable resources on our tribal lands that are being held by liens and that our Tribe is asking for a waiver of those liens and monies be returned to the Tribe for land acquisition. I want to thank our Superintendent and Mr. Lake for bringing this issue to my attention and providing the substantive talking points, (Russ and Tim nina wopida tanka).

I want to thank OEP for cleaning up the back of the old library, the one adjacent to federal building. My office has been trying to clean up the areas of our Tribe that have been neglected for years. Once they are cleaned up our areas don't look as bad and the results show our communities that we care about our lands and other areas. I am going to work on one more cleanup project this year and there will be a before and after picture to show our Dakota people that we are taking care of our buildings, tools, lumber and other materials. Also, I want to thank our Tribal Council and the other two Executives for their support and contributions to my office in cleaning up our tribe and getting a handle some of the untagged equipment and update our inventory.

Other than cleaning up the tribe, Council and Tribal Executives have been working diligently to get us our own grocery store. The final pieces are in the hands of the lender and once our loan package is approved we will begin construction on our Tribally owned new grocery store. Council has done a great job working with DNDC and Josh Flute and his staff by keeping us informed and keeping the project moving along. We are all still optimistic the construction will start by the end of July.

There are concerns of young people breaking into homes and stealing expensive items such as flat screens and dvd players, etc. I would like to remind our Dakota people to be conscientious of your surroundings and be mindful of your area. This leads me in to something this past weekend that was disturbing and concerning.

The Tribal federal building, (the post office in Sisseton), the upper and lower floors were broken into and trashed. We have some expensive equipment that was damaged and stolen from this facility and has saddened my heart. We know these are young people that broke in and I asked myself, "What is it that we as Tribal leaders are not doing to stop youth from acting out this type of behavior?" It is really bothering me and I thought about it all day today. I thought about the Tribe building a new youth center out by Dakota Connection, then I thought about if we tear down the old TZ and build something like a Dakota Fitness Center where there are three full basketball courts, half courts, batting cages, and weights and exercise equipment. I thought about this because I want to try to find a solution to keep these kids off the street and able to accommodate to their skills and their likes and wants. I wonder about the parents of these young people that made the decision to break in our building and trash the place, I wonder what is going through their minds that they would do such thing.

Maybe, if they had a big youth center with plenty of equipment and sports type stations where they could play and work out maybe they would not be out looking for something to do. I would like to work with Tribal Council to see what we can do to find some resources to build our youth a new bigger and better youth center. I dream big, so I am looking at something like Shakopee's Dakota Fitness building; just a thought.

This week we have General Council and I am excited to hear where we are at with our tribal finances and take any and all questions from our Dakota people. The self-governance staff will be here Friday to answer all your concerns on transitioning the IHS to the Tribe. I also have a small presentation on my perception of the financial status of the tribe/districts based on what I see every day in my office and offer a solution to the many multitudes of social challenges I see and hear every day as Tribal Chairman.

I wish everyone a good week; I hope to see enough Dakota people and tribal members sign in so that we get a quorum as we have not had a General Council quorum in a very long time. Also, our 149th annual Dakota Wacipi is in two weeks and we are all excited to have a good year this year singing and dancing and playing moccasin. However, next year will be the 150th anniversary of our Treaty that established this reservation and we need to begin preparing a large celebration to honor our Treaty and invite our elders to share the stories their grandparents shared about our reservation in its infancy. This will be a big event and a historical event; my office has been working on medals to honor the treaty and our survival and recognize our Dakota ways of life and values.

I will share another update and report to the Dakota people after the Fourth of July Wacipi. I will have a very lengthy report to share but until then, be safe, ask all the questions you want at the General Council meeting and all I ask is that you be respectful of Tribal leadership and be respectful of the audience; all of you have every right to know what has been going on with the tribe and we will do our very best to answer all your questions openly and honestly. Finally, have fun this year at the Fourth of July Wacipi, sing hard, dance hard, and play moccasin hard. Hoka hey!

Dave Flute, Tribal Chairman.

First General Council of 2016 this Thursday and Friday

The first Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate General Council of 2016 will be held this Thursday and Friday, June 23 and 24, at the Tribal administration building. Start time both days is 9:00 a.m.

Purpose of this General Council is primarily for Tribal members to receive reports about the Tribe's financial affairs. Besides the reports from the offices of SWO Tribal Vice-Chairman Garryl Rousseau Sr. and the Tribal Finance Department, reports will be come from all of the Tribe's for-profit enterprises. This includes reporting from Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise and from the gaming properties.

In addition, SWO Tribal Chairman Dave Flute has scheduled a special report by the Self-Governance Working Group immediately following lunch on day two – Friday. Come and find out the status of planning for the Tribal possibly assuming control over delivery of health care services on the Lake Traverse Reservation.

SWO Tribal Secretary Crystal Owen will also give a report; hers is scheduled on Thursday afternoon.

Besides the oral and written reports, there will be an opportunity to present comments and/or ask questions at an open microphone.

And there will be door prizes.

Here is the agenda for both days.

All Tribal members who can attend are encouraged to do so.

Thursday June 23rd, 2016

Day One – General Council

9:00 a.m.          Flag Song, Dakota Nation

9:05 a.m.          Posting of Colors, United Veterans Association

9:15 a.m.          Roll Call, Recording Secretary

9:20 a.m.          Opening Prayer

9:25 a.m.          Opening Remarks by Dave Flute, Tribal Chairman

9:30 a.m.          Vice-Chairman's Report, Vice-Chairman Garryl Rousseau Sr. and Greg Benidt, CFO

9:40 a.m.          Audit Report, Eide Bailey

10:10 a.m.        Open microphone for questions/drawings

10:30 a.m.        SWO Business Council, Josh Flute

10:50 a.m.        Affiliated Food, Virtual Tour

11:00 a.m.        Fuel Inc., Josh Flute

11:10 a.m.        Dakota Western/SWO Plastics, Robert Huff, General Manager

11:30 a.m.        Dakota Nation Community Development, Danny White Manager

11:40 a.m.        Open microphone for questions/drawings

12:00 a.m.        Lunch

1:30 p.m.         Tribal Secretary's Remarks

2:00 p.m.         Retreat of Colors

Friday June 24th, 2016

Day Two – General Council

9:00 a.m.          Flag Song, Dakota Nation

9:05 a.m.          Posting of Colors, United Veterans Association

9:15 a.m.          Roll Call, Recording Secretary

9:20 a.m.          Opening Prayer

9:25 a.m.          Opening Remarks by Dave Flute, Tribal Chairman

9:35 am Russell Hawkins, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Sisseton Agency

10:00 a.m.        Drawings

10:30 a.m.        Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise Report, Ron Olson, CEO and Weston Quinn, CFO

10:50 a.m.        Dakota Magic Casino and Hotel Report, Michael Schrader, General Manager

11:00 a.m.        Dakota Sioux Casino Report, John Rondell, General Manager

11:10 a.m.        Dakota Connection Casino, Leroy Quinn, General Manager

11:20 a.m.        Open microphone for questions/drawings

12:00 p.m.        Lunch

1:30 p.m.          Chairman's Remarks

2:30 p.m.         Retreat of Colors

Oyate to hear update on SWO's Self-Governance planning at General Coucil

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate (SWO) Self-Governance Planning Work Group will provide an update on the planning phase that is underway during General Council this Friday, June 24th. The report will be a final piece in the two-day General Council under the Chairman's Remarks following the noon meal.

The Tribe is conducting a Tribal Self-Governance Planning Phase in 2016.

Purpose of the planning phase is to explore whether health care services, health status, and access to care would improve under Tribal operation.

Another purpose of the planning phase is to assess the Tribe's readiness for operating additional programs, functions, services and activities currently operated by the Indian Health Service. The goal is to complete the planning phase this summer.

SWO has engaged a team of expert consultants to provide support, analysis, and recommendations during our Self-Governance planning process. At General Council, Work Group members from the legal firm Sonosky, Chambers, Sachse, Endreson & Perry, LLP, will report on progress achieved so far and plans and next steps.

Myra Munson

Myra Munson is a partner in the Juneau, AK office. After serving as Alaska Commissioner of Health and Social Services from 1986 to 1990, Ms. Munson joined the Sonosky Law Firm. Her practice has emphasized self-determination and self-governance, the Indian Health Care Improvement Act (IHCIA), Medicaid and other third-party reimbursement issues, and other health program operations issues. She has conducted extensive training on the IHCIA amendments and Affordable Care Act since their passage and serves as a consultant to the National Indian Health Board for training on and implementation of these laws. Ms. Munson continues to encourage and support Tribes to assume authority over health programs, because she has "seen the health status of Tribal citizens improve when Tribes operate their own programs because they can more easily recognize and assess community needs and responses."

Colin Cloud Hampson

Colin Cloud Hampson is a partner in the San Diego, CA office. Mr. Hampson represents Indian Tribes and Tribal organizations in litigation, transactional, governmental affairs and other matters, involving issues such as tribal sovereignty, economic development, gaming, environmental regulation, water law, health care, taxation, labor and employment, self-determination, cultural resources and administrative law. Mr. Hampson is a descendent of the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska and the White Earth Band of Chippewa. Colin is excited to work with the SWO Self-Governance Planning Work Group, because, "Under Self-Governance, Tribes have a vested interest in managing their health programs effectively to ensure that those programs provide quality care to improve the wellbeing of the entire community."

Advocates for Native Issues, LLC (ANI), a 100% Native owned business specializing in American Indian policy advocacy, curriculum development, training and support for programs that serve in Indian Country, is also assisting the Work Group with the planning phase.

The Tribal Executive Committee has appointed Tribal employees who represent the critical systems that will need to interface with those currently operated by IHS to serve on the Work Group. Essential systems includes governance, accounting, procurement, human resources, legal, information technology, and healthcare. The work group is tasked to:

1.  Learn and study how the Self-Governance process works.

2.  Learn and study how the healthcare programs and systems operated by the Indian Health Service might be integrated with the programs and systems operated by the Tribe.

3.  Assess how SWO might operate each individual system and program.

4.  Assess how participation by this Tribe would beneficial.

5.  Develop a plan that can be presented to the people for review and consideration.

6.  Routinely report progress to the Tribal Council and make recommendations for review, input, and decision-making.

The planning phase is authorized by Tribal Council Resolution No. SWO-15-104 adopted on September 2, 2015. SWO-15-104 states there is to be no "decision to pursue Tribal Self-Governance compacting without and until there has been a thorough review process with the Districts and applicable Tribal entities with resulting assurance that the planning phase has been completed to the satisfaction of the Tribe, as required by Law."

