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Volume 51 Issue No. 8

Anpetu Iyamni, Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2020

Inside this Edition –

Sota distributed on Tuesday due to Treaty Day Observance

Tribal Execs travel to Washington, DC

Consultant update on SWO IT assessment

SWO selected for MHP's Native Community Development Institute

Highlights of the 2020 Ice Fishing Derby: See page two

Ninth in a series: Winter 2019 general council reports

Sisseton man, father strengthen bond in sobriety

January SWO Tribal Council proceedings

Prayer gathering for families of missing persons

"We Want Change" – Public forum Saturday, Feb. 22nd

Reminder: Deadline for receiving copy is Friday noon

Executives travel to Washington, DC

SWO Tribal Chairman Donovan White testified before a U.S. Senate Appropriations committee in the nation's capitol last Tuesday. See last week's Sota for the written text.

Purpose was to lobby for funding the detention center and long-term treatment needs of the Oyate.

Accompanying the Chairman was SWO Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson.

Chairman White said afterwards they had had "great meetings with Senators Thune and Rounds, Representative Johnson, and IHS Admiral Weakhee."

"We are getting closer to funding our long-term treatment center," he said.

"Also, Admiral Weakhee assured me he will look into our Council resolution to remove the CEO and investigate our IHS issues."

The Chairman attended a meeting in St. Paul, Minn. Wednesday with Minnesota Housing Partnership to talk about the Tribe's inclusion in MHP's third round of the Native Community Development Institute. (See the related article.)

And on Thursday, the Chairman led a delegation meeting with Shakopee to discuss plans for the Tribe's long-term treatment facility.

Another week of winter weather

Snow, wind and icy road conditions made for patches of treacherous driving for most of the past week.

A blizzard struck on Wednesday, February 12th, shutting down the schools and Tribal offices.

And while the blizzard conditions had expired windchill temperatures were reported as low as -31 making for late starts Thursday for offices and schools.

Milder temperatures returned Friday but wind and blowing snow made for dangerous driving conditions.

Consultant update on SWO IT assessment

Consultant Paul Veeneman, VP of MBA Engineering Remote Maintenance Technologies, provided Tribal Council an update on the status of the SWO IT assessment, which he reports is "two-thirds" completed.

The report is comprised of several sections:

Executive Overview

Assessment Scope

Chronology of Events

Review of specific security controls related to the ransomware impact:

·Access Control

·Audit and Accountability

·Configuration Management

·Contingency Planning

·Identification and Authentication

·Incident Response

·Physical and Environmental Protection

Recommendations for Remediation and Improvement

"I have been in consistent contact and communication with the IT department through the writing of the assessment report, validating additional information and confirmation of detail and items."

"Everyone involved has been extremely responsive and forthcoming with information which has made the entire process very straightforward," he writes.

SWO to participate in NCDI

Minnesota Housing Partnership (MHP) notified Tribal Planning Director Michael Roberts in a letter on February 4th that an application he had submitted on behalf of the Tribe was approved.

Here is an excerpt from the letter:

"…We are excited to welcome your team to the third round of MHP's Native Community Development Institute (NCDI)."

"The Native Community Development Institute supports and strengthens the capacity of Native communities to reach their community development goals through collaborative, self-styled trainings, peer-to-peer workshops, and customized assistance."

An initial meeting was held with Chairman White and the Tribe's Planning staff last Wednesday. Feb. 12, at MHP offices in St. Paul and a second is scheduled at Agency Village Friday, Feb. 28th.

Sarah Bellefuil, MHP's Community Development Deputy Director, will be staff liaison working with SWO during its participation in NCDI.

Ms. Bellefuil said SWO was chosen to participate because of SWO's leadership and staff commitment to pursuing community development goals that benefit the Tribe.

The NCDI is an 18-month program that includes five, 1.5 day workshops.

To participate, SWO will have a team of approximately 8 people committed to attending all five workshops.

The workshops will include presentations and facilitated action groups that address community needs.

Watch for news about the first workshop to be held in late March.

About MHP

Minnesota Housing Partnership (MHP) strengthens development capacity and promotes systems change to expand opportunity, especially for those with the greatest need. We support, lead, and collaborate with a diversity of partners to stimulate innovation and drive positive impact in affordable housing and community development in Minnesota and beyond.

We are a team of community developers, researchers and communicators, and policy advocates who work to...

Strengthen the ability of organizations to build and preserve housing and community assets. Learn more.

Provide original research and education resources to generate public support of vital communities and affordable housing. Learn more.

Drive efforts to secure the policies and funding needed at the regional, state, and federal levels to advance local housing and community development. Learn more.

Vision: Communities are strong and have affordable housing to meet their needs.

Mission: Minnesota Housing Partnership (MHP) strengthens development capacity and promotes systems change to expand opportunity, especially for those with the greatest need. We support, lead, and collaborate with a diversity of partners to stimulate innovation and drive positive impact in affordable housing and community development in Minnesota and beyond.

MHP began in 1987, as an informal coalition organizing community groups and nonprofit developers to play an active role in affordable housing. The catalyst for this effort was the governor of Minnesota's decision to establish a commission to help guide the state's role in housing for the decade of the 1990s.

The initial work of MHP focused on informing housing groups of policy and program developments occurring at the state and federal levels. MHP also was a catalyst for increased state funding targeted to addressing the housing needs of low-income people. In addition, MHP helped create the state's first programs to build the capacity of nonprofit housing providers.

In 1989 MHP incorporated as a member based, nonprofit organization. The MHP board of directors was structured to provide a balance between affordable housing interests in Greater Minnesota and the Twin Cities.

In 1994 MHP became a major provider of technical assistance and financial support to increase the capacity of housing development groups. MHP administers a predevelopment loan program and provides training and operating grants to nonprofit developers.

MHP's demonstrated capacity to deliver housing programs led to its recruitment serving as a funding intermediary for several government agency programs including the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. MHP delivers project-based and organizational technical assistance (TA), including as a national TA-provider for HUD's Neighborhood Stabilization Program, OneCPD model, and Rural Capacity Building Program.

Over the years, MHP has developed an effective lobbying arm and advocacy network. MHP has earned the respect of affordable housing supporters throughout the state, as well as government and legislative leaders.

Ninth in a series –

SWO Winter 2019 general council reports

The Winter 2019 general council was held Thursday and Friday, December 19 and 20. As in past years, your Sota is publishing summaries of program reports over coming weeks. For more information, including financials, see the general council booklet, Tribal Education Department booklet, and other distributed reports submitted too late to be included in the booklets. Copies are available through the Tribal Chairman's office.

This week's article continues the afternoon of day two with reports from programs under the office of the Tribal Secretary.

Tribal Health Administration

Annual report

Tribal Health Coordinator Sara DeCoteau introduced herself and gave the health admin report.

She also notified the Oyate she would be giving the Diabetes Prevention Program/Health and Fitness Center report on behalf of its Director Sara Lincoln, who could not attend.

"With Health Administration," she explained, "we have a self-determination contract that we have had since 1981."

"And we are in good standing."

Sara reported that the Tribe has not contracted any additional programs but are implementing "a number of initiatives and grants … (and are) particularly busy with three of them."

The first she talked about was the Tribal Opioid Response grant.

"There is an opioid epidemic, and so with our grant, we are promoting medication assisted treatment, safe medication storage, and then this year we worked with law enforcement and we're able to provide access to an opioid reversal agent."

"It is called Narcan or naloxone."

"Law enforcement officers are now carrying that," she said.

"This year, in April, the Indian Health Service implemented a standing order for friends and family and people who are using opioids … so you can go to the pharmacy, you can get a prescription filled to have that on hand."

"If someone has overdosed, you can administer the naloxone and it will reverse the effect that is otherwise fatal."

Sara talked about the orthodontics program, which falls under the IHS master contract.

"This year, we had 26 children complete orthodontics."

"In total, we have had about 480 children participate in the program, and 285 have completed."

"I want to thank all of you parents and grandparents who have supported your children in getting them to their appointments."

She called it "a big commitment over what can be, three years period of time."

Sara also reported that Health Administration has assisted the Tribal Elderly Affairs program, reimbursing the program for 3,000 referrals for advanced funding so that people could get to their medical appointments.

"We have a number of teams and committees that meet every month to coordinate things, and it's connected with our SWO health plan," she said.

"We have an inner agency and home care team that meets once a month to assist people to stay in their homes and be as independent as they can."

"We have a community safety team that works on prevention of injuries, behavioral health."

"And our agency team that's coordinating services between those that are providing substance use disorder treatment and counseling, suicide prevention services."

"We have a First 1000 Days inter-agency forum that that is working to get upstream of intergenerational trauma, and connected with that, we have two new grants that are being implemented this year."

"One of them is the I-LAUNCH project, and April Eastman will present a report on that."

"Also, the Great Plain Tribal Chairmen's Health Board is funded for a MMIEDC grant, which is Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting project that also is being implemented."

"We also have an Early Childhood Caries Prevention collaborative that meets regularly."

"We're trying to prevent tooth decay in young children, and this next year, we'll be working on our successor SWO health plan."

"We have had five year plans since 1980, and we'll be updating and coming up with new initiatives."

"We have 15 initiatives in the health plan."

"One is the First 1000 Days initiative and the other is the Grant Writing initiative."

"And I'm proud to say that we have had, out of 26 applications that we've submitted, we have had 16 funded."

Sara reported that two funded this year are for Tribal Management and for Adult Vocational Rehab.

She said that Leah Fyton has been hired as Tribal Health Director and "will be working on helping us develop our capacity for self-governance and to administer additional grants."

Sara pointed out that Education Director Dr. Sherry Johnson had reported on the Adult Vocational Rehab program.

She reported as a priority for the coming year are building "capacity for Indian self-determination contract and grant management … think about how we are going to sustain our new grant funding."

"Some of the grants are shorter term or they are coming to an end."

"For example, the Tribal Opioid Response grant is only two years, so we only have nine more months left."

"Certainly, the federal government is not expecting us to resolve the opioid epidemic in two years, so we are thinking there will be something else coming down the line."

The Tribal Health Coordinator said that Sara Lincoln, Health & Fitness/Diabetes program manager, had to leave for a youth event.

"We have a Heart of the Nation cardiovascular health grant that is expanding the scope of the diabetes center," she said, "wo be able to deal with high blood pressure and heart disease."

"There are challenges and activities that are going on every month, every day at the diabetes center, and we encourage you to come over and check it out."

From the written report:

Staff:

Sara DeCoteau, Health Services Coordinator

Diana Hawkins, Public Health Initiatives Assistant / Student Extern October 1 - December 31, 2018

Bridgette Neilan, Health Project Manager / Data Specialist

Program Summary and Responsibilities:

1. Coordinate SWO's Indian Health Service Comprehensive Health Care Services Contract (Indian Self-Determination and Educational Assistance Act or "638" IHS Master Contract)

2. Implement health initiatives and grants.

3. Participate in interagency coordination activities to promote collaboration and collective impact.

4. Plan and develop services that will improve health status, quality, and access to care (SWO Health Plan).

Program unmet needs and identified issues:

1. Lack of mid-level management prerequisite to sustaining existing services developed under recent grants, forging systemic capacity, propelling organizational readiness, and mobilizing transition planning aimed at 638 assumption of additional programs services, functions and activities. Recommendations: Implement Tribal Management Grant - Health Management Structure Development Project, which will establish mid-level management by hiring a highly qualified and experienced Department Director to assume supervisory, programmatic and fiscal management for SWO health and human services programs, projects, grants, initiatives and developmental activities.

2. Repeat: Lack of appropriate and affordable space for new grants and programs. Recommend SWO develop a facilities master plan to "plan the work and then work the plan".

3. Although the Indian Health Care Improvement Act (IHCIA) authorizes construction of specialized facilities, the Indian Health Service has no funds to plan, construct or provide staffing for substance use disorder / behavioral health treatment centers. Recommendations: Advocate that Congress appropriate funds to develop Health Systems Planning Manual modules to plan for construction, staffing and operational costs. Once a process is established, then advocate for Congress to appropriate the n funding necessary to address this important unmet need.

4. Fragmentation of care with services delivered by multiple autonomous organizations, each with its own processes and requirements and too little incentive to work together. Recommendations: A new Electronic Health Record system may partly address this if it includes integrating Tribal and other partner services. Processes for fostering and developing interagency teamwork and differentiating "Tribal partnership" from "Tribal consultation" are needed.

