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TZTS Summer 2017 Film Camp videos online on YouTube

 

Search YouTube for:

TiospaZinaTribalSchool@gmail.com

 

Film Camp behind the scenes:

https://youtu.be/pEc83D_s2Hk

 

Ivy:

https://youtu.be/7lH27IOsRNo

 

Dylan:

https://youtu.be/nJYfMAlYee4

 

 

Mystic Fight Scene:

https://youtu.be/CxZQo2FOf3U

 

 

Anhother behind the scenes look at camp:

https://youtu.be/y7_0YiFFhTE

 

 

Redwing:

https://youtu.be/N-uKyMAiDhM

 

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate: Want to re-read the Self-Governance articles from past issues of your Sota Iya Ye Yapi?

Whether or not the Tribe assumes administrative authority over your health services is a BIG DEAL. What do you know about it?

Here they are:

Self-Governance Articles from past Sotas

  Obituaries Editorials Editor's column Education
Legals
Trading post

 

 

Vol. 48 Issue No. 33

Anpetu Iyamni, Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017

Inside this Edition –

Chairman's Corner: Chairman Flute updates the Oyate

Final call: Tribal Self-Governance of IHS public meeting this Wednesday

Sisseton School Board holds historic consultation with SWST at TiWakan Tio Tipi

Tribal Council hosts Governor Daugaard for Dakota Crossing tour, roundtable discussion

First look at the Tribe's Meth Code

Sisseton Wahpeton College and partners launch Dakotah Language program

Highlights of Standing Up for the Children conference

Eagle to be released in ceremony at Dakota Sioux this Tuesday

Photo highlights of National Night Out at Sisseton's SWO Memorial Park

Reminder: Deadline to submit copy for consideration in the Sota is Friday noon

Chairman's Corner –

Updating the Oyate

Mitakuyapi ka Mitakodapi.

First and foremost, I want to say publicly, on behalf of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe, thank you to Governor Daugaard and his staff for coming to our Tribe last Friday and visiting with us on a number of topics, and taking time to shake hands and visit with some of our Tribal members. At 8:30 a.m., we gave the Governor a tour of our new grocery store, Dakota Crossing. We shared our thoughts on the economic impact this new business brings to the community. Dakota Crossing has created over forty new jobs, offers a better alternative to Teals and, will highlight many new choices and amenities that Teals does not offer. We also gave the Governor and his staff a tour of the old jail and shared the history and recent actions of the B.I.A. closing the doors. We also had a nice visit with Dr. Mason and she shared some great thoughts of the work the Tribe is doing regarding treatment. We finished up the morning with a tour of our Tribal Archives by Tamara St. John, and a roundtable and working lunch with a few members of Council, Legal, the Vice-Chairman and I, and our B.I.A. Superintendent Mr. Hawkins. We had a very productive visit and look forward to working on some of the issues we shared with the Governor. Issues we will begin to work on are the gaming compact, including Dakota Crossing into the tax agreement, working with the state tourism office to expand the cultural study for tourism to extend north of Watertown, and writing a letter to our Congressional delegation supporting the Tribe's efforts in obtaining funding for a new detention facility. The visit we had with our South Dakota Governor and his staff was absolutely great and ended with a gift exchange between the Governor and the Vice-Chairman and I. Finally, this coordinated Governor's visit would not have been as pleasant without a very supportive staff. I cannot say how proud and happy I am, and thankful I am and need to recognize my staff: Scott German, Lennie Peters and Christine Fineday for all their help and patience and putting it all together from coordinating the meet and greet weeks ago to setting up the Council suite for the meal. Rochelle Half-a-Day for the meal; it was absolutely dynamite! Also, "thank you" to Tamara, Randy, Greg, Gary from Tribal Police and Ben from the SD Hwy Patrol providing escort for the Governor.

Last Monday, I took part in consultation with the Sisseton public school board and staff (although education is a responsibility of the Tribal Secretary, she did not participate, and I felt it was necessary someone from the Executive branch attend). Recent federal law, Every Student Succeeds Act, requires meaningful consultation between tribes and public schools that receive impact aid funding. For the first time, we hosted this required consultation in our Tribal Council chambers. It generated lots of questions, answers and ideas for improving and offering equal opportunity to all students. The consultation lasted about two hours. Although there is room to grow, I was satisfied that we made some progress in the process and building a working relationship with the public school. I would like to thank Dr. Sherry Johnson for her diligence and compassion regarding education for our Native students and asking the tough questions and the right questions. I'd like to thank the Tribal members that attended and participated in the consultation. I also want to recognize these Councilmen for participating: Alvah Quinn, Arnold White, Lois Owens and Jr. Rondell; I cannot express the importance of having Tribal leadership present during these consultations that are required by federal law.

Lorne Aadland hosted a visit from local and state conservation officers that took place at our Enemy Swim buffalo farm. It was quite an informative meeting with other conservation officers and I was impressed with the quality of people in attendance. One of our highlights was our range rotation of our buffalo herd and how knowledgeable out buffalo management team has of our herd. Karena Miller shared a detailed history and current status of our herd. Stacey and Matt also contributed and I want to publicly recognize them for their hard work and outstanding performance taking care of one of our most sacred animals of our Dakota people – our buffalo. I also want to thank Lorne for setting up the meeting and inviting me to give a welcome to our guests; I learned quite a bit about soils and range management.

I would like to congratulate the St. Mary's Church and its members for 135 years of existence. I was asked by Mr. Michael LaFountaine to write up a certificate of commendation and I apologize I did not get that done last week. However, we are working on a certificate of recognition and will have it done soon; my sincerest apologies to Mike and all the members of St. Mary's church.

I would like to remind everyone that on Wednesday there will be a two to three hour discussion on our efforts to 638 compact our local service unit. This is serious business and entails our health care service and current U.S. administrative decisions that will affect our Tribe unless we make the next step in self-governance. This will be aired on KXSW 89.9 FM. Finally, I say this with honesty and transparency; I have not taken a break from my duties as Chairman since I took office January 2016. I have not missed a day of work for any reason other than a VA appointment every couple of months (and even so, I have either come back to the office, or answered calls and responded to emails during my appointments). It is my choice to say this publicly and I do so because I want everyone to know my honesty and transparency; I will be taking at least a one-week break soon. My staff will take care of any requests of me during my break.

Wopida tanka.

Dave Flute, Chairman.

Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe.

Tribal Council hosts Governor Daugaard

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribal Council hosted South Dakota Governor Dennis Daugaard last Friday, August 11th.

SWST Chairman Dave Flute led the Governor and staff members on a tour of the Tribe's new grocery store, Dakota Crossing. The Governor also got a look inside the old jail.

Afterwards they took part in a roundtable discussion at headquarters with available Council members – Chairman Flute, Vice-Chairman Floyd Kirk Jr., Big Coulee District Councilman Alvah Quinn Sr., Heipa District Councilman Winfield JR Rondell, Buffalo Lake Councilman Arnold White Jr., and Long Hollow District Councilman Justin Chanku. Also present was the Legal Department staff. With the Governor were several staff members and SD Department of Tribal Affairs Secretary Steve Emery.

Sisseton BIA Superintendent Russell Hawkins joined the group later.

The roundtable discussion was informal, with Chairman Flute moderating and asking other members of Council to jump in with their comments or questions for the Governor.

Governor Daugaard opened the roundtable by thanking the Chairman for the tour of Dakota Crossing.

He said, "Congratulations on this multi-faceted facility."

Later in the conversation the Tribal grocery store came up again, concerning taxes to be collected and the Tribe's agreement with the state.

The talk turned to the need – considered critical by both the Governor and Tribal officials – for the SWST to build a detention and/or justice center.

Chairman Flute updated the Governor on his and other Tribal officials' lobbying efforts, and potential support from the BIA.

The Chairman described the Congressional delegates as supportive, and the Tribe hopes for support from Congress.

He did, however, say that Congressional appropriations are "kind of like rolling the dice."

The Governor offered to write a letter of support if the budget is adopted.

Gov. Daugaard said he "cannot imagine anyone with a more compelling need (detention and/or justice center) … transporting and housing inmates, and the meth problem."

They talked about set aside money possibly providing "substantial assistance."

The discussion went into the "meth problem."

The Governor said "Meth is more and more a problem across South Dakota."

He spoke of how meth is increasingly coming through the coasts, and the Texas border.

It was a big concern, he told Tribal Council, at a recent national governors meeting.

"Opioid use is increasing," he said, "and meth."

"Opioid arrests, and deaths, are not as bad here (in South Dakota), but the trend is increasing here."

"And that is disturbing."

"Meth used to be mostly home cooked, now it's being brought in," he said.

Chairman Flute said that there is still "some cooking meth and abuse in the home" and said the Tribe has meth detection equipment in use.

Big Coulee District Councilman Alvah Quinn agreed, adding that home cooking of meth is down from a decade ago, and that more and more the drugs are being brought onto the Reservation from outside.

Gov. Daugaard talked about a project the state implemented on July 1st this year.

The SD Highway Patrol is increasing surveillance, paying special attention to the state's borders. Specifically, stopping meth from being coming in.

Questions were raised by Tribal Attorney Deb Flute about where the Highway Patrol will be watching borders – especially since Interstate 29 runs through the Reservation and the South and North Dakota border.

The Governor responded that he does not have "specifics" about the program, with "hiring and strategizing" ongoing.

He said that his administration is focused on "prevention and treatment … arrests of those who break the law."

Chairman Flute told the Governor that Tribal Council had just "created a hard law … to address meth."

He also said, "We (Tribe) want to be a good partner with the state to combat opioids and meth."

Shifting to another topic, Chairman Flute informed the Governor that the Tribe is "working on a master plan for expanding Dakota Connection."

This is a project the Chairman had brought up to Oyate at the June General Council meeting.

The expansion would provide a full-service truck stop and hotel at Sisseton.

He informed the Governor that the Tribal Planning Director had researched but found no "cultural study" done by the state for its northwest corner further north than Watertown.

And the Chairman requested the Governor's assistance in having that done so that the Tribe might better engage tourism as a revenue stream.

Governor Daugaard responded by saying "I will" when it comes to seeing that such a state survey/study can be done.

These studies have helped advance South Dakota Tourism in other areas of the state.

There was a discussion about the Tribe's tax agreement with the state, specifically how it will work with Dakota Crossing.

Deb Flute brought up an issue, that not everyone in state government wants to classify the grocery store site as "Indian land." It is, however, mostly trust land.

But questioning it as "Indian land" is Attorney General's office, not the SD Department of Revenue.

The Governor described it as seemingly "a point of law that has no consequence."

He said he would bring up the issue with the Tax Department.

The Chairman asked – the roundtable had already gotten into Tribe-State tax matters – would the Governor be open to re-negotiating the gaming compact?

Governor Daugaard responded affirmatively.

He suggested that the Tribe begin by bringing his office "a draft that you think is fair."

"Then," he said, "we will get back to you if we think it unfair."

Heipa District Councilman Rondell brought up to the Governor that previous "state arguments were not with the Tribe … but with the BIA."

Gov. Daugaard went on to say he is "grateful for the government to government relationship" he has with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Tribe.

After the discussion, the Governor was given a tour of the administration building, including the Tribal Archives and several Tribal program offices, then he and his staff were treated to a noon meal which featured buffalo on the menu.

Last call: Community meeting on self-governance of health service

SWST Chairman Dave Flute has called for a community meeting to be held this Wednesday, August 16th, on tribal self-governance of health services.

The Oyate are invited to attend and participate in what should be a wrap-up of the past two years of meetings on this issue.

The meeting will take place at the Tribal Elderly Nutrition Center at Agency Village, from 1:00-3:00 p.m. There will be snacks, juice and coffee provided.

On the agenda:

*What does self-governance mean?

*What could it mean for the Oyate if the Tribe chooses to self-govern IHS?

*How will this transition benefit Tribal members at IHS?

If you have any more questions regarding self-governance, this is the time to ask them.

Because of the critical nature of this decision, two weeks ago the Sota published of the SWO Self-Governance Working Group's summary of its research.

Copies of that information, printed in a special section, will be available at this week's meeting.

The summary, in its entirety, is available on the Sota website:

www.earthskyweb.com/sota.htm

or

www.earthskyweb.com/news.htm

or

http://www.earthskyweb.com/sg_articles.pdf

Sisseton School Board names Interim Superintendent

Sisseton, SD – Aug. 9, 2017 – After accepting the resignation of Wally Leipart as Superintendent, the Sisseton School Board held a special meeting on Tuesday, August 8th, to consider an Interim Superintendent.

The Board announced it has unanimously approved hiring Mrs. Tammy Meyer as Interim Superintendent for the 2017-18 year.

Mrs. Meyer currently serves as Sisseton Middle School Principal, and recruitment is underway to find a replacement.

She will continue providing administrative support to Middle School until a candidate is found.

In its announcement, the School Board wrote "We want to assure our parents, community, and staff that the School Board and Administrative team are working collaboratively to have a smooth transition, to be ready for school to start, and to have a successful year."

The Board accepted Mr. Leipart's resignation on Thursday, August 3rd.

On Monday, August 7th, he helped facilitate the consultation meeting between the Sisseton School Board and the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe, held at Tribal headquarters. (See related story.)

Sota editorial, news, part one –

Sisseton School Board holds consultation with SWST

By CD Floro

Sota Editor

Last Monday, August 7th, the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe hosted members of the board of Sisseton's public schools for a consultation. The session, held in Tribal Council Chambers at the end of the work day, could be the beginning of a new, less contentious era in their relationship. A relationship marked by decades of mistrust, public confrontation, and legal dispute.

How often has the Sota published editorial content about the Sisseton School Board's continued institutional racism and unwillingness to fulfill its obligation under federal law? Many times.

Here, last week, we witnessed what could become the change we've been wanting to have happen for a very long time.

It's possible.

Darrell DeCoteau served as moderator for the consultation, which went on over two hours.

Superintendent Wally Leipart introduced School Board members and school staff responsible for federal/Indian programs in the Sisseton schools.

Present on behalf of the Tribe were Education Director Dr. Sherry Johnson, members of the Education Department, Johnson O'Malley program, and representing Tribal Council were Tribal Chairman Dave Flute, Big Coulee District Councilman Alvah Quinn Sr., Buffalo Lake District Councilman Arnold White Jr., and Enemy Swim District Councilwoman Lois Owens. Others attending were from Legal and the Chairman's office.

KXSW Announcer Tom Wilson was present and aired most of the discussion live.

(Note: Watch for a write-up from notes and information coming from the SWO Education Department in part two, next week in the Sota.)

SWC and partners launch Dakota Language Program

Sisseton, SD – Sisseton Wahpeton College (SWC), in partnership with the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community (SMSC), Cankdeska Cikana Community College, Fort Peck Community College, and Nebraska Indian Community College, today announced Voices of Our Ancestors, a two-year Dakota language program. This new initiative is funded entirely by the SMSC, which committed nearly $2 million toward its development and implementation. The program will include a total of 20 Native students from the five participating communities who will be working with instructors and mentors 40 hours per week over 24 months.

In 2008, the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Council passed a resolution declaring a "Dakota Language Crisis" and a "State of Emergency for the revitalization of the Dakota Language." Since that resolution was passed, the SWO has lost 43% of its fluent Dakota language speakers. Across the United States and Canada, our relatives are experiencing similar loss of the language; some Dakota communities have no fluent, first-language Dakota speakers left. The goal of the SWC Dakota Studies Department is to reverse this trend and increase the number of speakers of the Dakota language. SWC's participation in the Voices of Our Ancestors project will help meet this goal.

The Voices of Our Ancestors curriculum will immerse participants in Dakota language, culture, and history. The program will also include educational opportunities preparing the participants for leadership roles and certification as Dakota Language instructors. Tom DeCoteau, James Bird Jr., Leslie Hansen, and Rena Johnson have been selected as the four Dakota Language Learners for SWC's program. SWC Instructor Eric Dumarce will be their lead instructor and help facilitate their lessons with other language and culture mentors. Erin Griffin, the Director of Dakota Studies, will administer the program and provide supplementary professional development for the learners.

Wakan tanka Dakota iapi kinde unk'upi. The creator gave us this language, it is sacred, and its spirit must be respected. Anpetu iyohi Dakota iapi! Speak the Dakota language every day.