The planning phase studies whether it will serve the Tribe well at this time to exercise sovereignty to more fully operationalize as a public health authority. The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Constitution, Article VII - POWERS, provides (h): "To promote public health, education, charity, and such other services as may contribute to the social advancement of the members of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate." Prior to the Indian Self-Determination and Educational Assistance Act, Tribes relied on IHS to carry out this function. Many remember when IHS was actually referred to as "Public Health". Over the years IHS has transitioned tore of a clinical model aimed at treating the individual patient -- which leaves significant gaps in public health related activities at the community, policy, law, systems, and environmental levels.

There are 352 Tribes participating in Self-Governance today through 88 compacts totaling $1.8 billion -- which is 1/3 of the IHS budget. Combined, Tribal Title V compacts and Title I contracts total $2.5 billion, which is over half of the IHS budget. Earlier this month on June 1st, the Spirit Lake Nation was first in the Great Plains Area to assume operation of its IHS clinic. Three other Tribes in the Area are, including SWO, are currently engaged in planning studies.

"From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer"

Tribal Veterans Service office is vandalized

GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov

Phone 605-698-3388

*Veterans Cemetery Groundbreaking Ceremony: Will be held this Wednesday, June 22, 2016 at 11:00 AM. We will want all Honor Guards to participate Tribal and City as well as inviting Council, Executives and City officials.

*2nd Annual Bataan Memorial March: Is scheduled to take place on Friday, July 1st, 2016 and we will have it early morning like we did last year. I am asking everyone arrive by 7:30 AM so we can start at 8 AM sharp! The first 100 participants will get a commemorative tee shirt! Last year we had such a great turnout in HONOR of our survivors and all survivors and those who perished on the actual Bataan Death March WWII. We hope you can join us this year. Our WWII Veteran survivors of the Death March are: Winfield Thompson Sr., WWII and Louis Williams, WWII Veteran.

*OFFICE VANDALIZED: Most of you may or may not have heard that our offices had all been vandalized in the middle of the night Thursday. We all came into work to face this on Friday morning. To you four kids that did this: Shame on you, shame on you for destroying and breaking and stealing from all of our offices. Shame on you as Tribal members vandalizing property that you own. As Tribal members this belongs to all of us including you. Shame on you for taking medals and throwing them – our soldiers died for these medals for protecting our country! And how dare you dig so deep into our cabinets and drawers and that you took out something that is so dear to me it broke my heart. My brother Bruce was in Vietnam – I have a box here with mementos from him. He inspired me to go into the Armed Forces, to want to make sure everyone suffering from PTSD gets the care and help they deserve. Because my brother did not get the care, he died at age 23. Everything that I own that I have of him was in that box. You opened that box; you took out his letters to me and they were separated from the envelopes; you stole some items, the pictures I have left of him were all over this office – I found some 50 feet away. Do you know that you damaged what little I have left of my brother and it broke my heart. But yet you did not care what you did. It's apparent on the outside of the box that he is gone; it clearly says In Memoriam. I've had that box with me since I was in high school. I took it with me when I left for the Military it was with me while I lived in California, it's part of me. To see what you did is so horrible. You did more than that: I have this Korean War Veteran that bought me something to have in my office to always remember him by; you stole it. It's an eagle bone handle knife with the stone chipped to make the blade. It's gone - you stole it. All four of you! That is not all: We were so proud to have four things from a Vietnam Veteran: They said "Pride, Brotherhood, Honor and Courage" - they were knives that went into "a Grenade, a Rock, Antlers and a knife holder. You destroyed and broke every single one that had pictures of scenes from Vietnam painted on them. I know one of you is age 20. One age 18 and the other two not much younger. You are old enough to know better. You not only did these things but you turned our office upside down, you emptied boxes of paper and boxes of rubber bands and threw all over you broke things, you destroyed papers that we were working on you threw things all over the floor even our computer monitors - we could not even walk on our floor it was full of destruction caused by you! Shame on you! I'm sure the kids who did this crime will not be reading the Sota…but parents you will. You may know who they are; you need to get them and you need to tell them what they did is unacceptable. Our Veterans have died for you so that you have FREEDOM, and for you to desecrate their memory is deplorable. Please parents talk to your kids, teach them right from wrong, know where they are at night before you go to bed. If they come home with items that they did not buy and that you do not recognize please ask them hard questions. Hold them accountable. This is something that has been happening a lot in Sisseton the robberies, thefts, the vandalism – SAVE our children. They will grow up someday would you rather them learn now while they are still under the age of 18? Thank you all who stopped by and assisted us. And the whole building for pulling together. Our kids are our future – we deserve more than this. We all do. Thank you to Chairman Dave Flute for checking on our needs after being vandalized. Thanks also for the offer of help with clean-up, although because of confidentiality of service records we had to do the clean-up work ourselves.

*VETERANS: PLEASE CALL OUR OFFICE IF YOU NEED ASSITANCE; WE ARE HERE TO SERVE! 698-3388.

*WOMEN VETERANS CALL CENTER: 1-855-VA-WOMEN. Crisis Help Line: 1-800-273-8255, available 24/7, and tell them you are a veteran. All calls are confidential.

*REMEMBER: We are here to serve you our fellow Veteran, widows, dependents. And also you see a Veteran shake their hand---that small gesture means a great deal to them! Call us at 698-3388 or cell 268-0502.

*American Legion Post #314- Delano Renville, Commander Cell: # 268-0354 / Vietnam Veterans Kit Fox Society - Phone: # 698-3901 ask for Doc / Desert Era Veterans - Danielle DeCoteau, Commander Cell#: 268-1765. For GAS ASSISTANCE: Geri Opsal 698-3388.

Have a good week. Geri Opsal, Tribal VSO.

SWO Tribe hosts regional NICOA conference

The SWO Tribe hosted a two-day regional conference of the National Indian Council on Aging (NICOA) last Tuesday and Wednesday at Dakota Magic Convention Center. After brainstorming over a number of priorities, focus was on a few considered the most urgent issues. These are expected to be worked into resolutions to be proposed at the 2016 NICOA conference.

This year, the conference will be held Sept. 13-15, 2016 at the Conference & Event Center, Niagara Falls, NY.

Theme is "Aging Healthy Through Song and Dance."

This will be the 40th year the Council has served Indian country. Its mission is "To advocate for improved comprehensive health, social services and economic well-being of American Indian and Alaska Native elders."

Robert LaFromboise served as moderator throughout last week's conference.

Elders from SWO, Rosebud, Lower Brule, Standing Rock attended.

Guest speakers included: Randella Bluehouse, Navajo, NICOA Executive Director from Albuquerque; Teresa Salazar, Central Region Program Manager for Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP); Marsha Renville, SWO, spoke about Medicare and the Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders (SHINE) program; Caroline DuMarce and Zelma Flue, speaking on caregiving to those with Alzheimer's.

Day one was spent largely in discussions of critical problems with health services, IHS, elder abuse, drug and alcohol and prescription drug abuse.

While much of the focus was on elders, understandably, attention was put on young people – especially those struggling with drug abuse.

Participating was SWO Tribal Secretary Crystal Owen, who served as the Tribe's Meth Prevention Coordinator for eight years before being elected to Executive office. And here she has continued working on the battle against meth addiction.

Also attending, for both days, was Lori Walking Eagle, who is the Meth Coordinator for the Rosebud Tribe.

Together, they have coordinated a series of meth summits across the Great Plains.

Raising of grandchildren, and great grandchildren, was also discussed. A problem made worse by the meth epidemic – with addicted parents unable to care for their own children.

Also on the first day of the conference, Sara Lincoln and Etta Jo Marks spoke about exercise programs available at the SWO Health & Fitness Center for Tribal elders. The Center is there for elders as much as for any other age group.

Housing was another issue for Tuesday, also a nursing home for Tribal residents.

First matter on the agenda Wednesday, day two, was a continuation of health services.

Marsha Renville spoke about Medicare and SHINE.

Colleen DuMarce and Zelma Flute provided emotional insight into serving as caregiver for a loved one with Alzheimer's.

"Let's be there for them," said Colleen.

"Let's respect them … give them the dignity they deserve."

There are Alzheimer's chapters in North and South Dakota. Support for their annual walk events was discussed.

A suggestion was made that caregivers not feel guilty about taking time away to care for themselves.

There was discussion about the need for people to file a living will, letting medical providers and family to know their their end-of-life choices.

Last issue concerned a request that the elders request support for protection of mni wiconi – sacred water.

Sylvana Flute read a letter from her aunt Paula Horne, and Julian Boucher spoke also.

Paula and Julian have been actively engaged in the SWO Mni Wiconi group to raise awareness of the contamination of surface and ground water on the Lake Traverse Reservation. High levels of contamination have been coming from extremely large concentrated cow dairy operations (dairy CAFOs). After listening, and discussion the need to protect water resources for the future of the Oyate, elders talked about including the issue among resolutions to go to Niagara Falls this year.

SWC hosts first Dakota Language Symposium

By Erin Griffin

Sisseton Wahpeton College held its first Dakota Language Symposium last week attracting over 100 participants, including many Dakota relatives from Spirit Lake, Standing Rock, and Ft. Peck. The conference was organized as a means to offer Dakota language education and teaching tools to the community.

Glenn Wasicuna, Dakota Language Instructor at Minnesota State University from the Sioux Valley Dakota Nation, opened the conference with a presentation on the sacredness and use of the Dakota language.

Dr. Lanny Real Bird, a language consultant from Crow Nation, gave two presentations on Plains Indian Sign language. Dr. Real Bird also explained how to utilize sign language as an effective Dakota language teaching tool.

Dr. Armik Mirzayan, Assistant Professor of Linguistics at the University of South Dakota, provided an introduction to Siouan linguistics and the Siouan language family. Neil McKay, Dakota Language Specialist at the University of Minnesota from the Spirit Lake Dakota Tribe, gave an introduction to immersion education and Dakota grammar rules.

Beth Brown, 1st and 2nd grade teacher at Bdote Learning Center in Minneapolis, MN, provided an extensive presentation on early childhood immersion.

