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Volume 49 Issue No. 33

Anpetu Iyamni, Wednesday, August 15, 2018

Inside this Edition –

Chairman Dave Flute updates the Oyate

REB releases official candidates list for 2018 SWO elections

Lake Traverse Reservation designated Purple Heart Reservation in ceremony last week

Sara DeCoteau recognized for serving Oyate health needs for 45 years

Highlights of last week's National Night Out

Reminder: Deadline for receiving copy is noon on Friday

Chairman's Corner –

Updating the Oyate

My friends and relatives:

Recently, our Tribe has suffered some heavy losses from many good families across our reservation; it is with a heavy heart, to all those families, that I say on behalf of the entire Tribe I send our sincerest sympathies.

I am very proud to announce, that our Tribe, is the third in the entire United States of America, to be officially recognized as a Purple Heart Reservation. I want to thank the families of deceased and living recipients that attended this historic event and showed great appreciation to our Tribal leadership for making this happen. I am grateful for our TVSO and her assistant, Geri Opsal and Gabe Fischer, for coordinating the set-up, food and banners and blankets for this event. I want to thank SD Governor Daugaard's office for his proclamation, and Senator Rounds' statement. I will share ND Governor Burgum's proclamation as soon as it comes, as well as our North Dakota and South Dakota delegations' letters. The irony of this event and our Tribe being officially recognized as a Purple Heart Reservation, is that this also fell on the national recognition day, August 7th. We had state commanders as far as West Virginia and commanders from Region VIII from California that attended this event. Also, about 16 Purple Heart veterans from Chapter 5355 from Sioux Falls and other local Purple Heart organizations attended and were grateful we did this for the Reservation and all the community. It was an emotional event that is non-partisan and will now forever be engrained into our Tribe. I am humbled by the presentations given to me and look forward to official signs that will be placed at various locations and major highways, acknowledging our Reservation as a Purple Heart Reservation.

Our hemp project is growing phenomenally and we are excited to get ready for the harvest stage. Once we see the quality and value of that quality will dictate our next step. Unofficially, we are the only Tribe in the nation that is growing industrial hemp, and once we do get official notification, there will be a national press release and interviews highlighting our operation. We look forward to keeping everyone updated via the Sota and KSXW.

I cannot express enough, the importance of keeping our Tribe aligned with our sister tribes in the Great Plains. The Department of Interior, under the direction of the President, is proposing to re-organize the tribal regions. I have made it clear to the Secretary of Interior, that I do not support taking the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe out of the Great Plains and aligning us with the Great Lakes region. I provided testimony during an official consultation session last fall in Shakopee and will be providing testimony again in Rapid City with the rest of our sister tribes. These issues are vital and it is important that leadership educate themselves on the impacts this would have on us if we were pulled out of the Great Plains, separated from our sister tribes, and put into the mix with the Great Lakes Region; and there are many, upon many complications that would not be in our best interest. Therefore, I will be in Rapid City August 20-21 reaffirming our position of remaining with the O'ceti Shakowin. Again, I understand "some people" do not like what I have to say about the name, but this is another reason why it is important to remain as our sister tribes do and refer to themselves per the treaties that were made with the U.S. Government; every tribe in our region identify themselves as "Sioux Tribe," except us. I cannot help but think, when I get approached by government officials and other people, the "Oyate" name gets tossed in the mix with Ojibwe, Omaha, Oneida and Ottowa and it really, really concerns me that we are not keeping within the name that is on our treaty and in my opinion it is hurting us.

Heipa' wacipi is coming up around the corner and so is Toka Nuwan; we look forward to seeing some of the finest moccasin games and some tough singing and dancing. I encourage all of you to go and check out these local district powwows as they are keeping our culture alive.

Aho!

Dave Flute, Chairman.

Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe.

REB releases official candidates list for 2018 SWO elections

The Reservation Election Board released its official list of candidates for the 2018 SWO elections on Friday, August 10th. Please see the entire notice elsewhere in this Sota.

Here are candidates listed on the ballot for the primary election Tuesday, October 2, 2018:

BIG COULEE:

       Alvah Quinn Sr.

       Alexandria "Lexie" Fancher

       Bruce Robertson Jr.

 

ENEMY SWIM:

       Lois Owens

       Cheryl Owen

       Jan Red Wing

       Kevin Robert

 

LAKE TRAVERSE:

       Francis Crawford

       Dawn Thompson

       Chad Ward

 

OLD AGENCY:

       Milton "Nippy" Owen

       Ethan Dumarce

       Jesse Larsen

 

TRIBAL SECRETARY:

       Edmund Johnson Jr.

       Lisa Jackson

       Myrna Thompson

 

TRIBAL CHAIRPERSON:

       David Flute

       Ella Robertson

       Michael Selvage Sr.

 

There will be NO primary election for the following candidates. Voting for these positions will be held during the Tribe's general election Tuesday, November 6, 2018.

 

BUFFALO LAKE:

       Arnold White Jr.

       Louis Johnson

 

HEIPA:

       Winfield Rondell III

       Marc Beaudreau

 

LONG HOLLOW:

       Justin Chanku Sr.

       Curtis Bissonette

 

TRIBAL VICE-CHAIR:

       Floyd Kirk Jr.

       Danielle DeCoteau

Lake Traverse Reservation designated Purple Heart Reservation in ceremony last week

From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer"

GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov

605-268-0502

*PURPLE HEART DAY: It was such a wonderful turnout, our Purple Heart recipients and families as well as all of the guests. Thanks to Jerome Sr., an crew for setting up all the tables and chairs and to Dakota Magic Casino again, the dream team, for providing such a great meal. It was just fantastic. Now the other tribes in SD are going to follow suit and start their process as well. I think it's a great thing that our Veterans are recognized across the State. Our Desert Era Veterans, American Legion Post #314 & Kit Fox brought in the colors, Gerald Thompson carried the Purple Heart Flag which was so appropriate as he himself is a Purple Heart Recipient as well as his Father in law and brother in law, Peggy Heminger Thompson's father Leroy Heminger and her brother Terry Heminger. Just a family full of Heroes. Vanessa Carlson who is the niece of Arden Renville, KIA and Purple Heart as well the Mother of two Veterans one currently still serving active duty helped us to decorate, thanks again. There is power in numbers and everything just looked so wonderful, there were many compliments from the guests as well as Veterans who so deserve the special day. It was so nice to see David Seaboy and Earl Evans whose families brought them from the Webster Nursing Home. Our WWII and Korean Veterans are getting up there in years even the Vietnam Veterans so we need to cherish them and honor them while they walk this earth. For those of you that weren't able to attend KXWS 89.9 had the whole ceremony recorded including how this came about – it's really good to listen to if you have time to check it out. It's great how our Tribe was approached during the visit of the Korean Ambassador - what a great honor bestowed upon our Tribe. I was very happy that Angela Beacom, Roberts County VSO, Day County & Brookings County VSO, all came to witness. I believe the Counties will also be applying for this to honor all the Veterans across the State, so this is going to have the snow ball effect and be a good thing for those Veterans that earned the Purple Heart. See the Chairman's column, as he may have a copy of the Resolution that was passed that day.

*The Student Conservation Association is seeking US Military Veteran Fire Corps candidates to serve in Nebraska, South Dakota, and Colorado. Please share this information with anyone who may be interested. Below you will find our current veteran opportunities, job postings for the three locations (Nebraska, South Dakota, and Colorado), a link to our blog story about the VFC, a video link about the program, and I have attached a flyer with additional information. About SCA Veteran Opportunities: https://www.thesca.org/serve/program/veterans-opportunitiesSouth Dakota VFC Job Posting: https://www.thesca.org/serve/position/2018-black-hills-nf-vfa-team-fall/po-00725405 Benefits Include: $280 living allowance (weekly) $650 travel allowance (one time) Housing is provided Eligible for AmeriCorps Education Award Training - over $1,200 worth of certifications. The following are qualifications required for selection: Post 9/11 US Veteran, DD 214 indicating an honorable discharge or general discharge (under honorable conditions) on a case-by-case basis. Acceptance into this program is contingent on proof of Veteran status, Valid driver's license, Successfully pass a criminal background check, Be comfortable and willing to live and work with veterans from all branches of service, Wildland firefighting demands a high level of fitness to work in difficult environmental conditions, including steep terrain, extreme temperatures, altitude and smoke, Must pass SCA's medical screening, Must pass the Work Capacity (Pack) Test at the "arduous" level. The Pack Test consists of completing a 3-mile hike with 45-pound pack in 45 minutes. Thank you for your time, and if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to reach out. P: 703.524.2441, ext. 2028 jsushelsky@thesca.org

*Congratulations: To Ashley Johnson's son Jaymin who graduated from US Army basic training on August 8, 2018 in Fort Jackson, SC. He is the grandson of Anita Barse ane Louie Johnson. It's great to see our young ones step up and continue to serve. (See the accompanying photo of Jaymin.)

Schedule of events:

Aug 20-24-SDDVA Benefits School-Ramkota-Pierre

Aug 24-30-American Legion National Convention-Minneapolis, MN

Sept 21 -8th Annual POW/MIA Day - front of Tribal Admin Building

Sept 30 - Gold Star Mother Day

*****

*GI Bill Info: 1-888-442-4551, ask any questions check eligibility!

*Crisis Line: 1-800-273-8255 Press 1 for Veterans.

*Make the Connection: 1-888-823-7458 (inspiring stories about Veterans).

Contact information: American Legion Post #314 Woodrow Wilson Honor Guard: Clayton Ellingson, Commander 1-605-924-1266 / Vietnam Veterans Kit Fox Society - Doc Wanna, Commander Phone:# 698-3299 / Desert Era Veterans - Jesse Chanku, Commander 1-605-956-0197: Geri Opsal, TVSO 698-3388 or 268-0502. GABE: 1-605-419-1007 - PLEASE SCHEDULE IN ADVANCE AT LEAST 5-7 DAYS AS HE MAY BE BOOKED.

Have a great and safe week.

Geri Opsal, TVSO.

Seasons change, but commitment to serve does not

Larry Zimmerman, Secretary.

SD Dept. of Veterans Affairs

Once the celebrations of the Fourth of July are behind us we have the tendencies to start cramming as much summer fun as we can into our calendars.

We are getting close to turning the pages from summer to fall. Pools will be closing and school doors will be opening. We will be putting away the boats, jet skis, bikes, and lawn mowers and we will be getting out the rakes and servicing the snow blowers.

Our troops serving don’t have the opportunity to enjoy the season changes â€" they work in severe cold, sudden thaws, heavy rains, great heat, and high winds as each war zone has its own special climate.

Our country's military has left a legacy like no other fighting force ever assembled. The uniforms they wear, and the flag they carry, are held in esteem wherever they have served. And that is their finest tribute. Across the world, to people who struggle and suffer, the sight of an American in uniform has meant hope, relief, and deliverance.

Our troops live and perform by a creed to serve the people of this great country by carrying out their mission. There are no seasonal distractions for them.

Whatever the season, make sure to plan time with family and friends. Make sure to remember our troops that are serving. They are the guardians of our freedom and the way of life we have come to love. We depend on their sacrifices.

Community observes National Night Out

Submitted by Sara McGregor-Okroi

National Night Out is an annual event celebrated nationwide each year on the first Tuesday in August.

Purpose of the event is to promote drug prevention awareness, as well as to strengthten police-community partnerships and bring neighborhoods together to create safer, more caring places to live.

National Night Out provides an opportunity to bring law enforcement and community members together under positive circumstances to celebrate what makes communities great.

This year's National Night Out celebration was planned and hosted by the Sisseton Police Department, SWO Law Enforcement and the Roberts County Sheriff's Office. Aliive-Roberts County was also part of the planning process.

The event took place on August 7th at the SWO Memorial Park.

Over 200 community members attended and enjoyed the festivities.

Other participants in the event included: South Dakota National Guard, Roberts County Coroner, Sisseton Fire Department, Roberts County Emergency Management, Grant-Roberts Ambulance, South Dakota Highway Patrol, SWO Behavioral Health Department, Sisseton Chamber of Commerce, and Fallout Shelter Ministries.

The agencies involved in the planning would like to thank the following sponsors for the donations to make the event a success: Shopko Foundation, SWO Café, Dakota Magic and Casino, and Thrivent Financial. A special thank you goes out to Vice Chairman Floyd Kirk Jr. for providing food, KXSW's Tom Wilson for the entertainment, SWO Game, Fish and Parks for the use of the park and SWO Child Protection for the backpacks that were provided to the youth who attended. Without local support, community events couldn't happen and each donation of either materials or time was appreciated very much.