FY 19 accomplishments:

1. Coordinated SWO's P.L. 93-638 contract with the Indian Health Service, including preparation of budget modifications, end-of-the year carry-over adjustments, incorporation of recurring and non-recurring increases, maintaining contract compliance and preparation of renewal documents. The recurring base of SWO's IHS Master contract was $2,737,315. Plus, non-recurring funds totaled $3,991,903.57 (of which $608,548.33 was Indirect Costs and $91,107.29 was third party income generated by Dakotah Pride Center). We also received non-recurring increases for Alcohol & Substance Abuse Area and Headquarters Tribal Shares ($33,667), Maintenance and Improvement ($15,627), and Equipment ($1,177) for Dakotah Pride Center. For FY/2020, $1,123,971.65 was carried over in advance of close-out to continue non-recurring initiatives. We processed eight (8) budget modifications in FY/19. The recurring base increased by $56,086 due to appropriations by Congress. The IHS Master Contract had 19 accounts - 8 recurring and 11 non-recurring. HC prepared continuation contract documents. HC served as Fair and Uniform Services (FUS) Coordinator to address participant concerns, although there were none submitted in 2019. The HC participated in Dakotah Pride Center's Quality Improvement Committee to support accreditation and record meeting minutes. The relationship between Tribal Health contract and grant programs with Sisseton IHS (including space) is pursuant to Collaborative Agreement SD-CA-06-0061 and its appended Business Associate Agreement for protection of privacy and confidentiality of patient information.

2. Coordinated access to orthodontic treatment for eligible children with the greatest clinical need through a partnership between the IHS Dental Clinic, Delta Dental of South Dakota, and participating orthodontist providers. Twenty-six (26) children completed orthodontic treatment this year at a cost of $143,872.14. As of 9/30/18, we have $1,012,726 obligated for the 143 children who are in some phase of treatment or waiting to start treatment. This year, we referred 51 new children, obligating $361,182 for their treatment over the next several years. The total cost for the 35 children who completed was $210,775.47. We have 16 children who are referred and ready to start. We processed 51 first payments for children starting treatment and 42 second payments for children mid-way through treatment. Due to carry-over funding over-and-above our recurring base, we were able to continue to refer children with severity scores <65. Since the program began in 2010, 283 children have completed treatment! The partnership between the Tribe, IHS, Delta Dental, and the participating orthodontists is what is making the program so successful.

3. Reimbursed the Tribal Elderly Affairs Program for non-emergency medical transportation payments advanced to Tribal members referred through the IHS Purchased and Referred Care Program. Reimbursements to the Tribal Elderly Affairs Program totaled $197,500.60 for 3,000 IHS patient referrals. This program is operated pursuant to the IHS Manual, Part 2, Chapter 3, Purchased and Referred Care, §2-3.18 Fiscal Intermediary, 21.85 Patient and Escort Travel. (Tribal Elderly Affairs requires that a copy of the IHS PRC approval letter must be submitted with the Tribal member's application in order to verify that the patient is eligible for Purchased/Referred Care funds. In order to be eligible, the patient must have been referred by IHS, live within the IHS Contract Health Service Delivery Area, and not have another resource that will pay for transportation. For example, the State Medicaid Program reimburses patients or transportation providers for non-emergency medical transportation.)

4. Supported implementation of grants and initiatives. Health Administration is actively involved in implementation of two grants that are funded by the Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA): ILAUNCH & TOR). a) Dissemination of Results from the Pregnancy Health Survey for Parents of Newborns on the Lake Traverse Reservation: Infographics were developed for community education on key findings, including nutrition, safe sleep, breastfeeding, tobacco, substance use, and correlations of Adverse Childhood Experiences with behaviors. Copies (with accompanying articles developed by the HC) were distributed via First 1,000 Days website, clinics, collaborative partners, Tribal newspaper, and social media. This was the first time ever that fathers were engaged in a PRAMS-like survey, so fathers' data was prominent. This study demonstrated the feasibility of a paternal pregnancy health survey and found that fathers' attitudes and behaviors related to breastfeeding and smoking are related to the mothers' behaviors. Secondly, a vast majority of fathers are attending health care visits with the mother; however, fathers are not being screened for their own health conditions, despite risks. Prenatal and well child health care visits provide an opportunity to address paternal health issues and provide education. The data was used in documenting need for several grants. b) Indigenous Linking Actions for Unmet Needs in Children's Health (ILAUNCH): The Tribal Secretary assigned supervisory oversight for project implementation and mentorship for this five-year grant to the HC. Activities have included recruitment, hiring, and orientation of key staff; contracting with Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health for Family Spirit home visiting training and Care4 database; renovating a facility; Community Needs and Readiness Assessment; first draft standard operating procedures; and three-day Project Officer site visit during September. c) Tribal Opioid Response (TOR): The Tribal Secretary also assigned supervisory oversight for implementation of this two-year grant to the HC. Activities have included recruitment, hiring and orientation of staff; completing the strategic plan; development and then revision of standard operating procedures (including forms); execution of Naloxone Access Agreement that provides access to opioid reversal kits to SWO Law Enforcement; participation in several interagency consortia; efforts to provide access to Medication Assisted Treatment; community awareness education; and submission of a request for $77,860 in supplemental Year 2 funding. d) Great Plains - Maternal Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Project: The third grant is funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration, awarded to the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's Health Board, and will be implemented on the Lake Traverse Reservation. HC served on the Core Group. Activities have included community asset mapping; Young Child Wellness Resource Directory; selection of home visiting model; & Community Needs and Readiness Assessment.

5. Participated on interagency teams for collaboration and to achieve collective impact on priority issues. a) Interagency Inhome Care Team: Meets monthly pursuant to IHS Collaborative Agreement SD-CA-09-0021 (& appended Business Associate Agreement) for case-collaboration aimed to assist elderly and disabled Tribal members in maintaining the most independent and highest possible quality of life. HC served as the Recorder. b) Community Safety Team: Meets monthly to prevent injuries using the complementary 4-Es of public health: Education, Environmental Modification, Engineering advances, and Enforcement of laws, regulations and policies. HC served as the Recorder. The Team operates pursuant to IHS Collaborative Agreement SD-CA-10-0021. c) Behavioral Health Interagency Team: Meets monthly pursuant to IHS Collaborative Agreement SD-CA-09-0006 (and appended Business Associate Agreement) to coordinate mental health, substance abuse, social service, and criminal justice services for clients with co-occurring issues. HC functioned as the Recorder. d) First 1,000 Days Initiative Interagency Forum: Meets monthly to coordinate resources to support healthy resilient families and prevent or mitigate the effects of toxic stress from Adverse Childhood Experiences on lifelong health and wellbeing. This year's foci have included Community Needs and Readiness Assessments associated with new grants and the South Dakota Department of Health; updating the community resource directory; and coordination of follow-up on 2017 Epi Aid on Substance Use During Pregnancy. This group operates under a charter. HC served as the Facilitator and Recorder. The charter, infographics, Epi-Aid material, and minutes are on the website. e) Early Childhood Caries Prevention Collaborative: Meets monthly to achieve SWO Health Plan Smart Goal: By December 31, 2020 the percent of children aged twelve months and younger having a first dental exam will increase by 25% from 41.6% (baseline measure) as of December 2018 to 66.6% (target measure). The HC served as the Recorder. The group promotes prevention of tooth decay in young children and partnered to bring the Delta Dental Smile Mobile to Sisseton in September. f) SWO Health Plan Stakeholders' Work Group and Project Development Team: Meets quarterly to coordinate efforts and monitor implementation of the the 5-year strategic action plan. The Project Development Team meets as needed to work on grant applications. HC served as the Facilitator and Recorder. g) Other Meetings: Includes, Diabetes Team, Orthodontics Team, Local Research Review Board, ILAUNCH Staff and GPO meetings, MCH Team, Emergency Preparedness for Patients with Serious Medical Conditions, ILAUNCH Young Child Wellness Advisory Group, Adult Services Task Force, MCH Team, Tribal Maternal Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Project Core Group, Program Managers Human Services Board, health event planning, South Dakota Health Care Solutions Coalition, South Dakota Opioid Abuse Advisory Committee, Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's Health Board's Rural Communities Opioid Response Planning Consortium, Avera HRSA Rural Communities Opioid Response - Planning Steering Committee, Great Plains Tribal Epidemiology Center Opioid Surveillance Task Force, and Native Connection Grantee Calls.

6. Coordinated Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Health Plan (2016-2020) priority initiatives. The Health Plan was adopted by Tribal Council resolution on July 5, 2016. A Stakeholders' Work Group meets bi-monthly to collaborate efforts. a) Fifteen priority initiatives are funded through existing recurring resources, remnants of non-recurring funds awarded to SWO's 638 contract from Sisseton IHS prior to FY/2016, and new grants and grants secured to address Health Plan priorities. b) HC is the Lead for Priority #12 Grant Writing / Project Development initiative. Goal: To increase the number of grants awarded to support SWO Health Plan priorities from four as of January 2016 to fifteen by 2020. When pursuing a grant, Project Development Teams are formed to work with the grant writer contractor, and there must be a Lead identified that is responsible for the grant application and implementation (if funded). Out of 25 applications submitted, 16 have been awarded, 9 were not, and 0 is pending. With the awards totaling $9,878,213 ($2,084,379 in FY/19), the Grant Writing initiative is at 145.45% of reaching its target. The number of positions funded = 18 employees. FY/19 grant writing expenses = $25,428.40. c) HC is also the Lead for #4 (First 1,000 Days). Refer to 4a) b) d) and 5d) (References are in general council booklet.)

Goals for 2020:

1. Build capacity for Indian Self-Determination contract & grant management. Support implementation of Tribal Management Grant (TMG) - Health Management Structure Development Project, funded by the Indian Health Service for three years. The Department Director, once hired, will be supervised by the Tribal Secretary and located at the Tribal Office.

2. Develop successor SWO Health / Tribal Action Plan (2021-2025). Compile year-end initiative reports. Compile and conduct community needs and readiness assessment. Create a strategic plan using participatory processes with stakeholders, partners, and potential partners that will serve as a blueprint for work to be accomplished. Encourage stakeholder participation and buy-in.

3. Implement evidence-based Family Spirit home visiting services. Achieve SWO Health Plan Priority #4 First 1,000 Days, Strategy 5 by staffing up key positions and beginning home visiting services through the I-LAUNCH and GP-MIECHV grants, in partnership with Johns Hopkins University and GPTCHB.

4. Sustain new grant services. Apply for new cycles for grant projects that will be ending after FY/2020, as well as new grants that provide for similar services. Support development of systems that will generate third party revenue and other feasible strategies.

Tribal Opioid Response project

Annual report

From the written report:

Staff:

Sara DeCoteau, SWO Health Coordinator (in-kind)

Melissa Favila, TOR Nurse Care Connector (Hired 12/3 - resigned 4/12)

Josie Deutsch, TOR Nurse Care Connector (Hired 5/28))

Bridgette Neilan, Project Manager/Data Specialist (Hired 12/31)

Program Summary and Responsibilities:

TOR aims to reduce unmet treatment need and opioid overdose related deaths by connecting people to prevention, treatment (including Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT), and/or recovery support services that are safe, effective, evidence-based and culturally appropriate, in accordance with Dakotah values, public health strategy, and the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate/Tribal Action Plan (2016-2020).

Program needs:

1. Delays in hiring, extraordinary weather-related closures in Winter 2019, NCC turnover, and lack of example standard operating procedures caused less than anticipated participation in care connector services. Recommendations: Request that the Government Project Official lower the target number of Year 1 participants from 25 to 10.

1. Delays in supplying opioid reversal agent kits to SWO first responders due to inefficient processes for developing and executing collaborative agreements. Recommendations: For the short-term, the State Agreement will allow access to Naloxone for first responders not covered by the IHS Agreement. 31 kits have been distributed to trained responders to date.