Afternoon breakout sessions gave participants an opportunity to have Dakota language lessons with Glenn Wasicuna, Neil McKay, Beth Brown, Orsen Bernard, Lillian Owen, Spencer Wanna, Delbert Pumpkinseed, and Gordon Redday.

A special thank you to Laverne White Bear for cooking amazing meals all week, Tribal Secretary Crystal Owen for giving the opening remarks and the donation of door prizes, and the SWO Dakota Language Program for the donation of door prizes.

With so many coming together to learn and discuss the Dakota language, the conference was a great success. Once again, it was reasserted that we must speak Dakota every day and use what we know, even if it is only a few words. Dakota iapi kin wounhdakapi kte!

See accompanying photo highlights.

From the SWO Planning office –

Sharing budgeting advice, Dakota values with youth

We all understand the stresses of managing our money and how the lack of money can create hardships in our lives.

Last week Ella Robertson, Planning Director and certified Financial Literacy Trainer, shared with the SWO Summer Youth some information on our historic practices in planning, preparing, saving and budgeting.

"If our people didn't plan and they didn't save, they didn't survive." said Ms. Robertson.

She expressed the importance of knowing what your expenses are and knowing the difference between a "need" and a "want."

Dakota Values play a huge role in the decisions that we make when it comes to money, she explained.

An exercise on Values showed that 80% of the youth ranked FAMILY as the most important. 90% stated that they would help their parents pay bills with their summer youth earnings.

"It's very crucial at this time in their lives that we are teaching our kids the importance of good money management that will inspire and guide them in making sound decisions as an adult."

The Planning Department also participated in the Resiliency Conference held at the SWC Auditorium, June 8-9th.

They had on display items that were used from the buffalo.

The buffalo was our modern day Walmart, everything that we needed came from the buffalo, our home, our clothing, our food, even our tools.

The Planning Director was asked to speak on behalf of her program and expressed the importance of gardening and harvesting from Mother Earth and that their program has been instrumental in pushing the Food Sovereignty movement at SWO, teaching not only the modern methods of gardening but also teaching some of the old food gathering practices with the community to revitalize this knowledge.

"Psychological resilience is defined as an individual's ability to properly adapt to stress and adversity. Stress and adversity can come in the shape of family or relationship problems, health problems, or workplace and financial worries, among others. Resilience is one's ability to bounce back from a negative experience with competent functioning. Resilience is not a rare ability; in reality, it is found in the average individual and it can be learned and developed by virtually anyone."

"Resilience should be considered a process, rather than a trait to be had. It is a process of individuation through a structured system with gradual discovery of personal and unique abilities."

SD Senators introduce amendment to help tribes construct new detention facilities

SWO Tribal Chairman Dave Flute thanks the Senators, calling the amendment "critical … to help us combat the serious and urgent law enforcement problems…."

Washington, DC – June 16, 2016 – U.S. Senators Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) and John Thune (R-S.D.) today introduced an amendment to the Commerce, Justice, Science and Related Agencies (CJS) appropriations bill currently being debated on the Senate floor that would set aside $25 million from the Office of Justice Programs (OJP) existing budget to replace outdated detention facilities on tribal land.

"Many detention facilities on tribal land in South Dakota are dilapidated and unfit to hold detainees," said Rounds. "Sisseton-Wahpeton's detention center, for example, was condemned by the Department of Interior 15 years ago and still has not been replaced. Our amendment would allow tribes to replace facilities that are beyond rehabilitation without adding to the national debt."

"This common-sense amendment solves a critical problem that South Dakota tribes have been dealing with for years now and does so in a fiscally responsible way," said Thune. "This approach should be one that garners bipartisan support, and my hope is the full Senate will consider our proposal as the debate on the CJS bill continues."

"On behalf of my tribe, we greatly appreciate Senator Rounds and Senator Thune for introducing this critical amendment to the CJS appropriations bill," said Dave Flute, Sisseton-Wahpeton Tribal Chairman.

"This bill is desperately needed and will provide the tools and resources to help us obtain funding to fix our facility needs and help us combat the serious and urgent law enforcement problems plaguing our people on the Lake Traverse Reservation."

The amendment would require OJP to give priority to Indian tribes with 10,000 or more tribal members, which demonstrate readiness and preparedness to begin construction.

Field hearing shines light on IHS crisis

Part of coordinated effort between Tribes, Delegation, and Administration

SWO Tribe represented by Tribal Secretary Crystal Owen

Rapid City, SD – June 27, 2016 – Today the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, at the request of U.S. Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.), convened an oversight and legislative hearing in Rapid City to receive testimony from stakeholders impacted by the years-long crisis at Indian Health Service (IHS) facilities across the Great Plains area and examine comprehensive IHS reform legislation recently introduced by Thune and Sen. John Barrasso (R-Wyo.), chairman of the Indian Affairs Committee. Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) and Rep. Kristi Noem (R-S.D.) joined Thune and Barrasso at today's hearing, which highlighted the importance and need for a coordinated effort to properly respond to this crisis.

"The laundry list of issues plaguing the IHS has been well-litigated over the last six years," said Thune. "No one knows those problems better than the tribal members who've been directly affected by them. While that conversation is far from over, today's hearing was an important turning point toward examining the concrete areas in which we can make improvements and reforms to an agency tasked with the critical role of providing quality health care to tribal citizens in South Dakota and around the country. Not only do I want to thank Chairman Barrasso for convening today's hearing, but also the witnesses who provided constructive feedback about my bill and what can be done to finally fix this crisis."

"Today's hearing helped us better understand the problems at IHS," said Rounds. "We had a productive discussion with tribal leaders and IHS representatives that reiterates the need to fix the health care crisis in Indian country. I thank Chairman Barrasso for holding this important hearing, and I thank Sen. Thune, Rep. Noem and all the witnesses for their participation today. It is clear that IHS is dealing with serious administrative, financial and quality-of-care issues that still need to be addressed. In order to fulfill its trust responsibility to tribal members, IHS must undergo major reform, under close collaboration with the tribes. Consultation with the tribes is critical. Further, today's hearing reaffirmed the importance of an external audit of IHS so we can work to fix their systemic problems. I appreciate Acting Deputy Secretary Wakefield's support for an independent audit and look forward to working with her to get the answers necessary to turn the agency around."

"IHS should get out of the hospital business," said Noem. "The medical and administrative malpractice in the Great Plains is killing our tribal communities. Expansive reforms are necessary to end the corruption, mismanagement and life-threatening care. I am encouraged that we already have broad agreement between the House and Senate on some of the legislative changes, but cooperation from federal agencies will be paramount to our success. I thank Chairman Barrasso, Senators Thune and Rounds, the witnesses, and the many tribal members who attended today's hearing. In the end, we are all partners in fixing this problem."

Today's witnesses included Dr. Mary Wakefield, acting deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS); the Honorable William Bear Shield, chairman of the Rosebud Sioux Tribal Health Board; Ms. Wehnona Stabler, tribal health director of the Omaha Tribe of Nebraska; Ms. Ardell Blueshield, tribal health director for Spirit Lake Tribal Health; and Ms. Stacy Bohlen, executive director of the National Indian Health Board.

The Barrasso-Thune bill, the IHS Accountability Act of 2016, would improve transparency and accountability at the IHS by:

Expanding removal and discipline authorities for problem employees at the agency;

Providing the HHS secretary with direct hiring and other authorities to avoid long delays in the traditional hiring process;

Requiring tribal consultation prior to hiring area directors, hospital CEOs, and other key leadership positions;

Commissioning Government Accountability Office reports on staffing and professional housing needs;

Improving protections for employees who report violations of patient safety requirements;

Mandating that the HHS secretary provide timely IHS spending reports to Congress; and Ensuring the HHS inspector general investigates patient deaths in which the IHS is alleged to be involved by act or omission.

The IHS Accountability Act also addresses staff recruitment and retention shortfalls at IHS by:

Addressing gaps in IHS personnel by giving the HHS secretary flexibility to create competitive pay scales and provide temporary housing assistance for medical professionals; Improving patient-provider relationships and continuity of care by providing incentives to employees; and Giving the HHS secretary the ability to reward employees for good performance and finding innovative ways to improve patient care, promote patient safety, and eliminate fraud, waste, and abuse.

Noem has also introduced comprehensive legislation in the House that offers critical structural changes to how IHS operates, addressing both medical and administrative challenges with bipartisan support.

Rounds delivers opening statement at field hearing

Rapid City, SD – June 17, 2016 – U.S. Senator Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) delivered the following opening statement at a hearing entitled, Improving Accountability and Quality of Care at the Indian Health Service through S. 2953.

Rounds' opening statement, as prepared for delivery:

Thank you, Chairman Barrasso, for holding today's field hearing here in South Dakota, where our tribal members are all too familiar with the failures of the Indian Health Service.

I would also like to thank Senator Thune and Congresswoman Kristi Noem for their tireless work to address the problems plaguing the IHS.

In South Dakota, we know all-too-well of these ongoing problems.

Nearly every week – if not every day – our newspaper headlines tell the tale of new problems.

Let me read some of the headlines we've seen just in the last month:

· IHS Hospital in Immediate Jeopardy

· Feds Deal Blow to Rosebud IHS Hospital

· Man won't return to "death hospital"

· Tribal leaders say they were left out of IHS call for help

· Health Care Crisis Hits South Dakota reservations

I could spend my entire time reading headlines, but it's important to understand the impact it's having on real people, our tribal members:

· The Great Plains Area IHS – which covers South Dakota, North Dakota, Nebraska and Iowa – has the second-highest mortality rate among all IHS regions.

· We also have the highest diabetes death rate, almost double the average among IHS facilities.

· Our life expectancy rate is the lowest of all IHS regions, at 68.1 years. Compare this to the U.S. average of 77.7 years.

It is clear the IHS is failing our tribal members, who are suffering and even dying due to this inadequate and disgraceful care.

As we all know, Rosebud has had its emergency department on diversion status for 195 days as of today, meaning tribal members are having to drive over 50 miles to receive emergency care.

The same is true for their OB and surgical departments as well.

These circumstances are going to continue to occur until we demand a thorough review and reform of IHS. We need an audit.

I had the opportunity to meet with the Great Plains Tribal Chairman's Association in April.

· We discussed an in-depth profile analysis on IHS that my office researched in an attempt to seek answers and gain a better understanding.