Opportunities for public involvement in the program will be forthcoming.

About Sisseton Wahpeton College Sisseton

Wahpeton College's mission is to provide higher education, research, vocational and technical education and continuing education to the members of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation and others within the historical lands of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate. As a 1994 land grant institution, SWC will preserve and extend Dakota culture, language, and history while contributing to economic development through the provision of human capital and other resources.

About the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community

The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community is a federally recognized, sovereign Indian tribe located southwest of Minneapolis/St. Paul. Following a Dakota tradition of generosity, the SMSC is one of the top philanthropists in Minnesota and is the largest contributor to Native American tribes and causes across the country. It is a strong community partner and a leader in protecting and restoring natural resources. The SMSC's government, Gaming Enterprise, and various other enterprises are collectively the largest employer in Scott County.

SWST to participate in release of rehabbed Eagle

Bramble Park Zoo, Watertown, SD, is scheduled to release back into the wild an Eagle that has been rehabilitated after being found ill with lead poisoning.

The release will be held at Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, rural Watertown, at 2:00 p.m. this Tuesday, August 15th.

Tribal Chairman Dave Flute, and spiritual leader Mikey Peters, will be present for a ceremony and to explain the sacredness of the Eagle, and why Native people cherish the bird.

Dakota Sioux General Manager Garret Renville will present a check to Bramble Park Zoo administration to assist in purchasing a machine to help treat, and save lives of, more birds.

There will be a drum group, song, and prayer for the release.

Week-long celebration of youth draws crowds

Submitted by Sierra Wolcott

SWO Education Program

Siceca Wiyukpeya, a first annual week-long celebration of our youth, starting Monday, July 31st and ending Saturday, August 5th , was well attended and enjoyed by youth and adults alike!

This week, a collaboration of the SWO Youth Department, Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi Project of the SWO Education Department, MSPI, and SWO Fitness Center, included nightly activities for the whole family and supper. Families participated in different sports and activities for various prizes and enjoyed time together as families and as a community. Events like this help to build resilience in our youth by support of the protective factors of culture, community belonging, and family connectedness. Through the SWO Youth Prevention Collaborative we hope to continue to provide events like this but also the day to day resources that youth and families need like crisis intervention, support groups, workshops, and mentoring. Please watch the Sota for upcoming dates.

The week started with Girls softball versus parents game on Monday. The girls who have been participating in the softball program all summer through the Youth Department were able to show off their skills to their parents. The parents were also able to teach their girls a few things.

Law Enforcement National Night Out at Memorial Park on Tuesday included a collaboration between SWO Law Enforcement, Sisseton Police Department, Roberts County Sherriff's Department, South Dakota Highway Patrol, and South Dakota Army National Guard. The Youth Department assisted, in addition ET Demo, SWO Natural Resources, and SWO Community Health Education all had booths with fun activities. The park was filled with families enjoying themselves. (See photo highlights in this Sota.)

On Wednesday, bean bag and 3-on-3 basketball tournaments were held for youth and families who braved the possibility of storms. The Youth Department and SWO Fitness Center employees ran these tournaments. There was plenty of tough competition and laughs.

Ominous weather almost canceled all of the events on Thursday but the archery and football kick at the Winfield Thompson, Sr. powwow grounds and Big Jim Memorial Softball Field went on as scheduled. Several families participated and earned gift cards for their efforts.

Friday evening there was a moccasin tournament as well as a handgames tournament at the powwow grounds. While there were only a few families who participated, those that did had a lot of laughs and fun learning to play these traditional games.

Starting Friday evening and through Sunday, there was a High School age Basketball tournament held. There were so many teams that they had to use three gyms: The TZTS gym, the Veterans Memorial Youth Center gym, and the SWC gym.

The week of activities culminated in a youth powwow on Saturday. 165 participants were counted at the evening session. Everyone that attended enjoyed a hand drum contest, singing and dancing from our youth and some adults, and some fun specials included men's fancy shawl, women's fancy feather, and youth/adult kahomani!

We look forward to honoring our youth again next year during this engaging fun filled week of culture and community!

Bringing together community and law enforcement –

Highlights of Sisseton-Wahpeton National Night Out

Photos by John Heminger

Sisseton-Wahpeton Tribal Law Enforcement joined with the South Dakota Highway Patrol, Roberts County Sheriff's Office, and Sisseton Police Department, to hold National Night Out on Tuesday, August 1st, 2017.

The event, open to the public, was held at the SWO Memorial Park at Sisseton.

There was something for everyone the family, with music, games, and sharing information about public safety and need for understanding and cooperation between the community and its law enforcement officers.

It was also a fund-raising event, with proceeds going to local organizations sharing in projects to improve safety in the community.

SWST Law Enforcement held a raffle, inviting people to pay for tickets to "taze" an officer! Volunteering for the role of a fictional character resisting arrest was Officer Bill Owen. He was a good sport in the tazing.

Tribal Chairman Dave Flute drew the winning ticket, which happened to be held by Stacy Azure.

She was then armed with a tazer.

But before firing, Stacy gave Bill a hug. Showing there would be no hard feelings later, the only hard feelings being in the stinging holes made by the pins of the tazer in Bill's back!

Tensions mounted, as the crowd assembled around the stage, plus many watching over the internet to live streaming, awaited the firing.

And then it came! With fellow officers on either side, Bill was struck and went down onto a mat, writhing awhile before having the darts pried from his back.

The Highway Patrol brought its impaired driving exhibit, giving community members a chance to experience what an impaired driver sees while trying to negotiate a vehicle down the road.

They also set up their highway rollover simulator.

The simulator shows graphically, dramatically, what happens when a person is ejected from a vehicle in a rollover accident when they are not wearing a seat belt. Fortunately, the simulator tosses out a crash dummy and not a real person!

Buckle up!

What is National Night Out?

National Night Out is an annual community-building campaign that promotes police-community partnerships and neighborhood camaraderie to make our neighborhoods safer, more caring places to live. National Night Out enhances the relationship between neighbors and law enforcement while bringing back a true sense of community. Furthermore, it provides a great opportunity to bring police and neighbors together under positive circumstances.

Millions of neighbors take part in National Night Out across thousands of communities from all fifty states, U.S. territories and military bases worldwide on the first Tuesday in August (Texas celebrates on the first Tuesday in October). Neighborhoods host block parties, festivals, parades, cookouts and various other community events with safety demonstrations, seminars, youth events, visits from emergency personnel, exhibits and much, much more.

Historic progress in Tribal Education Sovereignty

SWO K-12 Communications and Math Standards Approved by Tribal Council

Submitted by Sierra Wolcott

SWO Education Program

The Tribal Education Department, Tiospa Zina Tribal School, and Enemy Swim Day School have collaborated to create academic standards for communications and math. These standards are in draft and were approved by Tribal Council on Wednesday, August 2, 2017. They will be implemented this school year (2017-18) at Tiospa Zina Tribal School and Enemy Swim Day School. After one year of usage the Tribal Education Department will update, in collaboration with educators from ESDS and TZTS, in June 2018 and provide the final Tribal Education Standards to Tribal Council in August 2018 for adoption. The Tribal Education Department and Tribal Council are not lowering standards but revising them. We all want to ensure that SWO students are well prepared for life!

The Draft Sisitunwan-Wahpetunwan K-12 Standards are closely aligned to the Common Core and South Dakota Reading and Math Standards. The Performance Based Learner Outcomes (PBLO) and the Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings & Standards have been added to make them more appropriate for our SWO children.

This project is required per the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Education Code - Chapter 66. The Education Code was approved on May 3rd, 2013 and amended November 5th, 2014 by the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Council. Under Title 6 - Educational Standards, "Assist with the development of education standards with educational institutions..." The Sovereignty in Education (SIE) Project of the SWO Education Department is funded through the BIE for the purpose of supporting the development of a school-reform plan. A goal of the SIE is to improve educational outcomes for students in BIE funded schools within the Lake Traverse Reservation.

These standards are a landmark move towards education sovereignty for the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, and Indian Country as a whole. Whenever a Tribal community creates their own standards, laws, or policies, sovereignty is utilized and recognized. Students at Enemy Swim Day School and Tiospa Zina Tribal School will now be submersed in their language and their culture daily and within communications and math curriculum.

These standards are just the first step, the overall goal being Dakota Language and Culture within all aspects and all subjects taught at the Tribal Schools. Our youth will grow up knowing their language and having pride in being Dakota. Research proves that Native children that know their language and have an understanding of their culture are better equipped to deal with the issues that our youth face with drugs, alcohol, abuse, and neglect. These standards are a small piece of the larger plan of supporting our community to become one in which our youth can grow into resilient and empowered young adults.

The Tribal Education Department is hosting a parent meeting on Tuesday, August 15th from 5-6:30 p.m. to introduce the Draft Sisitunwan-Wahpetunwan K-12 Communications and Math Standards. This meeting provides parents/guardians an opportunity to not only learn more about what your child(ern) are expected to know and learn at each grade level but also to provide feedback on these draft standards. If you have any questions on the meeting or the standards, please contact Bonnie Haines at 605-698-8412.

Parent meeting on draft K-12 communications, math standards

The Tribal Education Department is hosting a parent meeting this Tuesday, August 15th from 5-6:30 p.m. to introduce the Draft SWO K-12 Communications and Math Standards. The meeting will be held in the training room at Tribal administration building.

These draft standards were approved by Tribal Council on Wednesday, August 2, 2017 and will be implemented this school year (2017-18) at Tiospa Zina Tribal School and Enemy Swim Day School.

The Draft SWO K-12 Standards are closely aligned to the Common Core and South Dakota Reading and Math Standards. The Performance Based Learner Outcomes (PBLO) and the Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings & Standards have been added to make them more appropriate for our SWO children.

This meeting provides parents/guardians an opportunity to not only learn more about what your child(ern) are expected to know and learn at each grade level but also to provide feedback on these draft standards.

If you have any questions please contact Bonnie Haines at 605-698-8412.

"Standing Up for the Children Conference"

News & Pictures by Crystal Owen

SWST Program Managers Lorraine Rousseau, Child Protection Program, and Charnelle Gill, Early Childhood Intervention Program, put their minds together and came up with the idea of a conference designed specifically for the protection of the children.

After attending several meetings where the discussion centered around children at risk they decided on a conference that would begin the conversation on educating and motivating parents, grandparents, guardians, foster parents and other caregivers to build good healthy family relationships. To build solid foundations for the children, a place to feel safe, protected and loved.

The goal is to begin networking and collaborating with community partners and Tribal leadership in order to see an action plan formulated that will address the needs of the child and the family.

Today among our Oyate we are seeing many children who are hurting, emotionally, mentally, physically and spiritually.

There are babies being born addicted to drugs and alcohol and not many are reporting it when they see it or know it.

There are many reports from those who work directly with children who cry when they say "The children are hurting."

There are parents who are feeling overwhelmed and are wondering how they can help their child through these times. They wonder what happened or they might have an idea of what happened but don't know how to help the child and family to get through it.

We have grandparents raising their grandchildren because the parents have given up on themselves.

We have children in an overwhelmed foster care system where there are not enough foster parents.

We have parents fighting each other over children, we have complaints of bullies, and we have complaints of children running around late at night getting into trouble.

We know there is a breakdown in families because many parents struggle with how to be a parent as a result of their own unresolved childhood trauma.

We have a long journey ahead of us but we must get to back being forgiving of our own past parenting mistakes, we must make amends with our own children, we must begin to encourage each other and help one another.

During the conference there were two full days of learning and networking with over 100 participants in attendance.

On Wednesday the topics discussed in breakout sessions were:

*Understanding Risk-Young Children & Behavior and also Strategies & Support for Young Children by Carla Miller of the S.D. Parent Connection

*Gypsy Wanna from SWO Health Education gave a presentation on what is Trauma?

*Dr. Gail Mason presented on Generational Healing.

*Teresa White and Ron Hill from Dakotah Pride Treatment Center spoke about addiction in the family.

On Thursday:

*Keynote speaker was Dr. Tami DeCoteau, licensed Clinical Psychologist, who explained trauma and how it impacts the brain and body. She discussed the link between historical trauma and mental health and how identify ways that cultural practices can heal trauma.

*Lorraine Rousseau gave a presentation on Mandated Reporting and why it is important.

*Paula Bossert from IHS Behavioral Health presented on Trauma Informed Care.

*Myrna Thompson held a session on Drug Endangered Children.

*Dionne Crawford Lake and Shobi Zetina presented on Methamphetamine, the process for referral and other questions.

At the end of the day a visitor came on the stage and reminded us about one of the many things that we are fighting to protect our children from. Meth is death was his message.

Here are just a few of the comments received from participants:

*****

The trainings were amazing! I think we need more training for our people. The negativity on the Reservation or the bullying each other is very extreme as adults. Until we help ourselves to show our children or demonstrate our Dakota values to our children a successful future for our children is going to be sad. Work on self! Let's make a difference for our children!

*****

This workshop has been an eye opener. Loved how it just pulled things out of myself to put my foot down and stand for my family. We live and learn and never give up on anyone. It also pulled out of me how I can make a difference. I said words to the Grandfathers now I need to do what I need to do.

*****

I thought this training conference was very helpful and understanding. I will use what I learned in the past two days in the future…starting now!

*****

Great display from Tribal Police on what these drugs look like.

*****

Dr. Tami DeCoteau…AWESOME!

*****

Thank you to all the presenters! I need to become more involved. People need to realize everyday how sacred the children are.

*****

Nina Wopida to all of the presenters at the conference you all gave 100%. You were outstanding! You educated over 100 people, you made a difference in so many lives. The information and stories you shared are life changing for many. We also want to say Nina Wopida to the staff at Dakota Magic Hotel and Convention Center. Nina Wopida to all the staff at CPP and ECIP for all of your help! Nina Wopida to the programs and individuals that set up educational booths! Nina Wopida to each and every one of you who walked through the doors to attend this very important conference! There is talk of plans to make this conference a yearly event so all of the evaluation comments will be taken into careful consideration as the team continues to work and plan and collaborate all of our efforts! We must keep this movement alive!

*****

It was an honor to help organize and facilitate the Standing Up for the Children Conference 2017! (Crystal)

First Look: SWO Chapter 24A Controlled Substances Act

The Controlled Substances Act is what has been referred to as the "Meth Code."

It is the culmination of efforts by Tribal Council and the Legal Department to provide an enforcement tool. It is designed to put a halt to expanding addiction to Meth and other drugs and related crime on the Lake Traverse Reservation.

This code was approved by Tribal Council resolution on August 2nd, 2017.

The entire code is available online at the SWO Legal Department's website:

http://www.swo-nsn.gov/departments/justice-department/legal-department/

While the details are spelled out below, here are excerpts which point out the reasoning behind the Tribe's adopting a law which allows for banishment:

*The Tribe's purpose in passing this law is "to provide for the safety and well-being of the tribal community by providing parameters for the temporary exclusion of persons who are considered a danger to the community from lands under (tribal jurisdiction) … due to that person's convictions involving methamphetamine and Schedule I drugs."

*The Tribe finds this law "necessary to protect the social, economic, and political welfare of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate … as well as to protect the lands and assets ... Tribal Council further finds that drug use and trafficking, as well as other serious criminal offenses, are negatively impacting our communities and require a stern response."

*****

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

OF THE LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

CHAPTER 24A

CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES ACT

24A-01-01 TITLE.

This Chapter shall be known as the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Controlled Substances Act.

24A-01-02 PURPOSE AND INTENT.

This Act shall be construed to promote the following:

1. Our most important resource is our people and the presence of methamphetamine use and trafficking in our communities poses an imminent and serious threat to the health, safety, and welfare of our people and the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate as a whole.

2. Methamphetamine use can lead to short and long term psychological, medical, and social damage to our people and communities, including increases in violent crime, anti-social behavior, and child neglect and abuse. The damaging effects of methamphetamine use on the brain are long-lasting and certain effects are irreversible. Methamphetamine use may also lead to paranoia and delusions, extreme weight loss, damage to the heart and brain, increased risk of stroke, dental problems, pregnancy complications, and damage to unborn children.