2. Access to MAT is tight for several reasons. One barrier is the IHS MAT policy and procedures has not been approved through the area office. Three IHS providers have received the DEA waiver training. However, only one provider is prescribing before the policy and procedures are approved. There is one provider at Coteau des Prairies Hospital who prescribes but she is doing so without backup support and buy-in from the other providers in her organization. Recommendations: Subject matter experts at Massachusetts General Hospital who have been working in our Area for several years and came onsite through their arrangement with the Great Plains Tribal Chairman's Health Board. The possibility to use the supplemental funding in order to have providers on or near the SWO who are providing healthcare to the SWO population become DEA Waivered Prescribers. The NCC has addressed the idea to implement TeleMAT with Project Recovery.

3. Removal of the opioid containing product VivaZen, and any others containing kratom, from sales at tribal stores. Recommendations: The SWO Health Coordinator as well as the CHE Director presented a proposal to the SWO Council and Executives on the proposed ban of VivaZen on November, 5th 2019.

4. Approval of six additional Naloxone Access Agreements for the treatment centers and security personnel of the casinos and SWO Administration Building.

FY 2019 accomplishments:

1. Developed strategic action plan annex to SWO Health/Tribal Action Plan (2016-2020) for TOR and coordinate efforts with other stakeholders for collective impact. The strategic action plan was submitted to the Government Project Official (GPO) on 2/26. It is an annex to the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Health Plan (2016-2020). Collaboration for collective impact occurred by attending monthly team meetings, including Community Safety Team, Behavioral Health Interagency Team, First 1,000 Days Interagency Forum, and Health Plan Stakeholders meetings.

2. Led efforts for SWO first responders to have access to the Naloxone opioid reversal agent in collaboration with the Community Safety Team. In order to have the Naloxone Access Agreement with Indian Health Service, the Tribe was required the Tribe to have a Good Samaritan law. The First Responder and Good Samaritan Immunity Code was adopted by Tribal Council on 3/19. After legal reviews by IHS and SWO, the Naloxone Access for First Responders (SD-CA-19-0026) for SWO Law Enforcement was approved by the Tribal Council on 8/28 and the IHS Area Director 9/9. Because of the delays and opioid overdose deaths in the community, naloxone kits were also provided to TOR via a Training & Distribution & Hold harmless agreement from the South Dakota Department of Health for other first responders.

3. Organized workforce (employee) education activities to increase awareness about the opioid epidemic and resources that are available for recovery and overdose prevention. TOR collaborated with IHS Pharmacists to implement training for first responders on how to administer Naloxone (narcan) to prevent death by opioid overdose. On 9/11, 16 Tribal Police officers were trained and Naloxone issued by IHS. A second training was held for 8 Dakotah Pride Center staff on 9/27, at which time the NCC issued Naloxone kits provided by the South Dakota Department of Health to those trained. In total, 24 people were trained to use Naloxone kits.

TOR has been using the NOVA PBS film Addiction to educate the workforce at Lunch & Learns and other venues. The link to it (below) continues to be distributed. Survey Monkey was used to collect the following feedback from 45 viewers.

*42 people said it improved their understanding of the opioid epidemic

*45 people said it touched their hearts

*29 said there was something new that surprised them

*43 will recommend the film to someone else

*36 said they think the opioid epidemic is on the Lake Traverse Reservation and 9 were not sure

*33 said they were member of the SWO or affiliate workforce

*Respondents identified additional information they would like to learn about the opioid epidemic.

4. Implemented outreach, community education, and mass media activities. An aim of the community outreach and workforce education is to engage potential participants in Nurse Care Connection services.

TOR staff were certified during March in the Botvin Lifeskills® Training "Life Skills Training Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention" curricula through the South Dakota Human Service Agency. Two presentations using the curriculum were made, one on the Community Health Education 411 TV show and the other a lunch and learn sponsored by Aliive Roberts County.

TOR partnered with the Aliive-Roberts County coalition to promote National Drug Take-Back Day during April. TOR also promote safety by promoting muse of the med safe disposal bins in IHS Pharmacy and CDP clinic that are available EVERY DAY.

In June TOR provided medication safety education at the Sisseton Wahpeton College Health Fair to 16 people and at the Summer General Council meeting to 91 people. Thirty-six locked medication devices and 200 DisposeRx Single-Use Drug Disposal Packets were dispensed.

On 8/6, TOR provided education to 24 people at the National Night Out event at Veterans Memorial Park on Fentanyl, safe medication storage and disposal, the TOR program and Medication Assisted Therapy. A substance abuse survey was conducted.

TOR staff assisted with the Piya Canku Akan Maunipi "On the healing road we walk" event scheduled August 16-17, 2019, held at Veterans Memorial Park, including the speaker payment for Angela Kennecke c/o Emily's Hope Approximately 165 people attended the event.

The NCC presented at the Early Childhood Intervention Program monthly parent meeting on 8/28. A record number 68 parents attended.

The NCC had a table at the IHS Open House on 9/10 where 50 people received information.

The NCC presented during the 9/20 KXSW-CNB SWO Behavioral Health TV show on safe medication storage, Naloxone and how it is used, prevention of overdose, and read a letter from the mother of a daughter in recovery. The show had 865 views with 24 community members sharing it on social media.

5. Provided care coordination services to people with Opioid Use Disorder.

The NCC enrolled 11 participants for care coordination.

A recruitment brochure with a tear-off referral sheet was developed and disseminated for partners to use in referring prospective participants to TOR.

Standard Operating Procedures were revised from the earlier version approved in April and approved by the Tribal Secretary on 9/12.

TOR utilizes the IHS Electronic Health Record and established an i-Care panel for client information management. Initially, TOR obtained a license to, training in, and access to the AccuCare electronic health record system but decided not to use it.

TOR has compiled and is issuing a self-help workbook, Healing Journal in ring binder format to participants. Resources can be accessed and downloaded from the Avoid Opioid SD website.

The NCC attends SWO Parole Wellness Team, which informs parolees returning to the SWO community about the programs and resources available to help with successful transition and addresses swift and certain sanctions for violations of the conditions of parole. (The SWO parole case-load was 88 in FY/2019.)

6. Partnered with the Tribal Epidemiology Center and other opioid response coalitions and consortia to coordinate efforts.

7. On 9/27, SWO received a $77,860 supplemental award. This additional funding may be used to continue or expand services to address the opioid crisis by increasing access to culturally appropriate and evidence-based treatment, including medication-assisted treatment (MAT). The intent is to reduce unmet treatment need and opioid overdose-related deaths through the provision of prevention, treatment and/or recovery activities for OUD. We submitted a budget narrative justification and plan on how we plan to use this funding to SAMHSA on October 30th.

Goals for 2020:

1. Provide a presentation to the community by Melanie Weise, whom is an eye doctor in Watertown, SD who suffered from opioid misuse. She discussed her personal story with addiction and how addiction has many faces. It would be possible to get her into the schools and a community event to present her story.

(Editor's note: This event has already been held.)

2. Continue to provide workforce training regarding Naloxone medication use to first responders (casino security officers and treatment centers), as well as Good Samaritans, in collaboration with IHS Pharmacists. The NCC is still working to set up training times for the casinos staff. Dakota Magic Casino is the last to be trained. The date is still in the planning faze. The NCC has set up a MAT committee meeting with important staff to have the possibility of implementing TeleMAT with Project Recovery.

3. Continue to offer workforce education through Lunch and Learns.

4. Plan and implement a public health approach to eliminating local retail access to products containing kratom, such as VivaZen and any others, without generating unintended demand or curiosity and banning sale in SWO venues. Advise the workforce and/or public that the product is not only addictive but also could show up in urine drug screens and affect their employment and/or status as a drug user. The SWO Health Coordinator as well as the CHE Director presented a proposal to the SWO Council and Executives on the proposed ban of VivaZen on November, 5th 2019.

5. On 9/27, SWO received a $77,860 supplemental award. This additional funding may be used to continue or expand services to address the opioid crisis by increasing access to culturally appropriate and evidence-based treatment, including medication-assisted treatment (MAT). The intent is to reduce unmet treatment need and opioid overdose-related deaths through the provision of prevention, treatment and/or recovery activities for OUD. Plan, develop and submit to SAMHSA a budget narrative justification and program plan. This may include a technical assistance contract with Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) subject matter experts at Massachusetts General Hospital who have been working in our Area for several years and came onsite through their arrangement with the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's Health Board RCORP grant in March.

Program statistics:

1. Coordinate efforts with SWO Health Plan for collective impact

# Meetings attended           40

# Strategic Action Plan Annex Completed or Revised 1

# Stakeholder Reports / Updates Made         10

2. Organize workforce (employee) education activities annually

# Activities 5

# Events    7

# Participants         139

3 & 7. Implement outreach, community education, mass media activity (6 per year)

# Community Education Activities  19

# Community Education Events      7

# Participants         1282

4. Provide care coordination services to 50 people with Opioid Use Disorder

# of Initial Contacts 20

# of Intakes 11

# 3-Month Contacts           1

# 6-Month Contacts           0

# Discharges          0

5, 6, & 7. Collaborate and coordinate to deliver care coordination services

# of MOAs, MOUs, Collaborative Agreements         1

Collaborative Meetings       46

# Collaborative Contacts     23

Number of referrals received            8

Number of referrals made    48

# Collaborative Activities / Projects  1

8. Partner with Tribal Epidemiology Center and other opioid response coalitions and consortia # Meetings attended (includes teleconferences)           41

Health & Fitness Center

Diabetes Prevention program

Annual report

From the written report:

Staff:

Sara Lincoln, Director

Pauline WhiteThunder, Admin Assistant

Danielle Grey, Diabetes Prevention Coor.

Natasha Renville, Incentive Coordinator

Tyler Bellonger, Fitness Room Attendant

Ashley Lee, Fitness Technician

Chelsey Canku, Outreach Coordinator

Glenn Fineday, Fitness Technician

Unmet needs: Not enough space. Recommendation – wellness center.

FY 2019 accomplishments:

We have met all our goals already that are required by both of our grants. Results: Health Assessments, Monthly Activities, and Outreach.

Goals for 2020:

Since we met our goals by September of this year we increased our goals for next year's grant cycle.

Additional information:

*This year we began a Motivator of the Month where we nominate and recognize someone that has made a healthy change in their life.

Dakotah Pride Center

Annual report

Richard Bird, manager, gave the Dakotah Pride report to the Oyate

"Currently," he reported, "we have about 17 staff members."

"We are a state accredited program, substance abuse treatment … for alcohol, cannabis, opioids, meth and any kind of drug, any kind of substance abuse."

"We provide assessments," Richard said, "and that assessment determines which treatment program that they should follow."

He said the staff is "grateful" for having "a good day treatment program that has been gearing up."

"They also provide intensive outpatient treatment.

"So we are trying to get more and more people who will complete inpatient treatment to try to get them referred to the day treatment program, Mayuteca, so hopefully that works out better in the coming years."

"We have been, for the past 15, maybe 20 years or so, thinking about planning for a new and improved treatment center, a larger one, larger capacity, 24 to 32 beds or so."

"Sixteen of those beds would primarily be for treatment for alcohol and focus more on alcohol treatment."

"And the other 16 beds would be focused more on methamphetamines, longer term treatment."

"Open-ended type treatment too."

He said the goal is "working toward longer term treatment and open-ended type treatment."

From the written report:

Staff:

Richard Bird, Program Manager

DaVonna Keeble, Office Manager

Cassandra Mason, Data Entry

Ronnie Skjonsberg, Maintenance

Brianna Donnell, Inpatient Counselor

Ronald Hill, Inpatient Counselor

Clarice BearHill, Inpatient Treatment Coordinator

Catherine Thompson, Food Service Manager

Marylou Thompson, Outpatient Counselor

Dakotah Eltherington, Prenatal Empowerment Case Mgr.

Norman Watts, CD Technician

Barbara Heminger, CD Technician

Lloyd V. LaBelle Jr., CD Technician

Timothy White, Nurse

Julie Watts, Outpatient Counselor

Program Summary and Responsibilities:

*Function/Mission Statement: To promote and sustain the quality of life, integrity, and empowerment of SWO Tribal Members by planning, developing and providing alcohol and drug addiction services consistent with the behavioral, physical, cultural, and spiritual values of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation.

*Dakotah Pride is a SD State accredited substance use disorder treatment program which provides alcohol and drug use disorder assessments; a 12-bed adult inpatient residential treatment program; intensive outpatient treatment program for adults; a 26-week aftercare treatment for adults; and a 10-bed transitional care halfway house for adult men and women. Other services provided by Dakotah Pride Center include; transportation for social detoxification; referral/collaboration to Mental Health Department at Indian Health Service; referral/case management for patients with co-occurring substance use disorders and mental health disorders; and a 24-hour on call counselor (742-3114).