· We talked about the administrative imbalance; that there are 15,000 employees at IHS, only 750 are doctors yet nearly 4,000 are administrative "medical billers".

· We also found that IHS employees and administrators can't explain or don't understand their own budget.

After reviewing the data with me, the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen voted on a resolution supporting an audit of IHS.

The IHS needs major reform. But, more taxpayer money won't solve the dysfunction, because what IHS lacks is an efficient system and accountability.

Consider this: if the president proposed and Congress supported doubling IHS's budget, based on IHS's current template they would have 20,000 administration employees, 7,400 bureaucrats billing Medicaid and still only 1,500 doctors.

The imbalance in priorities would still exist – just at a greater level.

From my standpoint, investing more taxpayer money in a dysfunctional system will only compound the problem.

This is a serious issue that requires tangible solutions – not band aids.

There are significant administrative management, financial management and quality-of-care issues that must be addressed.

Today's hearing will help us better understand where the problems lie and steps forward to fix these problems. We need an audit.

Ultimately today's hearing is to fix the poor quality of health care for our people.

IHS will never be able to deliver the timely, quality care the federal government has a trust responsibility to deliver, without broad reforms.

I thank Chairman Barrasso, Senator Thune and Representative Noem for being here today, and also their ongoing work to address these issues.

Field hearing important step to fixing IHS

By Senator Mike Rounds

Rapid City, SD – June 17, 2016 – I recently joined Senate Indian Affairs Committee Chairman John Barrasso and the other members of the South Dakota congressional delegation in a field hearing in Rapid City to discuss the inadequate health care being provided to our tribal members. The purpose of the hearing was to shed additional light on the ongoing crisis at Indian Health Service (IHS) facilities within the Great Plains Area, and to work with tribal leaders toward permanent solutions.

Nearly every week, if not every day, our newspaper headlines tell the tale of new problems with IHS facilities. It is important to understand the impact that IHS is having on real people on our tribal land. The Great Plains Area IHS, which covers South Dakota, North Dakota, Nebraska and Iowa, has the second highest mortality rate among all IHS regions. We also have the highest diabetes death rate, almost double the average among all IHS regions. Tragically, our life expectancy rate is also the lowest of all IHS regions, at 68.1 years. The U.S. average life expectancy is nearly a decade longer at 77.7 years. It is clear the IHS is failing our tribal members, who are suffering and in some cases even dying due to this inadequate and disgraceful care.

As we all know, Rosebud has essentially had its emergency department shut down for approximately 200 days and counting, meaning tribal members are having to drive over 50 miles to receive emergency care. The same is true for their obstetrics and surgical departments. These circumstances are going to continue to occur until we demand a thorough review and reform of IHS. More specifically, we need an external audit.

I had the opportunity to meet with the Great Plains Tribal Chairman's Association in April. We discussed an in-depth profile analysis on IHS that my office put together in an attempt to seek answers and gain a better understanding. We talked about the administrative imbalance; of the 15,000 employees at IHS, only 750 are doctors and nearly 4,000 are administrative "medical billers." We also found that IHS employees and administrators can't explain or don't understand their own budget.

After reviewing the data with me, the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen voted on a resolution supporting an audit of IHS. The IHS needs major reform but more taxpayer money won't solve the dysfunction, because what IHS lacks is an efficient system and accountability. I appreciate Health and Human Services Acting Deputy Secretary Mary Wakefield's support for an independent audit and look forward to working with her to get the answers necessary to turn the agency around. From my standpoint, investing more taxpayer money in a dysfunctional system will only compound the problem.

This is a serious issue that requires tangible solutions, not temporary fixes. There are significant administrative, financial and quality-of-care issues that must be addressed. The hearing helped us better understand where the problems lie so IHS, working in close collaboration with the tribes, can take steps forward to fix these problems. IHS will never be able to deliver the timely, quality care the federal government has a trust responsibility to deliver, without broad reforms.

Supreme Court affirms tribal sovereignty in US v. Bryant

Pipestem Law – June 13, 2016 – (Lame Deer, MT) The United States Supreme Court, in a unanimous decision, affirmed the constitutionality of the Federal Government's reliance on the existence of prior Tribal Court convictions to create federal criminal jurisdiction over a repeat offender's third—and hopefully final—assault on a Native woman. The Supreme Court's decision in United States v. Bryant upholds the constitutionality of the Habitual Offender Provision (§ 117(a)) of the Violence Against Women Act ("VAWA").

"The Supreme Court recognized the staggering rates at which our Native women suffer from domestic violence, and the severe consequences Native women face due to jurisdictional limitations on prosecuting violent offenders in Indian Country," stated Cherrah Giles, President of the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center's ("NIWRC") Board of Directors, a leading advocate against domestic violence in Indian Country and Amici Curiae to the Bryant case.

"In re-affirming Tribal sovereignty, and upholding the constitutionality of § 117(a), the Court has ensured that repeat domestic violence offenders in Indian Country will receive more than a slap on the wrist." Lucy Simpson, NIWRC's Executive Director stated.

In United States v. Bryant, the Supreme Court acknowledged the extraordinarily high rates of domestic violence Native women experience, and that as a result of the tribal, state, and federal criminal jurisdictional patchwork, many repeat abusers fell through the cracks and escaped sentences of any real consequence prior to the enactment of VAWA § 117(a) in 2005.

Section 117 creates federal criminal jurisdiction over individuals who have at least two prior, valid domestic violence convictions. In today's decision, the Supreme Court rejected Bryant's assertion that prior, valid Tribal Court convictions cannot give rise to federal criminal jurisdiction when the previous convictions were obtained in a Tribal Court proceeding without the provision of counsel. Specifically, the Supreme Court held that because Tribal Nations constitute "separate sovereigns pre-existing the Constitution," the Sixth Amendment does not govern Tribal Court proceedings, and moreover, the Indian Civil Rights Act ("ICRA") ensures defendants in tribal court proceedings enjoy rights equivalent to the United States Constitution's Bill of Rights.

"Today the Supreme Court affirmed the inherent sovereignty of Tribal Nations to protect their women and children from repeat domestic violence offenders," said Mary Kathryn Nagle, partner at Pipestem Law, P.C. and attorney for NIWRC. "Justice Ginsburg's well-reasoned opinion confirms that a Tribe's exercise of its inherent sovereignty in no way 'violates' the Constitution because the Tribe's power existed before, during, and after the United States' Constitution came into existence."

As a leading advocate in the fight against domestic violence in Indian Country, the NIWRC's amicus brief was joined by 34 organizations that work to end domestic violence nationwide.

"Today the Supreme Court clearly articulated that the rate of violence against Native women is unacceptable," said Sarah Deer, co-author of the NIWRC's amicus brief. "Now we have a decision which affirms one of the most important tools at our disposal – namely, the ability of federal prosecutors to take action after multiple tribal court convictions. Until a complete restoration of tribal authority is achieved, this VAWA provision is critical for the safety of Native women. The decision necessarily implicates tribal sovereignty, which is directly and repeatedly threatened whenever a Native woman is attacked."

The National Indigenous Women's Resource Center ("NIWRC") is a nonprofit organization that provides technical assistance, policy development, training, materials, and resource information for Indian and Alaska Native women, Native Hawaiians, and Native non-profit organizations addressing safety for Native women. The NIWRC's primary mission is to restore safety for Native women through preserving and restoring the inherent jurisdiction of Indian Nations to protect their women and children on tribal lands. For more information, visit www.niwrc.org.

Share culture, dance in journey to Alaska

Submitted by Jolene "Jo" Abraham

Dean, Syrus and I went to Seattle and Alaska from June 3-June 15. We attended the Sealaska Celebration in Juneau, Alaska from June 8-June 12.

The women here are members of the world-renowned dance group Git Hoan led by David A. Boxley. They are granddaughters of Frank Williams and Myrna Wallace Johnson. We are Dakota, Haida, Tlingit and Tsimshian. We are Eagle clan through my mother and grandmother. My daughters also dance with the Eagle design commissioned by my grandmother.

I danced in the Grand Entrance only with the dance group Lepquinm Gumilgit Gagoadim.

From the Sealaska Heritage Institute

For four days every other June, the streets of Juneau fill with Native people of all ages dressed in the signature regalia of clans from throughout Southeast Alaska and beyond. There is traditional song and dance. Arts and crafts. Food. And people speaking local Native languages. This is Celebration, our biennial festival of Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian cultures. Celebration is one of the largest gatherings of Southeast Alaska Native peoples and is the second-largest event sponsored by Alaska Natives in the State of Alaska. The event draws about 5,000 people, including more than 2,000 dancers. Thousands more watch the event online.

Prior to European contact, the peoples of the Northwest Coast held many traditional ceremonies in which singing, dancing, formal oratory, and feasting took place. As the economy of the region changed to one based on cash rather than trade and sharing, some Native traditions floundered. Dance, song, traditional oratory, and knowledge of clan protocol were in danger of being lost to history. Realizing this, Native elders created Celebration as a way to bring Native people together to showcase and preserve their traditions and customs.

Celebration is a new tradition. During earlier times, a clan from one moiety would always host a clan from the other moiety. An Eagle clan, for example, might host a Raven clan and, then, the reverse would occur in order that balance, reciprocity, and respect be maintained. Those who danced together as either hosts or guests were from one clan, one side. Now, clan members have scattered in order to pursue careers and personal interests, and the formal system of reciprocal obligation has become more difficult to maintain although traditional ceremonies are still a vital part of Northwest Coast culture. At Celebration, some clan members still gather as single-clan Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian dance groups but most groups at Celebration represent combinations of many clans.

As times have changed, the peoples of the Northwest Coast have adopted revitalized festival traditions while continuing to maintain the old. Although Celebration follows the pattern of a traditional ceremonial it is not a potlatch or memorial party. Adoptions, name giving, memorial services, and other events that are a proper part of those traditional gatherings are not part of Celebration and are observed at other times.

Gods and monsters: Bulldozer rips into ancient sacred site

By Stephanie Woodard

Indian Country Today – June 18, 2016 – A three-judge panel of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals has denied the Te-Moak Band of Western Shoshone's request for an emergency injunction to stop the destruction of an ancient trail in the Tosawihi Quarries, a 10,000-year-old sacred site. Though a legal appeal and an over-arching lawsuit concerning the entire project are still pending, an international gold-mining consortium's bulldozer is already at work constructing a power line along the doctoring trail, said the Band's attorney, Rollie Wilson, of the law firm Fredericks Peebles & Morgan.