3. Methamphetamine use and trafficking are not in keeping with traditional Dakota values. We recognize that it is our solemn duty to combat the problems created by methamphetamine on all fronts.

4. The goal of this Act is to create specific provisions related to the manufacturing, distribution, conspiracy, aiding and abetting, possession, and ingestion of methamphetamine and other Schedule I drugs that can be used in our criminal justice system to impose serious consequences on offenders. These consequences are fashioned in such a way as to allow offenders the opportunity to make positive changes in their behavior and understand "WoDakota" (an understanding of what it is to be Dakota or way of life).

5. The purpose of this Act is to recognize and treat manufacturing, distribution, conspiracy, aiding and abetting, possession, and ingestion of methamphetamine and other Schedule I drugs as serious crimes against our society.

24A-01-03 SCOPE.

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate possesses the authority to regulate methamphetamine and Schedule I drugs based offenses on lands within its jurisdiction and to Tribal members within the Lake Traverse Reservation:

1. By treaty, the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate has the right to adopt laws, including laws "for the security of life and property" of its members.

2. The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate has the inherent power to exclude non-members. The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate has the inherent power to condition non-members entry, and condition non-members continued presence on lands within its jurisdiction, which includes being fined for manufacturing, distributing, conspiracy, aiding and abetting, ingesting and possessing methamphetamine or Schedule I drugs. The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate has the inherent power to detain and turn over to federal or state law enforcement those non-members violating criminal law.

3. The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate has the inherent authority to protect its political integrity and provide for the welfare of its members and others who choose to live within its territory.

4. The problems created by methamphetamine and other Schedule I drugs within the boundaries of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate are seriously impacting the ability of the tribe to provide for the health and wellbeing of its tribal members and threatens the political integrity of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate.

5. The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate shall exercise criminal jurisdiction related to methamphetamine and Schedule I drug offenses pursuant to Chapter 20 of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Code of Law.

24A-01-04 SPECIFIC APPLICABILITY.

This Act shall apply to methamphetamine and Schedule I drug offenses and shall take precedence over any general laws of applicability.

24A-01-05 EFFECTIVE DATE.

This Act shall be in full force and effect on the date of formal approval and adoption by the Tribal Council. A drug conviction occurring prior to the effective date shall not be included as a prior offense.

24A-01-06 SOVEREIGN IMMUNITY NOT WAIVED.

By the adoption of this Act the Tribe does not waive its sovereign immunity or consent to suit in any court, whether the court is federal, tribal, or state, and the adoption of this Ordinance shall not be construed to be a waiver of the sovereign immunity of the Tribe nor a consent to suit against the Tribe in any court.

24A-01-07 SEVERABILITY.

If any clause, sentence, paragraph, section or part of this Act shall be adjudicated by the Tribal or Appellate Court to be invalid or unconstitutional, such judgment shall not affect, impair, or invalidate the remainder, but shall be confined in its operation to the clause, sentence, paragraph, section, or part, directly involved in the controversy in which the judgment was rendered.

24A-01-08 AMENDMENT.

This Act may be amended only upon an affirmative vote of a majority of the Tribal Council of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate.

24A-01-09 EFFECT OF HEADINGS.

Headings shall not be deemed to govern, limit, modify, or in any manner affect the scope, meaning, or intent of the provisions of any portion of this Act.

TITLE II - DEFINITIONS

24A-02-01 DEFINITIONS.

The following definitions shall apply to this Act:

1. "Aiding and Abetting" means when a person who, with the intent to promote or facilitate the commission of a crime, aids, abets, or advises another person in planning or committing the crime.

2. "Child" means any person under the age of 18.

3. "Community Service" means court ordered labor under the supervision of law enforcement that must produce a tangible benefit to the Tribe and its members.

4. "Conspiracy" means agreeing with one or more persons to engage in or cause to be performed such criminal conduct and any one of them commits an overt act in pursuance of such conduct.

5. "Distribution" means to sell, give away, deliver, exchange, distribute, or dispose of to another.

6. "Elder or Elderly" means any person 55 years of age or older.

7. "Enhanced Punishment" means the punishment imposed for a particular offense shall be enhanced to the punishment imposed in the next level of offense if there are Aggravating Factors.

8. "Exclusion, Banishment and Removal" shall not be distinguished in this Ordinance and each shall mean the temporary expulsion of a person from the Tribe's jurisdiction pursuant to the requirements of this Act.

9. "First Offense" means the first time a person is convicted of a crime or comparable crime in any federal, state, or tribal jurisdiction.

10. "Indian" means any person who is a member of a federally recognized Indian tribe, band, group, pueblo, or community.

11. "Ingestion" means to willfully and knowingly ingest, inhale, or otherwise take into the body any substance for the purpose of becoming intoxicated.

12. "Jurisdiction" or "Jurisdiction of the Tribe" means the Tribe's criminal, regulatory, and adjudicatory jurisdiction exercised on all lands located within the original boundaries of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation as defined in the Treaty of February 19, 1867, regardless of whether such land is held in trust, fee, or subject to restrictions; provided that as to non-members the jurisdiction of the Tribe extends to such lands within the Reservation that are held in trust, have been allotted, or are subject to restrictions.

13. "Member" means an enrolled member of the Tribe as required by the Constitution of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation.

14. "Methamphetamine and Schedule I related offense" means a criminal offense that relates to methamphetamine and Schedule I drug manufacturing, distribution, possession, ingestion, or aiding and abetting the manufacturing or distribution of methamphetamine. The provisions of this Act shall govern methamphetamine and Schedule I related offenses and supplant the SWO Penal Code.

15. "Manufacture" means and includes the production, cultivation, packing, repacking, tableting, encapsulating, labeling, relabeling, filling, or otherwise processing, of drugs.

16. "Non-Indian" means a person who is not an enrolled member of a federally recognized Indian tribe, band, group, pueblo, or community.

17. "Non-member" means a person who is not an enrolled member of the Tribe.

18. "Offense" means, for purposes of this Act, a conviction of a crime involving methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug by a Federal, State, or Tribal Court, including Tribal Courts of any federally-recognized Indian tribe. For purposes of a second or third offense the prior conviction must have occurred after the effective date of this Ordinance.

19. "Possession" means to have methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug in one's physical control, including joint control with others, and knowledge or intention that the drug was in their custody or control.

20. "Prior Conviction" means that an individual was found guilty by a jury or court of a crime in any federal, state, or tribal jurisdiction or the individual pled guilty to a crime and such plea was accepted and recorded by a court in any federal, state, or tribal jurisdiction. For purposes of a second or third offense the prior conviction must have occurred after the effective date of this Act.

21. "Schedule I drug" means the list of Schedule I drugs maintained by the U.S. Attorney General, through the Drug Enforcement Agency, pursuant to the Controlled Substances Act, 21 U.S.C. § 801 et seq., which is updated from time to time in the Federal Register. A Schedule I drug does not include peyote used by a member of the Native American Church and used for religious or ceremonial purposes, but is still unlawful as provided by § 24-09-08. A Schedule I drug does not include marijuana, which is an illegal drug but is not treated as a Schedule I drug for purposes of this Act.

22. "Second Offense" or "Subsequent Offense" means the second time a person is convicted of a crime involving methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug by a Federal, State, or Tribal jurisdiction provided that the prior conviction occurred after the effective date of this Act.

23. "Third Offense" means the third time, or more than third time, a person is convicted of a crime involving methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug by a Federal, State, or Tribal jurisdiction provided that the prior convictions occurred after the effective date of this Act.

24. "Tribal Court" means the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Court of the Lake Traverse Reservation.

25. "Tribe" refers to the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation and includes its activities, programs, agencies, departments, divisions, instrumentalities, economic development enterprises, and their respective officials.

26. "Vulnerable adult" means any person 18 years of age or older who possesses a physical or mental infirmity or other physical, mental, or emotional dysfunction that impairs the individual's ability to care for themselves.

TITLE III - CRIMINAL PENALTIES AND PROCEDURES 24A-03-01 METHAMPHETAMINE AND SCHEDULE I RELATED OFFENSES.

Methamphetamine and Schedule I drug related offenses may already be addressed under the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Penal Code. The purpose of this Act is to supplant the drug offenses listed in the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Penal Code for criminal charges specifically related to methamphetamine and Schedule I drugs. The specific provisions related to methamphetamine and Schedule I drug possession, distribution, manufacturing, ingestion, conspiracy, or aiding and abetting included in this Act shall supersede the general provisions included in the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Penal Code. If this Act does not specifically address a topic, the applicable provisions of Tribal law shall apply. The offenses addressed in this Chapter shall be prosecuted according to the applicable provisions of Tribal law.

24A-03-02 MANUFACTURING.

Any person that manufactures methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug, in any amount, with or without intent to distribute, shall be guilty of Manufacturing of Methamphetamine or Schedule I Drug. A violation of this section is a Felony and shall be punishable according to the following provisions:

 1. First Offense - A person convicted under this section for a first offense shall be

sentenced to:

(a) imprisonment for not less than one (1) year and not more than three (3) years;

(b) supervised probation for one (1) year or until all the terms of sentencing are complete, whichever is longer. Probation shall include testing the convict's residence, vehicle, or other property on a monthly basis in accordance with § 24A-06-02;

(c) 120 hours of community service;

(d) restitution; and

(e) payment of a fine of not less than $5,000.

 2. Second Offense - A person convicted under this section for a second offense shall

be sentenced to:

 (a) imprisonment for not less than two (2) years and not more than three (3) years;

(b) supervised probation for two (2) years or until all the terms of sentencing are complete, whichever is longer. Probation shall include testing the convict's residence, vehicle, or other property on a monthly basis in accordance with § 24A-06-02;

(c) 240 hours of community service;

(d) restitution; and

(e) payment of a fine of not less than $10,000;

 3. Third Offense - A person convicted under this section for a third offense or more

shall be sentenced to:

(a) imprisonment for not less than three (3) years;

(b) 320 hours of community service;

(c) restitution; and

(d) payment of a fine of not less than $15,000;

(e) temporary exclusion by the Tribal Council for five (5) years after imprisonment, which may only be lifted after the five (5) year term has expired and the individual completes all sentencing requirements or exclusion requirements.

 4. Aggravating Factors - An individual may be sentenced to enhanced punishment

listed in subpart 3 of this section for an offense if:

(a) the offense was committed in the presence of child, elder, or vulnerable adult;

(b) the offense was committed in a household in which child, elder, or vulnerable adult normally reside;

(c) the individual utilized a minor to distribute drugs;

(d) the individual used or carried a firearm during and in relation to the offense, possessed a firearm in furtherance of the offense, or had a firearm in their possession at the time of arrest; or

(e) the individual had over $500.00 in their possession at the time of arrest.

24A-03-03 DISTRIBUTION.

Any person that distributes methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug or possesses methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug with intent to distribute in any amount shall be guilty of Distribution of Methamphetamine or Schedule I drug. A violation of this section is a Felony and shall be punishable according to the following provisions:

1. First Offense - A person convicted under this section for a first offense shall be sentenced to:

(a) imprisonment for not less than one (1) year and not more than three (3) years;

(b) supervised probation for one (1) year or until all the terms of sentencing are complete, whichever is longer. Probation shall include testing the convict's residence, vehicle, or other property on a monthly basis in accordance with § 24A-06-02;

(c) 120 hours of community service;

(d) restitution; and

(e) payment of a fine of not less than $5,000.

2. Second Offense - A person convicted under this section for a second offense shall be sentenced to:

(a) imprisonment for not less than two (2) years and not more than three (3) years;

(b) supervised probation for two (2) years or until all the terms of sentencing are complete, whichever is longer. Probation shall include testing the convict's residence, vehicle, or other property on a monthly basis in accordance with § 24A-06-02;

(c) 240 hours of community service;

(d) restitution; and

(e) payment of a fine of not less than $10,000;

3. Third Offense - A person convicted under this section for a third offense shall be sentenced to:

(a) imprisonment for not less than three (3) years;

(b) 320 hours of community service;

(c) restitution;

(d) payment of a fine of not less than $15,000; and

(e) temporary exclusion by the Tribal Council for five (5) years after imprisonment, which may only be lifted after the five (5) years has expired and the individual completes all sentencing requirements or exclusion requirements.

4. Aggravating Factors - An individual may be sentenced to enhanced punishment listed in subpart 3 of this section for an offense if:

(a) the offense was committed in the presence of a child, elder, or vulnerable adult;

(b) the offense was committed in a household in which a child, elder, or vulnerable adult normally resides;

(c) the individual utilized a minor to distribute drugs;

(d) the individual used or carried a firearm during and in relation to the offense, possessed a firearm in furtherance of the offense, or had a firearm in their possession at the time of arrest; or

(e) the individual had over $500.00 in their possession at the time of arrest.

24A-03-04 CONSPIRACY.

Any person that intends for conduct constituting manufacturing or distribution of methamphetamine or a Schedule 1 drug to be performed and agrees with one or more persons to engage in or cause to be performed such conduct and any one of them commits an overt act in pursuance of such conduct shall be guilty of Conspiracy to Manufacture or Distribute Methamphetamine or a Schedule 1 drug. A violation of this section is a Felony and shall be punishable according to the following provisions:

 1. First Offense - A person convicted under this section for a first offense shall be

sentenced to:

(a) imprisonment for not less than six (6) months and not more than three (3) years;

(b) supervised probation for six (6) months or until all the terms of sentencing are complete, whichever is longer. Probation may include testing the convict's residence, vehicle, or other property on a monthly basis in accordance with § 24A-06-02;

(c) 60 hours of community service;

(d) restitution; and

(e) payment of a fine of not less than $1,000 and not more than $5,000.

 2. Second Offense - A person convicted under this section for a second offense shall

be sentenced to:

(a) imprisonment for not less than one (1) year and not more than three (3) years;

(b) supervised probation for one (1) year or until all the terms of sentencing are complete, whichever is longer. Probation may include testing the convict's residence, vehicle, or other property on a monthly basis in accordance with § 24A-06-02;

(c) 120 hours of community service;

(d) restitution; and

(e) payment of a fine of not less than $5,000;

3. Third Offense - A person convicted under this section for a third offense shall be

sentenced to:

(a) imprisonment for not less than two (2) years and not more than three (3) years;

(b) 240 hours of community service;

(c) restitution;

(d) payment of a fine of not less than $10,000; and

(e) temporary exclusion by the Tribal Council for three (3) years after imprisonment, which may only be lifted after the three (3) years has expired and the individual completes all sentencing requirements or exclusion requirements.

24A-03-05 AIDING AND ABETTING.

Any person who promotes or facilitates the commission of an offense related to the manufacturing or distribution of methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug shall be deemed guilty of Aiding and Abetting the Distribution or Manufacture of Methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug. A violation of this Section shall be a Felony punishable to the same degree as Conspiracy to Manufacture or Distribute Methamphetamine or a Schedule 1 drug.

24A-03-06 POSSESSION.

Any person who possesses methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug shall be guilty of Possession of Methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug. A violation of this section is a Felony and shall be punishable according to the following provisions:

 1. First Offense - A person convicted under this section for a first offense shall be

sentenced to:

(a) imprisonment for not less than six (6) months and not more than three (3) years;

(b) drug evaluation and mandatory follow-up in accordance with the recommendations of the evaluator;

(c) supervised probation for six (6) months or until all the terms of sentencing are complete, whichever is longer. Probation may include testing the convict's residence, vehicle, or other property on a monthly basis in accordance with § 24A-06-02;

(d) 60 hours of Community service;

(e) payment of a fine of not less than $1,000 and not more than $5,000.

 2. Second Offense - A person convicted under this section for a second offense shall

be sentenced to:

(a) imprisonment for not less than nine (9) months and not more than three (3) years;

(b) drug evaluation and mandatory follow-up in accordance with the recommendations of the evaluator;

(c) supervised probation for nine (9) months or until all the terms of sentencing are complete, whichever is longer. Probation may include testing the convict's residence, vehicle, or other property on a monthly basis in accordance with § 24A-06-02;

(d) 90 hours of Community service; and

(e) payment of a fine of not less than $5,000.