*Goal: To raise the behavioral health status of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate to the highest possible level through the provision of prevention, educational, and treatment services as part of an integrated behavioral health approach to reduce the incidence of alcohol and substance use disorders by working collaboratively with medical and behavioral health providers.

Unmet Needs: Additional bed for transitional housing and after treatment completion care. Recommendations: Seek funding from I.H.S and State Resources

Ongoing Issues or Struggles: Increase staff-secured housing for parolees and probations; Detox for medical and social. Recommendations: Seek funding from I.H.S. and State Resources

FY 2019 accomplishments:

Admitted 97 clients to inpatient. 83 completed (85 percent completion rate).

Goals for 2020:

Work with Planning office and IHS to secure funding for 32-bed open ended treatment facility.

Program Statistics:

*Adult Inpatient Treatment: Dakotah Pride Center admitted a total of 97 clients to participate in the 5-week treatment program. Of these clients, 83 successfully completed and received a certificate of completion.

*Intensive Outpatient Program Level II.1 for adults, the number of clients that successfully completed was 29.

*The Prenatal Empowerment Program had 13 referrals; of those, 7 were not eligible for the program as they were no longer pregnant when referred. 6 enrolled and/or completed the program.

*Evaluations: A total of 350 evaluations were scheduled, of those 264 were completed and 86 did not show up for their scheduled evaluation.

*Place & Referral (Contract Health Services) a total of 75 clients were referred to other inpatient treatment centers:

Keystone Treatment Center (18)

Tallgrass Recovery (38)

New Dawn (12)

Gila River Treatment Center (4)

Rosebud Meth Program (3)

*Stimulant Use Disorder or Meth was as frequent as Alcohol Use Disorder followed by Opioid Use Disorder and Cannabis Use Disorder.

Winter 2019 general council reports

Continued in next week's Sota

Gov. Noem signs eight bills

Pierre, SD – Feb. 14, 2020 – Governor Kristi Noem has signed the following bills during the 2020 legislative session:

HB1005 – An Act to revise certain provisions regarding the use of telehealth technologies.

HB1015 – An Act to revise certain provisions regarding banks.

HB1016 – Act to revise certain provisions regarding money transmission.

HB1017 – An Act to provide for certain insurer corporate governance disclosure requirements.

HB1018 – An Act to revise certain provisions regarding life and health insurance insolvencies.

HB1030 – An Act to revise certain provisions regarding the Board of Technical Education.

HB1049 – An Act to establish a maximum on the number of words contained in a statement of a proponent or opponent for the ballot question pamphlet.

HB1052 – An Act to change a reference from a secondary election to a runoff election to maintain consistency in terms.

For more information on these bills and other ongoing pieces of legislation, visit the Legislative Research Council website: sdlegislature.gov/.

Senate committee passes bill requiring businesses to accept tribal IDs

By Stephen Groves

Pierre, SD – Rapid City Journal – Feb. 12, 2020 – A Republican lawmaker on Wednesday proposed a bill amendment that would add tribal IDs to the list of documents that can be used to register to vote in South Dakota — a measure aimed at encouraging registration in communities with low voter turnout.

The measure came after House Republicans shot down a similar proposal from Democrats last week.

Rep. Tamara St. John, a Republican from Sisseton and a member of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, on Wednesday said tribal IDs should be allowed for registration as long as the secretary of state's office has verified the information on voter registration forms, in agreement with the tribe that issued the ID.

The Democratic proposal last week did not require any such memorandum of understanding between individual tribes and the secretary of state. Republicans argued that it would have threatened the security of voter registration.

In the 2018 general election, tribal communities reported some of the lowest voter turnout figures in the state. Native Americans make up 9% of the state's total population.

St. John said the bill strikes a balance between keeping the tribes sovereign and making it easier for people to register to vote.

Tribes in South Dakota have enhanced the security and information on IDs in recent years, adding dates of birth, addresses and holographics. The IDs can be used to go through security at airports and to verify identity at voting booths.

St. John pushed for a Senate committee to amend a bill that would allow people to use state IDs other than driver's licenses to register to vote. The House passed that bill last week, but without the language allowing tribal IDs.

The amendment was unanimously approved by the Senate committee, but the committee did not have enough time to vote on the bill. If the bill is approved, it will be considered by the full Senate. The amended bill would then head back to the House for a vote.

Statement from Rep. Tamara St. John

Pierre, SD – Feb. 12, 2020 – S.D. Rep. Tamara St. John (R-District 1) today announced the inclusion of her amendment to HB 1054, allowing the Secretary of State to enter into memorandum of understandings with any of the nine tribes in South Dakota, creating a path forward to allow tribal members' Tribal ID numbers to be used when registering to vote in South Dakota.

"Although we collectively are a part of the Great Sioux Nation, each tribe located in South Dakota is unique. Tribes are able to create their own codes, set their own enrollment criteria and create their own ID cards. I'm pleased my legislative colleagues over in the senate understood the value in adding this amendment. I believe we have struck a balance that promotes tribal sovereignty, creates further collaboration between state-tribal relations and allows more opportunity for citizens to register to vote in South Dakota."

The bipartisan amendment was introduced Thursday during a Senate State Affairs committee meeting by S.D. Sen. Kennedy (D-District 18) and was passed unanimously by voice vote. Action for HB 1054, as amended, was deferred and will be voted on in committee during a future hearing. Text of the amendment (HB 1054J) can be found here:

https://mylrc.sdlegislature.gov/api/Documents/67422.pdf

Native American leader says tribal sovereignty still threatened from 'every corner'

By McKenzie Sadeghi

Washington, DC – Cronkite News – Feb. 11, 2020 – Despite some "encouraging developments," threats to tribal sovereignty still come "from every branch and every corner of federal and state governments," the president of the National Congress of American Indians said Monday.

NCAI President Fawn Sharp said in a wide-ranging State of Indian Nations address that the state of the nations is strong, with "remarkable stories of cultural, social, political and economic renewal" made possible by "the greatest indigenous core value of all – self-governance."

But that self-governance continues to be threatened by many Americans, including policymakers, who don't understand tribal sovereignty, she said.

"They don't recognize the indisputable fact that we are genuine governments with the right, and more importantly, the ability, to govern our own lands and communities," Sharp said.

The annual address touched on everything from a lack of federal funding for tribal programs to concerns about voter suppression and climate change. But through it all, Sharp stressed the need to renew the "enduring government-to-government relationship between tribal nations and the U.S. government."

There have been successes in the past year – like the reauthorization of a grant program for the study of Native American languages and the passage of a bill to fund tribal colleges – but Sharp said those "are the exceptions to an increasingly alarming rule."

She pointed to Congress' refusal to pass a reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, that has given tribes greater authority to prosecute domestic violence cases, and legal attacks on the Indian Child Welfare Act, which gives priority to tribal members in adoption cases.

VAWA, she said, provided justice for Native victims of violence "where none existed before," but that Congress is "refusing to expand tribal authority to administer justice for sexual violence, child abuse, stalking, and human trafficking."

Among the greatest threats to Indian Country are the ongoing problems "caused by federal inaction and indifference," Sharp said. That neglect was "powerfully illustrated" in the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights' 2018 report, "Broken Promises," which said the "federal government continues to fail to support adequately the social and economic wellbeing of Native Americans."

"This report is a troubling glimpse into the pervasive impacts that federal budget shortfalls have on the health and vibrancy of tribal communities," said Sharp, noting that the 2018 report mirrored findings of a report 15 years earlier.

Sharp laid at least some of the problems at the feet of the Trump administration – a claim echoed in the congressional response by Rep. Deb Haaland, D-N.M.

"I have witnessed actions that I never thought possible by a president of the United States," Haaland said during her speech.

Haaland said the most important legislation right now is the VAWA reauthorization, because "women have the right to be safe."

President Donald Trump did sign an executive order in November creating "Operation Lady Justice," a task force aimed at combating the problem of missing and murdered indigenous women. But Haaland said she is concerned that the task force does not include the voices of any survivors or tribal leaders.

She said the order "lacks concrete transparency and consultation requirements." Haaland said the administration needs "to recognize the centuries of violence that Native people endured, which won't be solved without concrete procedures and with only $1.5 million."

She and Sharp both blamed the administration for inaction on climate change, an issue Sharp faced firsthand when rising sea levels forced her Quinault nation to move its main village to higher ground.

"Federal inaction and indifference is perhaps no more destructive than with the current failure of the administration and some in Congress to address the rapidly accelerating impacts of climate change, or even knowledge that it exists," Sharp said.

Sharp called on the government to fully count Native Americans in the 2020 Census, and to protect them against attempts at voter suppression.

"We will settle for nothing less, and we will exercise our rapidly growing political power and voice in Washington and at the ballot box against any and all who fail to meet this standard," she said.

That call to protect voting rights hit home for Susanna Osife and Tyler Owens – Jr. Miss Gila River and Miss Gila River, respectively – who were at Monday's address.

The two said that ensuring that Native Americans have a voice is important, as they have seen "time and time again," in their community and across Indian Country, that things that tribal communities hold important are being ignored.

Noem wants state's tribes to cooperate on crime, meth

Rapid City Journal – Feb. 13, 2020 – ov. Kristi Noem is asking the nine Native American tribes in South Dakota to enter into law enforcement agreements with the state to better tackle crime and meth on reservations.

The Republican governor on Thursday commended tribes for addressing problems with meth addiction and said the state wants to help tribes that don't have sufficient tribal police officers to counteract crime and drug addiction. But tribal leaders said the governor would have to overcome a history of trauma and strains in their relationship over the governor's revival of "riot boosting" laws this year.

"This will be a new kind of partnership that I would like to see every single tribe engage in," Noem told reporters on Thursday.

The agreements would respect tribal sovereignty while promoting cooperation between state law enforcement and tribal police officers, Noem said. State police may be allowed to act on tribal lands as part of the agreements, but would follow tribal laws. The agreements would be flexible, only applying for a certain length of time or particular type of law enforcement, she said.

The state already has an agreement with the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe that allows Highway Patrol officers to conduct traffic enforcement on highways running through tribal land. State police officers also help with security during the tribe's annual powwow, but can only enforce tribal laws.

Lester Thompson, the chairman of the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe, said the tribe entered into the agreement after overweight semitrailers started tearing up tribal highways. He also had concerns about people being trafficked through tribal land.

Thompson said the agreement has worked so far, but he would be cautious about expanding it to allow state law enforcement onto more tribal land.

"You have a people who have had a historically traumatic experience with state law enforcement and it's hard to erase that history," said Thompson. "You have to build that trust again."

Thompson said Noem's push this year to revive "riot boosting" laws ahead of the planned construction of the Keystone XL pipeline strains the state's relationship with the tribes. The laws target people who urge or incite violence, but Native American groups have said it would also silence protesters. Five tribes have voiced opposition to the proposal.

Noem said while they may disagree on that issue, "that doesn't mean that on every other issue that we can't continue to work together."

The governor met with representatives from some of the tribes before the session began to discuss pending legislation and issues facing the tribes. At the Great Sioux Nation Address in January, tribal leaders said meth addiction is one of the biggest threats to their communities.

The Rosebud Sioux Tribe partnered with Noem's office last year to explore how to address increasing rates of meth addiction among tribal members. Rodney Bordeaux, the tribe's president, said he could use 20 more officers to address meth trafficking. The tribe is working with sheriffs from surrounding counties and will consider working with state police if that goes well.

Jason Cooke, the vice chairman of the Yankton Sioux Tribe, called the tribe's land a "checkerboard reservation" where people can travel between tribal and state land just by crossing the street. This allows drug dealers to evade law enforcement at times, he said.

"We've got to do something ... so we can get it off the reservation," Cooke said.

But the tribe is still split on whether to give state police jurisdiction on tribal land. The tribal council would have to approve an agreement with the state.

Dave Flute, the governor's Secretary of Tribal Relations said Noem's offer represents a chance for "a new narrative moving forward that we do trust each other."

Highlights of SWO 2020 Ice Fishing Derby

Report and Photos by Charlene Miller

Natural Resources/Fish & Wildlife Manager

This year it was sunny and mild at the SWO Fish & Wildlife Department Ice fishing derby, held Saturday February 1, 2020 on South Buffalo Lake.