The construction equipment was fired up within days of the court's June 8 order, according to Wilson. The one-page decision did not detail the court's reasoning.

Destruction of the doctoring trail, which connects healing places, means irreparable harm to the culture and identity of the Western Shoshone, said Joe Holley, a member of the Band's council and a former chairman. The Band is now asking for a rehearing by the full court, a legal process that may take several months. Unless the rehearing is granted on an emergency basis, construction is likely to continue, and the trail may well be obliterated, said Wilson.

The entire cultural landscape, including the doctoring trail and additional related places, is revered by numerous Plains tribes in addition to the Western Shoshone. The Tosawihi Quarries currently sit on federal land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), which has declared them eligible for the National Register of Historic Places.

"To get a rehearing, you have to cite a clear error of law," said Wilson. "Once properties are deemed eligible for the Historic Register, Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act requires that you determine whether an undertaking like the power line will have an effect on them and then figure out how to mitigate or avoid the effects. BLM, which issued the permit for the power line, along with other mining activities in the Quarries, did not take that final step. They determined the trail eligible, then let the mining company bulldoze right through it."

BLM documents show that the agency appears to keep the mining consortium's concerns top of mind. In March 2014, BLM approved the current round of gold mining after a telephone call from the company's legal counsel to a BLM staffer to advise that the consortium needed the Record of Decision (ROD) for Tosawihi mining activities in time for a quarterly report to investors. Emails that were part of the court record—which were shared with ICTMN by the Band's attorney—with the subject line "urgent" began flashing among BLM employees, warning against delay.

"They are requesting that the ROD and approval be signed or dated no later than March 31. March 31 is the end of the first quarter," emailed one BLM staffer.

Another BLM employee joined in, warning of tribal concerns. Despite the statutory requirement to consider them, the BLM got the ROD signed in time for the quarterly report.

The Band has engaged in a multi-generational fight to protect the Quarries, Holley said. For decades, BLM has tried to limit recognition of sacred sites in the area, Holley charged; earlier mining activities had scarred much of the landscape and depleted its waters, but the Band hoped to prevent further destruction, he said. Ted Howard, cultural resources director and member of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes, has called the Quarries "the center of our spiritual being."

"They tell us this power line is only a temporary impact," Holley said. "But for 20 or 30 years—an entire generation—the line's presence means we will not be able to practice our culture, religion and spirituality in this important place. We will lose the chance to pass these practices and traditions to the next generation, and that means they will be gone forever. We will lose another piece of our culture, which we are working hard to maintain, and which the United States has a trust responsibility to protect."

Matt Spangler, spokesperson for the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, described it as the "federal agency lead" on the project, but adding that questions of broad tribal trust policy were outside ACHP's purview. Spangler deferred to the BLM for questions about the effects on the trail and the BLM's relationship with the mining company.

At press time, BLM spokesperson Chris Rose said he would have a statement ready within a few days. For its part, the Nevada-based mining company, Carlin Resources, an arm of Toronto-based Waterton Global Mining Company, which is part of a firm headquartered in the Cayman Islands, had not responded to requests for a comment.

Cansayapi team finishes season strong

An encouraging first season of Dakota Premier Lacrosse League play came to an end recently for the Cansayapi Lacrosse Team at the state tournament held in Watertown, S.D.

By Ben Stoterau

Redwood Gazette – June 15, 2016 – An encouraging first season of Dakota Premier Lacrosse League play came to an end recently for the Cansayapi Lacrosse Team at the state tournament held in Watertown, S.D.

The local boys opened up tournament play as the number four seed against five seed Brookings, S.D. and would hold on for a 7-6 victory.

"We came out a bit rusty after not having played as a whole team for over a month," Coach Dan Paur said. "We were able to give a great defensive effort in the fourth quarter and hung on for the win."

In the semifinals the team would face top-seeded and undefeated Grand Cities and watched as Grand Cities slowly pulled away for an 11-4 win.

"We weren't intimidated and came out hard and fast, but the game was slowed by penalties and we weren't able to mount a comeback," Paur said. "I was proud of our effort."

In the third-place game the team would top the Sioux Falls Sparks to finish third, as Denton Jackson had four goals and Vincent Jackson three in the win.

The defensive effort of Michael Helsper, Santee Red Eagle, Preston Camp and goalie Ace Primeaux stood out to Paur in the victory.

"It's a resilient group and I was proud that they stayed mentally and physically tough all season," Paur added.

Denton Jackson, Vincent Jackson, Camp and Primeaux were named to the All-American team.

(Note from Coach Frankie Jackson: "A very special Thank you Crystal Owen. Nina wopida for your support! A very special thank you to Lower Sioux Tribal Council for your continued support of this program and these awesome young men Justice Wabasha, Deuce Larsen!")

Free solar air heating training coming to Lake Traverse Reservation

SWO Energy Office of Planning and Economic Development Aug. 15-25, 2016

Lakota Solar Enterprises (LSE) - Henry Red Cloud is the Founder and Sole Proprietor of Lakota Solar Enterprises (LSE) on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. One of the first 100% Native American- owned and operated renewable energy companies in the nation, LSE employs tribal members to manufacture and install solar air heating systems for Native American families living on reservations across the Great Plains.

Additionally, Henry co-manages the Red Cloud Renewable Energy Center (RCREC), a one-of-a-kind educational facility where tribes from around the U.S. receive hands-on green job training in renewable energy technology and sustainable building practices including solar electric, solar water pumping, solar mobile power stations, solar radiant floor heating, wind turbines and building with straw bales and compressed earth blocks (CEBs).

Working in partnership with the Colorado non-profit organization, Trees, Water & People; Lakota Solar Enterprises has built and/or installed more than 1,000 solar air heating furnaces for ten western tribes. Additionally, Lakota Solar Enterprises has conducted renewable energy, energy efficiency and sustainable housing workshops for more than 30 additional tribal governments and organizations across the Great Plains and beyond.

This summer Lakota Solar Enterprises is partnering with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, Office of Planning and Economic Develop to offer a Solar Air Furnace training. The Solar Air Furnace Training will be on Aug 15-25, 2016 and include instruction in assembling solar air furnace kits, as well as hands-on experience installing these solar heaters in the field, on the homes of local families.

The training will provide:

*Overview of solar heating principals and methods

*Testing and quality-control of electric assembly

*Site evaluation

*Complete installation of solar heater systems at multiple sites

*Education and training of heating system recipients

This solar air heater workshop Aug 15-25 continues Lakota Solar Enterprise's successful history of providing renewable energy training opportunities to help tribal communities meet their renewable energy goals. For more information or to register for this training please contact:

Hazen LaMere, Tribal Energy

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Planning & Economic Development Department

Email: hazenl@swo-nsn.gov

Office: (605) 698-8212

Cell: (605) 268-3963

House Foreign Affairs Committee okays Women, Peace, and Security Act

Washington, DC – June 16, 2016 – The House Foreign Affairs Committee today approved Rep. Kristi Noem's Women, Peace, and Security Act (H.R.5332). This bipartisan legislation would require the U.S. to develop a comprehensive strategy to increase and strengthen women's participation in peace negotiations and conflict prevention globally as well as ensure accountability to Congress. With the committee's approval, H.R.5332 is expected to be considered by the full House later this year.

"Particularly in areas where increased stability creates greater security for the United States, we must make sure the work we are doing produces lasting results," said Rep. Noem. "This legislation is but one instrument in a toolbox our military and diplomatic leaders can use when looking to produce long-term peace. Critically, it includes detailed accountability mechanisms that I'm hopeful will help yield more sustainable outcomes during future conflict resolution and peace negotiation processes."

Research shows peace agreement is 35 percent more likely to last at least 15 years when women are involved. While some work has been done to include women at the negotiating table, this legislation would require a focused strategy with greater congressional oversight.

Rep. Noem introduced H.R.5332 in May 2016 alongside cosponsors Rep. Jan Schakowsky (D-IL), House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Ed Royce (R-CA), and House Foreign Affairs Committee Ranking Member Eliot Engel (D-NY). Sens. Mark Kirk (R-IL) and Barbara Boxer (D-CA) have introduced similar legislation in the Senate.

Grow SD –

Celebrating National Homeownership Month

June is National Homeownership Month, a time to recognize how owning a home relates not just to achieving the American Dream, but also to providing stable lives for families and creating stronger neighborhoods and communities. Homeownership is always a focus for GROW SD, as we provide a variety of products and services to help people purchase or improve their homes.

The GROW SD staff members are prepared to help households with their housing goals, and many recently upgraded their skills by attending a variety of training programs at the NeighborWorks America National Training Institute in Los Angeles, May 2-6. All of the training programs focused on various aspects of home buying or rehabilitation. Six staff members attended.

*Lori Moen, Chief Operating Officer, trained in loan servicing topics.

*Stephanie Sexton, Housing Loan Program Assistant, became certified to teach homebuyer education classes.

*Brenda Waage, Housing Loan Officer, became certified in packaging USDA Rural Development housing loans.

*Dustin Bragg, Home Improvement Coordinator, trained in aspects of managing construction and rehabilitation projects.

*Lori Finnesand and Marcia Erickson, Chief Executive Officers, worked with board members to complete the Excellence in Governance program.

As a result of this and previous training, GROW SD became recertified in the NeighborWorks Full-Cycle Lending model. Full-Cycle Lending provides a comprehensive package of pre- and post-purchase services designed to increase home ownership rates in underserved markets.

GROW SD is focused on providing the best possible service to people who want to become homeowners and homeowners who want to make their homes safer, healthier, and more energy efficient.

The nation has formally celebrated the benefits of homeownership for more than 20 years. In 1995, President Clinton announced National Homeownership Week, and President George W. Bush extended it in 2002, declaring the month of June to be National Homeownership Month.

For more information about GROW South Dakota's housing and business development programs and services, please visit our website at www.growsd.org or call (605) 698-7654.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

Same ol' same ol'

By Sierra Wolcott

Sisseton School District has been in the news several times in the last few years in regard to the homecoming coronation and the mascot which is the "Redmen." The homecoming coronation has been a subject of dispute due to the stereotypical Native American imagery and ceremonial representation, complete with medicine man. Last August, School Board members said they would "…look at changing it next year, but this year it is coming up too quickly to change."