3. Third Offense - A person convicted under this section for a third offense shall be sentenced to:

(a) imprisonment for not less than one (1) year and not more than three (3) years;

(b) 120 hours of community service;

(c) payment of a fine of not less than $10,000;

(d) temporary exclusion by the Tribal Council for two (2) years after imprisonment, which may only be lifted after the two (2) year term has expired and the individual completes all sentencing requirements or exclusion requirements.

4. Aggravating Factors - An individual may be sentenced to enhanced punishment listed in subpart 3 of this Section for an Offense if the person possessed more than 2 grams of methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug.

5. Suspended Imposition - The Tribal Court may suspend the imposition of any sentence for a first offense for possession upon condition that the individual complies with such reasonable terms as the Court deems necessary. When considering suspending imposition of a sentence, the Tribal Court shall consider the prior record of the individual, his or her background, character, financial condition, family and work obligations, and circumstances of the offense and attempts at restitution. If the individual violates the terms of the suspended imposition, the Tribal Court may order any sentence within the range of punishments included in this section. If the individual successfully completes the terms of the suspended imposition, the charges will be dismissed and nothing will go on the individual's criminal record.

6. Suspended Sentence - The Tribal Court may suspend any sentence for a second offense for possession upon condition that the individual complies with such reasonable terms and conditions as the Court deems necessary. When considering suspending any sentence, the Tribal Court shall consider the prior record of the individual, his or her background, character, financial condition, family and work obligations, and circumstances of the offense and attempts at restitution.

24A-03-07 INGESTION.

Any person that ingests methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug shall be guilty of Ingestion of Methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug. A violation of this section is a Felony and shall be punished according to the following provisions:

 1. First Offense - A person convicted under this section for a first offense shall be

sentenced to:

(a) imprisonment for not less than six (6) months and not more than three (3) years;

(b) drug evaluation and mandatory follow-up in accordance with the recommendations of the evaluator;

(c) supervised probation for three (3) months or until all the terms of sentencing are complete, whichever is longer. Probation may include testing the convict's residence, vehicle, or other property on a monthly basis in accordance with § 24A-06-02;

(d) 60 hours of Community service; and

(e) payment of a fine of not less than $1,000 and not more than $5,000.

 2. Second Offense - A person convicted under this section for a second offense shall

be sentenced to:

(a) imprisonment for not less than nine (9) months and not more than three (3) years;

(b) drug evaluation and mandatory follow-up in accordance with the recommendations of the evaluator;

(c) supervised probation for six (6) months or until all the terms of sentencing are complete, whichever is longer. Probation may include testing the convict's residence, vehicle, or other property on a monthly basis in accordance with § 24A-06-02;

(d) 90 hours of Community service; and

(e) payment of a fine of not less than $5,000.

 3. Third Offense - A person convicted under this section for a third offense shall be

sentenced to:

(a) imprisonment for not less than one (1) year and not more than three (3) years;

(b) 120 hours of community service;

(c) payment of a fine of not less than $10,000; and

(d) temporary exclusion by the Tribal Council for one (1) year after imprisonment, which may only be lifted after the one (1) year term has expired and the individual completes all sentencing requirements or exclusion requirements.

4. Suspended Imposition - The Tribal Court may suspend the imposition of any sentence for a first offense for ingestion upon condition that the individual complies with such reasonable terms as the Court deems necessary. When considering suspending imposition of a sentence, the Tribal Court shall consider the prior record of the individual, his or her background, character, financial condition, family and work obligations, and circumstances of the offense and attempts at restitution. If the individual violates the terms of the suspended imposition, the Tribal Court may order any sentence within the range of punishments included in this section. If the individual successfully completes the terms of the suspended imposition, the charges will be dismissed and nothing will go on the individual's criminal record.

5. Suspended Sentence - The Tribal Court may suspend any sentence for a second offense for ingestion upon condition that the individual complies with such reasonable terms and conditions as the Court deems necessary. When considering suspending any sentence, the Tribal Court shall consider the prior record of the individual, his or her background, character, financial condition, family and work obligations, and circumstances of the offense and attempts at restitution.

24A-03-08 PROSECUTORIAL DISCRETION AND REPORTS TO TRIBAL COUNCIL

If any person is charged with possessing more than 2 grams of methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug, then the Tribal prosecutor must consider adding a charge of distribution, in addition to possession and/or ingestion. Should the Tribal prosecutor determine not to add to the charge of possession and/or ingestion, then the Tribal prosecutor must explain the reasons in a written report to the Tribal Court with a copy to the Tribal Council.

The Tribal Prosecutor shall prepare an annual written report to the Tribal Council summarizing the charges, convictions, and acquittals of every charge pertaining to methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug. The annual report is due in January of every year.

24A-03-09 CRIMES SUBJECT TO FEDERAL PROSECUTION.

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate or tribal law enforcement officers shall immediately notify the appropriate federal law enforcement official when it becomes aware of a crime committed by an Indian or non-Indian on tribal land that may be subject to criminal prosecution by the federal government. Tribal law enforcement officers and authorized personnel shall assist in investigating, prosecuting, and detaining and transporting individuals that they believe may be committing a crime in Indian Country that may be subject to criminal prosecution by the federal government.

24A-03-10 COMMUNITY SERVICE.

The Tribal Council shall designate tribal programs and departments for which community service hours may be satisfied for convictions under this Ordinance. The Tribal Council may order community service as a provision of revocation of an exclusion order.

24A-03-11 RESTITUTION.

Regardless of the ability to pay, the Tribal Court must order a person convicted under the Act to pay restitution to the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate for the cleanup or reimbursement for cleanup of any property within the Tribe's jurisdiction that has been contaminated by methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug. Restitution shall include clean-up of property, restoring property to its original condition, and any other costs necessary to make any victim whole, including, but not limited to, reasonable expenses pertaining to lodging and food for any and all displaced victims or displaced dependents caused by the contamination to the property. Any restitution that is left over after cleanup shall be used for law enforcement activities by the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate.

Restitution under this section is mandatory, shall be treated as a non-dischargeable debt until completely paid off regardless of any bankruptcy proceedings in any forum. Restitution under this section shall be treated by the Tribal Court as the first priority in debt collection.

24A-03-12 FORFEITURE OF MONEY OR PERSONAL PROPERTY.

A law enforcement officer must seize any personal property that was used in the commission of an offense related to methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug as described in this Act, including without limitation, all money and property of any kind, which is used, intended for use, or assisted in the manufacturing, distribution, transportation, or possession of methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug. Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate law enforcement shall retain possession of all money or property. If the prosecution results in a conviction, the Tribal Court shall have no authority or discretion, except as provided for herein, to return the money or property to the convict or the convict's family and the Tribal Court must direct and order the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate law enforcement to retain the money and sell the personal property seized at a public auction. The money seized and all proceeds from the auction shall be deposited in the Tribe's treasury and shall be used for law enforcement activities.

Should any person make a claim to personal property seized by law enforcement, such person must produce legal title to the property in question and must produce witness testimony to demonstrate, beyond a reasonable doubt, that the personal property is owned by such person and the person was not involved in the crime. No person may claim money seized from any offense related to methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug.

TITLE IV - TEMPORARY EXCLUSION 24A-04-01

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE, FINDINGS, AND AUTHORITY

1. Purpose. The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate enacts this chapter to provide for the safety and well-being of the tribal community by providing parameters for the temporary exclusion of persons who are considered a danger to the community from lands under the jurisdiction of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate due to that person's convictions involving methamphetamine and Schedule I drugs. An order for temporary exclusion shall generally bar the individual from accessing, using, or being located on lands within the jurisdiction of the Tribe and receiving services or benefits from the Tribe.

2. Findings. The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Council finds that this chapter is necessary to protect the social, economic, and political welfare of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate and its tribal members, as well as to protect the lands and assets of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate. The Tribal Council further finds that drug use and trafficking, as well as other serious criminal offenses, are negatively impacting our communities and require a stern response. It shall be understood by Tribal members and their elected government that temporary exclusion from the Tribe's jurisdiction shall be utilized only after all reasonable efforts and other means of resolution have been tried but the conduct giving rise to such efforts has remained unabated and continues to threaten the peace, health, safety and welfare of the Tribe.

3. Jurisdiction. The exercise of jurisdiction pursuant to this Chapter shall conform with Chapter 20 of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Code of Law. Except as otherwise noted in this Ordinance, the Tribal Council shall have exclusive jurisdiction to order temporary exclusion. The decision of the Tribal Council shall be final.

24A-04-02 GROUNDS FOR TEMPORARY EXCLUSION

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate may temporarily exclude members and non-members from the Territory of the Tribe for any of the following reasons:

1. Conviction of a methamphetamine or Schedule I drug related offense in Tribal Court for which temporary exclusion has been authorized pursuant to this Act;

2. Conviction of a methamphetamine or Schedule I drug related offense in any other federal, state, or tribal jurisdiction for which exclusion would have been authorized pursuant to this Act had the conviction occurred in Tribal Court;

3. The successful civil prosecution of a non-Indian that violates the Code of Conduct outlined in Chapter V of this Act; or

4. Convictions for other criminal offenses for which temporary exclusion has been authorized pursuant to the Sisseton-Wahpeton Penal Code or other tribal laws.

24A-04-03 NOTICE OF GROUNDS FOR TEMPORARY EXCLUSION.

Written notice shall be provided to the Tribal Council that grounds exist for temporary exclusion by:

1. The Tribal Prosecutor following the successful prosecution of an individual for any of

the grounds listed in part 24A-04-02. An individual convicted of any of the grounds listed in part 24A-04-02 shall be deemed to have received actual notice that they are subject to temporary exclusion pursuant to this Title.

2. Any Tribal employee that is aware of an individual with a conviction of a methamphetamine or Schedule I drug related offense in any other federal, state, or tribal jurisdiction for which exclusion would have been authorized pursuant to this Act had the conviction occurred in Tribal Court shall report such conviction to the Tribal Council. An individual convicted of any of the grounds listed in part 24A-0402 shall be deemed to have received actual notice that they are subject to temporary exclusion pursuant to this Title.

24A-04-04 TRIBAL COUNCIL DETERMINATION ON TEMPORARY EXCLUSION.

The Tribal Council shall issue a temporary exclusion order upon receiving satisfactory evidence that a criminal conviction or civil prosecution occurred for which exclusion applies unless it adopts a resolution that includes explicit findings that the individual's continued presence on lands within the Tribe's jurisdiction will not endanger the health, safety, and welfare of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate or its members.

24A-04-05 TEMPORARY EXCLUSION ORDER.

1. A temporary exclusion order shall be written and shall identify the person who is subject of the order, the grounds for exclusion, the date the order was issued, the length of the temporary exclusion, and any special conditions that must be satisfied before the temporary exclusion order will be eligible for revocation. The temporary exclusion order may premise revocation upon satisfaction of all the conditions of the criminal conviction and any other conditions deemed appropriate by the Tribal Council.

 2. The Tribal Council shall have the temporary exclusion order served on the excluded person and send copies to the Police Department, the members filing the petition, and any tribal departments directly impacted, if known. Temporary exclusion orders shall be effective upon issuance.

3. A copy of the temporary exclusion order, as well as other records related to the exclusion proceedings shall be maintained by the Tribal Council Secretary or designee. Such records shall be maintained for at least the duration of the temporary exclusion plus three (3) years.

24A-04-06 IMPLEMENTATION OF TEMPORARY EXCLUSION ORDER.

1. Time to Vacate Tribal Land. While temporary exclusion orders are effective upon issuance, persons normally shall be provided reasonable time to voluntarily vacate tribal land in compliance with the temporary exclusion order. However, if warranted by circumstances, a person may be immediately removed from the Tribe's jurisdiction by law enforcement.

2. Personal Property. If a person requires time to remove or dispose of personal property from tribal land following the issuance of a temporary exclusion order, then that person must make arrangements with law enforcement to access the Tribe's jurisdiction for such purpose.

24A-04-07 EXCEPTIONS TO A TEMPORARY EXCLUSION ORDER.

Persons subject to a temporary exclusion order may enter the Tribe's jurisdiction for the following purposes on the condition that such entry is in strict compliance with Tribal law:

1. Funerals. Persons subject to a temporary exclusion order may enter tribal for purposes of a family member's funeral on the day of the funeral and during funeral hours. The person must notify the Tribe's Police Department at least four (4) hours prior to entering the Tribe's jurisdiction for the funeral. The person is only permitted access to go directly to the funeral and must exit immediately after the funeral. A person may be denied entry for a funeral if there is a substantial threat of harm or injury to the community or a person.

2. Voting. Persons subject to a temporary exclusion order may enter tribal land for purposes of a voting in a Tribal election. The person must notify the Tribe's Police Department at least four (4) hours prior to entering tribal land for the voting. The person is only permitted access to go directly to the voting place and must exit immediately after voting.

3. Employment. Unless specifically authorized by special condition of the temporary exclusion order, persons subject to an exclusion order are not authorized to access tribal land for the purpose of employment.

4. Business. Unless specifically authorized by special condition of the temporary exclusion

order, persons subject to a temporary exclusion order are not authorized to conduct business with the Tribe or operate or conduct any other business activities on Tribal land.

24A-04-08 REVOCATION OF TEMPORARY EXCLUSION ORDER.

The Tribal Council may reconsider and revoke a temporary exclusion order upon its own motion or based upon a request of a member or the person who is the subject of the exclusion. The temporary exclusion order may be revoked by the Tribal Council by resolution that explicitly finds that the individual's continued presence on lands within the Tribe's jurisdiction will benefit the health, safety, and welfare of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate or its members. The Tribal Council may act to revoke a temporary exclusion order at any time following its issuance. A person who is the subject of the temporary exclusion may not submit a request to the Tribal Council to have a temporary exclusion order revoked until at least one (1) year has passed since the order was issued. In addition, the person must be able to show that the person has successfully taken actions to rehabilitate the conduct that provided the grounds for the temporary exclusion.

24A-04-09 ENFORCEMENT OF TEMPORARY EXCLUSION.

1. Law enforcement officers are authorized to take reasonable measures to remove persons from the Tribe's jurisdiction who are the subject of temporary exclusion orders under this ordinance.

2. Law enforcement officers are authorized to take reasonable measures to remove persons who have been banned from the premises of tribal buildings or facilities.

3. Persons who are the subject of a temporary exclusion order are trespassing when they refuse to comply with such exclusion order and may be subject to prosecution under applicable laws.

4. Law enforcement officers shall refer individuals found in violation of a valid temporary exclusion order to the federal government for prosecution under federal trespassing laws.

TITLE V

CODE OF CONDUCT FOR NON-INDIANS

24A-05-01 AUTHORITY.

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate has the inherent authority to exclude non-members from the Tribe's jurisdiction and place conditions on non-member entry onto such lands. As a condition of entry and continued presence on the Tribe's jurisdiction, non-members, which includes non-Indians, have a general duty to abide by the laws of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate. The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate has the authority to define civil offenses and sanction violators as part of its regulatory jurisdiction over the conduct of persons and activities on tribal land.

24A-05-02 PURPOSE.

The intent of this chapter is to create a regulatory framework for the enforcement of a code of conduct for non-Indians who enter into the Tribe's jurisdiction and to authorize the Tribe to pursue civil remedies against individuals that violate the code of conduct. This chapter does not classify crimes and criminalize conduct but rather places conditions on non-members and non-Indians that enter or have continued presence in the Tribe's jurisdiction and outlines civil remedies for violations of such conditions.

24A-05-03 RULES OF PROCEDURE.

Unless a specific provision of this chapter provides otherwise, the suit brought to enforce the below-described civil offenses shall be governed by the Rules of Civil Procedure for the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Court.

24A-05-04 NOTICE OF CIVIL VIOLATION.

Upon becoming aware that a civil offense has occurred, a Tribal law enforcement officers or another officer of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Court shall serve the respondent, or have the respondent served, with written notice that shall include at least the following:

1. the name of the Respondent;

2. the name of the officer or agent issuing the notice, including the signature of the agent or officer;

3. the date the notice was prepared;

4. a citation and quotation of the provision of this Act which the Tribe alleges the Respondent has violated;

5. A statement which provides that the Respondent may obtain an attorney at their own expense, and that the Respondent may have the opportunity to call witnesses and cross-examine the Tribe's witnesses; and

6. a statement that the Tribal Court will schedule a hearing date for the citation. 24A-05-05 SERVICE AND NOTICE TO THE TRIBAL COURT.