Despite the deep snow the anglers had to deal with there were 140 adults and 45 youth registered for the derby.

This year's derby was held in memory of J. Kenneth Adams, who was a SWO Fish & Wildlife Commissioner for many years.

Many of his family members attended the derby and visited with the staff.

One family member, Amber Adams, said she remembers attending many of the meetings with him when she was quite young.

Amber reminisced of some of the other past commissioners that she remembers sitting at the table as she sat back quietly observing those historic meetings.

As she thanked the staff for remembering him she added $100 to the Northern category.

In addition to the fishing contest there were many door prizes given out throughout the derby.

Also, the prizes for the raffle ticket winners were given out at the conclusion of the derby.

Many anglers enjoyed the buffalo burgers and hot dogs from the Buffalo Management Program's concession stand.

Northern:

1st (tie) Marshall Flannery & Jeremy Schuester

3rd Andy Schuester

Perch:

1st Braxtyn Huff

2nd Moses Rodlund

3rd (tie) Nass Bibbey & Matt Dombrowski

Other Pan Fish:

1st Alan Brown

2nd Nicholas Schraeder

3rd Keith Pietzel

**No Walleye or Bass were caught

Youth Grand Prize Drawings:

Ice Fishing Shelter-Duwayne Decorah

Sled-Braxtyn Huff

Raffle Ticket Drawings:

Otter X-Over Cottage: Aubrey Oien

Vexilar Genz Pack: Alan Lekness

Eskimo Stingray Auger: Donovan White

Mr. Heater: Ian Wanna

More oil flows from DOI managed leases under Trump administration than ever before

Washington, DC – Feb. 11, 2020 – The Department of the Interior announced today that over one billion barrels of oil were produced in Fiscal Year (FY) 2019 from leases on federal and American Indian-owned lands and offshore areas – a historic milestone. This is greater than a 29 percent increase in production compared to the end of the previous Administration, which totaled 808.7 million barrels in FY 2016, and represents a 122.5-million-barrel increase in production compared to FY 2018.

On American Indian-owned lands, oil production increased to 92.26 million barrels and is over 52 percent more production than in FY 2016.

"The Trump Administration continues to appropriately develop our natural resources and be great stewards of conservation, benefiting all Americans," said U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt. "Disbursements paid to states and Tribes from oil lease revenues go right back to the communities where the energy was produced, providing critical funding for schools, public services, conservation improvements, coastal restoration and infrastructure projects that create good-paying American jobs."

At the beginning of his Administration, President Trump issued two executive orders regarding energy development: "Implementing an America-First Offshore Energy Strategy" and "Promoting Energy Independence and Economic Growth." These EOs have served as a blueprint for the Department, driving the implementation of common sense regulatory changes and improved internal processes to more efficiently issue permits. These actions have helped to propel secure and reliable American energy on public lands and waters in a responsible manner – a prerequisite to a safer and more prosperous America and a boon to American conservation.

Royalty revenues collected in FY 2019 from oil production on Interior-managed lands increased by 21 percent over FY 2018 to $7.5 billion, continuing a successful upward trend for the Trump Administration. These revenues from producing oil leases increased by $1.3 billion in comparison to FY 2018 and are 122 percent higher than at the end of the previous Administration in FY 2016.

Often the second-highest generator of federal income following taxes, energy revenue disbursements are a critical source of funding to states, American Indian Tribes and individual Indian mineral owners, as well as to the Land and Water Conservation Fund, Reclamation Fund, Historic Preservation Fund and the U.S. Treasury. Accounting for all energy production on federal and American Indian-owned lands and offshore areas, total revenues collected last year increased by 31 percent to approximately $12 billion, nearly double that of FY 16 revenues.

The more than $1 billion disbursed to American Indian Tribes and individual Indian mineral owners is more than double the disbursements paid in FY 2016. The revenues disbursed to the 33 federally recognized American Indian Tribes and approximately 37,000 individual Indian mineral owners represent 100 percent of the revenues received from energy and mineral production activities on Indian lands. Tribes use these revenues to develop infrastructure, provide healthcare and education and support other critical community development programs, such as senior centers, public safety projects and youth initiatives.

In evaluating the overall impact of energy development on public lands, the Department released an economic impact report for FY 2018. From the report, oil and gas produced from Department-managed public lands and waters supported an estimated $85.4 billion in value added, $139 billion in economic output and 607,000 jobs.

All federal, non-renewable energy revenues are collected, accounted for, analyzed, audited and disbursed by the Office of Natural Resources Revenue from energy and mineral leases and other monies owed for the use of public resources on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf and onshore Federal and American Indian lands. All production, revenue and disbursement data are available on the Natural Resources Revenue Data portal located at https://revenuedata.doi.gov.

US Department of Interior:

About the U.S. Department of Interior

The Department of the Interior conserves and manages the Nation's natural resources and cultural heritage for the benefit and enjoyment of the American people, provides scientific and other information about natural resources and natural hazards to address societal challenges and create opportunities for the American people, and honors the Nation's trust responsibilities or special commitments to American Indians, Alaska Natives, and affiliated island communities to help them prosper.

Legislative Reports from Pierre

Report from Dis. 1 Senator Susan Wismer

One piece of good news for the week was that new revenue projections should provide enough wiggle room for us to provide SOME wage increase to the big three drivers of the state budget: education, Medicaid providers, and state employees. The last couple months have seen better tax revenues than the Governor had projected when she put together her budget last fall. I think there's enough for at least a 1% increase if not more.

There is such a push and pull between landowners involved in pay to hunt operations and advocates for resident public access to hunting. This week the outfitters brought SB 79 to Senate Local Government committee, hoping to legalize the placement of unlocked gates across more section lines than is now allowed. It turned out that there was a lawsuit behind the proposal, and the bill was defeated in committee, 5-2. Legislators don't like to meddle in ongoing lawsuits.

SB 150 is a proposal to increase the limit on nonresident waterfowl hunting licenses available from 4,000 to 6,000, and to divide the 10 day license into one that is good for two five day consecutive periods. I had an interesting conversation with an avid waterfowler who said he used to enjoy coming to our corner of the state to hunt ducks, but doesn't' anymore because there is too much competition for public duck hunting opportunities compared to the good old days he remembers.

GF&P is proposing that they be allowed some additional enforcement measures in their battle against aquatic invasive species contamination, such as the dreaded zebra mussel, on our public waters. HB 1033 will allow them to establish inspection and decontamination stations, and give them authority to inspect and require boaters to decontaminate their watercraft before entering state waters. Zebra mussels have invaded both Lake Sharpe and Francis Case, threatening irrigation and public drinking water intakes. Beaches in the Yankton area are already so covered with zebra mussels that swimmers protect their feet from their sharp shells.

Wednesday we were disappointed to see SB 90 fail. It was an attempt by the Association of Towns and Townships to address funding needs for large culverts and small structures. It asked for $2.4 million per year from the SDDOT. Legislators saw this as a bleed from the state highway fund, though, which they wouldn't allow. I proposed a gas tax increase to make them whole, but that didn't get out of committee.

In Senate Taxation Committee, we once again killed the bill that would require ag land to be taxed based on its actual use rather than on its soil type. Our tax policy, especially since the switch to productivity value, is detrimental to grasslands. The Revenue Department feels that the new soil survey information they now have, which requires counties to have GIS capabilities to utilize, will enable counties to more accurately classify land with topography or climate issues that make it most suitable for grasslands. I am somewhat encouraged with the energy of the new Property Tax Division Director, and by her commitment to assuring a professional corps of county assessors that apply the law equitably across the state.

It is my honor to serve my community in the State Senate. Please feel free to contact me at 605-237-3086, or mail at PO Box 147, Britton, SD 57430. Legislators can't be experts at everything; we need input from constituents!

Report from Dis. 1 Rep. Tamara St. John

Reaching the Halfway Point of the 95th Legislative Session

February 9, 2020

It's been a busy couple of weeks in the SD Legislature. We're rapidly approaching the half way mark and are all navigating the new paperless filing system. This year there are 479 bills between both chambers, not counting any commemorations or resolutions. This year, I'm again serving on the House Judiciary and House Health and Human Services committees, along with the State-Tribal Relations Committee.

There was a hot topic that came at the end of this week. HB 1054 is an act to revise the documentation required for voter registration in South Dakota and comes at the request of the Secretary of State. The requested change through this bill is to add "non-driver identification" to the current law as an acceptable way for the state to verify someone's eligibility to register to vote. There was an effort via a last-minute amendment to add Tribal ID cards as sole proof to South Dakota for voter registration. To see my full statement on why I couldn't support this amendment, please check out my facebook page at facebook.com/TamaraforSD.

I want to thank the constituents who came to speak with me from Webster and Britton about the surrogacy bill – HB 1096. Most people who have heard the debates can see the concerns for regulation along with the importance of supporting the loving families that value life. There are those who love babies in a way that only those who have faced infertility can understand. Due to the many who contacted me on HB 1096, I couldn't support the final bill in the House. I have a deeper appreciation for the process of passing legislation and the value of public testimony and debate. That is why I did support the amendment to allow the legislature to conduct a summer study on surrogacy in South Dakota and that will allow for more conversation on the guidelines for altruistic surrogacy that honors life. This bill now moves on to the Senate.

It's my honor to be bringing a bill for the regulation and licensing of Acupuncture. It's an alternative many people find relief in that do not wish to take pain medications. This is a bill that was brought years ago but was never signed into law. This year, I have been working with folks who were tasked with additional efforts to get the bill language strengthened. We've been working with providers, state officials and others to get this bill ready for prime time. It's a great example that sometimes things take more work than we may realize, and sometimes an idea has to be put through the process more than once. I'm happy to be a part of the effort to pass the bill for the South Dakota Acupuncturists in the 2020 legislative Session.

This next part is something I have had to say prayers before deciding to do. I won't be able to share details but I do wish to talk about the issues of stalking and domestic violence. I have gotten so many calls and messages about this issue and I want people to know that I greatly appreciate the love, concern and prayers. I've been speaking extensively about the need for a tribal task force to address the issues in our community, and how we should interact with the state when a woman is missing or a family is worried. We need these things in place for women or people who are fearing for their life due to violence, stalking or threats. The confusion and delays from not knowing who to call, the struggle of not knowing who is acting on their behalf or what can be done to protect themselves. I now understand the frustration and fear when someone is telling a woman that there is nothing they can do or maybe that their worries are not taken seriously. Jurisdictions are complex on the reservations and some tribes are even dealing with two different state laws and law enforcements. There are a few pieces of legislation this session that looks at stalking. HB 1068 is one of them. I've agreed to cosponsor HB 1068 which would strengthen the law on stalking in South Dakota by taking any previous offenses from another state in to account.

In closing, I want to share my gratitude for prayers. For the many people who have continue to reach out, talk or debate when we have hard issues. For those people who put their heart on the line and come to speak face to face to fight for what they believe in. For those people who are willing to listen to opposing sides with an open heart and mind. For those that are brave enough to be different from the norm around them or go against what their world expects them to do or say. For those that aren't afraid to speak up for others that can't or who are not yet born. For those that are willing to be strong enough to step away from the crowd and work together in mutual respect.

A colleague recently said "each of us are common people who at the end of the day are simply doing our best as imperfect humans to make the world a better place for our families and fellow man." In Dakota we say "Ikce Wicasta" or common man. Many times, in working with diverse groups of people there are moments when I see and feel that we are truly all the same. We face the same things every day and we say the same prayers, sometimes just in different languages.

Report from Dis. 1 Rep. Steven McCleery

Welcome to Week 5 of this legislative session. The capitol has been a little busy this week, but we are working through! This week, bills are beginning to make their way through committees and across chambers.

HB 1057 found its way into the Senate Health and Human Services committee this week. The bill aims to prevent doctors from providing gender-affirming surgery or hormones to transgender youth in South Dakota. While in this committee, an amendment was brought to change the criminal charge attached to instead allow the individual who receives the care to hold the ability to sue the doctor in later years. This amendment passed in committee. Over 20 individuals came to Pierre to testify on behalf of themselves or organizations both in favor and against HB 1057. The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) testified against this bill, as well as organizations such as the South Dakota Medical Association, South Dakota Pharmacists Association, South Dakota and Sioux Falls Chambers of Commerce, and several more. With all these testimonies spoken and the room full, the Senate Health and Human Services committee voted to defer HB 1057 to the 41st legislative day, killing the bill.