On May 25, 2016 the Sisseton School Board held a special meeting. At this meeting the School Board made and approved a motion (with a 4-3 vote) to keep the homecoming coronation the same.

I brought this to the attention of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Education Department and action was taken. On Monday June 13 a regular school board meeting was held. At this time, Dr. Johnson, Director, SWO Education Department presented a letter to the school board from SWO Chairman, David Flute. In the letter, Chairman Flute requested reconsideration of the decision to keep the homecoming as is: "Please add discussion and a motion to the agenda, and change your votes so that we may move on from this issue and continue to build and strengthen a relationship for the betterment of the children of this community."

This letter was presented during the "public input" portion of the school board meeting that happens before the consent agenda is approved and action items are discussed. At this time, anyone from the community may address the school board, but the school board need not take any action or even hold discussion on the topics presented. I have been going to Sisseton School Board meetings for several years and I have never seen them use the authority they hold, which is to add a topic to the consent agenda. This authority was used at the June 13 meeting, but not for the reason I had hoped. A parent requested that their student be allowed to add a piece of playground equipment to the elementary school. Right away, the topic was added to the agenda so that it may be discussed and approved.

The school board chose not to add the homecoming issue to the agenda. They did not legally have to. It is this type of blatant disregard for real topics that shows how unwilling the school board members are to discuss important issues. Sports, the stadium, etc. always take precedent over issues such as "are our students being supported in the best way we are able?"

After Chairman Flute spoke, the School Board Chair, Sara Johnson, thanked him and Dr. Johnson for their words and asked the school board to approve the consent agenda (with changes for the addition to the elementary school playground), the board made the motion, it was seconded, and they moved on with their meeting.

I asked Chairman Flute and others if they would like to step outside and discuss next steps, when my mother, Peggy Peters, said "NO!" she went on to interrupt the school board meeting and ask why the issue of homecoming was not addressed. She was reminded by the school board Chair, that this was "a school board meeting held in public, not a public meeting." It was also explained to her that just because the item was not added to the agenda, does not mean it won't be discussed at a later time. In other words…we heard you speak…that's all we legally need to do…good day.

Conversations about restorative justice, trauma informed care, or even the homecoming coronations are too uncomfortable. I was not surprised that the school board did not take action on the subject of homecoming, while I was disappointed. SWO Chairman David Flute spoke to the school board in regard to progress in our community and our nation. "We have all heard," Flute said, "of the shooting in Orlando, school shootings (around the country), and…here there was a bomb threat…several years ago…This makes me want to come together as a community…Its important for the next generation that we expand on a good working relationship."

Last week it was announced that the high school in Watertown, South Dakota will not be continuing the "Ki-Yi" tradition, which was also full of stereotypical Native American imagery. A school with less than 10% Native American students decided that it was time to update and be respectful of their Native American neighbors and students. So why, as a school district of roughly 60% Native American students, Sisseton, South Dakota struggles.

This Tuesday June 21 there is a School Board elections in Sisseton-Three seats are up for election. There are six candidates running, three of those running are Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal members Debra Flute, Dr. Sherry Johnson, and Tom Wilson. The hope is to fill all three open seats with Tribal members. With Tribal members on the school board the school board will more accurately depict the diversity of our community. Sisseton, South Dakota is a small town with many wonderful attributes: a thriving arts community, many progressive residents, and an overall sense comradery, hopefully soon our small town will follow the lead of communities all across the nation in changing outdated and detrimental mascots and homecoming coronations.

Brief editorial comments from the editor's desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

General Council, first one of 2016, will be held this Thursday and Friday.

Slipped up on us, thinking somehow we had one more week … but no it's this week!

First General Council is for Oyate to receive reports on the Tribe's financial condition.

On day one, SWO Tribal Vice-Chairman Garryl Rousseau Sr. will be presenting his annual report, while CFO Greg Benidt will give a report on the Tribe's finances.

Day two will feature reports from the for-profit enterprises.

These will include gaming reports from DNGE CEO Ron Olsen and CFO Weston Quinn, as well as from general managers of each of the casino properties.

On day two there will be an update by the SWO Self-Governance Work Group.

Make sure to attend, if possible. The whole point of holding these General Council sessions is to allow participation in your Tribal government and its business interests.

There will also be special exhibits by several programs, although their annual reports won't be given until December.

And vendors.

And door prizes.

*****

We're encouraged that the South Dakota Congressional delegates are working toward helping the SWO Tribe replace its old detention facility.

The new justice center project is right up at the top of the list of priorities and has been there far too long!

*****

The 149th annual SWO Wacipi will be held the following week!

Don't miss the opportunity to share your Dakota culture and visit relatives and kodas who are not always at home on the Lake Traverse Reservation.

Watch for our annual visitors guide to the pow wow next week in your Sota.

*****

All registered voters in the Sisseton School District, please turn out at the polls this Tuesday, June 21st, and vote for whomever you think will best serve to build a better school board!

We are endorsing the three SWO Tribal members who bring a wealth of education, experience, and a deep appreciation for moving this community forward … out of the dark ages of institutional racism.

These are Dr. Sherry Johnson, Deb Flute, and Tom Wilson.

And, again, pidamiya to each for being willing to stand up not only for the best interests of the Oyate children but for all children of the district. This includes non-Indian students who have also been ill-educated under the old system.

*****

We are waiting, along with the Oyate, on an update from the Reservation Election Board.

There were many letters of intent filed for office and the waiting now is for REB to complete the certification process.

Once certified, the official list of candidates for Tribal Executive and Council positions will be posted.

Watch for the list, and we encourage each and every registered voter to let your conscience and consideration of what is best for everyone among the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, be your guide.

The 2016 Primary Election will be held

*****

We'd like to extend a special thank you to Erin Griffin for help she provided this week.

Also, we'd like to recognize her for organizing many exciting cultural activities being held at the Sisseton Wahpeton College.

The most recent event was last week's Dakota Language Symposium.

We hope to see continued support for the many Dakota cultural events at SWC.

*****

Please read the new Sota policy concerning political advertising.

The rates reflect a greater discount rate for full, half and quarter page advertisements – as much as 70 percent off the commercial rate, depending upon size of the ad.

Full page: $180.

Half page: $100.

Quarter page: $50

Smaller sizes will still be discounted, but will be charged $2.50 per column inch: for example, 2 col. x 10" ad (20 col. inches) would cost $50, the same as a quarter page; another example, 2 col. x 5" ad (10 col. inches) would cost $25.

The policy is a re-statement that all political advertising must be pre-paid. No exceptions.

Advertising copy can be mailed with an accompanying check or money order to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279; or placed in the Sota mailbox at Tribal headquarters (no postage required).

If an advertisement is sent electronically, by e-mail or fax, then a check must be mailed to the Sota, either at headquarters or through the postal service.

There can be no exceptions.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

Elder's Meditation of the Day June 17 "Your power comes from the songs." –Ethel Wilson, COWICHAN

If you do not know any of the songs, ask an Elder to teach you. Get yourself a drum. When you sing a song and play the drum, you'll be surprised how your mind, body, and spirit will react. Everything becomes calm and joyful. Our bodies love the songs. The songs allow us to touch the hand of the Creator. When we sing and touch the Great Spirit's hand, He gives us power. Songs are another way to pray.

My Grandfather, teach me a song today.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

The end of the human race will be that it will eventually die of civilization. Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

By all means marry; if you get a good wife, you'll be happy. If you get a bad one, you'll become a philosopher. Socrates (469 BC - 399 BC)

A painting in a museum hears more ridiculous opinions than anything else in the world. Edmond de Goncourt (1822 - 1896)

What some people mistake for the high cost of living is really the cost of high living. Doug Larson

It never hurts to ask. Unless you ask for hurt. Takayuki Ikkaku, Arisa Hosaka and Toshihiro Kawabata, Animal Crossing: Wild World, 2005

The enemy is anybody who's going to get you killed, no matter which side he's on. Joseph Heller (1923 - 1999), Catch 22

There are 10^11 stars in the galaxy. That used to be a huge number. But it's only a hundred billion. It's less than the national deficit! We used to call them astronomical numbers. Now we should call them economical numbers.

Richard Feynman (1918 - 1988)

Take care of the luxuries and the necessities will take care of themselves. Dorothy Parker (1893 - 1967)

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Harold Johnson services planned Tuesday

Harold Hoyt Johnson passed away on Friday, June 17, 2016.

Funeral services will be held on Tuesday, June 21, 2016 at 2:00 p.m. at the SWO community center, Agency Village, SD.

All-night wake services were set for Sunday and Monday nights at the community center.

Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD, is in charge of arrangements.

Watch for a complete obituary in next week's Sota.

Services pending for Tracy Renville

Tracy Brock Renville (born October 10, 1975) passed away on Saturday, June 18, 2016.

Funeral services are pending with Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD.

Watch for more information online and on KXSW-FM.

A complete obituary will be published in next week's Sota.

Services pending for Randy Birdsall

Randy Birdsall (born February 19, 1957) passed away on Saturday, June 18, 2016.

Funeral services are pending with Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD.

Watch for more information online and on KXSW-FM.

A complete obituary will be published in next week's Sota.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Testimonial for Wacinyan Tipi

By Denise Cloud

My goal here at the House Of Hope (Wacinyan Tipi) is to reach out to others who I may know that are still out there addicted to meth, or to anyone that wants to hear my story of how I came to be clean and sober. Being a former addict and involved deeply in that lifestyle for many years I've met addict that were and are very talented, loving, caring, hard-working individuals. Who would do anything for you, if need be. But yet being the talented people that they were, I've witnessed the deadly drug destroy their lives as well. I've seen it slowly creep into their lives and quickly destroy not only the individual's life but also their family as a whole. I've witnessed them become so blindly addicted to METH that they would sacrifice everything they had to get their fix. Even if it meant putting their lives in danger they would go to the extremes to get this evil drug.

Surviving addiction and the far reaching consequences of the lifestyle can be the hardest struggle anyone can endure. In addiction it is extremely likely that you could lose every bit of self-worth you have left. I myself, have found myself being so addicted that l couldn't see any hope for my own self. I had become extremely tired of being in a lifestyle that seemed to have sprung up around me and almost led to my death. This made me want to come clean about my addiction and help others in any way that I could with others as well as my own.