The next National Night Out event will take place on August 6, 2019.

See accompanying photo highlights.

Two tribes hail court stay preventing FCC from cutting off Lifeline services to most tribal lands

Fort Thompson, SD – August 10, 2018 – The Crow Creek Sioux Tribe and the Oceti Sakowin Tribal Utility Authority announced today that they are "very pleased" with the decision today by U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit preventing the FCC Lifeline Order from going into effect that would have effectively ended Lifeline service on many Tribal lands. The court's decision is available online at http://bit.ly/LifelineOrderStay.

"Our people have long suffered from flawed federal government policies and actions, so the Court's decision today is an important step in righting past injustices and allowing residents of Tribal lands to obtain critical Lifeline services," said Joe RedCloud, executive director, Oceti Sakowin Tribal Utility Authority.

"Residents of Tribal lands, like many low-income consumers, rely on Lifeline service from wireless resellers, who are the primary, and sometimes only, providers of Lifeline service," said Gene DeJordy, attorney for the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe. "The victory today is for the people -- Tribal members who cannot afford many of the basic necessities of life and rely on Lifeline service for their telephone and broadband needs."

In the stay order, the Court ruled: "Petitioners have demonstrated a likelihood of success on the merits of their arguments that the facilities-based and rural areas limitations contained in the Order are arbitrary and capricious. In particular, petitioners contend that the Federal Communications Commission failed to account for a lack of alternative service providers for many tribal customers."

The court action freezes implementation of a December 1, 2017 FCC rule, "Bridging the Digital Divide for Low-Income Consumers," that order limits eligibility for the Tribal Lifeline enhanced Lifeline subsidy to "facilities-based" service providers, as opposed to the "resellers" that actually provide Lifeline services in the vast majority of tribal areas.

(Editor's note: Lifeline service is provided on the Lake Traverse Reservation.)

Congressional candidate Bjorkman meets with Oyate members

Tim Bjorkman brought his campaign for Congress to Sisseton on Thursday, July 26.

Bjorkman, the Democratic candidate for South Dakota's lone seat in the U.S. House of Representatives, spent several hours in Sisseton, with a stop at headquarters of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribe of the Lake Traverse Reservation.

During his meeting with Tribal members, Bjorkman was told of long waits for service through the Indian Health Service, primarily due to a lack of funding.

They also discussed the need for a detox center for people struggling with opioid addiction, and meth use, which is running rampant across the state and region and has hit Native American communities hard.

People are referred to other facilities, Bjorkman was told, but then the IHS refuses to make payments.

When Tribal members do not pay the bills, their credit ratings are damaged. It's a vicious circle that leaves them harmed in several ways.

Another problem is the high rate of turnover among medical staff, especially physicians. Contracting with Avera or Sanford might help relieve that.

The discussion was deeply personal, since everyone who met with Bjorkman had lost a family member due to the lack of continuity, with doctors coming and going at a rapid rate, they said.

Bjorkman suggested establishing a scholarship to pay for the education of healthcare professionals. However, the lure of higher-paying jobs in urban hospitals makes it difficult to retain staff.

A possible solution is to establish satellite clinics in each District. That would reduce travel time and cost. The increased use of tele-pharmacy and other new technologies also would be beneficial.

Tribal members also said they wished for stronger relations with the city of Sisseton. They said the city has made few efforts to reach out to the Oyate.

Bjorkman said he will seek input from Native Americans and be aware of issues that impact them. He said he would have at least one Native American on his congressional staff.

"I made it a point when I announced for Congress as someone with no political experience or connections to reach out to Native Americans across the state as I've tried to do with other South Dakotans," Bjorkman wrote in a column last week. "I traveled to the Pine Ridge and Rosebud on multiple occasions and have met with members of the Rosebud Sioux, Oglala Sioux, Yankton Sioux, Cheyenne River Sioux, Standing Rock Sioux, Flandreau Santee Sioux, and Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate tribes so far. I also have trips in the works to the Lower Brule Sioux and Crow Creek Sioux.

"I have conducted town halls in Mission on the Rosebud (Jan. 13), in Eagle Butte on the Cheyenne for that community and Standing Rock (May 18), and on the Pine Ridge (May 25) and offered to come to other reservations and conduct them also. In those town hall sessions I listened carefully to what each person who attended had to say, and answered every question asked until the questions stopped coming, then met individually and listened to stories until people were done.

"I have heard seemingly unending accounts from those who have fallen through the cracks of IHS healthcare, something I saw on the bench for over a decade as well. I've heard their stories of failure to get basic healthcare even though our government has a federal treaty obligation to provide it. I've spoken across the state, not just on reservations, about the need to hold the government accountable for this travesty that is harming so many of our fellow citizens and spoken of the need to treat the meth and opioid epidemics as the national health crises they are rather than a ticket to prison."

"I've listened to the many aspects of tribal jurisdiction issues, criminal justice issues, sovereignty problems, and a host of others."

"In addition to the town halls we've held, I've met with Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribal Council members and toured their remarkable new healthcare clinic, and just this week met with Tribal Council members of Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate. We will continue to hold meet and greets and other events across the tribal lands in South Dakota and will continue to listen to tribal members who live off the reservations in our communities across the state. I've fielded a large number of questions from Natives across the state on Facebook and on the campaign trail at fairs like Central States, the Sioux Empire and others."

In Sisseton, Bjorkman attended a meet-and-greet fundraiser hosted by Kent Frerichs, Maurine and Don Slotto, Kathy Tyler, Karen Devine, Gary Hanson and Jason and Ashley Frerichs at the Valley View Golf Course.

Bjorkman, a former circuit court judge, promises to work for affordable healthcare for all, fight to protect Social Security and has signed a term limits pledge.

He also is focused on economic development across the state. He promises to train his entire congressional staff in economic development for rural communities like Sisseton.

Bjorkman refuses all special interest money or donations from political action committees so he can represent regular South Dakotans.

"You can't fight special interests if you are taking their money," he said.

Bjorkman was unopposed for the Democratic nomination for South Dakota's lone congressional seat. He will face Republican Dusty Johnson, Libertarian George Hendrickson and independent Ronald Wieczorek in the Nov. 7 election.

For more, go to timbjorkman.com.

Announces New Northeast Area Regional Director

Pierre, SD – August 6, 2018 – U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) today announced that Jennifer Hieb has been hired to serve as his Northeast Area Regional Director. She replaces Josh Haeder, who is stepping down later this month, and is based in Rounds' Aberdeen office.

"Jen has served in a variety of marketing and leadership roles throughout her career," said Rounds. "Her experience, along with her desire to serve others, will be a tremendous asset to my office and the Northeast region. I look forward to having Jen join our team as we continue to provide the best possible constituent services across the state."

Hieb most recently served as secretary for the School of Education at Northern State University. She previously worked as director of marketing for Aberdeen Wings of the NAHL and as Vice President for Advancement at Presentation College. A native of Tripp and graduate of Augustana University in Sioux Falls, Hieb has lived in Aberdeen with her husband, Jack, and their three sons for more than 20 years.

Bipartisan bill supports Indian country, ag, affordable housing

"… an additional $2 million in funding to hire staff for tribal detention facilities, which could apply to the facility being constructed by the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribe."

Washington, DC – Aug. 1, 2018 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today voted with a bipartisan majority of the U.S. Senate to pass a bipartisan funding bill that includes major wins for Indian Country, North Dakota crop and livestock producers, and affordable housing projects.

"This bipartisan spending package helps fund many of North Dakota's most pressing priorities, including Farm Service Agency funding to help our farmers in times of crisis, increased public safety resources on our reservations, and greater affordable housing opportunities for our vulnerable neighbors," said Hetikamp. "We have immense education, health, and law enforcement challenges in Indian Country, and I fought to make sure this bill would provide necessary funding for my Commission on Native Children, which became law in 2016. Since first arriving in the U.S. Senate, I've fought to create, fully fund, and fully staff this Commission so that it can address these challenges for Native kids in North Dakota and across the country. Additionally, this bill supports publicly conducted agricultural research, which is so important as growers look to increase their yields in an environmentally responsible way and to protect against disease. As we continue to push for a strong, bipartisan Farm Bill like the one recently passed by the Senate, this bill supports our producers' interests and will work to provide greater certainty amid the administration's continued trade disruptions."

The bipartisan bill includes several key provisions Heitkamp fought for to address the complex challenges facing North Dakota's Native communities, promote affordable housing and business opportunities in North Dakota's rural communities, hold federal agencies accountable, and support North Dakota's ag producers, including:

Indian Country

· Funding Heitkamp's Commission on Native Children. The Senate-passed bill includes an amendment Heitkamp cosponsored that would provide funding for her Commission on Native Children, which was created by her bipartisan bill that became law in October 2016. It was the first bill she introduced as a U.S. senator. Earlier this month, the Commission held its first meeting to address the major economic, social, justice, health, and educational disparities experienced by Native American children.

· Boosting resources for tribal law enforcement officials and facilities. The bill includes a Heitkamp amendment that would provide an additional $2 million in funding to hire staff for tribal detention facilities, which could apply to the facility being constructed by the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribe. Additionally, the bill includes increased funding to combat domestic violence in tribal communities, improve criminal investigations, and support detention and correctional services. This legislation builds on Heitkamp's years-long push to improve public safety in Indian Country following her introduction of Savanna's Act last year to address the epidemic of missing and murdered indigenous women, and passage of her bipartisan bill to expand AMBER Alerts in Indian Country, which was signed into law earlier this year.

· Securing funding for federal tribal technical colleges, including United Tribes Technical College (UTTC), and tribal colleges and universities. The bill would maintain funding for UTTC, one of two tribal technical colleges authorized and funded under the Tribal College Act. This funding builds on Heitkamp's efforts to protect the mission UTTC, including successfully pushing for a waiver that prevented the college from losing its Pell Grant Eligibility. Additionally, the bipartisan bill provides funding for the 28 tribal colleges and universities funded under the Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities Assistance Act.

· Securing critical Bureau of Indian Affairs social services funding for North Dakota caseworkers. The bill would include funding for social services programs that allow caseworkers to respond and intervene in crisis situations on reservations. Additionally, the funding will allow the program to continue conducting outreach activities to strengthen and support families while preventing domestic abuse and child maltreatment.

· Promoting health care professions in Indian Country. The bill would provide important funding for three federal programs—including the Quentin N. Burdick American Indians into Nursing Program, which funds college and university programs to train Native students for health professions. These programs are critical in addressing the shortage of American Indian health professionals. For example, the University of North Dakota has graduated hundreds of American Indian nurses and medical and health science students through each of these programs.

· Increasing funding to address alcohol and other substance abuse challenges facing Native communities. The bill would direct the Indian Health Service to increase its support for culturally competent preventive, educational, and treatment services programs and partner with academic institutions with established training and health professions programs to research and promote culturally responsive care— including to address the ongoing opioid and methamphetamines crisis.

Agriculture

· Securing critical Farm Service Agency (FSA) funding amid plans to slash disaster assistance. The bill pushes back against the administration's request to cut funding to the FSA, which supports the delivery of farm loans, commodity, conservation, and disaster assistance. Many farmers throughout North Dakota rely on FSA ownership and operating loan programs to stay in business and weather periods of low commodity prices or droughts. Last year, Heitkamp successfully pressed USDA to provide additional staffing at FSA offices across North Dakota to help farmers and ranchers get drought assistance. Additionally, this bill maintains funding for the Grassroots Source Water Protection Program.

· Strengthening public agriculture research in North Dakota through the Agriculture Research Service (ARS). ARS is the USDA's principal scientific in-house research agency, and this bill would fund research projects across the country that assist U.S producers, protect sustained federal investment in this research, and support programs that directly benefit North Dakota growers— including the Pulse Crop Health Initiative, the Small Grains Genomic Initiative, and the U.S. Wheat and Barley Scab Initiative.

· Funding student and faculty-led agricultural research. The bill would provide funding for USDA's Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR), which provides funding to rural universities so they have the resources to be competitive in academic research. Click here for more information about North Dakota EPSCoR.

· Supporting small businesses in rural communities. The bill would maintain funding for grants that support the growth of small and emerging rural businesses. Additionally, this bill includes funding for Agricultural Innovation Centers, which partner with land grant universities to help market regionally grown crops with local businesses.