HB 1065's purpose is to revise drone surveillance protections. In 2017, SDCL 22-21-1 was written to address privacy concerns in South Dakota regarding drones. Since the initial writing of SDCL 22-21-1, federal regulations for drone operations have been established by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). HB 1065 will remove the conflicts between South Dakota's current law and the FAA's regulations. This bill will also authorize South Dakota businesses, individuals, and governmental agencies to operate drones for business purposes.

The hemp bill had an interesting journey in the House this week. HB 1008, which will legalize the growth, production, and transportation of industrial hemp in South Dakota, passed out of the House Agriculture and Natural Resources committee last week unanimously and showed up on the House Floor on Tuesday. The discussion was expected to be long and in depth, but we representatives were fairly surprised when only one person spoke up on the floor. The bill passed the House with a 54-12 vote, moved to the Senate, and has been assigned to the Senate Agriculture and Natural Resources committee.

SB 28 is an act to repeal real estate auctioneer restricted license. This bill will repeal the real estate auctioneers license type. However, it will grandfather current auctioneers and allow them to retain a license. The purpose of the grandfathering process is because the services provided by auctioneers will still require a license. Auctioneer licenses are being applied for scarcely, especially since an individual with a broker's license can perform auctions. Essentially, an auctioneer licensee is doing the same or a similar amount of work to obtain a license as a broker, but the scope of practice for auctioneers is significantly more limited than that of a broker.

HB 1099 would authorize counties to impose a temporary voter-approved half-cent sales and use tax and to issue revenue bonds to fund certain county infrastructure construction. As legislators, we recognize that funding for counties needs to be improved. HB 1099 addresses this problem. It is not the final solution, but it is a starting point that will allow counties to hold votes of its citizens. If citizens vote in favor, the county may implement the half-cent sales and use tax and use the money for the renovation or replacement of facilities designed to reduce jail incarceration. Adding the sales and use tax will provide a new source of revenue for this purpose. On the House Floor, the votes for this bill were split every-which way. With results of 32-35, HB 1099 failed and is done for this session.

South Dakotans are very familiar with telemarketers. HB 1131 prohibits the use of misleading identification for telephonic communications. We often get phone calls from a number that appears to be familiar, but the call will end up being a scam. Most of the text of this bill already exists in our laws, but this bill does add some essential language. HB 1131 adds language to include text messages and prohibits the telemarketer from using false or misleading caller ID display names and phone numbers. This bill passed the House unanimously and will be sent to the Senate.

HB 1054 has been a conversation piece here in the Capitol. The bill allows a state-issued non-driver identification card to be used on a voter registration form. HB 1054 passed the House and was assigned to Senate State Affairs this week. An amendment was passed that includes the use of tribal identification cards as long as the tribe has a memorandum of understanding with the Secretary of State. The bill is still sitting in committee as the members deferred final action until a later date.

HB 1117 is the riot-boosting legislation. The purpose of this bill is to establish the crime of incitement to riot and to revise provisions regarding civil liability for riot and riot boosting. House State Affairs committee had a full room during the hearing of this bill. Overregulating protests for a political agenda is a violation of the First Amendment rights of South Dakotan citizens, especially our Native American populations who are fighting for clean resources and for recognition of their communities. Members of our tribal nations testified against this bill, as well as the ACLU. The bill passed in committee with a 10-3 vote, which fell almost exactly along party lines. Representative Smith, myself, and Representative Haugaard voted against the passing of this bill.

SB 50 is a bill to revise certain provisions regarding the practice of a certified registered nurse (CRNA) anesthetist. The purpose of this bill is to modernize South Dakota law to match other states and their CRNA practices. Rural communities often struggle to find anesthesiologists, and the goal of this bill is to help these communities by allowing CRNA's to work closer with care providers when it comes to providing pain medication. The modernizations of current law will recognize the important role CRNAs play in our medical communities and the work they do in all kinds of medical settings.

As always, I am proud to be here in Pierre representing District 1. If you ever have any questions or concerns, please contact me at Steven.McCleerey@sdlegislature.gov or 605-742-3112.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial

Call to Indigenous Peoples

My Great Great Grandfather Jon Bear and family. (See photo.)

He is donning a 'Peace Medallion' issued from the US government "to wear when traveling out of designated living quarters' as US soldiers would kill any offenders. Due to the severity of an offense violation, there were designated members of the families to carry out 'business traveling'."

The 'peacetimes' were after the 1862 Dakota Uprising and immediately after the defilement of our ancestors' families.

We were corralled, then beaten and torn from each others' arms and shipped to concentration camps aka "reservations" throughout the Midwestern United States and Canada.

Now, that our ancestors were severely misplaced, the US government ordered every child within school-age years to be taken directly from their families and shipped to boarding schools throughout the country.

Lastly, the US government ordered a ban on our religions.

We, Indigenous Peoples, could not show adoration/gratitude to the only God we had ever known.

In come the missionaries to show the "Savages" how to conform to the "White God."

Our Ancestors had been stripped of everything they ever knew.

And then they molested us with all the government and missionaries final attempts at building our "Savage" hearts into their own image.

The US government only recently lifted the ban – in 1978.

Our Indigenous ancestors had endured great and horrendous crimes done upon them by the US government in  opes of "eradicating the problem."

Our Indigenous nation of the North had survived this onslaught, these attempts at genocide seemingly since the arrival of the Mayflower, Pinta and Nina – 1492.

Divide, assimilate, and conquer seemed the mantra of the US government hundreds of years ago, as we witness today, history repeating itself with our brothers' and sisters' of the Indigenous Nation of the South.

– Tricia A. Gill

Secretary of State agrees to settle Voter ID lawsuits with North Dakota tribes

Bismarck, ND – Feb. 13, 2020 – In the wake of the district court's denial of the State's motion to dismiss, the Secretary of State has agreed to settle two federal voting rights lawsuits brought by two Native American Tribes and several individual voters over North Dakota's voter ID law.

The law requires voters to present identification listing their residential street address – a substantial hurdle for many Native Americans living on reservations, because the state has failed to assign residential street addresses to homes on tribal reservations.

In January 2016, eight Native Americans, represented by the Native American Rights Fund (NARF), Tom Dickson, and Rich de Bodo filed suit to block the North Dakota voter ID law, which disenfranchised Native American voters and violated both state and federal constitutions as well as the Voting Rights Act.

On October 30, 2018, NARF, Campaign Legal Center (CLC), Robins Kaplan LLP, and Cohen Milstein Sellers and Toll PLLC filed a separate lawsuit on behalf of the Spirit Lake Tribe and six individual plaintiffs to ensure that eligible Native American voters residing on reservations in North Dakota would be able to cast a ballot in the 2018 midterm elections and in all future elections. The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, with approximately 5,868 residents of voting-age that could be affected by the law, joined the Spirit Lake case in early 2019.

"This fight has been ongoing for over four years, and we are delighted to come to an agreement that protects native voters," said Matthew Campbell, Staff Attorney for the Native American Rights Fund. "It has always been our goal to ensure that every native person in North Dakota has an equal opportunity to vote, and we have achieved that today. We thank the Spirit Lake Nation, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, and the individual native voters that stood up for the right to vote."

"We are pleased with the result of the settlement. It was a breakthrough for the state to recognize its responsibility to ensure that Native Americans have access to the identification needed to exercise their voting rights," said Paul Smith, vice president at CLC. "In order to have a successful 2020 election, the state must follow through with a robust voter and poll worker education campaign to ensure that proper protocols are followed so people aren't rejected because of the state's failed addressing system."

Backstory

Facing a trial date in the Spirit Lake case in May of this year, the Secretary of State announced an emergency rulemaking last week in an attempt to address some of the issues raised by the lawsuit. At an in-person mediation at the North Dakota capitol on February 6, 2020 with representatives from the Spirit Lake Nation and attorneys from CLC and NARF, the Secretary agreed to take additional steps to ensure that eligible Native American voters are not disenfranchised due to the restrictive voter ID law.

Because of the state's broken addressing system, many Native Americans living on reservations do not have or do not know their residential addresses, and are therefore unable to comply with the North Dakota voter ID law. During the 2018 election, the Spirit Lake Nation and the Standing Rock Sioux tribe expended substantial resources to ensure that their tribal members would have the identification necessary to vote, including by shouldering the burden of identifying and providing residential street addresses for their members.

The unique burdens faced by Native Americans in North Dakota – including a severe housing shortage – mean that tribal members are much more likely to have moved in the intervening time, or to be homeless or precariously housed. As a result, determining members' residential addresses – and providing them with the documentation necessary to vote – is an ongoing effort that requires substantial resources.

Details of the agreement

In addition to the previously announced rulemaking, which requires the state to recognize tribal IDs and supplemental documentation issued to tribal members, the Secretary has agreed to enter into a binding consent decree, enforced by a federal court order, which will ensure that Native American voters who do not have or do not know their residential street address are able to vote.

The Secretary of State also agreed to work with the Department of Transportation to develop and implement a program with tribal governments to distribute free non-driver photo IDs on every reservation statewide within 30 days of future statewide elections.

In the 2020 election, Native American voters will have the opportunity to mark their residence on a map, a process that is commonly used by voters in other states. The burden will then shift to the state to verify the residential street addresses for these voters, to provide that information to the voter and the tribe, and to ensure those voters' ballots are counted.

The court-ordered consent decree will include details about what the state must do to educate the public and train poll workers on the new procedures, as well as measures designed to enable the Tribes to ensure the state is complying with its obligations under the agreement.

Read the stories of six North Dakota residents that described their challenges accessing the ballot while living on the Spirit Lake Reservation in the days leading up to the 2018 elections.

About Native American Rights Fund (NARF):

Since 1970, the Native American Rights Fund (NARF) has provided legal assistance to Indian tribes, organizations, and individuals nationwide who might otherwise have gone without adequate representation. NARF has successfully asserted and defended the most important rights of Indians and tribes in hundreds of major cases and has achieved significant results in such critical areas as tribal sovereignty, treaty rights, natural resource protection, and Indian education. NARF is a non-profit 501c(3) organization that focuses on applying existing laws and treaties to guarantee that national and state governments live up to their legal obligations.

Brief editorial comments from the editor's desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

The SWO Education Department was tasked with organizing Dakota cultural events for Treaty Day.

Several activities were scheduled to be held in the admin building rotunda this Monday, February 17, although Tribal offices were closed.

Watch for highlights in next week's Sota.

*****

Interested community members are invited to attend the roundtable this Tuesday, Feb. 18th, with officials from the US Attorney's office and FBI.

The event is scheduled in the Council suite at 10:30 a.m.

*****

A public forum will be held at the SWO community center, Agency Village, this Saturday, February 22nd.

(Note this is a change, the forum was originally scheduled to take place at the elderly nutrition center.

It was requested by Tribal members concerned about welfare of children in ICWA cases.

The forum gets underway at 12:00 noon.

A meal will be served.

Please see the notice elsewhere in this edition of your Sota.

*****

There will be a women's self-defense class in the SWC omniciye tipi Tuesday, March 3rd.

Please contact Ella Robertson at 605-467-0054 to register.

Note there are only 20 spots available.

*****

This week's Sota features the next – ninth – in our series of program report summaries from the Winter 2019 general council.

It continues in the afternoon of day two, Friday, December 20th.

These reports are from programs under the office of the Tribal Secretary.

*****

Our thanks to Natural Resources/Fish & Wildlife Manager Charlene Miller for getting results and photos of the annual ice fishing derby for our Sota readers!

We very much appreciate the help of many who help us bring news onto these pages for our Oyate!

*****

Thanks also to the Aberdeen American News for permission to reprint Kelda Pharris' article on Billy Keeble's journey to sobriety, which is in this week's Sota.

Our best wishes and encouragement to Billy and to every one of our loved ones and relatives who struggle with sobriety and healing.

*****

Watch for the poster coming that announces the 36 annual U of M-Morris pow wow.

This year's event is the biggest contest powwow the University has ever held before, and organizers are hoping to attract many of our Oyate dancers.

The Kit Fox Society will provide the honor guard.