Service shall be completed pursuant to the Rules of Civil Procedure for the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Court. The law enforcement officers or another officer of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Court shall immediately file the notice with the Tribal Court.

24A-05-06 BURDEN OF PROOF.

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate shall have the Burden of Proof for proving all elements of the below-described offenses by a preponderance of the evidence.

24A-05-07 PROPER PARTIES AND DESIGNATION.

All civil offenses shall be enforced and pursued in civil actions initiated in the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Court. The enforcement of this chapter shall be by sworn and commissioned officers of the Tribe. Offenses shall be prosecuted in the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Court by the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Prosecutor or another attorney authorized to prosecute such offenses. No other person or entity shall enforce, nor pursue in court, a civil offense contained in this Act without the express authorization of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Council.

24A-05-08 CODE OF CONDUCT.

This Code of Conduct addresses activities that represent a civil offense that threatens the political integrity, economic security, and health or welfare of the Tribe. It shall be a violation of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Code of Conduct to engage in any of the following activities:

1. Distribution - A person commits the offense of distribution if they sell, give away, deliver, exchange, distribute, or dispose of to another methamphetamine or Schedule 1 drug within the Tribe's jurisdiction.

2. Manufacture - A person commits the offense of manufacturing if they produce, cultivate, pack, repack, tablet, encapsulate, label, relabel, fill, or otherwise process methamphetamine or Schedule 1 drug within the Tribe's jurisdiction.

3. Possession - A person commits the offense of possession if they are found with methamphetamine or Schedule 1 drug within the Tribe's jurisdiction.

4. Ingestion - A person commits the offense of ingestion if they willfully and knowingly ingest, inhale, or otherwise take upon the body methamphetamine or Schedule 1 drug within the Tribe's jurisdiction.

5. Aiding and Abetting - A person commits the offense of aiding and abetting if they promote or facilitate the commission of a crime that aids, abets, or advises another person in planning or committing the crime of manufacturing or distribution of methamphetamine or Schedule 1 drug within the Tribe's jurisdiction.

24A-05-09 CIVIL REMEDIES.

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Court may grant the following civil remedies if an individual is successfully prosecuted pursuant to this Code of Conduct:

1. Civil Fine - the Tribal Court may impose civil fines of up to $2,500 for violations of this Code of Conduct made payable to the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate for drug diversion programs.

2. Civil Restitution - the Tribal Court may order an individual to pay restitution to the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate for any damage to property that occurred as a result of the individual's actions.

3. Civil Temporary Exclusion - the Tribal Court may recommend temporary exclusion, which shall be conducted pursuant to the procedures of Chapter 4 of this Ordinance, for any violation of this Code of Conduct.

24A-05-10 EMERGENCY REMOVAL OF NON-MEMBER.

1. Law enforcement officers are authorized to remove non-members and non-Indians from the Tribe's jurisdiction if an officer determines that the non-member's presence constitutes an immediate danger to the safety or health of a Tribal member or the Tribe and delay would result in irreparable harm.

2. Such removals may be effective for up to seventy-two (72) hours from the time of the removal.

3. In the event such an emergency removal occurs, law enforcement shall promptly notify the Tribal Council of the action and the reason for the action. The Tribal Council shall consider whether the situation requires further action to exclude the non-member in accordance with this Act.

TITLE VI

CIVIL PROCEEDINGS

24A-06-01 PRIVATE RIGHT TO TEST.

As a matter of Tribal law there exists a private, legal right to test property and a property owner, landlord, tenant, or other person living at a property has a legal right to test the property to determine whether the property was used to manufacture, distribute, store, or use methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug for any reason or no reason at all and without prior notice to any other person. This legal right is unique to Tribal law and ensures that the general health and welfare of property owners, landlords, tenants, and others that live on the property have a right to know if methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug was manufactured, distributed, stored, or used on the property.

Every lease, sublease, rental agreement, contract, or other written document affecting the property is subject to this legal right to test property to determine whether the property contained methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug. Such lease, sublease, rental agreement, contract, or other written document may not contradict this legal right.

24A-06-02 TESTING STANDARD.

The test must test meth surface contamination samples for the concentration of the mass of meth found on a surface area. The mass is measured in micrograms (µg, one-millionth of a gram). The health-based standard for meth residue is 1.5 µ/100cm2, which also serves as the health-based cleanup number for homes subject to clean up.

24A-06-03 REPORTING POSITIVE TEST RESULTS.

1. Every positive test shall be reported to law enforcement and the Tribal Court. Every person, business, landlord, tribal entity, and Housing Authority that owns or manages property and is aware of a positive test result has a legal duty to report a positive test to the Tribe's law enforcement and to the Tribal Court.

2. Every person, business, landlord, tribal entity, and Housing Authority that owns or manages property must include the legal duty to report a positive test result to the Tribe's law enforcement and to the Tribal Court in every lease or other written agreement concerning the property.

3. Failure to report shall constitute a violation of this Act and shall be subject to a civil fine

not less than $5,000.00. Failure to report may result in the termination of the right to do business within the Tribe's jurisdiction.

4. A property that tests positive for methamphetamine or Schedule I drugs may be condemned if the property exceeds the testing standard of § 24-06-02 or constitutes a danger to occupants, visitors, or the public.

24A-06-04 CONTAMINATION AND CLEAN UP.

Law enforcement shall file a notice of violation of testing for methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug with the Tribal Court and serve the notice on the property owner or manager. The Tribal Court shall order that any property or portion of a property that has tested positive or found by law enforcement to be a place of manufacturing methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug comply with the following conditions:

1. The property shall not be occupied or used until it has been assessed and cleaned up as provided in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's most recent cleanup guidelines, including disposal in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

2. The cleanup of the property shall be accomplished by a contractor certified for methamphetamine cleanup with expertise with hazardous waste and who will make the verification required in accordance with the cleanup guidelines.

3. The property may be subject to additional testing. Methamphetamine made in a rental property with multiple units may result in contamination throughout the structure from chemicals or by-products of the manufacturing process or usage of methamphetamine. The units adjoining the meth lab unit (up, down, front, back, left, and right) may also be contaminated and must be tested.

4. The Tribal Court shall determine, if possible, who caused the positive test. After notice and opportunity to be heard, any person that is determined to be responsible for the positive test must pay for all costs of testing, cleanup, and disposal, including of his property and any adjoining property.

24A-06-05 HEALTH RISK BUT NO CONTAMINATION.

If the measured methamphetamine or Schedule I drug level is below the testing standard and the property was not declared a methamphetamine lab, cleanup may only be necessary if law enforcement determines that the property presents a health risk to any occupant and files a notice of violation of a health risk pertaining to methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug with the Tribal Court and serves the notice on the property owner or manager. The Tribal Court shall order cleanup that, in its discretion, will eliminate the health risk.

24A-06-06 SUMMARY EVICTION PROCEEDINGS.

A landlord shall be entitled to institute summary eviction proceedings in the Tribal Court of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation if a tenant manufactures, distributes, aids and abets, ingests, or possesses methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug or the property is subject to a positive test. The landlord shall service notice on the tenant. After receipt of the filing of a summary eviction notice, the Tribal Court shall issue a notice of hearing and provide the tenant with a meaningful opportunity to be heard prior to eviction.

If the Tribal Court determines that a tenant manufactures, distributes, aids and abets, ingests, or possesses methamphetamine or a Schedule I drug on the property in question or the tenant caused the property to be subject to a positive test, then the Tribal Court shall order:

1. The lease shall be terminated;

2. The landlord shall be entitled to immediate possession;

3. The landlord shall have the property tested in accordance with this Title;

4. Notice of lease termination and the institution of summary eviction proceedings shall be served upon the tenant;

5. The Tribal Court's Order must inform the tenant that they have 3 days to vacate the property due to the violation of Tribal law, the threat to the health and safety of other tenants, to avoid additional damage to the property, and to ensure that the property in question is subject to testing and the appropriate clean up.

6. Failure to timely vacate the property shall result in the tenant paying for the costs of vacating the property.

Republic of China (Taiwan) to honor American Veterans who served in Taiwan

Pierre, SD – Republic of China (Taiwan) will honor 52 South Dakota veterans who served in Taiwan during 1955-1979 at a ceremony hosted by the South Dakota Department of Veterans Affairs. The ceremony will be held Monday, Aug. 14, at 1 p.m. (CST) in Galleries B & C at the Ramkota Conference Center in Pierre.

On behalf of the Republic of China (ROC) government, the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Denver will present the "US-ROC Mutual Defense Commemorative Badge" to express the country's appreciation for their service and contributions.

The United States of America and the Republic of China established a Mutual Defense Treaty from 1955 to 1979, which defended Taiwan's democracy and freedom. Director General Jerry Chang said, "The American soldiers played a very important role in maintaining the peace and stability across the Taiwan Strait during that time and we are very grateful for all the veterans' contributions to providing assistance in Taiwan's self-defense. Taiwanese people will always remember with deep appreciation."

"It has been an honor to work side by side with the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office on this ceremony," said Larry Zimmerman, Secretary of the South Dakota Department of Veterans Affairs. "They recognize what these heroes have given and as a token of their sincerest appreciation they will present them with the US-ROC Mutual Defense Commemorative Badge which symbolizes their adoration and appreciation for their service and sacrifice."

"This is a conflict not many remember, and few even know about," said Zimmerman. "We must continue to provide opportunities like this ceremony to educate all on the sacrifices made by those who serve."

The ceremony will include remarks from Gov. Dennis Daugaard, SDDVA Secretary Larry Zimmerman and Director General Jerry Chang.

August 2017 report from the SD Dept. of Veterans Affairs –

Connecting with our Veterans!

By Secretary Larry Zimmerman

This summer we have had hot temperatures, wind, and very few rain showers; leaving our soil as hard as rocks!

Rocks and stones play a large part in our life - Mount Rushmore, Crazy Horse, and beautiful memorials for our veterans. For some of us, we have stones in our fields, our landscaping and in our prairies. There are agates in every pile of stones.

These rocks are right in front of our faces and yet without picking up each one, we do not notice all of them. Much like our journey at the South Dakota Department of Veterans Affairs, we are in search of the gems/stones we call veterans.

It is important that we help our veterans move ahead, live life to the fullest, reintegrate into their communities and have access to high quality benefits and services in a timely, consistent, and equitable manner. It is important that we help them establish a "new normal" in family relationships, wellness, and financial stability.

Help us acquire the tools to provide care, services, and final tributes for our heroes.

Help us be as responsive to our youngest veterans as we are to our oldest veterans.

Help us to return functionality to the men and women wounded in service.

Help us guide our veterans to the resources that can help them and their families.

Help us leave no stone unturned.

Encourage your veteran to contact the South Dakota Department of Veterans Affairs (605.773.3269) or their local country or tribal veterans service officer.

Pathfinder Center opens doors to human trafficking victims

By Libby Leyden

Central South Dakota – The Daily Republic – Aug 9, 2017 – In the least likely of places, Lisa Heth found the place where she could finally provide refuge for human trafficking survivors.

What was formerly a run-down motel, is now a brightly decorated, long-term shelter for women and children — and the first of its kind in South Dakota.

The Pathfinder Center, which formally opened its doors early last week, has 13 bedrooms uniquely decorated by a variety of organizations and individuals who provided sponsorship.

One bedroom has a queen-sized canopy bed covered in a delicate, white-ruffled comforter, while another is brightly painted pink and yellow with affirmations written on the wall. And another bedroom, Heth designed herself, has hand-painted blue feathers outlining the ceiling.

"One size doesn't fit all," said Heth, executive director of the Pathfinder Center. "Every room is different, specifically for each woman's various needs. What works for one may not work for everyone."

The center is located in central South Dakota, but the specific city and location are being withheld from the public for the safety of the women.

Heth, who is executive director of Wiconi Wawokiya, has been working with trafficking and domestic violence victims for the past 25 years. Wiconi Wawokiya is a nonprofit victim services organization located on the Crow Creek Reservation in central South Dakota.

She first got the idea to open the center in 2015. A seemingly random phone call from a motel owner led Heth to the bank to ask for a loan to turn the motel into a shelter. Almost two years later, Heth is ready to open the shelter for services.

"These women should come into these rooms and feel the love that went into decorating them. To know that someone out there cares about them," Heth said.

In addition to providing long-term residence, the center will also provide group activities, GED classes and provide a dedicated room for law enforcement interviews if the victims choose to report the trafficking.

The women, who are accepted into the center, must make a commitment to stay for a minimum of six months with the ideal stay being 12 to 18 months. When the women are ready to graduate from the center, there will be a resource book provided, offering information on churches or organizations that can assist victims with transitioning back to normal life outside.

"We are trying to ensure these women can be successful outside the center," Heth said.

South Dakota has more than 30 sexual assault/domestic violence shelters but each site typically offers 30-day stays. And Heth intends to work with these centers to provide a list of referrals for possible acceptance into the center.

Heth also will be at the 2017 Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, typically a place where human trafficking occurs, to refer and welcome the first two women into the center — which could be as early as next week.

Heth wants to expand the center slowly, starting first with two women before the shelter is ready to accept more.

Straightening out a few pillows on a bed Tuesday afternoon, Heth said she is excited to welcome the center's first two women, and looks forward to impacting more lives down the road.

"This should be where these women can find their place in life," she said.

Oglala official pleads guilty in federal court to Embezzlement charge

Defendant prosecuted as part of the Guardians Project, a federal law enforcement initiative to combat corruption, fraud, and abuse in SD

Federal Law Enforcement Initiative to Combat Corruption, Fraud, and Abuse in South Dakota

United States Attorney Randolph J. Seiler announced that a Lacreek District Vice-Chair has pleaded guilty in federal court to Embezzlement and Theft from an Indian Tribal Organization.

Charles Leo Cummings, 57, of Martin, South Dakota, entered his guilty plea on August 4, 2017, before U.S. Magistrate Judge Daneta Wollmann.

The maximum term of imprisonment upon conviction is up to 1 year and/or a $100,000 fine, a period of 1 year of supervised release, and a special assessment of $25 to the Federal Crime Victims Fund. Restitution will also be ordered.

According to his plea agreement, between December 28, 2015, and January 18, 2016, Cummings did willfully and knowingly embezzle, steal, misapply, and convert to his own use monies, funds, credits, goods, assets, and other property belonging to the Oglala Sioux Tribe.

Cummings pleaded guilty to a federal misdemeanor and has agreed to pay restitution in the amount of $2,500.

The investigation is being conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Department of Interior, Office of Inspector General. Assistant U.S. Attorney Jeremy R. Jehangiri is prosecuting the case.

The case was brought pursuant to the Guardians Project, a federal law enforcement initiative to coordinate efforts between participating agencies, to promote citizen disclosure of public corruption, fraud, and embezzlement involving federal program funds, contracts, and grants, and to hold accountable those who are responsible for adversely affecting those living in South Dakota's Indian country communities.

The Guardians Project is another step of federal law enforcement's on-going efforts to increase engagement, coordination, and positive action on behalf of tribal communities.

Led by the United States Attorney's Office, the participating agencies include: Federal Bureau of Investigation; the Offices of Inspector General for the Departments of Interior, Health and Human Services, Social Security Administration, Agriculture, Transportation, Education, Justice, and Housing and Urban Development; Internal Revenue Service, Criminal Investigation Division; U.S. Postal Inspector Service; U.S. Postal Service, Office of Inspector General.

For additional information about The Guardians Project, please contact the United States Attorney's Office at (605)330-4400. To report a suspected crime, please contact law enforcement at the federal agency's locally listed telephone number.

#NoDAPL

DAPL faces allegations of misconduct

By C.S. Hagen

Bismarck, ND – High Plains Reader – Bismarck, ND – August 9th, 2017 – While some in the Peace Garden State claim Standing Rock activists are terrorists, jihadists, or simply troublemakers, the companies behind the Dakota Access Pipeline are also apparently far from innocent.

In addition to a civil lawsuit filed by the North Dakota Private Investigation and Security Board against international security company TigerSwan, the company now faces allegations of misconduct filed by the North Dakota Public Service Commission.