· Funding accurate agricultural data through the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS). This bill would support NASS as it works to provide accurate and useful statistics to support U.S. agriculture.

· Strengthening National institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) funding. This bill would provide funding for important NIFA programs that assist North Dakota farmers and ranchers, including the Farm Business Management and Benchmarking grant program, the Alfalfa Seed and Alfalfa Forage Systems Research Program, and Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) research. Support of UAS research through NIFA will help North Dakotans address emerging UAS issues, such as precision agriculture, ecosystem management and services, socio-economic impacts, and specific-data related issues. Additionally, the bill includes increased funding for programs that would help Native American students pursue careers in agriculture, building on Heitkamp's provisions in the 2018 Senate-passed Farm Bill to support beginning farmers and strengthen Tribal Promise Zones.

· Protecting safe drinking water in rural and remote areas. The bill includes funding to the Circuit Rider Technical Assistance program, which would provide the primary federal assistance to small communities for the operation of safe and clean drinking water supplies and compliance with water regulations.

Affordable Housing

· Maintaining funding for the Community Development Fund and Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) programs. The bill would provide funding to these vital programs, which provide North Dakota communities with flexible funds to construct and rehabilitate affordable housing and improve public facilities and services. Over the years, North Dakota communities have used CDBG funds to rehabilitate emergency homeless shelters, convert underutilized downtown spaces into an affordable health and dental clinic, revitalize at-risk neighborhoods, preserve hundreds of existing affordable rental units through rehabilitation/energy efficiency projects, and acquire and improve land for projects to develop affordable rental units.

· Providing adequate housing assistance for low-income families. The bill would secure funding for Tenant-Based Rental Assistance, which serves roughly two million low-income families across the nation.

· Supporting neighborhood reinvestment through the NeighborWorks America organization. The bill would maintain the necessary funding to support NeighborWorks America, a nationwide, nonpartisan organization that works to help people live in affordable homes through both long-term homeownership and high-quality affordable rental housing. In fiscal year 2017, NeighborWorks funded more than $27 million in project funding and leveraged private investment across North Dakota.

Small Business

· Reaffirming efforts to reestablish the Interagency Committee for Women's Business Enterprise. The bill recognizes the efforts of the Small Business Administration (SBA) and the National Women's Business Council (NWBC) to lead efforts at the federal level to assist women-owned businesses and entrepreneurs. Additionally, it encourages the SBA to examine the re-establishment of the Interagency Committee for Women's Business Enterprise. In June 2018, Heitkamp introduced legislation to reauthorize the Interagency Committee on Women's Business Enterprise to better coordinate federal resources to help grow women-owned businesses.

Government Accountability

· Supporting Heitkamp's bipartisan legislation to improve government efficiency and transparency. The bill includes funding that would enhance Oversight.gov, including the development of an open recommendations database—which Heitkamp pushed for. In June 2018, the Senate passed her bipartisan bill to help ensure that federal agencies are acting on recommendations made by inspectors general that save taxpayers money and make government more efficient.

$4.8 million awarded to preserve Native languages

Encouraging tribal communities to move toward social unity and strengthen Native language use

Washington, DC – Aug. 6, 2018 – The Administration for Native Americans (ANA) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Administration for Children and Families today announced awards for 18 grant projects, totaling more than $4.8 million, to help preserve Native languages in various tribal communities throughout the United States.

Funding through the Native Language Preservation and Maintenance and the Esther Martinez Immersion grants will assist tribes and tribal organizations with planning, developing and implementing projects to revitalize Native languages, preserve Native culture and ceremonies and strengthen inter-generational activities between elders and younger children. The purpose of these grant projects is to encourage communities to move toward social unity and strengthen Native language use.

"Our agency understands the value of restoration and preservation of Native American languages and is proud to support these important programs," said Jeannie Hovland, commissioner of the Administration for Native Americans. "We are providing funding to assess, plan, develop and implement projects to promote the survival and continuing vitality of Native languages through these two programs."

The Preservation and Maintenance projects will help establish Native language curriculums, teacher certifications, the development of digital language applications such as smart phone games and dictionaries, language classes and camps. The Esther Martinez Immersion projects will focus on community-driven programs designed to revitalize Native American languages. In the first year, 10 Preservation and Maintenance awardees will receive a total of $2,649,423 and eight Esther Martinez Immersion awardees will receive a total of $2,191,832.00. Most grants will be for a three-year project period.

The following tribes and Native American organizations are recipients of the Native Language Preservation and Maintenance grant:

Kulaniakea (HI) - $288,398.00

Papahana Kuaola (HI) - $298,983.00

Salish Kootenai College (MT) - $274,920.00

Fort Peck Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes (MT) - $199,274.00

Tuba City Regional Health Care Corporation (AZ) - $264,200.00

Makah Indian Tribe (WA) - $279,388.00

Tunica-Biloxi Tribe of Louisiana (LA) - $259,600.00

Crow Language Consortium (MT) - $213,407.00

Little Wound School Board, Inc. (SD) - $271,262.00

Rural America Initiatives (SD) - $299,991.00

The following tribes and Native American organizations are recipients of the Esther Martinez Immersion grant:

Thunder Valley CDC (SD) - $300,000.00

Lakhotiyapi Okahtan Wichiochage, Inc. (SD) - $298,344.00

Keres Children's Learning Center (NM) - $239,383.00

Waadookodaading, Inc. (WI) - $227,915.00

Chickaloon Native Village (AK) - $298,880.00

Central Council of Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska (AK) - $275,468.00

Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin (WI) - $251,853.00

Kalispel Community of the Kalispel Reservation (WA) - $299,989.00

To review the complete listing of Administration for Native Americans grants, visit: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/ana/current-grantees.

NAIHC strengthens homebuyer education for Native communities

Washington, DC – August 9, 2018 – The National American Indian Housing Council (NAIHC) has updated and re-launched its widely-used "Pathways Home" course to help Native American home buyers overcome the unique complexities of homeownership on sovereign tribal lands.

Completed in collaboration with Fannie Mae, with contributions from the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians and federal grants, NAIHC's effort aims to address a homeownership gap and broader economic challenges in American Indian communities.

The Pathways Home curriculum consists of a train-the-trainer course for tribal housing and financial professionals, and materials for prospective homebuyers. It addresses a range of issues facing American Indians, including credit, finding a home, applying for a loan, predatory lending, and foreclosure. It also highlights opportunities including manufactured housing, the Section 184 Indian Home Loan Guarantee Program, and homeownership opportunities on trust lands.

"A lot has changed in the last 15 years, both in the American Indian community and in the mortgage marketplace," said Tony Walters, executive director, NAIHC. "The new Pathways Home curriculum condenses that knowledge into a single homeownership course for American Indians."

Trainers who complete the course receive a certification and the necessary manuals to use with individuals in their home communities. In return, the trainers will provide feedback to NAIHC on the course's impact on homebuyers in a variety of measurements including loan requests and changes in budgeting behavior.

"We appreciate Fannie Mae's commitment to homeownership education. This curriculum will not only help educate homebuyers but will also address challenges that face our community and speaks specifically to American Indians," Walters added.

NAIHC will conduct Pathways Home train-the-trainer sessions nationwide throughout 2018. Tribal leaders can bring the benefits of Pathways Home to their community by registering for a session at naihc.net.

About the National American Indian Housing Council: The NAIHC is the only national organization representing the housing interests of Native people who reside in Native American, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian communities. The NAIHC is composed of over 267 members representing 498 tribes and housing organizations. NAIHC promotes and supports Native housing entities in their efforts to provide culturally relevant, quality, affordable housing on behalf of Native people.

For more information about NAIHC, visit www.naihc.net.

'We do right by Indian Country': Funding bill moves closer to passage

Indianz.com–  August 9, 2018 – For the first time in nearly a decade, Congress is close to passing a bill that funds a large number of Indian Country initiatives.

Before going on break last week, the House and the Senate passed their own versions of an appropriations bill for the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Indian Health Service and other key tribal programs. And while the two chambers must still come up with a unifying package before sending it to President Donald Trump, key lawmakers say the outlook is good for the first Americans.

"This appropriations bill demonstrates the United States' commitment to Native communities and honors the unique relationship that Indian tribes maintain with the federal government," Sen. John Hoeven (R-North Dakota), the chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, said after the measure cleared the chamber on August 1. "This bill provides strong funding for tribal-related programs and key federal agencies that serve Indian Country."

Hoeven's Democratic counterpart agreed. In addition to serving as vice chairman of Indian Affairs, Sen. Tom Udall (D-New Mexico) is the ranking member of the Senate subcommittee that wrote the Interior fiscal year 2019 funding measure.

"The bill funds the Indian Health Service and Bureau of Indian Affairs and provides resources for new health care facilities and schools for tribes across the country that are working to improve health and education outcomes," Udall said. "This funding helps fulfill our trust and treaty responsibilities to American Indians and Alaska Natives."

The House was the first chamber to take action, passing H.R. 6147 on July 19 by tally of 217 to 199. Every Democrat voted against the measure even though it contains increases for the BIA, the IHS and other agencies.

Rep. Betty McCollum (D-Minnesota), the top Democrat on a key House subcommittee, acknowledged that those Indian Country funding boosts represented one of the "few bright spots of bipartisan cooperation." But "toxic partisan riders" in the bill will end up harming the environment and public health, she said.

"We owe it to the American people to do better. I look forward to working with the chairman and my colleagues in the Senate to bring a better bill back to the House floor," she said, referring to Rep. Ken Calvert (R-California), the leader of the House panel that writes Interior's funding bill.

The Senate's passage of H.R.6147 on August 1 by a vote of 96 to 2 indeed leads to more work. While the bill bears the same number, the chamber did not include any of the contentious policy riders that caused trouble in the House so the differences must now be resolved.

But members of both parties were in agreement when it comes to the first Americans. H.R.6147 contains increases for the BIA, the IHS, Indian housing and other programs, representing a rejection of cuts proposed by Trump and his administration.

"We do right by Indian Country within this bill," said Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), who chairs the Senate's Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies subcommittee and also serves on Indian Affairs with Hoeven and Udall.

Murkowski noted that the Senate hadn't considered and passed an Interior funding bill in eight years, going all the way back to the Obama era. Due to partisan disagreements, Congress instead resorted to "omnibus" packages of thousands and thousands of pages in order to keep the the BIA, the IHS and other government agencies up and running.

H.R.6147 will now be sent to a joint conference committee consisting of members of the House and the Senate. The panel is expected to start its work after Congress returns to work in early September.

The goal is to resolve the differences in H.R.6147 and send it to the White House before the end of that month. Fiscal year 2019 starts on October 1 so getting the bill signed into law by that date would bring an infusion of funds to tribal communities.

"Of great import, not only to my home state of Oklahoma but to Native Americans all across the country, the bill honors our treaties and trust agreements by providing $5.9 billion for the Indian Health Service and $3.1 billion for the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Indian Education," Rep. Tom Cole (R-Oklahoma), a citizen of the Chickasaw Nation, said as the bill was under consideration in the House.

'We do right by Indian Country'

The two versions of H.R.6147, the Interior, Environment, Financial Services and General Government, Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Transportation, Housing and Urban Development Appropriations Act, 2019, differ in funding amounts and other language so the differences still need to be resolved. But here are some highlights from the Senate's version of the bill.

Indian Health Service (IHS): The bill increases the overall budget for IHS by $234 million above FY 2018 level ($348 million more than the Trump Administration's request) for a total funding level for the IHS of $5.772 billion, according to Sen. Tom Udall (D-New Mexico).

Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian Education: The bill increases the overall budget for BIA / BIE by $11.4 million over FY2018 levels ($661 million over the Trump administration's request) for a total of $3.075 billion, Udall's office said.

Education Infrastructure. The bill includes $238 million for BIE school construction and replacement activities, 227% above the Administration's request. This funding will help address the priority list of replacement schools, which includes three BIE schools in New Mexico, according to Udall.

Tribal Colleges and Universities. The bill provides $141.65 million for post-secondary programs at BIE, 53% above the president's request, Udall said.

$10 million dollars from the Indian Irrigation Fund are to be made available for use by the BIA to implement the Irrigation Rehabilitation and Renovation for Indian Tribal Governments and their Economies (IRRIGATE) Act, which authorizes construction and maintenance of Indian irrigation systems, according to Sen. John Hoeven (R-North Dakota).