It was a extremely difficult process getting started with my sobriety. Regaining a closeness with my higher power and giving my weakness to GOD was such a huge part of this stage of recovery. Giving my problems to him seemed to put me on the track I needed to be on. He has been there for me in so many ways mind, body and heart.

I've been fighting my addiction for years, having so many ups and downs. I've gained tons of strength for as many times I was made to get back up and regain my balance in this life. I can't explain in words how difficult battling METH was and is. I know that I am on the right path now, in knowing this helps me fight my addiction each day. I enjoy helping and listening to others in need, that are currently struggling in the lifestyle that is now behind me. I myself, know what it is like to have no one there to listen to you. Or nor knowing your suffering and pain that you're silently going through. Everyone is a little broken and could use some time for themselves to heal emotionally, mentally, last but not least physically.

Swimming closed at Codington County's Memorial Park

Watertown, SD – June 17, 2016 – The swimming area at Codington County Memorial Park has been closed until further notice due to high levels of E-coli found in water samples.

The beach will remain closed until the SD Department of Health determines that new water samples are within acceptable limits of the harmful bacteria.

Keep Fighting

By Rep. Kristi Noem

June 17, 2016

You have to do a double take when you get a letter like this: "My name is Maggie Einrem. I am a 36 year old breast cancer survivor." Wow, a survivor – at 36.

Maggie, a mother of two from Watertown, was only 34 when she received the diagnosis. She wrote: "I had no warning signs, never even thought that breast cancer could affect me. Naïve, I know, however, it was not something that I had worried about…. At the ripe old age of 34, I found a lump. Not thinking it was anything serious, I just let it go for a couple of months."

She was a busy mom and the to-do list was already busting at the seams. But by June of that year, the lump had grown. She received an ultrasound and a mammogram. Less than a month later, Maggie was in surgery and so her battle began.

"I made it through eight rounds of chemo and 36 radiation treatments," Maggie wrote, "worked eight hours a day, raised two kids (ages 3 and 9), put supper on the table every night…. I knew if I stopped to think about everything, I would lose it and go into a very dark place. So I put on a smile, lost all my hair, had burned skin, numerous surgeries, and felt like junk every day, but I kept going."

Not only did Maggie keep going in her own fight, she began to reach out to help others with theirs. She's become an activist even within her own family to make sure that all the women receive annual mammograms and that the men do self-checks. She made a blanket for a co-worker that was diagnosed recently, as the transfusion room can be so cold. And through her workplace, Sparton, she's raised awareness about breast cancer by helping with a cancer walk, a soup cook-off, and a raffle.

After hearing her story, I chose Maggie to be my guest of honor at this year's Congressional Women's Softball Game. Every year, female members of Congress team up to take on the female members of the press corps. We play to benefit the Young Survival Coalition, an organization set up to help young women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer.

Sadly, too many of these diagnoses are happening in our state. The number of incidents has risen steadily since 2010, putting South Dakota at the top of the list when it comes to breast cancer diagnoses per capita.

It's unclear what has caused the influx, and while not everything is in your control, there are steps you can take to reduce your risk. According to the American Cancer Society, excessive drinking, being overweight or obese (particularly after menopause), and a lack of physical activity can increase a woman's risk of developing breast cancer. These are things you can take action on today. Additionally, getting an annual mammogram can help make early detection possible. This means treatment can start earlier, possibly even before the cancer has spread.

We have made tremendous strides when it comes to detecting and treating breast cancer. Still, 680 South Dakotans are expected to learn they have breast cancer this year alone. I pray they are able to approach this diagnosis as Maggie did in her letter when she wrote: "I have too much to live for and so much love to give to others that I will never stop fighting!"

Keep on fighting, Maggie. You're an inspiration to your children, your community, and women fighting this disease everywhere.

On Call –

Cancer and keeping your house in order

By Richard P. Holm, MD

There is something about that word cancer, the big C.

When the pathology report displays those abnormal type cells on biopsy spelling out six black letters, then, whether it is a simple treatable condition or one that will most certainly predict an early death, the patient hears cancer and it changes everything.

Through the years, I have had to inform too many patients about a new diagnosis of cancer and have learned there is often a paralyzing fear that comes with the word. Due to advancements in science, many more people with cancer are surviving than when I started. Still, when I have had to say to anyone of them, "You have cancer," often the word cancer is the only word they will remember for days, and so I always plan to keep readdressing the topic until plans can be clarified.

Unfortunately, some people who hear the word cancer come to face their mortality for the very first time, even when the chance of cure is good. I dare say this goes for too many of us, resulting both from unrealistic expectations in this scientifically advanced world, and the cover-up of the dying process in this everything-is-going-to-be-alright society.

This week a friend told me she and her husband were preparing to sell their house by thinning our their stuff collected over 15 years, and remodeling with that new carpet they've needed for a long time. It reminded me of what a realtor friend once said, that he keeps his house ready for sale at all times. Why not put in the carpet, paint the bedroom, and fix the step so that he can enjoy it right now?

In a similar vein, I have heard it said that every once in a while, perhaps every year, we should all have some kind of significant brush with death and then be rescued. Maybe that would help us to get and keep our house in order.

And then when each of us has our turn to cross the river into that land of the Sweet Bye and Bye, we can feel what the young neurosurgeon Paul Kalanithi described before dying of cancer, "(I have found a joy)...unknown to me in prior years... a joy that does not hunger for more and more, but rests... satisfied in this time, right now..." *

We shouldn't have to come down with cancer to get our house in order.

*Paul Kalanithi MD, Before I go: A Stanford neurosurgeon's parting wisdom about life and time. The Washington Post, March 12, 2015.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

ET Demo students complete GED testing

By Denise Kranhold

Adult Education/Career Coordinator

Our Employment and Training Program has some EXCITING NEWS!

We have had three GED students successfully complete their GED this last month and all are either employed or on their way to post-secondary education.

Rikki Lufkins is currently employed at Dakota Magic. Her future plans are to attend Lake Area Tech and complete a degree in Cosmetology.

Jaron Small is currently employed at Dakota Magic Casino, with future plans to attend college as well.

Troy Pretends Eagle is currently enrolled at NDSU and will begin his journey to completing a Bio Chem & Cellular Biology Degree.

We are super excited for these students of ours. We wish them the best on their next endeavor. Congratulations!

Samantha Crawford attends Youth Leadership Forum

Submitted by Karen A. Fink

Tiospa Zina Tribal School Transition Coordinator

Samantha Crawford along with 39 other young people from across the state of South Dakota attended the 18th annual Youth Leadership Forum (YLF) at Northern State University in Aberdeen, South Dakota. YLF is a leadership camp for students with disabilities of all types. The camp was held from June 5th through June 9th. This year's theme was Lights, Camera, and ACTION!

The following is an excerpt of her experience at YLF:

I arrived at NSU on Sunday afternoon and met the other campers and leaders. We then went to the student union and were introduced to our team members. We went to our team rooms and made our Oscar. We designed it and decided on our team name. I was a GREEN AVENGER. There were four teams total. We got to know each other, we said what we liked and where we came from. We also told each other why we were at YLF. We told the emcee what our team name was. Later we did some team building activities. Sunday the yellow team or the GOLDEN WARRIORS took the lead.

Monday we had to get up early and eat breakfast. We did energizers and my team the GREEN AVENGERS were the lead team. We met Chaz and Chris, both men talked about their disability and how it affects their lives. They were funny and had an awesome message. Later that day, we each learned about our own disability and how it affects us. We learned about overcoming our challenges and how to be successful in telling others about what we need. In the evenings we would go and have fun. We went to the Red Rooster, a local coffee shop and met Magic Joe. I volunteered to be his assistant and he cut me in half.

The PINK PANTHERS and the BLUE REBELS each had a day to lead as well. We learned about different types of technology and how different delegates use it. We were introduced to Mark and Cassandra and they told us about how technology helps them. We had guest speakers' talk about how their blindness, how it affects them and how they use technology to get around. We learned about going to college with a disability and what we can do to make the college experience a successful one. We had a guest speaker talk to us about social media. She told us a story about a girl who met a friend online who she thought was a girl and it turned out to be a guy the whole time. The story was sad because it turned out bad for the girl.

We went to Wylie Park where pizza was delivered to us. We had lots and lots of pizza. I tried dessert pizza for the first time and it was good. Thom spoke to us about being somebody. He told funny stories. We all had to say "I AM SOMEBODY!" I really do believe this to be true. We went to Thunder Road and rode the go-carts and I tried bungee jumping and I did some flips an

I learned more about speaking up for myself. We had guests who included a student from Aberdeen Central, a school board member and a lawyer. They talked about getting involved in things such as student council and becoming class president and they talked about volunteering and becoming involved in the community. They encouraged us to talk about our disability and tell people what we need. I enjoyed the dance and we had a bonfire after the dance and we ate smores. I really enjoyed hanging out with my friends. The leaders made us go to bed after the bonfire.

On the last day, I cleaned up my dorm room and it was a sad day. We had a slide show presentation about all of the things we had done. We had lunch and we filled out each other's memory books. I got email address and phone numbers from the other delegates. I went back to Jerde Hall (the place I stayed at for the week) and got my stuff and said my final goodbyes. I came home and cried because I missed all of my new found friends.

I recommend YLF to anyone who has a child with a disability, because it is a great way to learn more about your disability and it opened my eyes to new experiences. I would encourage anyone who has a disability to find out more about this camp. I had a great time and I would like others to have the awesome experience that I had.

From the Sisseton Public School Title VII program –

2016 SHS senior honoring held

Submitted by Patsey Seaboy

On May 15th, 2016 – The Title VII program honored the graduating Oyate seniors from Sisseton Public School on May 15th.

There were 18 students graduating, and nine attended the honoring wit their families.

Delphine Wanna, Program Director, coordinated the event. Staff attending were Steve Owen, Mel MacConnell and Patsey Seaboy.

Pendletons were provided to each student as well as a Dakotah to English dictionary purchased from the Dakotah Language Program of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate. The Pendletons were provide by the generosity of the Dakota Magic Casino via CFO Weston Quinn.

Refreshments were served.

Graduating seniors who attended were Alec O'Farrell, James Neconish, Aron Haug, Brady Kirk, Logan Grimm, Dane Gill, Moriah Torres, and Tiarah Bissonette. Supporting staff who attended as well as the families of the graduates were Dr. Stephen Schulte and the Sisseton Public School Board Chairperson, Mrs. Sara Johnson.