Two investigations from North Dakota Public Service Commission are now pending, involving Dakota Access, LLC.

On May 31, 2017, the Commission opened an investigation into Dakota Access, LLC's work along the pipeline route.

"DAPL agreed to and participated in a preconstruction conference to ensure that the company fully understood the conditions set forth in the Commission's order upon which the certificate and permit were granted," a 33-page staff memorandum in response to the opened investigation stated. The memorandum was written by John Schuh, a staff attorney for the Commission, and by Sara Cardwell.

"There were a number of deficiencies and possible violations that were recorded such as debris left on the right of way, unsafe work practices, silt fences in disrepair, and not being compliant with the North Dakota Department of Health Environmental Section guidelines."

Additionally, wood matting was laid down in sensitive areas, cultural sites were discovered and the company rerouted without alerting the Commission in a timely manner. The pipeline company was also charged 83 times with destroying trees and landscape past 85 feet on either side of the pipeline, according to the memorandum.

The North Dakota section of the pipeline is 210 miles long, running through Mountrail, Williams, McKenzie, Dunn, Mercer, Morton, and Emmons counties, and cost an estimated $1.41 billion, according to the Commission.

"This will be an investigative hearing, it's kind of a first step," Consumer Affairs Specialist with the Commission Stacy Eberl, said. "The commissioners have asked the company to come in and give their side of the story on some allegations that staff brought forward concerning tree removal, subsoil segregation, and a fuel tank that didn't have the proper containment unit around it.

"It's a mix of different things that were noticed after construction," Eberl said. "The other separate complaint has to deal with an incident where a cultural resource was discovered while they were building, and that's the one where the company rerouted around the site, which was good, but they failed to notify the Commission. That one is holding right now. There is nothing formal on how they will resolve this quite yet."

Dakota Access, LLC could be fined a civil penalty not to exceed $10,000 for each violation for each day the violations persist, except the maximum penalty cannot exceed $200,000 for any related series of violations, Eberl said.

Eberl couldn't say if Dakota Access, LLC representatives were cooperating with the investigation.

"When we have an open case the Commission has to stay neutral because they are the judges," Eberl said.

Keitu Engineers & Consultants, Inc. performed the third-party construction consulting services, conducting inspections almost weekly from May 2016 until February 2017, according to the memorandum.

"Keitu's conclusion was that overall the project was generally maintained and in good condition," the memorandum stated. "However, Keitu did find that there were deficiencies."

The most common problem discovered was inadequate soil segregation – meaning subsoil and topsoil were piled together. An inspection on August 24, 2016 discovered tree removal extended beyond not only the 50 feet agreed upon in certification documents, but also beyond the 85 feet extension approved later by the Commission upon DAPL's request, according to the memorandum.

An August 4, 2016 investigation led to the discovery of a fuel trailer, which was not properly contained, according to the memorandum.

North Dakota has been the deadliest state to work in for five years running. The 2017 edition of "Death on the Job: The Toll of Neglect," compiled by the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organization, a national trade union center and the largest federation of unions in America, reported its latest statistics for 2015 that 12.5 North Dakota workers per 100,000 were injured on the job, and 47 people died while on the job.

Statistics for 2016 are not yet available.

On March 23, 2017, Mike Futch, the DAPL Project Manager for North Dakota, replied to the allegations saying that there exists a difference of opinions between inspectors, but that he would be willing to discuss the issues. Dakota Access, LLC used a company called Duraroot Environmental Consulting to perform its own investigation, which denied the company was liable in many of the cases cited by the Commission.

The public hearing on the issues will be conducted on Thursday, August 17, at 8:30am in the Commission's Hearing Room in the capitol building.

In victory for Standing Rock, court finds approval of DAPL violated the law

Ruling: Trump administration shortcut environmental review; Court seeks additional briefing on whether to shut down pipeline.

Washington, DC – Daily Native Americans – Aug. 4, 2017 – The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe won a significant victory today m its fight to protect the Tribe's drinking water and ancestral lands from the Dakota Access pipeline.

A federal judge ruled that the federal permits authorizing the pipeline to cross the Missouri River just upstream of the Standing Rock reservation, which were hastily issued by the Trump administration just days after the inauguration, violated the law in certain critical respects.

In a 91-page decision, Judge James Boasberg wrote, "the Court agrees that [the Corps) did not adequately consider the impacts of an 011 spill on fishing rights, hunting rights, or environmental justice, or the degree to which the pipeline's effects are likely to be highly controversial."

The Court did not determine whether pipeline operations should be shut off and has requested additional briefing on the subject and a status conference next week.

"This is a major victory for the Tribe and we commend the courts for upholding the law and doing the right thing; said Standing Rock Sioux Chairman Dave Archambault II m a recent statement. "The previous administration painstakingly considered the impacts of this pipeline, and President Trump hastily dismissed these careful environmental considerations in favor of political and personal interests.

We applaud the courts for protecting our laws and regulations from undue political influence and will ask the Court to shut down pipeline operations immediately:

The Tribe's inspiring and courageous fight has attracted international attention and drawn the support of hundreds of tribes around the nation.

The Tribe is represented by the nonprofit environmental law firm Earthjustice, which filed a lawsuit challenging the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for issuing a permit for the pipeline construction in violation of several environmental laws.

"This decision marks an important turning point. Until now, the rights of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe have been disregarded by the builders of the Dakota Access Pipeline and the Trump administration-prompting a well-deserved global outcry" said Earthjustice attorney Jan Hasselman. "The federal courts have stepped m where our political systems have failed to protect the rights of Native communities." The Court ruled against the Tribe on several other issues, finding that the reversal allowing the pipeline complied with the law in some respects.

The $3.8 billion pipeline project, also known as Bakken Oil Pipeline, extends 1,168 miles across North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, and Illinois, crossing through communities, farms, tribal land, sensitive natural areas and wildlife habitat. The pipeline would carry up to 570,000 barrels a day of crude oil from the Bakken oil fields in North Dakota to Illinois where it links with another pipeline that will transport the oil to terminals and refineries along the Gulf of Mexico.

Native American Women begin Awareness Walk along Missouri River

By Eric Tegethoff

Three Forks, Montana – Public News Service (publicnewsservice.org) – Aug. 1, 2017 – Women from Native tribes across the country begin their walk along the Missouri River today to show their respect for the water and raise awareness about protecting it.

Starting at the headwaters in Three Forks, Montana, the women will walk over the next month and a half to the river's confluence with the Mississippi in Missouri. They are inviting the public to join them along the way for as long as they want.

Lori Watso of the Dakota and Ojibwe tribes in Minnesota will be walking the river. She says she is honoring the water as a giver of life.

"It's our purpose, our intention to show our respect for the water and our gratitude and help other people to understand the importance of our caring for the water and its necessity in our future and future generations," she explains.

They will be passing through the homelands of Native Americans along the way, including the Standing Rock reservation.

People who want to join can go to www.nibiwalk.org

There will be a geolocation tag at the top of the webpage.

In the past, the water walkers have followed the St. Louis River in Minnesota, the Ohio River and more.

Roxanne Ornelas, another river walker, also is a geography professor at Miami University in Ohio. While Ornelas talks to her class about protection of the environment in terms of regulations and public policy, she says it's also important to impart indigenous knowledge about the sacredness of the river to non-native students.

"We look at the earth and our place in it, on it, holistically, that we are not separate from the earth," she says. "We are the earth."

Sharon Day is a leader of the walks and executive director of the Indigenous People's Task Force. She says the Missouri River faces threats not just from oil and gas production but agriculture too. Chemicals from fertilizers used on large farms flow down into the river and contaminate it.

Day says it's important to talk about threats to the river on this walk, but more important is the spiritual connection she feels with the river. She talks about how she's felt at the end of other river walks.

"You have a deep relationship with the water," says Day.

"And that's what we need to try to do is get people to understand that they do have a relationship and how do you nurture that relationship just as you would any other relationship, and this one is primary, right?"

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

"What can my Tribe do for me?"

By Sarah Sunshine Manning

August 10, 2017

"When are we going to get something from the Tribe?"

"When is the tribe going to fix (fill in the blank)?"

This pattern of thinking derives from a history of being disempowered during our early reservation days.

At one time, we operated with the understanding of our unlimited potential as human beings.

If something needed to get done, we did it ourselves.

We wasted little or no time on blame.

Today, things are so different.

We hurt ourselves and keep ourselves and our community stuck by blaming and criticizing and demanding more from the tribe, while we stand by and contribute little in comparison to the negativity and expectation we bring.

I try to be careful with sharing thoughts like this, as the conversation can quickly transform into accusations of victim blaming, self-righteousness, etc.

But in light of community building, rather than community blaming, I challenge my own child, nieces, nephews, and younger relatives to not waste their energy or their power on blaming our tribe, or waiting for more from the tribe.

We have so much power.

So much to offer, if we stop blaming, and start looking at ourselves, and then get to work.

We can begin a major transformation by challenging our children to ask themselves, "What can we do for our Tribe?"

Thinking this way allows us to take back our power and our ancestral way of thinking.

Sota guest editorial –

South Dakota: Selling out to harmful industrial ag profiteers

(The following comes from statements made last week by Dallas Goldtooth of the Indigenous Environmental Network.)

What a week!

I need to get a few things off my chest.

I just got back from the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition summer meeting in Madison, Wisconsin, and was catching up on the local agricultural news ... and really!?

"The most populous county in South Dakota is easing restrictions on big livestock operations."

That's right!

Minnehaha County Commissioners voted 5-0 to ease restrictions on CAFOs – concentrated animal feeding operations, or what should accurately be called Factory Farms.

I watched video from the County Commissioners meeting.

The head of the Friends of the Big Sioux River had the audacity to utter "Every time you build a CAFO you're probably improving the water quality in the area."

That is completely BS.

Later, reading the Argus Leader: "... head of Friends of the Big Sioux River, said modern CAFOs with manure storage offer better protection for rivers and streams than open pastures with smaller numbers of animals, but also told commissioners that enforcement needs to be a priority."

I agree enforcement needs to be a priority but the rest is just more BS!

This meeting apparently needed its own manure plan just to properly deal with all the shit being spewed by agribusiness and its talking heads.

These statements from the head of FBSR are completely inaccurate and do not take into a account any holistic grazing management which has been utilized in this state for generations.

Maybe the FBSR plan to get the river swimmable by 2025 is to put Factory Farms all along it, because apparently each time a new one pops up the water quality gets better?!?!

I guess I will be reconsidering renewing my FBSR membership this year.

I also watched a powerful human being articulate some very critical points. From, again, Argus Leader:

Julie Umstead of rural Garretson told them (commissioners) she grew up around agriculture, invests in agriculture and moved back to South Dakota to expose her family to the rural lifestyle.

"I want my kids to grow up around agriculture," said Umstead, who said she wasn't made aware of the discussed changes until a story ran in the Argus Leader.

"CAFOs are not agriculture. They're factory farms."

Umstead urged the commissioners to consider other sorts of businesses that work near urban centers but might be scared off by large dairies or hog barns, such as horseback riding camps, vineyards or breweries.

I want to be completely clear ... I love meat! I believe that human beings are part of an ecological system where animals eat other animals.

That's why I choose to support farmers grazing animals in humane and sustainable ways.

There are so many other reason why and how I do this but here are just two reasons why I do it:

1- The meat tastes better.

2- the money I spend stays here (and usually goes to a person I know).

How the hell did the grasslands turn into rows and rows of soy/corn and now factory farms?

That's too large of a rant … but here are a few things I continue to contemplate:

Six percent of rural Americans farm. For decades we have destroyed the vitality of our communities through large corporations dictating poor policy and continuing to allow agribusiness and its mantra of farming "get big or get out" destroy rural American farmers.

All of South Dakota is classified as "rural."

Like it or not Sioux Falls residents, we will not thrive while our "rural" communities wither away.

Allowing Factory Farms (family owned or not) to come in and pollute our communities with poorly managed manure plans, threatening the health of the citizens, and continuing to destroy our water and air quality, is not the way to have our state thrive.

-- Dallas Goldtooth

Brief editorial comments from the editor's desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

Please read Chairman Flute's column updating the Oyate.

There is so much going on among the Oyate to be reported, as readers can tell in this week's edition of your Sota.

We appreciated being asked to attend Tribal Council's roundtable with Governor Daugaard on Friday morning. Thank you to photographer John Heminger for taking pictures of his tour at Dakota Cross and of the discussion with Tribal Council.

We certainly hope that this open, informal dialog will help in the long run relationship and cooperation between the Tribe and the State.

Please read our summary of the discussion, and see John's photos.

*****

Tribal Council, on August 2nd, passed a resolution putting into law the meth code that has been under development by the Legal Department.

We are publishing the code in this issue.

The Legal Department also has it available online, along with other judicial codes of the Tribe, on its website:

http://www.swo-nsn.gov/departments/justice-department/legal-department/

Most of us are not lawyers, but still ought to read the code to get some understanding of its intent, and what enforcement tools – including banishment – it contains.

*****

Now that the first, in what is supposed to be an ongoing series of consultations – quarterly, it was suggested last Monday – is there to be a new era in the relationship between the Tribe and Sisseton public schools?

Perhaps.

And know that the process is what is important, and must continue regardless of this latest change in who is filling the Superintendent role at the Sisseton Schools.

Please read our editorial and news feature.

Also, if you are interested in what happens in the education of your children in the schools, please attend meetings.

The lack of attendance by parents is disheartening.

As was the lack of turnout at the recent school board election.

*****

Chairman Flute has called for a community meeting this Wednesday, August 16th, on the Tribe assuming self-governance of IHS.

Now is the time to ask any further questions about what self-governance means, how it might benefit Tribal members, and how the Tribe can make the transition.

Members of the self-governance task force will be available to answer your questions.

Please come, if at all possible.

If you cannot be there, tune in to KXSW-FM, as announcer Tom Wilson will be broadcasting live as well as streaming the meeting live on Facebook.

We published a special feature on self-governance in last week's Sota. And copies will be available for distribution at the public meeting.

A complete set of documents on self-governance are available on the Sota website:

www.earthskyweb.com/sota.htm

or

www.earthskyweb.com/news.htm

or

http://www.earthskyweb.com/sg_articles.pdf

These documents are the culmination of public meetings on the Lake Traverse Reservation over the past two years to determine the pros and cons, and whether or not for the SWST to embark on this self-determination, or self-governance, route with health care.

*****

Thank you to the SWO Tribal Education Department, and Sierra Wolcott, for providing our readers with information on the week-long celebration of youth "Siceca Wiyukpeya" and on the draft K-12 communications and math standards.

The public is invited to the meeting this Tuesday, August 15th, from 5:00-6:30 p.m. in the training room, to go over the standards.

And we are grateful also to have Crystal Owen's report on last week's two-day Sanding Up for the Children Conference.

What a great report on what can be done when people put their minds together and organize an event like this, which brings such needed resources directly to those who can put them to use here on the Lake Traverse Reservation.

Wopida Tanka.

*****

Oyate blood donors!

Here is the link to make an appointment to donate blood at Tribal headquarters on Thursday, August 24th:

https://www.bloodhero.com/index.cfm?group=op&step=2&opid=713726&opidh=26A8F8DAB44224A6BC99A316D362E13D&idt=42951.5835185

*****

We encourage all members to be actively involved in Tribal and District business.

If you are unable to come to Tribal headquarters to attend a Council meeting, these meetings are being broadcast live over Tribal radio station KXSW-FM and live-streamed over the internet by announcer Tom Wilson.

Check out KXSW 89.9 FM, the station's Facebook page, and website KXSWRez.net.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"We, the great mass of the people think only of the love we have for our land, we do love the land where we were brought up. We will never let our hold to this land go, to let it go it will be like throwing away (our) mother that gave (us) birth.".