Hoeven also said the bill funds the Native American Housing Block Grants program, Indian Community Development Block Grant program and continues the popular Tribal HUD–VASH program, all at the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Additionally, the bill provides funding for Native American Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs) at the Department of the Treasury, according to Hoeven's office.

According to Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), the bill establishes a new grant program through Indian Health Service (IHS) which provides $10 million to help tribes fight back against opioid abuse, $7.5 million is continued through Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) to fight opioid addiction. Her office said the measure also maintains increases to address substance abuse disorders, mental health disorders, suicide, violence, and behavior-related chronic diseases among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

Additionally, the bill provides funding for the Commission on Native Children, which recently got off the ground and met for the first time after becoming law almost two years ago. The authorizing law did not provide money for the panel, whose goal is to improve health, education and other outcomes for American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian youth.

The bill also fulfills the federal promises made to Alaska Natives by allocating full funding for Contract Support Costs, the operational costs of tribes to deliver services including federal Indian health programs, Murkowski's office said.

Federal gaming agency takes action on once controversial regulations

Indianz.com – August 10, 2018 – More than a decade after the courts took action, the National Indian Gaming Commission is suspending federal regulations that were once the subject of considerable controversy.

In a notice being published in the Federal Register, the NIGC said the minimum internal control standards (MICS) for Class III gaming will remain "on the books." But as of Monday, the agency is telling tribes and the public that the regulations are "not enforceable."

The move is of little legal consequence because the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals in 2006 ruled that the NIGC lacked the authority to issue the regulations. In a unanimous decision, a panel of judges said tribes and states are responsible for regulating Class III gaming, such as slot machines, blackjack and related offerings, through their gaming compacts.

"The NIGC did not appeal the circuit court's decision to the United States Supreme Court, so it is the law of the land and the NIGC has no discretion in regard to following the court's mandates," reads the notice, which was signed on July 18 by only two of the three commissioners of the independent federal agency.

But at the time of the litigation, the NIGC took a vastly different view. The agency -- then under the control of commissioners who were chosen by a Republican president -- claimed that the court decision only applied to the Colorado River Indian Tribes (CRIT) and not to the rest of Indian Country.

Although the tribe was indeed the only plaintiff in the case, the National Indian Gaming Association, the largest inter-tribal gaming organization, and other tribes submitted briefs in support of CRIT's position.

And as the case was making its way to the D.C. Circuit, a key lawmaker intervened. Sen. John McCain (R-Arizona), a former two-time chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, introduced legislation that would have essentially reversed the court ruling by authorizing the NIGC to issue the rules.

The bill did not become law but it was the subject of heated debate on Capitol Hill and in Indian Country. At the time, tribes were facing significant resistance from the NIGC on a wide range of significant and equally controversial matters, not just the disputed regulations.

But it turns out that tribes were right about their ability to serve as the primary regulators of their gaming facilities. Doomsday warnings about the court ruling never came to pass and tribes and states have continued to negotiate agreements in the way the 2006 ruling anticipated.

"Technology has advanced rapidly, though, making some standards obsolete and introducing new areas of risk not contemplated by the outdated standards, the forthcoming notice states.

As of Monday, the NIGC will consider the Class III MICS to be "non-binding guidance." Some tribes and states have continued to adopt, or refer to, the same standards in their compacts but that decision will be up to those governments and not the U.S.

"This guidance is not intended to modify or amend any terms in a state compact," the forthcoming notice reads.

The CRIT court decision did not disturb the NIGC's ability to regulate Class II gaming like bingo, pull tabs and electronic versions of those games. In June, all three commissioners of the agency took action to propose changes to those federal regulations.

Additionally, the NIGC finalized minimum technical standards for Class II gaming last December. And in April, the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians became the first tribe with approved alternate technical standards for Class II gaming.

"Here at the NIGC, we support each tribes' inherent sovereign authority to serve as the primary regulator of its gaming," NIGC Chairman Jonodev Chaudhuri said in June as the agency announced another year of growth in the industry. Tribes took in $32.4 billion at their casinos in 2017, an increase of 3.9 percent from the year prior.

ETP pipelines leaked hazardous liquids every 11 days for 15 years, on average

Energy Transfer Partners (ETP) is behind many pipelines, including Keystone, which saw a major leak on the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate homelands

By Sharon Kelly

DeSmog – April 20, 2018 – 5,475 days, 527 pipeline spills: that's the math presented in a new report from environmental groups Greenpeace USA and the Waterkeeper Alliance examining pipelines involving Dakota Access builder Energy Transfer Partners (ETP). It's based on public data from 2002 to 2017.

All told, those leaks released 3.6 million gallons of hazardous liquids, including 2.8 million gallons of crude oil, according to data collected from the federal Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA).

That doesn't include an additional 2.4 million gallons of "drilling fluids, sediment, and industrial waste" leaked during ETP's construction of two pipelines in West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Michigan. Also left out: air pollution and leaks from natural gas pipelines, which were beyond the scope of the new report but which play a significant role in climate change and can cause explosions.

Across the entire industry, hazardous liquid pipelines spilled a total of 34.7 million gallons during the past decade, directly causing 16 deaths and $2.7 billion worth of damage. More than one in ten of those gallons came from ETP.

"That's a red flag for a company that has an extensive network across the country and is building even more pipelines as we speak in Louisiana, Pennsylvania, and other states," said Greenpeace USA research lead Tim Donaghy, PhD. "ETP and Sunoco's track record of spills, including several striking examples of big spills, are indicators of a constant threat to communities and water. This could happen again to communities along the pipeline routes."

A Long List of Spills and Accidents

ETP spilled crude oil over 400 times, "refined petroleum products" such as gasoline 92 times, and other flammable or toxic fluids 27 times, the researchers found. And many of the spills involved large amounts of oil — roughly one in four of ETP's pipeline oil spills involved 2,100 or more gallons of oil.

In one 2005 incident, 436,000 gallons of crude oil spewed from a tank farm into a Delaware River tributary outside Philadelphia. That same year, a pipeline built in the 1950s dumped enough oil into the Kentucky and Ohio river to leave a 17-mile oil slick. And in 2009, a Texas pipeline caught fire and leaked over 140,000 gallons near Colorado City, Texas.

Cleaning up those sorts of spills is no easy job. Out of 3.6 million gallons ETP spilled, almost half — a total of more than 1.5 million gallons — was never mopped up, the report found. In addition, the company caused $115 million in property damage, according to federal tallies.

Sunoco, which merged with ETP, is included in the report's analysis. In 2012, ETP first merged with Sunoco, formally absorbing pipeline-wing Sunoco Logistics Partners in 2017. The combined companies operate over 70,000 miles of USpipes. That's "nearly long enough to encircle the earth three times," the report notes.

The new report finds that ETP's pipelines have a somewhat higher-than-average rate of problems. Twelve percent of ETP's spills polluted water sources, finds the report, titled "Oil and Water: ETP and Sunoco's History of Pipeline Spills." That's compared against a 10 percent national average. And three out of eight incidents nationwide where PHMSA specifically noted harm to drinking water supplies involved ETP pipelines.

The pipeline industry's record has grown worse over time, the report notes, reaching a peak of 454 spills in 2015 before dropping "slightly" to 404 in 2017.

Bayou Bridge Pipeline

The company's controversial pipeline construction projects across the US include the Bayou Bridge pipeline that would tie in to the Dakota Access pipeline and carry oil from North Dakota's Bakken shale down to the Gulf of Mexico, the Mariner East 2 pipeline that will carry the plastic precursor ethane across Ohio and Pennsylvania to the Atlantic coast, and the 713-mile Rover pipeline, that will transport natural gas through Michigan, Ohio, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania, where millions of gallons of drilling fluid have spilled during construction.

The Bayou Bridge pipeline's route through wetlands and drinking water supplies for over 300,000 people has community and environmental advocates particularly concerned.

"Construction of the Bayou Bridge pipeline represents a high risk to hundreds of waterways across the entire state of Louisiana," said Waterkeeper Alliance Clean and Safe Energy Campaign Manager Donna Lisenby.

The new report warns that if ETP's track record remains unchanged, the Bayou Bridge pipeline will experience multiple spills of 2,100 gallons or more of hazardous materials after it's built. "Assuming the US system-wide rate for significant crude oil spills of 0.001 per year per mile, we estimate that the Bayou Bridge Pipeline would suffer eight significant spills during a 50-year nominal lifetime," the report concludes. Photographs of Bayou Bridge construction taken by photojournalist Julie Dermansky, who has reported on Bayou Bridge for DeSmog, are included in Greenpeace's report.

"We're not happy with Bayou Bridge because we know that Energy Transfer Partners is accident prone," said Harry Joseph, a pastor from St. James, Louisiana, where the Bayou Bridge pipeline will terminate. "We fear that something will happen in St. James — it's just a matter of time because of ETP's history. The company has had problems."

Sinkholes, Spills and Suing

Those fears will sound familiar to some Pennsylvanians living near the Mariner East 1 and 2 pipelines, where the new report tallied over a hundred "inadvertent releases" and accidents, some of which contaminated locals' water wells, polluted local trout streams, or even caused massive sinkholes to open up. One of those sinkholes erupted just 300 feet from railroad tracks where Amtrak trains and local commuter rail operates, prompting the state to issue an emergency shutdown.

Many living near Mariner East's path are concerned about the risk of more accidents. "This is an organic farm," West Cornwall farmer Phil Stober told ABC News, "and if it damages our groundwater, what recourse do we have?"

The company's most notoriously controversial project was, of course, the Dakota Access pipeline (DAPL), where an encampment by people calling themselves "water protectors" in Standing Rock, North Dakota, drew national attention as law enforcement used attack dogs, tear gas, and high-pressure water cannons in subzero temperatures against Indigenous peoples and allies who opposed DAPL construction.

"We all recall the Dakota Access pipeline construction process because of the inspiring resistance from Indigenous communities that wanted to protect their water," said Greenpeace's Donaghy. "Those Water Protectors were right; that pipeline alone leaked four times in 2017."

An additional three incidents along the full stretch of the Dakota Access-Energy Transfers Crude Oil pipeline were also reported to federal authorities, including a roughly 5,000 gallon oil spill in Tennessee.

Other ETP pipeline construction projects that have had a lower national profile also caused major spills. The Permian IIExpress pipeline dumped 361,200 gallons of crude near Sweetwater, Texas, in the largest pipeline leak of 2016.

Last August, ETP sued Greenpeace, BankTrack, and Earth First!, claiming that anti-pipeline advocates were engaged in racketeering against the firm and demanding $900 million in damages. Greenpeace is currently defending against those charges in court and argues that the case is what's known as a Strategic Lawsuit Against Public Participation, or SLAPP suit, aimed at silencing discussion of harms caused by ETP. (This month, a federal judge effectively dropped Earth First! from that lawsuit, following arguments that Earth First! is a philosophy and not actually an organization. ETP had attempted to hold a magazine called Earth First! Journal liable as representing Earth First!) The lawsuit against Greenpeace is still ongoing.

Urge Administration to recognize, address challenges facing tribal areas in 2020 census

Washington, DC – August 2, 2018 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today is leading a bipartisan effort requesting information on the Census Bureau's plan to ensure an accurate and cost-effective 2020 Census count in tribal communities.

In 2017, Census tests across Indian Country were canceled, furthering concerns that Native populations are not being prioritized in preparations for the 2020 Census—even though the unique characteristics that tribal communities present require additional planning and effort to overcome. Native Americans have been historically under-represented in Census data, which then reduces the amount of federal support that tribal communities receive. With accurate measurements, tribes will have access to the necessary federal support for housing programs, job training, social services, and many other programs they are guaranteed under law.

In their letter to Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross— the top administration official overseeing the Census Bureau, Heitkamp and U.S. Senators Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) and Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) called on the administration to recognize the realities of tribal areas and to develop a plan that will ensure Native communities are accurately measured during the 2020 Census. Click here to read the full letter.

"Our tribal residents shouldn't have to worry about the Census Bureau drastically undercounting their rela`tives and neighbors, simply because of where they choose to live," said Heitkamp. "As the 2020 Census approaches, the agency must take steps to make sure these communities are counted fairly and accurately, so that tribal citizens can receive the federal funds they need to improve public safety, promote access to affordable housing, and provide high-quality education and health care. That's why we're pushing to hold the Census Bureau accountable and demand it take the appropriate steps for an accurate Census count in Indian Country. We need to see a well-developed plan that treats all Americans equally in the eyes of the Census—including those living in tribal, rural, or underserved areas."