Gabe DesRosiers is the arena director.

Set aside the date, Saturday, March 28th

*****

Elder's meditation:

"One of the essential characteristics we need to learn as men was to be gentle, and to be gentle means to be serene, to enter meditation or a prayerful state in the morning and evening."

–Larry P. Aitken, CHIPPEWA

The most important talk we can do during any day, is to start the day with prayer and meditation. We need to ask the Creator to be in our lives. We ask Him to direct our thinking. We ask Him for the courage and the power to be gentle. In the morning quiet time, we make our request for guidance using our spiritual tools. We pray for the people and we pray for ourselves. In the evening we thank the Creator for the day, for the lessons and for the opportunity to be of service to others. Then we go to sleep.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

You can pretend to be serious; you can't pretend to be witty. - Sacha Guitry (1885 - 1957)

I say that a man must be certain of his morality for the simple reason that he has to suffer for it. - G. K. Chesterton (1874 - 1936)

Lawyers spend a great deal of their time shoveling smoke. - Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. (1841 - 1935)

There is no nonsense so arrant that it cannot be made the creed of the vast majority by adequate governmental action. - Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Idleness is not doing nothing. Idleness is being free to do anything. - Floyd Dell

Good advice is something a man gives when he is too old to set a bad example. - Francois de La Rochefoucauld (1613 - 1680)

Well, if crime fighters fight crime and fire fighters fight fire, what do freedom fighters fight? They never mention that part to us, do they? - George Carlin (1937 - 2008)

Egotism is the anesthetic that dulls the pain of stupidity. - Frank Leahy

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

CDF

Obituaries –

Services held for Conrad DuMarce-German

Funeral service for Conrad Jasper DuMarce-German, Ta woie oyate on nawikca jin, "With his voice he defends his nation," 41, of Rosholt, SD was held on Saturday afternoon, 2020 at the SWO community center, Agency Village, SD, with Jr. Heminger and Clyde Kampeska Sr. officiating.

Pallbearers were Justin German, John German Jr., Thomas German, James German, Ryan German, Irvin Hill Jr., Thomas Bommersbach and Compton Cypress.

Honorary pallbearers were Dylan DuMarce, Devlin DuMarce, Stephen Owen, Scott German, Brendan LaBatte, Tristan LaBatte, Chase DuMarce, Keanen Ojeda, Danny Thompson, Glen German, Jr., John Long and Bob & Val Tchida.

 Interment will be in the Mayasan Cemetery.

Wake services were held Thursday evening and all-night Friday at the community center.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton SD was in charge of funeral arrangements.

Conrad Jasper DuMarce-German made his journey to the spirit world on February 12th, 2020.

On March 20th, 1978, Conrad was born at Coteau Des Prairie Hospital to Debra DuMarce and John German Sr.

He grew up in Sisseton and attended the local high school, receiving his G.E.D. in the process.

His nieces and nephews loved him dearly, and he loved them back.

He always showed up at his brothers and sisters homes and made everyone happy.

Riding horse was what made Conrad the happiest.

He also loved working on cars with his Grandpa Sam Alex and Uncle Wade.

For many years, he worked on a combine crew.

He was also a steel worker and overall a man of many talents.

The ones who wish him safe travels on his journey are his grandparents Alex and Barbra Heminger, Lorraine German; his father John German Sr. and mother Debra DuMarce; and his 6 brothers and 5 sisters, Justin German, John German Jr., Thomas German, Sr. James German, Ryan German, Sage DuMarce-White, April Eastman, Dionne German, Amanda German, Ashley German, and Shelby DuMarce; his aunties Tammie DuMarce, Helena LaBatte-DuMarce, Cynthia DuMarce, Brenda DuMarce, Maxine DuMarce, Joyce DuMarce, and uncles Wade DuMarce, Sr. Todd St. John, Waylon DuMarce, and special and long time friend Mary Drum.

Conrad will be welcomed with open arms by his grandfathers Sampson DuMarce, Sr. Gerald "Smoky" German Sr.; his uncles Samuel "Sonni" DuMarce, Hazen DuMarce Sr., Sam Alec DuMarce, and his sister Shannondora Gayle White.

Please visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com for Conrad's obit and online registry

Wanyetu Ta Sunke Ob Hi Win services

Wanyetu Ta Sunke Ob Hi Win, "She Comes with Winter Horses," returned to her Creator on February 11, 2020 at Sanford Medical Center in Bismarck, North Dakota.

She will be deeply missed by her loving family.

Survived by her father: Alvin Village Center; mother: Andrea Eastman; brothers: Ta Dyate Duta Zephier, Akicita Duta Zephier , Inkpa Duta Zephier, and Mato Sa Ici Ya Zephier Eastman; sisters: Shania Village Center and Malika Village Center, and many other loving family and friends.

All-night visitation for Wanyetu Ta Sunke Ob Hi Win will be held on Monday, February 17th, beginning at 7:00 P.M. at the Eastman home in Sisseton, South Dakota.

A funeral service for Wanyetu Ta Sunke Ob Hi Win will be held on Tuesday, February 18th, 2020 at 11:00 a.m. at the Eastman home in Sisseton, South Dakota.

Officiating will be Doug Wilkinson

Traditional officiant will be Robert Gill

Drum Group will be Grand River Singers, Pilani Wakpa Okolakiciye.

Casket Bearer: Alvin Village Center.

Interment will be held at the Big Coulee Ascension Church Cemetery in Big Coulee, South Dakota

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and should be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Sisseton man, father strengthen bond in sobriety

Used with permission from Aberdeen American News

By Kelda J.L. Pharris

Sisseton – A wandering impression cuts between two red and white homes on a cul-de-sac in north Sisseton. The pathway of trodden snow stretches out of sight to a scattering of woods beyond. Billy Keeble's finger traces the winter-bare tree line above the single-story rooftops. The trees create a natural border along the neighborhood. There are a few curtains rustled by curious homeowners as Billy talks and a blonde dog barks an alert from a taut leash. It's Jan. 16 and breaths rise thick in the sub-zero air.

Billy, 34, points to another cluster of trees to the southwest, across an empty expanse from this neighborhood. This purposeful grouping borders a school and parish. It would be a quick walk on foot but not this day. Billy's former hangout spots from his former life are inaccessible now, tucked away under a thick crust of snow.

He gets in his pickup with his father, Frank Keeble, in the passenger seat and drives the much longer street route to the parking lot closer to the second set of trees. He finds that a building has been torn down. Long ago, he'd often used it as a windbreak when passed out. This trip around the corner is a trip four years back for Billy. He's visiting old ghosts, seeing blurred flashbacks through the eyes of a desperate man without hope, awash in alcohol and grief.

If you ask Billy how many loved ones he's lost to alcohol- related deaths, it will take some time for an answer. When he was 2, his biological mother, Leta Keeble, died in an alcohol- related vehicle crash. He speaks of an aunt and uncle, friends and siblings. His name nearly made that list, too, on a Good Friday nearly four years ago.

Frank is Billy's adoptive father and biological grandfather. Frank could've also been on that list. Both men are sober today. Billy for nearly four years, for Frank nearly 40.

Intergenerational alcoholism is a common theme heard at Dakotah Pride Center in Sisseton, said Richard Bird, 20-year director of the treatment facility that serves members of the Lake Traverse Reservation. Bird is regularly faced with people at their lowest points. It's a challenging position with odds stacked against the center.

"I do what I can do. It's accepting that you do what you can do there," said Bird.

There are successes. Both Billy and Frank have been supported by the facility. Billy said methamphetamine is taking hold in his old circles, but alcohol abuse still has the biggest grip. His statement is backed by dire statistics.

Alcohol-related deaths continue to rise in South Dakota. And the rates are much worse for Native Americans compared to caucasians. In 2018, the rate of alcohol-related deaths for Native Americans in South Dakota was seven times that of white people. There were 236 alcohol-related deaths in total in South Dakota, up from 216 in 2017. The number had risen steadily from 99 in 2009, according to information from the South Dakota Department of Health.

"I used to have a little spot behind St. Peters," said Billy, pointing at an area empty except for a mound of snow. "We would be drinking, coming to, laying behind St. Peters. All us Rangers would sleep outside or here or there."

Rangers is the affectionate term for a collective of souls lost in the throes of addiction, set on the fringes of what is a small college town on the Lake Traverse Reservation in northeast South Dakota. He previously shared a photo of an old hangout in the woods. It was taken during a mild season. In the blurred image there is an old, cushionless couch propped against shrub trees and a couple weathered tents. Dingy pairs of sneakers and pillows rest on the shaded and trampled earth, as does a scorched metal bowl.

On colder nights he would head to a flophouse, colored a bluish- purple next to another church. Anyone who had alcohol was welcome. Hurricanes — a brand of malt liquor — were $1.80 or $2.10 at the K & K convenience store. There was also a liquor store directly up the alley. Billy would sit on the post office steps or wander the main streets, panhandling.

Family ties

For Billy, his first drink came around the age of 12 or 13. For a long time it seemed casual. What sent him into complete dysfunction was his adoptive mother's death in March 2014. Billy found Juanitta Keeble slumped over. Her death was attributed to a heart attack. She had been in poor health, but didn't drink. Two other relatives of Billy's would suffer alcohol-related deaths soon after. Billy was distraught.

Juanitta, married to Frank, had been Billy's only mother since he was 2. She was kind and raised him in the Baptist church after the couple adopted him when his biological mother died.

As Billy's drinking increased, his reasons to continue turned from numbing his pain to staving off the awful feelings of withdrawals. Sometimes he'd be hospitalized or find himself in jail. This went on for about three years.

Frank was in the depths of alcoholism once, too. He'd started in his later teens, having joined a band and social group where beer was readily available.

"I liked what it did for me. Seemed like it took care of my tiredness, whole outlook on life is different," Frank said.

He'd gotten married at 19 and worked on a masonry crew with his dad and brothers. The marriage didn't last.

Then Frank enlisted in the Army. He's not sure how he made it through with an honorable discharge, but he did. He went back to his old routine and married again in 1969. As a drunk Frank was absent at best. It wasn't grief that kept him drinking, it was guilt.

"As time went on, on the weekends there was a six-pack, then it became a 12-pack, then it went into a case of beer," he said. "I'd wake up on Monday hungover. I found if I'd take another drink I'd be alright. Over time I started missing Mondays at work, then Tuesdays I'd have a hangover …

"She said, 'You can't be a father, you can't hold a job, can't even provide for your family.' So I kind of smarted off," he said of his now ex-wife, Loretta.

At the time he knew she was right.

"My dad really didn't know what made me keep drinking," Frank said. "I had that secret from him. So I think that's what (Billy) did, too. Maybe it was his guilt. That's how I felt. I'd start feeling bad that I'd let my folks down. The trust they had for me, the love they had for me, I killed it all. That's what kept me from sobering up."

Frank, like Billy, also had a spiritual moment on the verge of his sobriety. It was July 1980 and he was bumming around Sioux Falls, drinking his days away. The routine was wearing on him. He decided to hitchhike back home, but began to fall into an old routine.

"I was in Sisseton, started a day or two of drinking, ended up in an abandoned house again. I woke up, saw the sun, said, 'It's a beautiful day,'" Frank recalled saying to another man.

The man handed him a drink. Frank took it because he was sick. He couldn't shake the image of the sunlit window as he rousted himself.

"I was in the pool hall, walked into the latrine, I was dry-heaving, vomiting. I asked the Lord, 'Come into my life, I need your help.' I walked out a free man."

Frank went to the hospital and was adamant that he be sent to detox. But the medical personnel suggested he go home with pills to take the edge off his withdrawal symptoms. He withdrew, went through programming with Dakotah Pride Center and devoted himself to a life of sobriety and to Juanitta. He credits his faith for his conviction to get sober.

When Billy was bad off, Frank would keep tabs on him. Both refer to Frank as a bit of an enabler, but both also shrug knowing what their present relationship is and how they've leaned on each other to get here.

"He'd see me on the streets, throw me a pack of cigarettes, give me $5," Billy said.

Occasionally Billy would come home when he was very sick. Frank would give him chores and such, keep him fed and sheltered. But once Billy felt better, he'd be off again. After losing other children to alcohol-related deaths, Frank admits that when he got a phone call, a little part of him expected it'd be Billy found dead from exposure.