- Letter from Aitooweyah to John Ross, Principal Chief of the Cherokee.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

History is indeed little more than the register of the crimes, follies and misfortunes of mankind. Edward Gibbon (1737 - 1794)

A wise man gets more use from his enemies than a fool from his friends. Baltasar Gracian

We always like those who admire us; we do not always like those whom we admire. Francois de La Rochefoucauld

Correct me if I'm wrong, but hasn't the fine line between sanity and madness gotten finer? George Price

A motion to adjourn is always in order. Robert Heinlein, Lazarus Long: Time Enough For Love

All animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others. George Orwell (1903 - 1950), "Animal Farm"

It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle (384 BC - 322 BC)

The greatest mistake is trying to be more agreeable than you can be. Walter Bagehot

Art is a collaboration between God and the artist, and the less the artist does the better. Andre Gide French critic, essayist, & novelist (1869 - 1951)

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Note –

There are no obituaries reported in this week's Sota.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Open letter to the Oyate

History repeating itself

History repeats itself every so often. And what we see as decades or centuries is only a step behind us.

Time is within these years and both are to walk behind us, but instead when something happens, time and the past walk beside us.

It is when we allow time to walk by us, that history repeats itself.

The White Plague: this was the epidemic of all reservations way back, accompanied by blindness.

There were no elderly boards comprised of a few that made decisions for the entire tribe. But today, it appears that a few elders who have dark pasts have made a very un-Dakota sagacious move that influenced the young tribal leaders' decision to banish our people suffering from another form of plague – Meth.

Today, we have the Black Plague but unlike today time reveals that everyone made the decision to the care of our people suffering from the White Plague. All districts had a voice, and even Father John Pohlen.

What became of this strong tribal voice?

The former Indian hospital. When this was being built the ones suffering from the White Plague started to disappear as they were treated like lepers.

It I said that the white poplar trees with the dark spots on them are souls of the ones who disappeared because humans could not care for them.

This leads to open fear in the priests, ministers, laymen and men of God who are afraid to walk where demons and evil spirits tread upon earth. They are afraid of suicide, Meth spirits, demonic possession, because they know not that they are dangerous but they fear their own darkness will surface.

Even our sundancers, pipe carriers and sweat lodge runners fear to tread upon these demons and evil spirits that take over the body, soul and spirit of our people.

Banishment and an ignorance of Meth, suicide and other substance abuse and yes, pornography, deviant sexual behaviors and falsehood will continue to destroy our tribe.

But then again like Father Pohlen and the Indian leaders of the past who spoke about the landless Indian: What good is a tribe or the boundaries if the Indians sell their land and become landless?

They were saying that banishment already happened when we sold our land. We are not a people or tribe anymore without the land under our feet.

We became the white man's Indian through enrollment.

Next step to end this misery, is it relinquishment?

Or to fight back.

I say fight back.

These fearful men of God, let them walk alone and it is you, me and your families that can end this Meth plague.

There is a way through Black Fire speaking.

If you want to join us in creating a strong force against what is happening to our people, call me.

Our male ancestors did not come from war to allow us, their blood lines, to become submissive or to become a broken spirited nation.

We are the descendants of strong Dakota men and women who came from war out of Minnesota!

Bring that power and voice back to our people and fight Meth the Dakota way.

Again, call me.

Betty Anne Owen.

605-360-9247.

Open letter to the Oyate

Aug. 11, 2017

I would like to thank the Tribal Food Pantry for the food that I received today.

I am unemployed and do not receive any type of assistance.

I earn money by cleaning homes and selling some of my crafts.

I do not believe in working the programs.

I am an able bodied veteran and a mother of 13 children.

Never received TANF but got food stamps.

I always worked to be an example for my children.

The Districts never gave out money like they do today.

I went through a finance company got $2,000.00 for school clothes. Paid it off and borrowed another for Christmas.

It kinda baffles my mind that young people today cannot take care of their family.

Thank you to the workers at the SWO Food Pantry and, and its contributors.

One more thing. If you receive food stamps or Snaps stop selling them because some of us truly need the food we get at the pantry.

Pidamiya.

Bonnie Rencountre.

Open letter to the Oyate

Crimes against elderly.

Deceiving the elderly.

Relatives and friends, being nice to the elderly.

Buying them food, clothes, even buying them booze, their rent, helping them pay their bills.

While under the influence of their friendship, talking the elders out of their land, making them sign over theirland, promising to always help them.

This is deception.

This land that you falsely receive belongs to the sons and daughters of the elder.

Obtaining land under false pretenses is fraud.

These acts are criminal.

Go to the tribal prosecutor, file a complaint, file charges, get you dad and your grandfather's land back.

Greed should not be tolerated.

Not by this tirbe or any other.

Larry Nerison, Indian, Sisseton, SD.

Poetry of Trinity Thompson

"Lost it All…"

in a blink of an eye,

life with my family, my sons,

my gurl … soon began

to pass out of existence…

my world crumbled right before me,

according to the laws of life

it was time to pay the price,

unfathomable the sacrifice I made…

the unforeseen destruction

ignited an every day ache and pain

that continues to burn fiercely,

over time…I've accepted all that

was given without protest,

it took a lot of effort to desensitize

the excruciating pain,

so many lonely nights that I kept

a lot of feelings secretly to myself,

this is genuine … to get accustomed

to my lighthearted ways

a milestone.

 

By Trinity L Thompson.

E-ternal Entertainment

August 3, 2017.

Reminder: Business consultant available

Carla Burns, Business Consultant with the Aberdeen Small Business Development Center, will be in Webster on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 beginning at 9:00 a.m. Carla will be at the GROW South Dakota NEW Webster Regional office, 14 West 7th Avenue (immediately behind Cornwell Drug) in Webster from 9:00 AM until noon. Please note this permanent change of address. From 1 PM to 5 PM she will be at the GROW South Dakota office also known as NESDCAP in Sisseton at 104 Ash St. East.

Carla is available to work with individuals interested in starting a new business or improving the operations of their existing business. Her management consulting services cover start-up issues, business planning, marketing and financial projections to mention a few areas. This is a free and confidential service.

It is best for clients to call ahead and make an appointment. Carla can be reached at (605) 626-2565 in the Aberdeen office.

If clients are unable to meet with Carla on this day, they are still encouraged to call her to arrange another time. SBDC is hosted by GROW South Dakota formerly known as NESDCAP and SBDC and GROW South Dakota are Equal Opportunity Organizations.

Senate unanimously passes Bill to protect victims of domestic violence

Bill would require US Attorney to sharpen focus on tackling domestic violence and sexual abuse in Indian country

Washington, DC – Aug. 3, 2017 – U.S. Senators Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND) and Dan Sullivan (R-AK) today announced that their bipartisan bill unanimously passed in the U.S. Senate would help to further combat domestic abuse and sexual violence by promoting pro-bono legal services for victims of these crimes.

Heitkamp and Sullivan – both former state attorneys general in their home states of North Dakota and Alaska, respectively – understand how the legal system can help deliver protection to victims and survivors of domestic violence while also reducing the probability that they are subjected to a cycle of abuse. Heitkamp and Sullivan's Pro bono Work to Empower and Represent (POWER Act) would specifically require U.S. attorneys in each judicial district across the country to work with domestic violence service providers, coalitions, or an area volunteer lawyer project to hold at least one event promoting pro-bono legal services each year. In a one-day survey in North Dakota in 2016 on domestic violence, 309 victims sought refuge in an emergency shelter or transitional housing, and 188 adults and children received services like counseling, legal advocacy, and children's support groups. As a result, their bill would help empower survivors of domestic violence, engage citizens, and help lift victims out of the cycle of abuse. Momentum for the bill is growing – companion legislation to the U.S. Senate bill was reintroduced in the U.S. House of Representatives this spring, and last Congress, Heitkamp and Sullivan's bill unanimously passed in the U.S. Senate.

"As former state attorneys general, Senator Sullivan and I understand how a legal advocate – or just awareness of services available – can make a difference in the lives of women and men across the country who live under the shadow of domestic abuse and sexual violence," said Heitkamp. "By encouraging more partnerships in every state to provide pro bono legal services, we can help offer the education, awareness, and legal tools for victims who would otherwise not be able to afford or seek the resources they need to escape, survive, and rebuild their lives. The U.S. Senate stands united behind victims of abuse by unanimously passing our bill. Our bill tells victims across this country, including those in North Dakota, that there is hope, and it's another step forward in the long-term fight to end the cycle of domestic violence so we make sure everyone is safe in their homes and communities."

"Passage of the POWER Act by the Senate is a solid avenue in making society aware that legal assistance is a critical first step in helping victims of domestic violence become survivors," said Senator Sullivan. "Pro bono assistance from Alaska's legal community has been a particularly helpful tool in giving hope to victims of domestic violence. The POWER Act will bring this tool to more communities, encouraging lawyers across the country to get involved and help victims who too often fear or are unfamiliar with the justice system. I call on the House of Representatives to swiftly move to pass this commonsense bill, so we can get the POWER Act onto President Trump's desk as soon as possible."

Across Native populations in North Dakota and Alaska, rates of domestic and sexual violence are staggering. To address these crimes specifically in Indian Country and among Native communities, Heitkamp and Sullivan included a provision in the bill mandating U.S. Attorney's offices work with the Native populations in their judicial district in planning and holding an event every few years with a focus on addressing these crimes in Indian Country and among Native populations.

Heitkamp has long worked to combat domestic violence in North Dakota and across the country. As North Dakota Attorney General in the 1990s, she implemented the original Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) across the state, and worked to change the perception of domestic violence as a public health issue, so it would be treated and viewed as what it is – a criminal act. As a result, Heitkamp saw firsthand the dramatic changes in the number of incidents that followed after domestic violence was criminalized. Largely due to VAWA, according to the Justice Department, the annual incidences of domestic violence have fallen more than 60 percent since 1993.

Since joining the Senate, Heitkamp has built on her work as Attorney General to combat domestic violence and stop those who seek to harm adults and children:

· Successfully fighting for greater protections for tribal communities in Violence Against Women Act reauthorization. The first bill Heitkamp cosponsored in the U.S. Senate was the reauthorization of VAWA, which she then played a key role in pushing through Congress. Heitkamp worked to include a key provision in VAWA to address the continuing crisis of violence against women in tribal communities. The provision strengthens the existing programs and provides tribal governments the force they need to prosecute non-Indian perpetrators who commit these crimes on tribal land. In 2015, Heitkamp supported a year-end spending deal that included a significant increase in federal funding to support domestic violence victims. The $480 million in federal support from the Office on Violence Against Women was a $50 million increase from the previous year, to be used for victims' services, legal, training and technical assistance, as well as research and analysis on violence against Native women.

· Raising awareness of domestic violence resources in North Dakota. During Domestic Violence Awareness Month last October, Heitkamp met with staff and board members at Fargo's Rape and Abuse Crisis Center which offers resources for domestic, sexual, and dating violence survivors. In October 2014, Heitkamp met with community leaders, advocates, and victims services in Fargo and Minot to highlight the need to address domestic violence as a public health crisis. Heitkamp also toured the Community Violence Intervention Center (CVIC) in Grand Forks and in Minot in 2015 to see programs supporting victims and combatting domestic violence in each region.

· Addressing emerging challenges in North Dakota to better combat domestic violence. In 2014, Heitkamp convened a task force of experts, law enforcement and leaders across the state in launching her Strong & Safe Communities Initiative to address emerging challenges – including a rise in domestic violence – in the wake of the oil and gas boom. Last August, Heitkamp released her Strong & Safe Communities Report offering a comprehensive set of proposals to address challenges facing North Dakota, including solutions on domestic violence and a host of other issues facing the state.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

IBLA Season preview: Totals 12 teams, 3 states on Canadian model

By Mark Donahue

(Submitted to the Sota by Franky Jackson, who writes: "Incredibly proud of our son Denton Jackson who is mentioned in the article below representing the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate. He will be playing in the Semi pro box lacrosse league the RBLL, plain for Blaine Lycans. He has only one focus, to be a better player. Good luck kid!")

LaCrosse All Stars – August 11, 2017 – Author's Note: Through the 2017 season, we've partnered with the Interstate Box Lacrosse Association (IBLA) to give you an inside look at what's going on around the country in all three Regional Box Lacrosse Leagues (RBLL). Since things kick off this weekend, let's get caught up.

There's a breath of fresh air in the American box lacrosse scene, setting the golden standard for how things should be done stateside. When I say fresh, I don't mean all that new. The model being followed has been tried and true in Canada for well over a hundred years. Brandon Scharaga's passion project, the Interstate Box Lacrosse Association, or IBLA, has exploded from a summer outlet for a group of athletes in Colorado, to a full blown cross-country operation.

The first year looked incredibly different from today, with only two teams in only one state. The rosters were essentially in place so Scharaga and friends would have an outlet to play box lacrosse the right way in the Rockies. In just a few short months, Colorado's Regional Box Lacrosse League (RBLL) has boomed to eight teams, split evenly between Senior A and B. Each team has their own home arena, in their own individual towns, something to build pride around.

Needing a Bigger Boat

Scharaga recognized that box lacrosse was building a solid foundation in Colorado, thanks to well coached youth programs and having a NLL team in town to develop a strong following.

Yet, for American adults, there's a major drop off when it comes to finding quality organized box. So the RBLL was founded, using CLA-based rules, on full sized floors, with coaches, GMs, and the whole shebang.

Mile High Stars Denver Buzz RBLL Colorado IBLA

Guys around the state saw how successful the first season went and hundreds threw their name into the ring for the second season. Only planning to add two teams for the second year, they had to figure out what to do with all of these people, aside of turning them away.

Instead of watering rosters down by adding more teams, or wasting guys' time as practice players, the decision was made to add B sides to every team. This gives a place for guys to learn the game by getting reps and playing a schedule of their own.

Keep It Growing

On top of adding two new teams, and a B side for each of them, the league has now expanded to two more states in the offseason. Minnesota and Oregon were quick to get on board, each following Colorado's model by starting with two teams in different cities.

Minnesota and Oregon took note of what was going on in Colorado and linked up with Scharaga to see how they could duplicate it in their states. Both are former NLL markets that still have the taste for high level senior lacrosse. That's where the IBLA was born, thus creating the need for the first national championship in November.

Just like in Canada, you win your state (or province), and you go to the big dance. The top team from Oregon, Minnesota, and Colorado will meet in the founding state for a three-way playoff.

This isn't the first time the IBLA took the show on the road to test the waters. In a preseason exhibition, the Mile High Stars took on the Denver Buzz a state away in Cheyenne, Wyoming. Looking to grow interest around box lacrosse and just do something new for all involved, they went mobile and gave guys a chance to shake the rust off or prove why the deserve their spot.

RBLL Colorado Parker Ranger IBLA

The goals in Colorado are to build. It starts by building excitement for the game, both with players and with fans. It's about building talent, in motion by separating a massive pool into A and B. They also want to build consistent and proficient officials, dedicating resources to training refs properly. The IBLA also wants to build a rock solid operation, focused on developing strong and reliable management across the board.

They've been working to market themselves to the local community and give locals sports fans something to be excited about. Scharaga believes it's something people should get behind…

It's exciting, affordable entertainment at $5 a game and the kids get in free. The main goal is just to introduce people to the game so they can fall in love with it. Providing a great experience so players and fans want to return, and others are drawn in, is the roadmap to expansion.

Season Preview:

Parker Rangers RBLL Colorado IBLA

After winning the inaugural Front Range Cup, Parker has heavily reloaded for the season. On the backend they got their leader, former NLL defenseman, Dan Finck and both goalies back. On the other side returns the firepower of Tyler Snyder and the massive Clark Woodard. They're poised to defend their title and make a run at the first Nationals, but it's going to be a whole lot harder than last year.

Under the helm of Dave Dennenberg, Israel's assistant coach, the Mile High Stars are in great hands. Drew Lazar will be serving as a major offensive threat, showing just that by putting up 6 goals in Wyoming. British Columbia-raised lefty Max Abbot also racked up 6 in the exhibition, proving his value to the Stars. Scharaga and Kevin Wiley have both returned to guard the irons providing a stable backstop. In front of them, Rowan Sloss, a defensive star turned transition man, was just named captain and looking sharp for 2017.

Mile High Stars RBLL Colorado IBLA

The Unknowns

It's hard to predict what the expansion teams will look like when they hit the floor, but they're not going in without talent and structure. For the Colorado Springs Wolves, the season will be led by Ron Garica, President of Philippines Lacrosse. Garcia put in the work to get things off the ground and picked up Nicola Bevacqua to oversee things as GM and to run on the floor. In the draft they grabbed former Kentucky Stickhorse Taylor Embury and Bevacqua to play key roles in guiding the team.