Heitkamp has long stressed the importance of the Census and tribes working together to break down barriers for people living on tribal lands in North Dakota and around the country, and to make sure Native populations are appropriately represented at all levels of government. At Heitkamp's urging, U.S. Census Director John Thompson visited North Dakota in 2014, during which he met with Native American leaders about the importance of accurate population counts and how Census data is used to distribute federal, tribal, state, and local government funds. Thompson returned to the state in February 2016 to participate in the Tribal Consultation Meeting held at Sitting Bull College.

"Census data is incredibly significant to American Indians and Alaska Natives as it is used by Tribes and Tribal Organizations to make informed decisions about the future of their people. This information helps ensure fair allocations of funding for federal programs that are vital to Native communities, including housing, healthcare, and education. Unfortunately, due to their remote nature, language barriers, lack of access to telephones and internet, and often non-tradition mailing addresses, getting accurate Census data in rural Alaska and throughout Indian Country is no simple task," said Murkowski. "With 92,000 Alaska Natives living in 'hard to count' communities, I urge my colleagues to consider the negative impacts that an undercount can have on rural Alaska and Indian Country as we are preparing for the 2020 Census."

"An accurate census count is vital to the health and wellbeing of Native American communities. In 2010, we saw that Native American communities were undercounted by nearly five percent," said Klobuchar. "If we fail to get an accurate count in 2020, it will hurt their ability to have access to healthcare, education, and fair representation in Congress."

In their letter, the senators also pointed to the Census Bureau's move away from paper questionnaires to an internet-based data collection method. While the senators praised these efforts, they expressed concerns that this transition may leave Native communities behind, since they are often located in remote areas without reliable internet or cellular service. According to the Census Bureau's data, only 58.2 percent of American Indians and Alaska Natives regularly use the internet.

Shortly after the U.S. Census Bureau's announcement in April 2016 that it would conduct a Census Test on the Standing Rock Reservation— one of just two tests nationwide in Indian Country in 2017 in preparation for the 2020 Census— the test was canceled, leaving a gaping hole in the federal government's preparations to address challenges of an accurate Census count on reservations and in the region.

Background

As a leader on the U.S. Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee (HSGAC), which oversees the Census, Heitkamp has fought to make sure the Census works for North Dakota. In October 2017, Heitkamp pressed key federal leaders on the many challenges the 2020 Census faces, including testing and reporting in rural and tribal areas. During a HSGAC hearing, Heitkamp drew the attention of Secretary Ross, as well as leaders from the U.S. Census Bureau and U.S. Government Accountability Office, to the recently canceled Census tests in Indian Country.

Heitkamp also sits on the U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, where she has fought to guarantee Indian communities have access to quality homes, schools, and health care.

A national Census takes place every 10 years. The data gathered through the Census informs the levels of federal funding that North Dakota and other states receive for transportation infrastructure, education, medical assistance, and many other essential programs. According to 2014 Census data, at the height of the oil boom North Dakota was the fastest-growing state in the United States. Heitkamp has advocated that all communities are counted accurately by also drawing attention to the enormous population growth in western North Dakota.

USDA invests $17 million in Rural Broadband Infrastructure in SD and ND

Huron, SD – Aug. 1, 2018 – Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue today announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is investing $97 million in 12 projects to provide or improve rural broadband service in 11 states.

"A person's location should not determine whether he or she has access to modern communications infrastructure," Secretary Perdue said. "That is why USDA is partnering with businesses and communities by investing in state-of-the-art broadband e-connectivity to remote and rural areas. These investments will expand access to educational, social and business opportunities for 22,000 subscribers to help grow their rural communities and America's economy."

USDA is making the investments through the Telecommunications Infrastructure Loan Program and the Community Connect Grant Program. In South Dakota:

RC Technologies in New Effington is receiving a Telecommunications Infrastructure Loan Program loan of $17 million to provide voice, video, and data services to more than 1,300 households, businesses and key community organizations. These services will create the potential for business growth, increased employment, better public services and public safety, and a higher quality of life for subscribers in Roberts and Marshall Counties in South Dakota and Richland County in North Dakota.

The projects USDA is investing in today will help improve the quality of life in rural communities in Arizona, Iowa, Idaho, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, Nevada, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

These investments underscore USDA's priority to promote rural economic development by centering around three principles: infrastructure, partnerships and innovation. Investing in telecommunications infrastructure connects people to each other: businesses to customers, farmers to markets, and students to a world of knowledge.

In April 2017, President Donald J. Trump established the Interagency Task Force on Agriculture and Rural Prosperity to identify legislative, regulatory and policy changes that could promote agriculture and prosperity in rural communities. In January 2018, Secretary Perdue presented the Task Force's findings to President Trump. As proven by the report, e-connectivity is more than just connecting rural America to rest of the world. It is a vital tool for productivity, education, and health care. These investments will be key catalysts for facilitating rural prosperity through economic development and workforce readiness, and for improving quality of life.

To view the report in its entirety, please view the Report to the President of the United States from the Task Force on Agriculture and Rural Prosperity (PDF, 5.4 MB). In addition, to view the categories of the recommendations, please view the Rural Prosperity infographic (PDF, 190 KB).

USDA Rural Development provides loans and grants to help expand economic opportunities and create jobs in rural areas. This assistance supports infrastructure improvements; business development; housing; community services such as schools, public safety and health care; and high-speed internet access in rural areas. For more information, visit www.rd.usda.gov.

Bill to prevent special interests from secretly influencing elections

Washington, DC – August 1, 2018 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced that she helped introduce a new bill to prevent special interest groups and wealthy out-of-state donors from anonymously funding political campaigns.

Heitkamp joined U.S. Senator Jon Tester (D-MT) and other senators to introduce the Spotlight Act, which would reverse a recent decision by the U.S. Treasury Department to allow non-profit organizations that engage in political activity to avoid disclosing certain donor information to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) on their tax returns. The bill would also require special interest organizations to disclose the names of donors to the public, not just the IRS.

"North Dakotans are tired of political ads funded by shadowy groups and individuals from outside our state that exploit loopholes to avoid exposing their donors," Heitkamp said. "At a minimum, North Dakotans deserve to know who's paying to try to influence their votes, and our bill would increase transparency so voters know who's behind these ads. The Treasury Secretary should not be able to unilaterally decide which groups and donors can hide in anonymity from the voters of North Dakota while flooding their airwaves and mailboxes, telling them what they should think or how they should vote. Voters should know who – and be able to decide why – these folks are so interested in coming into our state."

Under current law, 501(c)(3) organizations are required to provide donor information to the IRS. However, the Treasury Secretary has discretion over whether to require donor information from other types of tax-exempt organizations. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin recently decided he would not collect donor information for several types of special interest groups.

The Spotlight Act would specifically require three classes of nonprofit organizations – (501(c)(4), 501(c)(5), and 501(c)(6)) – to disclose to the IRS and the public the names and information of donors who contribute more than $5,000.

Heitkamp also recently helped re-introduce the DISCLOSE Act, comprehensive legislation to restore transparency and accountability to American elections by looking to end the practice of individuals, groups, and businesses using "dark money" to influence voters. The DISCLOSE Act would require organizations spending money in federal elections to disclose their donors, and help guard against hidden foreign interference in our democracy. Heitkamp has cosponsored the DISCLOSE Act in every Congress since she was elected to the U.S. Senate.

Since her time as North Dakota's Attorney General, Heitkamp has pushed for more campaign finance transparency. Heitkamp has long supported a constitutional amendment to allow Congress and States to set reasonable restrictions on political campaign donations to reduce the drastically growing influence of big money in financing campaigns and even the playing field for all campaigns both large and small. There have been hundreds of millions of dollars spent in federal elections by special interest groups that do not need to disclose their donors following Supreme Court decisions in the past several years.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

Treaties between the United States and Indigenous nations, explained

Treaties, and the U.S. government's history of unilaterally breaching them, have had a profound effect on Native people.

By Ruth Hopkins

Teen Vogue – Feb. 24, 2018 – Today, Natives are often thought of in terms of race, and we are considered people of color. But American Indians specifically are also designated by the federal government as a political classification. This is because we belong to ancient Indigenous tribes that predate the existence of the United States of America and we made treaties with them. These treaties recognized our sovereignty as independent nations.

Treaties, and the U.S. government's history of unilaterally breaching them, have had a profound effect on Native people. To be blunt, we were lied to. Treaties were used as a ruse to coax tribes out of defending their territory and to steal Native lands and resources.

The U.S. made hundreds of treaties with Native nations. The list is exhaustive. I am Dakota and Lakota from the Oceti Sakowin (Great Sioux Nation), so I will focus on treaties that my people have signed with the government and how that has affected us.

Minnesota is the ancestral land of the Dakota. More than 1 in 10 treaties ever signed by the U.S. involved land in what is today Minnesota.

In the 1851 treaties of Traverse des Sioux and Mendota, Dakota of the Oceti Sakowin (Great Sioux Nation) ceded land in Minnesota to the U.S. in exchange for money, goods, and services. Unbeknownst to the Dakota, Congress eliminated Article 3 of each treaty. This Article set up reservation land within Minnesota for the Dakota to live on. The government also defaulted on payments to the Dakota. It kept more than 80% of the money. Of the payments that were made, the government often gave the money directly to traders who were supposed to supply the Dakota with rations. The withholding of rations by these traders led to the Dakota War of 1862, because the Dakota, of which there were an estimated 6,500 people, were starving. All told, the war lasted a month and a half. About 400 Dakota were arrested by the U.S. military. Ultimately, 38 Dakota men were hung in the largest mass execution in U.S. history, in Mankato, Minnesota, on December 26, 1862, under the orders of President Abraham Lincoln.

The Dakota people were separated after the war. We became exiles. The governor of Minnesota put a bounty on the scalps of every Dakota man, woman, and child. Some Dakota were taken to prison camps in Iowa. Others, like my ancestor Chief Wabasha, were marched to the Crow Creek Reservation in South Dakota. More were moved to Nebraska territory. Most Dakota from the Sisseton and Wahpeton bands were moved to the Lake Traverse Reservation in South Dakota. Some managed to escape to the Spirit Lake Reservation in North Dakota and to Canada. Others died from sickness and famine. More than one-quarter of Dakota in 1862 died during the following year.

In 1863, more than 150 Dakota were massacred at Whitestone Hill, where the cavalry took out their vengeance for the war on many innocent Dakota by ambushing them. Women and children were slaughtered there. They even killed the Dakota's dogs and horses.

The Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851 "granted" the Lakota of the Oceti Sakowin (Great Sioux Nation) and their allies a large swath of territory in South Dakota, Wyoming, Nebraska, Montana, and North Dakota in exchange for the passage of roads and railways. Despite this, Lakota lands were encroached upon by outside invaders in breach of treaty law. The U.S. military launched the 1865 Powder River Expedition to subdue Natives within their own, established territory. The Lakota defended their lands. Oglala and Minniconjou Lakota warriors led by Red Cloud, Crazy Horse, and High-Back-Bone killed U.S. Captain W.J. Fetterman and all 80 of his men in half an hour, in what would become known as the Fetterman Fight.

Enter the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1868, which came about because of Red Cloud's War. In short, the Lakota, led by the Crazy Horse, were kicking settler butt. In this treaty, the Lakota were promised half of South Dakota and part of North Dakota as a "Great Sioux Reservation."

The Black Hills are the birthplace of the Lakota. Important ceremonies that bring harmony to the Universe have been held there for millennia. They are sacred to the Oceti Sakowin and are part of Lakota treaty lands, but they were taken from the Lakota when Congress reneged on the Fort Laramie Treaty during the gold rush that historians say began in 1874 — although rumors of gold in the Black Hills had lingered for years before then. In 1980, in United States v. Sioux Nation of Indians, the U.S. Supreme Court held that the seizure of the Black Hills from the Lakota was a wrongful taking and that the Sioux were entitled to "just compensation" under the 5th Amendment's "Takings Clause." The Lakota refuse to accept the money, because the Black Hills are not for sale. To this day, they rightfully belong to the Great Sioux Nation.