Board member Brian Grey Bull served as Master of Ceremonies and guest speaker was SWO Tribal Chairman Dave Flute.

The Title VII program sincerely thanks all who took part in our Senior honoring.

Legals

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 07-064

SWOCSE/ Danielle Rodriguez, PLAINTIFF

VS.

THOMAS STRUTZ, DEFENDANT      

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of June, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of May, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

25-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 07-167

SWOCSE/ Keri Guy, PLAINTIFF

VS.

THOMAS STRUTZ, DEFENDANT      

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of June, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of May, 2016

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 16-071

SWOCSE/ Margaret Roy, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SHAWNDA BERNARD, DEFENDANT           

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Recognize a Foreign Order and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of June, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of May, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

25-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 16-073

SWOCSE/ Margaret Wilson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JESSE BLUE, DEFENDANT  

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of June, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of May, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

25-3tc

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 14-146

SWOCSE/ Lorinda Sampson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TAI DEMARRIAS, DEFENDANT       

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of June, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of May, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

25-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 00-097

SWOCSE/ Gerri Rodlund, PLAINTIFF

VS.

STACEY FARMER, DEFENDANT      

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of June, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of May, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

25-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 16-065

SWOCSE/ Roland Heminger, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JOBETH BARTON/CADOTTE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of June, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of May, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

25-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 15-039

SWOCSE/ Damien Cadotte, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SARA RUNNELS, DEFENDANT        

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of June, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of May, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

25-3tc

Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Job Openings

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Adult Probation Officer, Tribal Court

Officer Manager/Research Assistant, Education Department

Closing Date: June 24th, 2016 @ 04:30 PM

All interested applicants may obtain application and job description information at the Human Resource Department, of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate or contact Arnold Williams at (605) 698-8238 or Denise Hill at (605) 698-8251. (Tribal preference will apply).

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Job Openings

Current Vacancies:

Substitutes needed for custodial, kitchen, teaching, and transportation - starting at $10/hr, varies per position Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma (please contact the HR office for more information) Applications are accepted on an on-going basis

2016-2017 School Year Vacancies:

Vacancy: High School Science Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School Science Teacher Opening Date: January 29, 2016 Closing Date: open until filled

Vacancy: Family and Consumer Sciences and Personal Health Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Family and Consumer Sciences and Personal Health Teacher Opening Date: March 11, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Career and Technical Education Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Career and Technical Education Teacher Opening Date: March 11, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Middle School Social Studies Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Middle School Social Studies Teacher Opening Date: April 22, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Gear-Up School Based Coordinator (Part-time) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Teaching Certificate and possess a valid South Dakota drivers license Opening Date: May 23, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled

2016-2017 Coaching Vacancies- Closing Date: Open until filled

Proof of all SDHSAA coaching requirements at the time application is submitted. Requirements are to complete the following courses through the National Federation of High School Sports (NFHS): Fundamentals of Coaching, and First Aid and Safety for Coaches. Must also submit a letter of intent that answers the questions found on form Athletics Coaching Questionnaire. **Do not need SDHSAA/NFHS Coaching Requirements.

Head Wrestling Coach

Head High School Track Coach

Head Volleyball Coach

**Jr. High Boys Basketball Coach

**Jr. High Girls Basketball Coach

**5/6 Grade Boys Basketball Coach

**Jr. High Football Coach

Jr. High/Assistant Track Coach

**Fall Cheerleading Adviser

**Winter Cheerleading Adviser

Assistant Varsity Boys Basketball Coach

Assistant Varsity Girls Basketball Coach

Assistant Volleyball Coach

Assistant Wrestling Coach

Assistant Track Coach (2) Assistant Varsity Football Coaches

2016-2017 Extra-Curricular Vacancies-Closing Date: Open until filled

Horse Club Adviser

Science Club Adviser

Close-up Foundation Adviser

Speech/Drama/Oral Interp Adviser

Destination Imagination Adviser

Drum Adviser

Junior Class Adviser

Military Club Adviser

Senior Class Adviser

If you would like to apply to be a part of the TZ tiwahe you may pick up an application and background check form from the TZTS HR office located at #2 Tiospa Zina Dr. Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications may also be printed off the HR web page. Completed applications may be sent to PO Box 719, Agency Village, SD 57262. Faxed to: 605-698-7686. For further information call 605-698-3953 ext. 208. Indian Preference employer. At will employer. All applicants are subject to a Background Check and Pre-Employment Drug Test, pursuant to SWSB policy and United States Code Title 25 Chapter 34 - Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention.

United States Code Title 25 Chapter 34 - Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention.

 

Enemy Swim Day School

Computer Technology Teacher/Instructor

The Enemy Swim Day School is seeking a Computer Technology Teacher/Instructor for the 2016-2017 school year. Preferred qualifications: BA/BS degree in Elementary Education, SD State Teaching License or obtainable or BA/BS in any field and technology proficient; will train if necessary. For more information about the position call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 and ask for Mrs. Dolney, or visit our website www.esds.us under Employment Opportunities. Send application, resume 3 letters of recommendation, and other credentials to: Enemy Swim Day School, 13525 446th Avenue, Waubay, SD 57273. Indian Preference policies apply. This position is open until filled.

TANF/Community Education Coordinator

Enemy Swim Day School has an opening for a TANF/Community Education Coordinator for the 2016-2017 school year, 11-month calendar. Qualifications: Associate's Degree preferred in Public Relations or, experience in special events planning, community development, After School Programs, working with children and grant writing. Working knowledge of computers and software programs. If interested please pick up an application from the business office or visit our website: www.esds.us under Employment Opportunities. For more information about the position call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 and ask for Rebecca Dargatz for details. Indian preference policies apply. Open until filled.

FACE Parent Educator/Early Childhood Co-Teacher

Enemy Swim Day School has an opening for a FACE Parent Educator/Early Childhood Co-Teacher for the 2016-2017 school year. This position will require flexibility and planning to conduct personal home visits for 50% of the time and provide support to the Early Childhood preschool classroom 50% of the time. Hours are 8:00 am to 4:00 pm, with some evening hours for scheduled events. Please visit our web site at www.esds.us for a detailed position description and application. Applications may also be picked up in the administration office. This position includes benefits. If interested please call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 for more information, ask for Virginia. Indian Preference policies apply. Open until filled.

25-2tc

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Cage Department: Cashier (Full-Time or Part-Time) Day, Graveyard

Foods Department: Buffet Attendant (Full-Time or Part-Time) as needed

Housekeeping Department: Porter (12 Full-Time or Part-Time) as needed

Support Services Department: Laborer (Full-Time or Part-Time) Swing

Closing Date: June 24, 2016 at 4:00 p.m.

Closing Date: June 17, 2016 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions

Two identifications documents required upon hire

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE, Hankinson ND 58041.For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO. (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment). Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

PORTER: PORTER (1 Full-Time Female) GENERAL FUNCTION: Serves as janitorial/housekeeping staff for guests and casino operations. REQUIREMENTS: Physical mobility throughout the facility and surrounding grounds. Able to lift 40 to 50 lbs. Must be able to bend, stoop, stand and walk a 8 hour shift. Weekends are mandatory, Must obtain a Non-Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on June 22, 2016 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

CAGE: WINDOW CASHIER (1 FULL-TIME) GENERAL FUNCTION: Responsible for providing our casino guests with excellent cashier services efficiently and accurately while maintaining a friendly and positive attitude. Services include cash exchange and check cashing transactions, as well as other monetary transfer of funds. REQUIREMENTS: Able to lift 25 lb., several times throughout shift. Available to work all shifts (Day, Swing and Graveyard). Total accountability for imprest bank. Computer knowledge helpful. Customer services a must. Must obtain a Key Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on June 22, 2016 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Security Department: Officer (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, weekends, holidays, and the ability to work flexible hours. Mobility throughout the facility 45% percent of time; will be stooping, bending, walking for long periods of time, able to lift up to 40 pounds, computer skills required for report writing. Will be exposed to noise and tobacco smoke. Appropriate dress code. Must be at least 21 years old. Must have High School Diploma or G.E.D. Must be able to obtain a Key License.

Sales & Marketing Department: Reel Deal Attendant (1) full-time; rotating shifts; day, swing, weekends, holidays, and the ability to work flexible hours. Must have good communication skills, customer service skills, computer experience, telephone skills, and ability to work under supervision and meet deadlines, previous experience is preferred. Must be at least 21 years old. Must have a High School Diploma or GED. Must be able to obtain a Key Gaming License.

C-Store Department: Clerk/Cashier (3) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, weekends, holidays, and the ability to work flexible hours. Excellent customer service skills; math skills essential; ability to operate necessary equipment; physical ability to lift moderate amounts of weight; previous experience working with money preferred; strong organizational skills managing various functions; and dependable. Must be at least 21 years old & have a High School diploma or GED.

Deli Attendant (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Ability to operate necessary equipment. Physical ability to stand for long hours, clean, lift heavy objects up to 30 lbs., and restock inventory; 6 mos. Previous cooking experience preferred, 6 mos. working with the public. Knowledge of food preparation safety requirements. Must be dependable & available to work any and all shifts. Must be at least 18 years old and have a High School Diploma or GED.

Restaurant Department: Prep cook/cook (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, includes weekends & holidays. Previous experience is preferred. Must be able to multi-task; have the ability to work under pressure; the ability to operate necessary equipment; knowledge of food preparation safety requirements and ability obtain a "Food Handlers" certification; physical ability to clean, lift heavy object up to 20 lbs. or more and restock inventory. Have the physical ability to stand for prolonged periods of time. Must be at least 18 years old & must have a High School Diploma or GED.

Opening date: Thursday, June 16, 2016

Closing date: Wednesday, June 22, 2016

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Cage Department: Main Bank/ Cashier/Drop Team Member (2) part-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Excellent customer service skills, excellent communication skills. Appropriate dress code; the ability to work under pressure. Excellent Math Skills, Basic Computer Skills, Knowledge of basic office equipment. At, least 2 years of previous experience in the cage department preferred. Ability to lift 50 lbs. Must be at least 21 years old, must have a High school diploma or GED. Must be able to obtain a Key License.

Opening date: Friday, June 17, 2016

Closing date: Thursday, June 23, 2016 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 
 

 

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