The Denver Buzz also picked up some experience, nabbing Metro State Denver coach Daniel Hunter to lead their own bench. They showed they have a long way to go, falling in the exhibition, 8-30. Lucky for the Buzz, they've had time to load up and get their ducks in a row before the first game. Mitch Larson is now with Denver after a strong first season for the Stars offensively and they should be able to pull some overlooked B players up to stabilize the roster.

The season in Colorado starts for Denver and Colorado Springs on August 26th at 7:00pm. Parker's first showing is on September 2nd while the Stars will wait until the 9th to get after it.

RBLL Minnesota

There's still a lot of unknowns for Minnesota, but it's surely started in the right direction. Scharaga can't say enough about what Manny Chavez, Blaine Lycans GM, has done to bring the RBLL outside of Colorado.

"MANNY WAS A REALLY SPECIAL PART OF THIS. [MINNESOTA] WAS THE FIRST STATE WE DECIDED TO EXPAND TO. HE MADE SURE THAT EVERYTHING'S DONE AS SIMILAR AS POSSIBLE TO HOW WE DID IT AND HE FOUND WHERE PLAYERS LIVE AND WHERE THE BOX FAN BASES ARE."

Plus, Chavez is a goalie, like Scharaga, which he believes is fundamental when founding leagues. Without goalies, you have no solid product. Chavez knew a wealth of guys, racking up three talented goalies, per team, to start with. Mike Nogel, Hastings Walleye GM, Hastings is connected the community, working hard to organize and get everything going.

Ireland's head coach Tom Howe is taking control of the Walleye to launch it. He's going to have the aide of longtime NLL veteran and former Swarm assistant Aime Caines on the floor and to learn from. Young American goaltending star Graham Husick is going to back Hastings after stints in the BCJALL and with USA U-19.

Blaine is looking just as healthy for their first crack at it. They were able to grab goal-scorer Nick Midboe first-overall in the draft, but the team is reaching far and wide for talent. Players like Corey Holiday and Denton Jackson are traveling from Nations as far as Nebraska and South Dakota respectively.

Things kickoff when the Walleye visit the Lycans on the hard floor on Saturday, August 19th at 7pm.

RBLL Oregon

When Michael Phillips was approached about planting the RBLL seeds in Oregon, he was in with little hesitation. Once again, Phillips happened to be a goalie, and he was hungry for more organized lacrosse. Goalies know players, one thing led to another, and there's now two senior men's lacrosse teams in the Beaver State.

Phillips connected the dots and found Upstate New York native Paul Voas to coach the Beaverton Mountaineers while he helps run things. The Portland Rivermonsters are under the guidance of co-captains, both of which have relocated for the season. Two-time provincial champion Ryan Emery is in from Kamloops, BC, with Jake Morris from Reno, NV, to help shape things.

RBLL Oregon box lacrosse IBLA

Players are coming from all over the state and trekking down from Washington to be a part of the first run of the RBLL Oregon. It only takes getting past one team to get a shot at Nationals, why not take a crack at it?

Oregon is the first to get started, starting this Saturday at 7pm in the PDX Sports Center in Portland.

"TOWNS NOW HAVE THEIR OWN TEAMS AND THERE'S FINALLY SOMETHING TO CHEER FOR LOCALLY OUTSIDE OF HIGH SCHOOL."

Stay Tuned

With games starting this weekend in Portland, things are just on the edge of taking off. We will be back every week with an update from all three IBLA states.

You can follow along with any of the games through their excellent stats website, but for $5, we recommend getting up and going to the games yourself. If you're not in a IBLA market right now, you might be in the near future.

Legals

Bid for Storm Cleanup

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Emergency Management Office

Summary:

Shall undertake all duties relating to June storm cleanup, tree/debris removal. Pertaining to 5 tribal member properties that were affected by the June 2017 storm.

Requirements:

o Provide your own supplies and necessary equipment.

o Tribal business license.

o TERO Certification.

o General Liability insurance/Workman's Comp.

o Cut fallen trees into firewood size.

o Transport all firewood to Dakotah Pride Treatment Center.

o Transport all debris to the landfill at own cost.

Specifications can be picked up at the Planning Department.

Schedule:

Need to complete work by 09/15/2017.

Deadline:

12:00PM (Noon) on August 18th, 2017.

Bids must be in a sealed envelope and submitted to the Procurement Office Any bids received after this time will not be accepted.

All interested parties acknowledge that any Agreement executed and performed within the Tribe's exclusive jurisdiction is subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the Tribal Court of Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation.

All interested parties acknowledge that they must comply with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Ordinances:

TERO Chapter 59 Requirements, Wage Rates & Compliance Plan; Business License Ordinance Chapter 53 and Tax Ordinance Chapter 67; and Chapter 75 Sex Offender Registration.

33-1tc

 

THREE AFFILIATED TRIBES

IN DISTRICT COURT

FORT BERHOLD INDIAN RESERVATION

NEW TOWN, NORTH DAKOTA

Civil Case No. 2016-0251

In the matter of C.R.E.H. and S.A.M., Child Custody.

Simon Red Fox, Petitioner

vs

Hillary Mountain, Wallace Hosie Jr., Unknown father of S.A.M., Respondents

SUMMONS

TO THE ABOVE NAMED RESPONDENT(S):

YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED AND REQUIRED to file an Answer to the Complaint/Petition in this action, which is attached, with the Clerk of this Court and serve upon Petitioners or his/her Attorney within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons upon you, exclusive of the day of service, If you fail to do so, u Default can be granted for the relief demanded in the Complaint/Petition.

Dated this 9th day of August, 2017.

FORT BERTHOLD DISTRICT COURT

(701)-627-4803

PO Box 969

New Town, ND 58763

Jamie M.S. Herman, Clerk of Tribal Court.

33-3tc

 

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-09-601-439

In the Matter of TIHME, a minor child and concerning

LEANN EASTMAN, Petitioner

vs.

MATTHEW PENDLETON, Respondent

ORDER OF PUBLICATION AND

NOTICE OF HEARING

The record indicates that the Tribal Court has been unable and/or the Respondent has been unwilling to accept service in this matter. Therefore, it is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided upon the Petitioner's Petition for Custody. Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the SWO Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 14th day of September, 2017 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWO  copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 13th day of July, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow Presiding Judge.

ATTEST: Lois A. Kohl, Clerk of Court.

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 10-030

SWOCSE/ Shannon Hopkins, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DANIEL CAMPBELL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Dismiss current and Establish Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of August, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of June, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 07-101

SWOCSE/ Whitney Hopkins, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DANIEL CAMPBELL, III, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of August, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of June, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 08-045

SWOCSE/ Jonita Barse, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DUSTY CLOUD, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of August, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of June, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 13-024

SWOCSE/ Elizabeth Hosie, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DUSTY CLOUD, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of August, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

 

Dated this 27th day of June, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 12-086

SWOCSE/ SD/Karen Lufkins, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DUSTY CLOUD, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of August, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of June, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 10-073

SWOCSE/ Mona Williams, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DUSTY CLOUD, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of August, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of June, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 15-026

SWOCSE/ Carrie HisGun, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DERRICK FLUTE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of August, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of June, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 17-045

SWOCSE/ SD/Ella Robertson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SHANE JEFFERSON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition for Recognition of Foreign Order and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of August, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of June, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 00-197

SWOCSE/ Alberta Crawford, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TRESSA BISSONETTE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of August, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of June, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 07-118

SWOCSE/ Curtis Bissonette, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TRESSA BISSONETTE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of August, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of June, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 16-173

SWOCSE/ Danette Kirk, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TRESSA BISSONETTE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of August, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of June, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 03-253

SWOCSE/ Rhiannon Redday, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JOSHUA DUMARCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of August, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of June, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-009

SWOCSE/ Sheila Lufkins, PLAINTIFF

VS.

OLIVER JACK, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of August, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of June, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-027

SWOCSE/ Kassaundra Sell, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MARKUS BARSE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of August, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of June, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 16-071

SWOCSE/ Margret Roy, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SHAWNDA BERNARD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of August, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of June, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 13-103

SWOCSE/ Joanne Rockwood, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ROSANNA HEER, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of August, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of June, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-072

SWOCSE/ Shanice Keoke, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TYSON FLUTE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Paternity and Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 1st day of September, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of June, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 16-102

SWOCSE/ LaVonne Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

OWINTINO HORNE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 1st day of September, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of June, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 02-191

SWOCSE/ Stephanie Williams, PLAINTIFF

VS.

NICOLAUS JOHNSON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 1st day of September, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of June, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 07-130

SWOCSE/ Yolanda Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BRIAN RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 1st day of September, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of June, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 08-066

SWOCSE/ Monica Littlebird, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MATTHEW GILL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of August, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of June, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-125

SWOCSE/ Sophia Bissonette, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JENNIFER OWEN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of August, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of July, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-134

SWOCSE/ Laura Small, PLAINTIFF

VS.

KALISE BAGOLA, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of August, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of July, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 05-519

SWOCSE/ Donita Wika, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ANTHONY COURNOYER, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of August, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of July, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 12-017

SWOCSE/ Aubrey Carlson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MITCHELL MASKEWIT, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of August, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of July, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-138

SWOCSE/ Alex Montreal, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JEREMY STORM, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of August, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of July, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 16-004

SWOCSE/ Larose Kampeska, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CLAUDE KAMPESKA, Jr. DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 1st day of September, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of July, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-056

SWOCSE/ Laura Small, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JERWYN RODLUND, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Paternity & Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 1st day of September, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of July, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 16-066

SWOCSE/ Delano Grant, PLAINTIFF

VS.

WAMBDI SEABOY, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Paternity & Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 1st day of September, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of July, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 06-252

SWOCSE/ Lavonne Spider, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JERILYN SPIDER, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 1st day of September, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of July, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 08-137

SWOCSE/ Angeline Spider, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JEREMIAH GREY, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 1st day of September, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of July, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

32-3tc

Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Tutor, JOM

Teacher, Early Head Start

Teacher Aide, Early Head Start

Bus Driver/Custodian, Head Start

Closing Date: August 18th, 2017 @ 04:30 PM

Attorney, Legal Department

Teacher Aide (3-positions), Head Start

Teacher (3-positions), Early Head Start

Youth Prevention Specialist, Veterans Memorial Youth Center

Resident Assistant, Wacinyan Tipi

Closing Date: August 25th, 2017 @ 04:30 PM

Application and job description information can be seen at SWO Human Resources Office or http://www.swo-nsn.gov/contact/employment. Application can be downloaded from "Apply Now" and emailed to ArnoldW@SWO-NSN.GOV or DeniseH@SWO-NSN.GOV. Contact can also be at Arnold Williams 698-8238 or Denise Hill 698-8251 with questions. (Tribal preference will apply).

 

Long Hollow District

Janitor/Custodial Job Description

We are looking for a responsible custodian to maintain our facility. Position will be part-time 3 days a week. The external and internal appearance of the District Center reflects on "us" Long Hollow District members. It is important for a custodian, or janitor to be careful and thorough in working, cleaning and tidying the premises, as well as preventing vandalism. Responsibilities: Ensure spaces are prepared for the next day by taking out trash, tidying furniture and dusting surfaces. Sweep and mop floors. Wash and sanitize toilets, sinks, showers and restock disposables (e.g. soap, toilet paper, paper towels, and utensils). Wipe mirrors and windows. Maintain outer premises by picking up trash, etc. Utilize insecticides to prevent mice, ants, and other bugs. Report all minor and major damages to District Coordinator or District Executives immediately. Undertake occasional custodial and janitorial tasks (shoveling snow from the sidewalk, salt sidewalk, lifting and moving heavy items, moving chairs, tables, etc.) Requirements: Proven experience as custodian, janitor or similar role. Knowledge of use and maintenance or industrial cleaning equipment and appliances. Knowledge of safe disposal of chemical liquids and other hazardous materials. Familiarity with basic handyman practices. Attention to detail and conscientiousness. Very good physical condition and strength, able to lift up to 50 pounds or more. G.E.D/High school diploma is preferred, but not required. Other job duties as required. Position closes on Aug. 25, 2017.

32-2tc

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Current Vacancies:

Substitutes needed for custodial, kitchen, teaching, and transportation - starting at $10/hr, varies per position Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma (please contact the HR office for more information) Applications are accepted on an on-going basis

2017-2018 School Year Vacancies:

Vacancy: Middle School Teacher Qualifications: Current Teaching Certification in any state meeting the requirements for the position in which applying Opening Date: May 1, 2017 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vancancy: Bus Monitor (Routes: E. Sisseton, W. Sisseton/Long Hollow, Dakota Magic/New Effington) Qualifications: GED/HS Diploma and willing to obtain CPR/Fist Aid Certifications Opening Date: June 13, 2017 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: High School Science Teacher Qualifications: Current Teacher Certification from any state meeting the requirements for the position in which applying Opening Date: June 29, 2017 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Art Teacher Qualifications: Current Teacher Certification from any state meeting the requirements for the position in which applying Opening Date: June 29, 2017 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Special Education Teacher Qualifications: Current Teacher Certification from any state meeting the requirements for the position in which applying. Opening Date: August 3, 2017. Closing Date: August 18, 2017

Vacancy: Information and Network Technology Manager Qualifications: Associates degree or equivalent from two-year college or technical school with a major in Computer Systems Technology or at least 3 years of college in Computer Systems Technology (prefer a candidate witha BA or BS degree in Computer Science with major in Computer Systems Technology or related field). Experience with providing network administration and in developing and maintaining technology solutions in an educational setting. Opening Date: August 11, 2017. Closing Date: August 25, 2017

Vacancy: Paraprofessional Qualifications: High School Diploma/GED and 461+ on the Paraprofessional Praxis or 48+ college credits in directly related field and one year experience. Opening Date: August 11, 2017. Closing Date: August 25, 2017

2017-2018 Extra-Curricular Activities Vacancies: Opening Date: May 19, 2017. Closing Date: Open until filled

Athletic Vacancies - Applicants must meet the South Dakota High School Activities Association requirements at time of application and have 2 years experience.

Athletic Coach Applicant Questionaire is to be submitted along with TZTS employee application. See our Employment webpage or contact us for a Head Coach Job Description and/or Assistant Coach Job Description.

Jr. High Boys Basketball Coach

Jr. High Girls Basketball Coach

Winter Cheer Coach

Assistant Boys Varsity Basketball Coach

Assistant Girls Varsity Basketball Coach

Assistant Track Coach

Assistant Volleyball Coach

Assistant Wrestling Coach

Extra-Curricular Activities Adviser Vacancies - Extra Curricular Adviser Job Description

Debate/Individual Events

Drum Adviser

Junior Class Adviser

National Honors Society Adviser

Oral Interpretation Adviser

Speech Adviser

Weight Room Monitor

If you would like to apply to be a part of the TZ tiwahe you may pick up an application and background check form from the TZTS HR office located at #2 Tiospa Zina Dr. Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications may also be printed off the HR web page. Completed applications may be sent to PO Box 719, Agency Village, SD 57262. Faxed to: 605-698-7686. For further information call 605-698-3953 ext. 208. Indian Preference employer. At will employer. All applicants are subject to a Background Check and Pre-Employment Drug Test, pursuant to SWSB policy and United States Code Title 25 Chapter 34 - Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention.

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Accounting Department:

Revenue Audit Clerk (Full-Time) Day-rotating weekends

Cage Department:

Cashier (Full-Time) Graveyard

Supervisor (Full-Time) Graveyard

Foods Department:

Bus Persons (Full-Time) as needed

Cashiers (Full-Time) as needed

Dishwashers (Full-Time) as needed

Wait Staffs (Full-Time) as needed

Supervisor (4 Full-Time) Day, Swing

Hotel Department:

Room/Laundry attendant (Full-Time) 8:00am to finish

Housekeeping Department:

Porter (Full-Time) as needed

Marketing Department

Supervisor (Full-Time) Rotating

Security Department:

Officer (Full-Time) as needed

Surveillance Department:

Observer (Full-Time) as needed

Closing Date: August 18, 2017 at 4:00 p.m.

Two identifications documents required upon hire.

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE, Hankinson ND 58041.For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO. (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment). Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 
 

 

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