Lakota treaty land also includes the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, where I was born and where water protectors camped out for nearly a year to prevent the construction of the Dakota Access pipeline through ancient Oceti Sakowin burial sites and under the freshwater source of millions of people downstream, both Native, and non-Native. February 23 marks the anniversary of the final raid of camps there. One of the last arrested was Regina Brave, a Lakota grandmother who was making a treaty stand. She is a veteran of the American Indian Movement's 1973 Occupation of Wounded Knee.

We are still fighting to protect our lands and waters. In June 2017, a federal judge ordered the Army Corps of Engineers to reconsider its environmental review of the construction of the Dakota Access pipeline by Energy Transfer Partners, thanks to successful protests and litigation by the Oceti Sakowin and their allies. That process is now underway.

Oceti Sakowin tribes are now mobilizing to stop the Keystone XL pipeline from crossing Lakota treaty lands. In January, permits were granted to start additional gold mining operations in the Black Hills. Lakota tribes were never consulted, nor did they consent. But we are on the right side of history.

Honor the treaties. Join us.

*****

OG History is a Teen Vogue series where we unearth history not told through a white, cisheteropatriarchal lens. In this op-ed, Ruth H. Hopkins (Cankudutawin-Red Road Woman), a Dakota/Lakota Sioux writer, biologist, attorney, and former tribal judge, explains the history of broken treaties between the United States government and the Oceti Sakowin (Great Sioux Nation), which she belongs to.

Treaties are part of what the U.S. Constitution calls "the supreme law of the land." Yet they are too seldom discussed, too often ignored, and viewed by too many today as ancient history.

Nonetheless, treaties are legally binding agreements that occur nation to nation. Treaties were made between newly formed European settler governments and the sovereign Indigenous nations that already populated the continent.

Sota guest editorial –

St. Croix Chippewa Tribe wins agreement over hemp and state jurisdiction

Indianz.com – Friday, July 27, 2018 – The state of Wisconsin is promising not to interfere with the St. Croix Chippewa Indians as the tribe moves forward with a hemp and cannabidiol (CBD) business.

A consent decree entered in federal court on Tuesday confirms that the state lacks jurisdiction on the reservation. The agreement comes just a few months after the tribe filed a lawsuit to protect its sovereignty.

"The tribe commends state Attorney General Schimel for working with our community to resolve any confusion over the tribe's inherent sovereign authority to adopt and implement its hemp and CBD control program," council member Elmer J. Emery said in a press release.

The tribe developed a comprehensive set of regulations to govern hemp and CBD production last fall. The announcement drew objections from the state even though industrial hemp and CBD oil are legal under Wisconsin law, as the consent decree notes.

The disagreement prompted the tribe to head to court. The complaint, lodged in February, asserted that the state's threats of interference "will have a substantial detrimental impact on the tribe's governmental and economic sovereignty."

But with the agreement signed and sealed, the tribe believes it is on solid legal ground.

The consent decree "settles a legal challenge filed by the tribe in U.S. district court and allows the tribe to move forward with its own regulatory program for hemp and CBD, as well as establish a tribally owned and operated hemp business," said general counsel Jeff Cormell.

Senate Bill 10, which Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) signed in April 2017, updates what is known as Lydia's Law. The 2013 law was named for a young girl whose epilepsy was being treated with CBD prior to her death in 2014.

Preliminary studies have indicated that CBD can be used to treat epilepsy, according to CNN. A patent granted to the Department of Health and Human Services cited its ability to address the effects of stroke, trauma and other diseases and conditions.

"Hemp and CBD are one of the fastest growing sectors of the burgeoning cannabis economy," attorney Brad Bartlett of the the law firm McAllister Garfield, which represented the tribe in the lawsuit. "This landmark agreement ensures that the tribe has parity in treatment with states when it comes to participating in the nation's new cannabis economy."

The tribe held two meetings in January to discuss hemp and CBD. Plans call for hemp to be grown using genetic clones of the plant. Marijuana will not be grown on the reservation, according to the tribe.

The CBD oil operation is expected to be housed in a decommissioned 200,000 square-foot building that once housed a fish hatchery. Details on the hemp grow are still in the works.

(Editor's note: While the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribe is moving ahead, cautiously, with its current industrial hemp pilot project, this and similar stories from across Indian country are well worth noticing. Besides many diverse industrial uses, hemp is likewise source of diverse healing products for many who are taken advantage of by big pharma.)

Brief editorial comments from the editor's desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

Please check out Chairman Flute's update on page one.

His columns give us the latest word on many important issues, some to which we do not have access.

*****

Be sure to check out the list of candidates certified by the Reservation Election Board.

The official list is in our front page news article, as well as included with other information in the REB notice on our legals page.

Thank you to each of those who filed, for your willingness to serve the people.

The 2018 SWO primary election is scheduled for Tuesday, October 2nd; the general election will be held on Tuesday, November 6th.

*****

Thank you to Geri Opsal, Tribal VSO, for organizing last Tuesday's Purple Heart Day observance, and for her photos, and thank you to photographer John Heminger for his pictures.

The SWO Tribe is only the third tribe in the country to be designated as a Purple Heart Reservation, although it appears others may follow and honor their Purple Heart veterans in this way as well.

Please read Geri's report to veterans on page one.

*****

Our thanks to Sara McGregor-Okroi of Aliive Roberts County for sharing photos and information from last week's National Night Out observance.

This is an annual event, promoting public safety and cooperation between community members and their law enforcement people.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"Nature is the storehouse of potential life of future generations and is sacred."

–Audrey Shenandoah, ONONDAGA

We need to honor and respect our Mother Earth. She is the source of all life. The sun shines life to the earth, then the earth produces life in all forms and in a balanced way. Everything is here to serve everything else. If we interrupt the flow in any way, we leave nothing for the future generations. Before every decision is made, we should ask, and answer, a final question; "If we do this, what will be the effects on the seventh generation? What will we cause our children to live with?" We need to have respect and love for all things and for all people. We need to do this for ourselves and for all the children still unborn.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

A man thinks that by mouthing hard words he understands hard things. - Herman Melville (1819 - 1891)

When a person can no longer laugh at himself, it is time for others to laugh at him. - Thomas Szasz, "The Second Sin"

There's a whiff of the lynch mob or the lemming migration about any overlarge concentration of like-thinking individuals, no matter how virtuous their cause. - P. J. O'Rourke (1947 - )

Any word you have to hunt for in a thesaurus is the wrong word. There are no exceptions to this rule. - Stephen King (1947 - ), "Everything You Need to Know About Writing Successfully - in Ten Minutes", 1988

A lot of fellows nowadays have a B.A., M.D., or Ph.D. Unfortunately, they don't have a J.O.B. - Fats Domino (1928 - )

The quickest way of ending a war is to lose it. - George Orwell (1903 - 1950), Polemic, May 1946, "Second Thoughts on James Burnham"

The two most common elements in the universe are Hydrogen and stupidity. - Harlan Ellison (1934 - )

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

CDF

Obituaries –

Memorial held for Dennis Jackson

A memorial service for Dennis Lavern Jackson, of Sisseton, SD was held on Wednesday afternoon, August 8th, 2018 at the Enemy Swim District Center, Enemy Swim, SD with Dennis Gill officiating.

Honorary Pallbearers were Sonny Jackson, Jesse Guffin, Dustin Guffin, Walter Chanku, David Campbell, David Anderson, Sky Lawrence, Douglas Rencountre, Brett Rencountre, David Gill, Glen Anderson, and all of Dennis's friends and family.

Wake service was held at Tuesday at the Enemy Swim District Center.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel of Sisseton, SD was in charge of arrangements.

One of South Dakota's finest guitarists has died at 61.

Dennis Jackson passed in his sleep from a heart attack in his home Friday evening, August 3, 2018.

Dennis was born March 7, 1957 in Sisseton, SD to Mary Lou Jackson and Dennis Tyndall.

He was raised by his Grandma Charlotte "Barse" Jackson Davies along with his sister Denise Jackson and cousins David Campbell and Liz "Jackson" Anderson.

Dennis was an athlete at Waubay High School and had many records and awards in wrestling.

He is also remembered by many of his musical abilities. He played in many bands such as Cahoots, Fry Bread, Action Jackson, Iron Wolf, & many other bands throughout his life.

He attended Wahpeton College to get a degree in Upholstery and moved to Florida to master his upholstery skills for 15 years.

Dennis relocated back to South Dakota in 1991 and he became a grass dancer and singer.

He then attended the Sisseton Wahpeton College for Dakota Studies and eventually intended on becoming an instructor.

Dennis is survived by his children Judah and Rebecca Jackson; brother Jon Farrar; sister Denise Jackson.yes

For Dennis's obituary and on-line registry please visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com

Services held for Victoria Max

Victoria Lynn Max, "Omaka Ska Tehinda Win" (She Loved Animals) age 32 of Sisseton, South Dakota journeyed to the Spirit World on Friday, August 3rd, 2018 in Rochester, Minnesota.

She was born on October 10, 1985 in Sioux City, Iowa the daughter of Vincent Max Jr. and Denise Robinson.

Victoria was fun loving, likeable and humorous. She had many friends, some since childhood.

Victoria loved being around family, going on road trips, fishing, playing horse shoes and bean bags.

Dean was the love of her life and her best friend!

She loved her dog Betsy and her cats Dabz and Smudgez.

Victoria had a beautiful and loving soul.

She never asked for much, but she deserved more.

Victoria attended school at Omaha Nation and Tiospa Zina.

Her first job was at The Dakota Magic Casino as a hotel room attendant and later on as a C-Store cashier.

Victoria's favorite color was pink.

She was a Minnesota Vikings fan.

Her favorite singers were the Weekend and Techn9ne.

Her favorite movies was How High and Friday. She could quote both movies word for word.

She loved it when it rained out.

She like sitting on the porch smoking cigs with family and friends or going for a cruise to town and taking a main.

She had a great sense of humor, just like her dad. They were two of a kind.

But most of all…she never liked to be alone.

She will be missed and loved forever.

Victoria is survived by her mother: Denise Robinson; her brothers: Delshay Webster Sr., Robert John Everrett; sisters: Shelby N. Webster and Nicolette M. Max: longtime companion: Dean DuMarce Ojeda; her grandmothers: Genevieve Robinson, Virginia Max, Rose Max and Joan Renville; Aunties: Linda Robinson, Denise Renville and Arlys Max; uncles: Jeff Max Sr., Travis Max Sr., Norman Robinson Sr., Dwight Robinson, Duane Robinson and Victor Robinson Jr.; many other relatives and friends.

Preceded in death by her father Vincent Max Jr., grandfathers Vincent Max Sr. and Victor Robinson Sr., and aunt Collette Max.

Traditional services were held on Thursday morning, August 9th, 2018 at the SWO community center in Agency Village, South Dakota.

Spiritual leaders were Robbie Gill and LaVerne Blackthunder.

Drum Group was "Dakota Nation".

Interment was at Max Renville Family Cemetery in Agency Village, South Dakota.

Wake services were held on Tuesday and Wednesday at the community center.

Honorary Casket Bearers were: Collette Renville, June Renville, Amanda Renville, Estelle Feather, Ashley Lee, Ashleigh Lawrence, Brooklyn Gill, Renae Wanna, Jessica Renville, Tasha DuMarce, Shayann Taylor, Chasity DuMarce, Nicole LaBelle, Shanna Keoke, Riley Galvin, Sydney Galvin, Ellen Block, Brad Gray, Ida Lufkins.

Casket Bearers were: Joshua Max, Felix Renville III, Travis Max Jr., Jarad Max, Joel Max, Cullen Max, Iyahan Max, Jeffery Max Jr., Jace Max, Hokshila Mato Mallory, Kent Mallory, Jamison Robinson, Rob Everrett, Cain Robertson, Dean DuMarce, Keenan Ojeda.

The Chilson Funeral Home in Winsted, Minnesota is serving the family. Online condolences may be made to www.chilsonfuneralhome.com

Services for Della Mae Shepherd Bernard

Della Mae Shepherd Bernard, "Tioyake Waste Wi" (Keeping a good house woman), age 73, of Sisseton, South Dakota went home to be with the Lord on Monday, August 6th, 2018.

She was born on October 28, 1944 in Sisseton, South Dakota the daughter of Ole and Victoria (Barker) Shepherd.

Della loved reading, the out of doors, watching Law & Order, her crossword puzzles, studying the Bible and going to Church gatherings.

She was also the #1 supporter of her sons singing at the drum.

Della was fond of watching Pow-Wows, storms, supporting other families in their time of need and spending time with her grandchildren and great grandchildren.

Survived by her five children: Harold, Delmer, Debra, Darwin and Doreen Bernard; eighteen grandchildren and twenty-nine great grandchildren; siblings: Solomon and Gideon Shepherd and Saphrona Shepherd Crawford; her adopted children: Thomas Wilson, Anthony Mazawisicana, Richard Hill, Dean Abraham, Lyndon Haug, Kevin LaFontaine, Michael LaFontaine, Vine Marks Jr. "Hokie", Cary Eastman, Derrick Bagda, Perry Lufkins, John Redday "Howie", Chris Felcia, Philmore Jackson, Steve Jackson Jr., Craig Spider, Nathan Smith "Jimmy", Kevin Chilson, Tracy Heminger, Darren Crawford, Marsha LaFontaine, Kim Kampeska, Cindy White Cloud, Vernon Renville and Coke Jones; many other relatives and friends. Preceded in death by sons: Edwayne Bernard and Alan Shepherd, two grandsons, Gabriel and Gage Heminger, her parents, husband: Delano Bernard, siblings: Edna Seaboy, Madeline Seaboy, Hildreth Seaboy, Moses Seaboy, Magnus Shepherd, Baby Joe Seaboy.

Funeral services for Della Mae Shepherd Bernard were held on Friday afternoon, August 10th, 2018 at the SWO community center in Agency Village, South Dakota.

Interment was at Eagles Wings in rural Peever, South Dakota.

Officiating were Pastor Nippy Owen, Pastor Phil Lawrence, Pastor Jerome Renville, Pastor Jim Bird and Gerald Heminger Jr.

Drum Group was "Old Agency Singers." Special music by: Phil Lawrence, Eddie Rousseau, Elaina Wilson, Lorraine Rousseau, Butch Felix and St. Mary's Lay Readers.

Wake services were held at the community center on Wednesday and Thursday.

Honorary Casket Bearers were Yvonne Red Earth, Mavis Hill, Bobbi Owen, Karen Holmes, Karen Renville, Marcella Haug, Diane Flannery, Kim Pratt, Dialysis Nurses, Barbara Mail, Alberta Crawford, Sylvia Owen, Katie Kitto, Darlene Kitto, Vastana "Rocky" James, Nettie Kirk, Amy Haug, and Abrey Flute.

Casket Bearers were Edward Rousseau, Lance Haug, Dion Bernard, Rain Shepherd, Noah Bernard, Isaiah Bernard, Marshall DuMarce, Joe Owen, Jordan White, Maurice Redday III, Anthony Mazawisicana.

The Chilson Funeral Home in Winsted, Minnesota served the family.

Online condolences may be made to www.chilsonfuneralhome.com

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Open letter to the Oyate

I called the REB this morning to request my Absentee Ballot before Sept 17, 2018, deadline for this year's Voting Session(s) & was again informed of the conditions to the Absentee Ballot of which those of us who are residing off the reservation STILL DO NOT HAVE THAT RIGHT TO VOTE. I asked if in regards to the Tribal Constitution time length that would be before that is possibly done for ALL to vote "off-reservation." The answer there is 2 years.

I was also informed that the 7 Districts of which the Tribe is Council for its Members & District Members took it to the Tribal Council for ALL "off-reservation" voting of which was denied, negated, rejected! In this conversation I asked for the next 2 months of District Meetings to continue with the Voting issue in hopes of being able to vote for this year's Election of Tribal members (politics).

I like the latter than the former for all of us out here to have Tribal Voting Rights Absentee Ballot "off-reservation" & I am sure I am not alone-it sure would be Greatly Appreciated to be part of things around there regardless of not being there or residing there for WE are Tribal Members also.

Thank you

Laura J. White.

Open letter to the Oyate

With recent employee suspensions at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and an investigation being led by the Perkins Coie law firm, it is clear UAF needs to clean house and address misconduct. Higher education must adhere to the highest standards. I would know.

During my 14 years in Higher Education at Brookdale Community College in New Jersey, I worked with international students, in recruitment, and public relations. I supervised student interns, mentoring them as they progressed. At each level, I endeavored to guide, support and encourage them to be their best. "Lead by example" was and continues to be my mantra.

Unfortunately, my ethics were not shared by the leadership. In 2012, college President Peter F. Burnham, who had retired from a 20-year tenure after corruption allegations, was convicted of felony official misconduct and theft, resulting in prison.

Howard Birdsall, longtime chairman of the college Board of Trustees, was convicted of making illegal political contributions via a scheme involving his employees, at the now defunct Birdsall Services Group. He was also sent to prison.

As the criminal investigation ensued, I realized what was really going on and I told the truth. Despite threats and intimidation, I refused to back down. My determination and integrity led to their convictions.

I was recently asked how I would describe myself. My response, "integrity." My character was tested and I stood firm. My integrity stands with the UAF students, faculty, and staff who have been wronged, and I encourage them to stand strong through the investigation and tell the truth. In Congress, I will always fight for what is right.

Carol "Kitty" Hafner.

Democratic Candidate for Alaska U.S. Representative and Retired NEA Union Member Higher Education Administrator.

Box Elder, South Dakota.

Correcting Vision with Polished Crystals, Venetian Glass, and Laser Beams

By Richard P. Holm, MD

The oldest known lens was found in the ruins of the ancient Mesopotamian city of Nineveh and was made from polished rock crystal. The Greek playwright Aristophanes mentions the use of such a lens to burn holes in parchment in one of his plays. Allegedly, Pliny the physician used a similar lens to cauterize wounds. A thousand years later monks started using "reading stones" which were sliced off sections of polished quartz spheres. Sometime in the latter half of the 1200s the monks put these reading stones up on their noses in what today we would recognize as spectacles.

It was in Venice, Italy, where glassmaking was (and still is) an art, that convex reading and magnifying glasses were refined. About three hundred years later, concave lenses were used to help the near-sighted Pope Leo the 10th. He apparently wore his special spectacles to aid him while hunting. It took just about three hundred more years for bifocals to be invented by America's own Benjamin Franklin.

It was in the mid 1800s that a protective lens was made to fit directly over the eyeball of a man who had lost his eyelid from skin cancer. This first "contact lens" protected his eye from drying out, which would have resulted in blindness. Over the next 150 years, contact lenses came into commercial use and moved from blown, to ground, to molded glass lenses and then to a whole variety of hard, then soft, plastic lenses.

The knowledge of refracting light with lenses has, more recently, brought us to correct vision by surgically altering the shape of the cornea with laser beams. Where will we go next?

*****

Watch On Call with the Prairie Doc® most Thursdays at 7 p.m. central on SDPTV and follow the Prairie Doc® on Facebook and YouTube for free and easy access to the entire Prairie Doc® library.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

 

Introducing: New teaching staff at Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Benjamin Barondeau

Benjamin Barandeau is the new 9-12 English teacher at Tiospa Zina. Originally from Roscoe, SD, he graduated from Dakota Wesleyan University with a degree in Secondary Education and from South Dakota State University with a Master's in English. After graduating from

DWU, he spent a year teaching English as a Second Language at Fukusaki Senior High School in Japan. His last teaching assignment was in Aberdeen, where he taught English for Speakers of Other Languages and Citizenship Preparation classes for refugees, asylees,

and immigrants. He and his wife Tasiyagnunpa live in Brookings with their four sons, Miles, Gavin, Caedmon, and Archer; daughter Evangelina; dog Tanka; and cat Sophie.

Rick DeLoughery

Duties: High School Science Teacher.

Before being a continuous substitute teacher at TZ (2017-18), Rick has been an agronomist with a diverse background of experience, having worked in seven states, and with a number of crops, soils and pests, and with irrigation and soil fertility. He has worked for state university and tribal college Extension education programs for over 20 years, both as an educator and project director. Rick's Extension work included seven years at Sitting Bull College on Standing Rock where he managed a bison herd, and held workshops on raising bison and tanning bison or deer hides. He and his wife are gardeners who live in Sisseton.

Tomi Hagen

Hi all!

My name is Tomi Hagen and I am a new 5th grade teacher at Tiospa Zina Tribal School! I am super excited to start teaching this year and can't wait to meet all my students! I grew up near Britton, SD and graduated from Britton-Hecla High School in 2013. I went on to Northern State University where I graduated in 3 years with a bachelor's degree in Communications and then continued on to Concordia University, St. Paul where I am graduating with a Master's degree in the Art of Teaching with a K-8 licensure. I now live with my husband and our dog, Stella, and cat, Peanut near Lake City. I love to read and bake in my spare time as well as help my husband on our family farm. I can't wait for this year to begin!

Sisseton team wins trophy in ND State Softball tournament

Submitted by Coach Solomon Goodsell

The Slammers mens softball team from Sisseton, SD, earned a 4th place championship trophy out of 37 teams a week ago in Wahpeton, ND.

The Slammers competed in the North Dakota State Softball Tournament.

Congratulations to the team!

Receive 10 free trees by joining Arbor Day Foundation in August

Nebraska City, Neb. – Spruce up your landscape by joining the Arbor Day Foundation

in August.

Everyone who joins the nonprofit Arbor Day Foundation with a $10 donation will receive

10 free Colorado blue spruce trees or 10 white flowering dogwood trees through the Foundation's Trees for America campaign.

The trees will be shipped postpaid between October 15 and December 10, depending on the

right time for planting in each member's area. The 6- to 12-inch trees are guaranteed to grow

or they will be replaced free of charge.

"Colorado blue spruce trees truly provide year-round beauty for any landscape," said Matt Harris, chief executive of the Arbor Day Foundation. "Dogwood trees will add color and beauty to your yard throughout the year, with their showy spring flowers, scarlet autumn foliage, and red berries that attract songbirds in the winter."

New members of the Arbor Day Foundation will also receive The Tree Book, which includes information about tree planting and care, and a subscription to Arbor Day, the Foundation's bimonthly publication.

To receive the free Colorado blue spruce trees, send a $10 membership contribution to:

Ten Free Blue Spruces OR Ten Free Dogwood, Arbor Day Foundation, 100 Arbor Ave., Nebraska City, NE 68410, by August 31, 2018, or join online at arborday.org/august.

Legals

Request for Audit Proposal

Requesting sealed proposals for:

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate is requesting proposals to audit the financial statements for the periods of October 1,2017 to September 30, 2018, October 1, 2018 to September 30, 2019, and October 1, 2019 to September 30, 2020.

All sealed bids must include and be submitted by August 30th, 2018:

Applicants must submit the following as a part of their proposal:

1.  A transmittal letter stating your understanding of the necessary audit procedures.

2.  Profile of your firm and audit team that will be assigned to the audit.

3.  Employee and staff qualifications.

4.  A statement that your firm meets the mandatory criteria as to independence and license to practice.

5.  Retention of audit working papers.

6.  A copy of your most recent quality review report and letter of comments (including any finding(s) identified by your quality review).

7.  A summary of your firm's experience in preparing tribal audits.

8.  A breakdown of the all-inclusive fee.

9.  Any data as to minority preference.

10. Additional services to be provided as part of the audit.

Required Documentation:

1.  Copy of SWO Business License, if proposal is approved.

Contact the Procurement Office for specifications: colletteh@swo-nsn.gov

Please submit sealed proposals to:

Floyd Kirk, Jr.

Tribal Vice-Chairman

Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate

PO Box 509

Agency Village, SD 57262

By 4:30 pm on Thursday, August 30th, 2018

All interested parties acknowledge that any Agreement executed and performed within the Tribe's exclusive jurisdiction is subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the Tribal Court of Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation. All interested parties acknowledge that they must comply with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Ordinances: TERO Chapter 59 Requirements, Wage Rates & Compliance Plan; Business License Ordinance Chapter 53 and Tax Ordinance Chapter 67; and Chapter 75 Sex Offender Registration.

33-2tc

 

Request for Bids

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation is now accepting competitive sealed bids on one (1) individual home site.

All bids must be addressed to: Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, Attention Tribal Realty Department, P.O. Box 509, Agency Village, SD 57262. Your bid shall be plainly marked on the outside of the envelope as follows: "BID ON LAND FOR SALE BY THE SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE." The tract of land offered for sale is legally described as: NW¼SW¼SE¼NE¼, in Section 16 T.124N. R.50W., Lawrence Township Roberts County Containing 2.5 acres. The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate reserves the right to reject any and all bids. The Sisseton-Wahpeton also reserves the right to allow a Tribal Member to match the high bid. The bid period will be for thirty (30) calendar days beginning on August 8, 2018 to September 6, 2018, until 4:30 p.m. Bid opening will be made by the governing authority of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate on or after September 6, 2018.

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Request for Bids

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation is now accepting competitive sealed bids on one (1) individual home site.

All bids must be addressed to: Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, Attention Tribal Realty Department, P.O. Box 509, Agency Village, SD 57262. Your bid shall be plainly marked on the outside of the envelope as follows: "BID ON LAND FOR SALE BY THE SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE." The tract of land offered for sale is legally described as: SE¼SE¼NE¼NE¼, in Section 24 T.125N. R.52W., Dry Lake Township Roberts County Containing 2.5 acres. The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate reserves the right to reject any and all bids. The Sisseton-Wahpeton also reserves the right to allow a Tribal Member to match the high bid. The bid period will be for thirty (30) calendar days beginning on August 8, 2018 to September 6, 2018, until 4:30 p.m. Bid opening will be made by the governing authority of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate on or after September 6, 2018.

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-18-734-556

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE OF NAME OF:

LIAM ALEXANDER REDSTAR EASTMAN, Minor

And concerning:                                  

Noelle Robertson, Petitioner.

ORDER AND NOTICE OF

HEARING

     NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from LIAM ALEXANDER REDSTAR EASTMAN to LIAM ALEXANDER ROBERTSON shall be heard before the Honorable BJ Jones, Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at 2:00 P.M. on the 21st day of AUGUST, 2018.

Dated this 14th day of June, 2018

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST:

E. Pfeiffer, CLERK OF COURTS

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-18-653-475

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE OF NAME OF:

AUTUMN BROOKE QUINN, Petitioner.

ORDER AND NOTICE OF

HEARING

     NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from AUTUMN BROOKE QUINN to KALLANI NOIRE QUINN shall be heard before the Honorable Michael Swallow, Associate Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at 1:30 P.M. on the 14th day of AUGUST, 2018.

Dated this 23rd day of July, 2018.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST:

E. Pfeiffer, CLERK OF COURTS

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-18-709-531

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE

OF NAME OF:

COLETTE MARIE WHITE, Petitioner.

ORDER AND NOTICE OF

HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from COLETTE MARIE WHITE to COLETTE MARIE SMALL shall be heard before the Honorable Michael Swallow, Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at _10:30 A.M. on the _30TH day of _AUGUST, 2018.

Dated this 31st day of July, 2018.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST:

E. Pfeiffer, CLERK OF COURTS

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 18-132

SWOCSE/ Dawn Godfrey, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DERRICK FLUTE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of August, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of July, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 18-115

SWOCSE/ Michelle Fleetwood, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MYRON EAGLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Recognize Foreign Order and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of August, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of June, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 18-107

SWOCSE/ Lisa Cleveland, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MITCHELL LAWRENCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of August, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of June, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 18-087

SWOCSE/ David Genia, PLAINTIFF

VS.

KYLE WOLFE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of August, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of June, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 14-110

SWOCSE/ Diana Canku, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FRANKIE BRAVE BULL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Re-Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of August, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of June, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 18-148

SWOCSE/ Maria White, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BRODY CLOUD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of August, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of June, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 18-144

SWOCSE/ Dyllan Roberts, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MICHEL'LE LACROIX, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Paternity & Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of August, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of June, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 18-150

SWOCSE/ Douglas Rencountre, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LUCY IRISH, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of August, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of July, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 18-154

SWOCSE/ John Kampeska, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SENECA ROCKWOOD,DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of August, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of July, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 16-052

SWOCSE/ Sara Farmer, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TYLER SHEPHERD, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of August, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of July, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 18-126

SWOCSE/ Arlene Owens, PLAINTIFF

VS.

NIKKI BROWN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of August, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of July, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 18-128

SWOCSE/ Deanna Anderson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SHERRY CHANKU, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of August, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of June, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 16-098

SWOCSE/ LaVonne Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

NATASHA ST. JOHN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of August, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of June, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 18-136

SWOCSE/ Norwood St. John, PLAINTIFF

VS.

NATASHA ST. JOHN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of August, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of June, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 18-113

SWOCSE/ Kelley DeMarrias, PLAINTIFF

VS.

RICK YELLOW EARRINGS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of August, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of June, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 17-117

SWOCSE/ Charlene LaFontaine, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SOPHIA KLEINHEKSEL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of August, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of July, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following position(s):

Program Manager, Child Protection Program

MCH Aide, CHR/MCH

Program Manager, Payroll

Closing Date: August 17th, 2018 @ 04:30 PM

Generalist, CHR

Parole Officer, Department of Parole

Closing Date: August 24th, 2018 @ 04:30 PM

Application and job description information can be seen at SWO Human Resources Office or http://www.swo-nsn.gov/contact/employment. Application can be downloaded from "Apply Now" and emailed to ArnoldW@SWO-NSN.GOV or DeniseH@SWO-NSN.GOV. Contact can also be at Arnold Williams 698-8238 or Denise Hill 698-8251 with questions. (Tribal preference will apply).

 

Sisseton Wahpeton College

Has the following vacancies:

Nursing Instructor, RN (Part-time)

Sisseton Wahpeton College has an opening for a part-time Nursing Instructor. Candidate must possess a current SD nursing license, BSN is required, Master's degree preferred. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and the application process. Contact HR at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118. Open until filled.

Digital Photography - Adjunct Instructor

Sisseton Wahpeton College has an opening for an Adjunct Instructor - Digital Photography. This position will assume responsibility for the delivery of quality education that will ensure that maximum learning can take place and help students learn subject matter and skills that contribute to their understanding of the specified subject. Requirements: Bachelor's degree, preferred. Previous teaching experience is preferred. Professional Photography experience is required. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and the application process. Contact HR at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118. Open until filled.

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Enemy Swim Day School

MIDDLE SCHOOL PARA EDUCATOR

Enemy Swim Day School has an opening for a Middle School Para Educator for the 2018-2019 school year. Duties include assisting students in middle school Math, English, Social Studies and Science content in the classroom, assisting teaching staff, working with SpEd staff, reporting and other duties. Must have post-secondary education, an AA degree or equivalent or successfully passing the ParaPro Assessment. ESDS can assist with ParaPro Assessment preparation, if needed. Wage is dependent upon experience. This position includes benefits. Call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 and ask for Dr. Eastman to inquire about the position. Indian Preference policies apply. Position is open until filled. Applications may also be picked up in the administration office or on our website www.esds.us.

ELEMENTARY PARA EDUCATOR

Duties: Enemy Swim Day School has an opening for an Elementary Para Educator for the 2018-2019 school year. include assisting in the classroom, assisting teaching staff, working with SpEd staff, reporting and other duties. Must have post-secondary education, an AA degree or equivalent or successfully pass the ParaPro Assessment. ESDS can assist with ParaPro Assessment preparation, if needed. Wage is dependent upon experience. This position includes benefits. Call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 and ask for Dr. Eastman to inquire about the position. Applications may be picked up in the administration office. Indian Preference policies apply. Position is open until filled.

SPECIAL EDUCATION PARA EDUCATOR

Enemy Swim Day School has an opening for a Special Education Para Educator for the 2018-2019 school year. Duties include assisting students, working with SpEd staff, reporting and other duties. Must have post-secondary education, an AA degree or equivalent or successfully passing the ParaPro Assessment. ESDS can assist with ParaPro Assessment preparation, if needed. Wage is dependent upon experience. This position includes benefits. Call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 and ask for Dr. Eastman to inquire about the position. Applications may also be picked up in the administration office. Indian Preference policies apply. Position is open until filled.

 

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Temporary Job Opening

September 4th through December 28th, 2018.

The job is for a full time position Monday through Friday 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. The job will include paid holidays.

There will be multiple job duties including but not limited to answering phones, helping members, ordering debit cards, entering data into the computer, etc.

Resumes can be turned in at the office or emailed to katie@coteauvalleyfcu.com

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Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Accounting Department:

Revenue Audit (Full-Time) Day

Count Department:

Team Member (5 Full-Time) 3:00 am to finish

Human Resources Department:

Clerk (Full-Time) Day

Marketing Department:

Promotions Coordinator (Full-Time) where needed

Security Department:

Officer (9 Full-Time) Rotating

Slots Department:

Technician (Full-Time) where needed

Smoke/Gift shop Department:

Clerk (2 Full-Time) Day, swing

Surveillance Department:

Observer (4 Full-Time) where needed

Uniforms Department:

Attendant (2 Full-Time or Part-Time) where needed

Closing Date: August 17, 2018 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions

Two identifications documents required upon hire

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department 16849 102nd Street SE Hankinson ND 58041 For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment) Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

HOTEL: FRONT DESK SUPERVISOR (1 Full-Time). GENERAL FUNCTION: Assist the Hotel Manager, provide planning, and observe the operation of the

Hotel Front Desk.

REQUIREMENTS: High School Diploma or GED. Three to six months related experience and/or training,

or equivalent combination of education and experience. Effective communication skills with ability to write simple correspondence. Ability to present information effectively in one-on-one and small group situations to customers, clients, and other employees of Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel. Ability to handle diverse situations and/or people. Must be available to work all shifts; day, swing and graveyard. Must be able to obtain a Non Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on August 15, 2018 at 4 pm.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

FACILITIES: MAINTENANCE (2 FULL TIME). GENERAL FUNCTION: Maintain the Casino building and grounds to provide a neat, safe, and clean environment.

REQUIREMENTS: Must have a high school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. Possess carpenter, electrical, or plumbing abilities. Knowledge in general maintenance repair. Must have necessary tools to complete work orders. Must have valid driver's license. Ability to work any or all shifts. Must be able to do moderate amounts of lifting and climbing. Will be required to obtain a Non Gaming license upon hire. Wage D.O.E. Must be 21 years of age.

This position will close on August 15, 2018 at 4 pm.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

TABLE GAMES: FLOORPERSON (1 Full-Time) Rotating. GENERAL FUNCTION: Must supervise all games and employees to ensure that the department is operating in compliance with all casino, tribal, state, and federal regulations. Must stay in close communications with supervisor and management on all issues.

REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. Minimum one year blackjack experience. Effective communication skills. Ability to handle diverse situations and/or people. Must be able to stand for 2 to 4 hours at a time. Must demonstrate excellent attendance practices. Must obtain a key gaming license.

This position will close on August 15, 2018 at 4 pm.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

FACILITIES: MAINTENANCE (1 FULL TIME). GENERAL FUNCTION: Maintain the Casino building and grounds to provide a neat, safe, and clean environment.

REQUIREMENTS: Must have a high school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. Possess carpenter, electrical, or plumbing abilities. Knowledge in general maintenance repair. Must have necessary tools to complete work orders. Must have valid driver's license. Ability to work any or all shifts. Must be able to do moderate amounts of lifting and climbing. Will be required to obtain a Non Gaming license upon hire. Wage D.O.E. Must be 21 years of age.

This position will close on August 15, 2018 at 4 pm.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Re-Advertisement

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

LOUNGE: SERVER (1 Full-Time). GENERAL FUNCTION: Acts as host/hostess for all Lounge and Casino patrons.

REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or GED equivalent. Must be able to stand and/or walk for prolonged periods of time. Able to reach, bend, lift, carry, stoop and wipe. Able to carry up to 20 lbs. on a continual basis. Able to lift 50-60 lbs. Basic math skills is a must for money handling responsibilities. Excellent communication skills. Good organizational skills. Must obtain Non-Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on August 15, 2018 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Cage Department:

Main Bank Cashier/Cashier/Drop Team Member (3) part-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Excellent customer service skills, excellent communication skills. Appropriate dress code; the ability to work under pressure. Excellent Math Skills, Basic Computer Skills, Knowledge of basic office equipment. At, least 2 years of previous experience in the cage department preferred. Ability to lift 50 lbs. Must be at least 21 years old, must have a High school diploma or GED. Must be able to obtain a Key License.

Opening date: Thursday, August 9, 2018

Closing date: Wednesday, August 15, 2018 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke.

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

C-Store Department:

Clerk/Cashier (4) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Excellent customer service skills; math skills essential; ability to operate necessary equipment; physical ability to lift moderate amounts of weight; previous experience working with money preferred; strong organizational skills managing various functions; dependable & available to work any & all shifts. Must be at least 21 years old.

Opening date: Thursday, August 9, 2018

Closing date: Wednesday, August 15, 2018 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 
 

 

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