"The whole time I was going through my addictions I'd always get a lecture, 'Billy, you've got to get your life right. I ain't going to be here forever,'" Billy said. "One time that really hit home, he said, 'Billy with your mom gone, you know how those elders go. Whenever a spouse goes, the other usually goes quick from loneliness.'

"That almost makes me cry today," he said.

Frank, from personal experience, knew getting sober would have to be Billy's decision.

The wakeup

"I was walking on the four-lane (highway), hungover, sick. I happened to look over at the Family Life Assembly of God Church," Billy said.

It's Jan. 16 and Billy stands among the pews of that same church. He and the Rev. Vern Donnell walk through their first meeting. Billy stumbled in just as the church's Good Friday service was to begin. Donnell admits he was caught up in the affairs of the day, but it only took him a split second to realize his priorities — a human who was hurting.

Billy's arm was hurt. He was sobbing, shaking and looked terrible as his body struggled in withdrawals. He pleaded for help. Donnell looked him over, made a call to Indian Health Services, then had Billy sit in a back pew to observe the service. Billy promised that he would behave.

Donnell carried on his pastoral duties, and as the service went on he heard a new voice singing among the parishioners. It was Billy's. He'd moved to a pew near the front of the sanctuary and was singing along to every word with the rest of the congregation.

After the service, a group of men surrounded Billy in prayer. Donnell called Frank at his home in Grenville.

"It was blowing and drifting. I got a phone call, it was from a pastor down in Sisseton. He says, 'I got Billy here with me,'" Frank said.

Donnell told Frank that he'd made arrangements for Billy at Dakotah Pride Center and a hospital.

"What I want from you is transportation," Frank recalled the pastor saying.

A week later, Billy was out of detox and found himself on Nicollet Tower, which overlooks Sisseton and the surrounding area for miles on a clear day. He calls it a spiritual awakening. A flood of emotions overcame him.

"It's like a pretty cool place, to go way up there. I got on my knees in prayer. I said, 'Please take these addiction chains away, release me.' I cried. I felt cold chills, like a ton of bricks were lifted off. Finally knew I didn't want to feel that anymore," he said.

Life, sober

During a phone call in December Billy announced, "Just got my last finals done. Sounds like I got a degree now."

He sounded in awe and relieved when he said the words aloud. It's a two-year degree. He's the first from his family to graduate from a college program. It makes Billy sad to know that Juanitta never saw him improve his life, but he knows Frank will tell her about it one day.

"I had a goal set — to walk across the stage when my dad is still alive. When he walks into heaven he could tell her everything I did," Billy said.

In mid-January Billy and Frank meet at Sisseton Wahpeton College south of Sisseton and next to Agency Village. Billy has a lightness in his step and an easy smile. He was able to book a boardroom for Frank and him to sit in and tell their story again. He's looking forward to the ceremonial walk and handshake for his degree in May. He's been busy, and it helps with sobriety. He's worked at the homeless shelter for three years and looks forward to being a chemical dependency counselor eventually, with more schooling and training. He's trying to be a good example to family and friends still chained to their addictions. The pastor at Bethany Baptist Church, the church Billy now regularly attends, stepped down and asked Billy to take over this summer. He's gladly accepted, and Donnell has continued to be a guide and mentor for him in his new calling.

Billy said his focus comes from reminding himself of the old days. No matter how bad he was doing and how few resources he had, he could always find a drink then. These days his goals aren't drinks, but he goes after his new aspirations with the same desire.

In the beginning of his sobriety, Billy very much avoided his old haunts and relationships. That felt a little isolating, but he knew it was crucial to maintaining his sobriety. More often than not, that's what pulls people back into their addictions — falling into old routines, he said. It's how he'd faltered several times before.

Billy credits God, his father and Donnell for being constant support for him. He knew they always had his back but he was unsure how others would react to him. He'd had a perception that he'd be labeled "too good for me" by former cohorts. The opposite has happened. Everyone he comes in contact with seems to be happy for him, proud of him — even those still in turmoil with their own addictions. Maybe his example of hope is rubbing off. That's the crux for those who maintain sobriety, according to Bird, with Dakotah Pride Center.

"Those that make it seem to find some kind of hope that they'll get better — not only physically or healthier, but their life will get better," he said.

Frank and Billy both briefly speak with regret of the wasted years behind them, dictated by alcohol. Neither was expected to escape the grasp.

But their spirits are warm and contented even on a cold winter day. They have come to understand that it's their hopes and future that will define them.

*****

Former American News reporter Shannon Marvel contributed to this story.

Prayer gathering for families of missing persons

There will be a prayer vigil Saturday evening, April 5th and remembrance walk Sunday, April 6th on the Lake Traverse Reservation for the families of missing persons.

April 7, 2020 is the 20th anniversary of the loss of Jon Andrew "AJ" Lufkins to his loved ones, tiwahe, and the community.

There is confirmation that family members of both Pamela Dunn and Serenity Dennard will attend.

Watch for more information.

Andrew Jon (AJ) Lufkins

April, 7, 2010. Missing from Sisseton, South Dakota.

 

Pamela Dunn

December 9, 2001. Missing from Watertown, South Dakota

 

Serenity Dennard

February 3, 2019. Missing from the Black Hills, South Dakota.

Timeline in search for AJ Lufkins

Volunteers form search parties to locate missing SWO man

Sota – April 28, 2010 – Volunteer crews have been gathering daily over the past week, searching for a missing SWO Tribal member, Andrew Jon "AJ" Lufkins.

AJ is the son of Sheila Lufkins, and he has been missing since April 7, 2010.

The search involves many law enforcement jurisdictions, including the Codington County Search and Rescue squad from Watertown.

Anyone able to assist in the search, or with any information about Andrew's whereabouts, please contact Tribal Law Enforcement at (605) 698-7661, or Sheila….

According to law enforcement, AJ was last seen between 9:00 p.m. and 12:00 midnight April 7th, on foot near the American Legion Club in Sisseton. He was reported to be wearing khaki pants, a dark colored sweatshirt with South Pole lettering on the front, dark undershirt, and a pair of blue-and-white shoes.

*****

Sota – May 5, 2010 – The search goes on for a missing SWO Tribal member, Andrew Jon

"AJ" Lufkins. AJ is the son of Sheila Lufkins and grandson of Carl Lufkins.

He was last seen the night of April 7, in Sisseton.

Anyone with information about AJ's whereabouts is asked to contact SWO Tribal Law Enforcement at (605) 698-7661, or call the Crime Tip Hotline at (605) 742-0088.

*****

The official investigation has met with a largely silent community and still has not given the family answers to the whereabouts of AJ.

One person was charged and found guilty of lying to investigators allegedly to deflect attention from a person of interest.

Besides unwillingness of community members who may know the circumstances of AJ's disappearance to cooperate with investigators, there was a question raised about how well the South Dakota Dept. of Criminal Investigations [DCI] handled the investigation.

See the following article:

Former State investigator asks: Why wasn't promising lead on AJ Lufkins Missing Persons Case followed up on?

By Lee

Brought To Light – April 22, 2015 – Former South Dakota Division of Criminal Investigation agent Mark Black worked on the case of missing Native American AJ Lufkin, who vanished in 2010.

But after Black was forced out of the department, a lead that came from two different sources that could have led to the discovery of Lufkins' body and finally brought peace to his family wasn't followed up on by the DCI, the state's police agency controlled by Attorney General Marty Jackley.

Mark Black explained the details in a short audio interview that is transcribed here.

Interviewer: We're on the phone with Mark Black, former investigator for the South Dakota DCI, the Division of Criminal Investigation. Hi Mark, how are you tonight?

Mark Black: Good, how are you doing?

Interviewer: Good. So I'm calling this Native American Cold Cases because you have a couple of cases that you worked on for the DCI, which is under Attorney General, Marty Jackley, that you know nothing has happened with. The one I want to talk about tonight's the AJ Lufkins case and this is a case people might've heard about, because this is a young man. He was about 23 when he disappeared in 2010, if I'm getting this correct. And... Does that sound right?

Mark Black: Yep.

Interviewer: You worked the case.

Mark Black: That's true. Yeah.

Interviewer: And you had, when you were forced out of the DCI, you had a pretty serious lead on where his body was, correct?

Mark Black: Yes, I did.

Interviewer: And it didn't come from just one person. There were two separate sources on it. Correct?

Mark Black: There were two separate sources on the individuals who we believed disposed of the body….

Interviewer: Right. So you got a lead on who'd disposed of the body. And we're not going to give away the details on this, because it's still open. And you were not just given details on who disposed of the body, but on where they disposed of it. Correct?

Mark Black: Correct.

Interviewer: And as far as you know, now when was this, when did you get those leads? And...

Mark Black: The first lead about those individuals that I was focused on towards the end, at least knew the location of the body, I believe we got in 2012. Then again in 2013, I was contacted by a person wishing to give information who mentioned these same individuals again. At that time I felt we had (little on) them and it was thin at best. A year later, this same informant comes back to me. He had been with one of the individuals on New Year's Eve and it was weighing heavily on his conscious and he shared with this individual how they disposed of the body and where they disposed of the body.

Mark Black: I immediately contacted Assistant Director Brian Zeeb and advised him that I had a possible location of the body. I took one of the local sheriffs up in northeast South Dakota. We went out to the location and looked on the scene with our own eyes, possible scene. I then contacted the National Forensic Academy and started confirmed with them about how to get a search done in this area. Geographically, it's kind of challenging, the area that needed to be searched.

Mark Black: So I was in the process of getting ready to launch of search on this as soon as the spring thaw came, and I was sharing this information with my Assistant Director and we had done multiple searches for this kid multiple times, about 10 or 12 times comes to mind. We launched searches using divers and search teams, professionals and amateurs. We would have 50 to a hundred people helping us search and this was a significant story up in northeast South Dakota and getting intelligence on the possible location of the body from people that are directly involved with the disposal of the body from different sources, usually a little more weight than just one person making an anonymous phone call. And these people are coming back to us as they're gaining more information.

Mark Black: So, to not have searched that area I think is somewhat negligent towards the feelings of the family, the Lufkins family had been without AJ or unable to say goodbye to AJ for over five years now. And I'm astonished that the agency hasn't done more to try and close this case. The information is there to possibly close it.

Interviewer: And compared to the other leads you had, you'd said you'd done 10 searches. Was this a better, you never know, obviously, but did this seem like a more solid lead than anything you'd had before?

Mark Black: It did, merely because we had it from, like I said, two different sources and the one source came back to us twice. When he came to us the first time, in speaking with him, I advised him, I said, "We've already looked at this before. We've already had this information before. You're not telling me anything new." Nothing came of it. Then this kid stayed at it and came back, like I said, a year later with more information then and the people up there, they want to find this kid. And we have done everything we can as an agency, when I was the case agent on that case, like I said, I can definitely point out at least 10 different searches we did in two different counties, actually three different counties in northeast South Dakota.

Mark Black: Any time we had any information, we would at least go out with the cadaver dog, walk the area, and see if we'd get any indications, but there was at least 10 searches where we had multiple agencies from law enforcement to search and rescue trying to find this kid. And I think the family deserves closure and respect of, if we have good information on a location, we'll look. We may not be able to prosecute out of it, but at least you got that kid's remains back to his loved ones.

Interviewer: And if this wasn't happening at the DCI, whose responsibility is that ultimately?

Mark Black: Attorney General Marty Jackley.

Interviewer: Okay, so again, if this is something that he wanted pushed, if he wanted to put law enforcement resources into it, this would happen?

Mark Black: Absolutely.

Interviewer: Okay. Mark Black, thanks very much. And we're going to have another one of these that's equally troubling at another time. Thanks a lot, Mark.

One year later, girls' fate unknown despite extensive search and investigation

By Bart Pfankuch

South Dakota News Watch – Feb. 1, 2020 – Despite a search by more than 1,200 people covering 4,500 miles of woodlands, and an investigation tracking down more than 220 leads and involving 465 interviews, Serenity Dennard remains missing and her fate remains a mystery.

Serenity was 9 on Feb. 3, 2019, when she ran away on a cold Sunday morning from the Black Hills Children's Home, a residential youth treatment facility located near Rockerville in Pennington County, amid some of the most rugged and remote terrain in all of South Dakota.

Though witnesses saw her run off, and a search began almost immediately, Serenity has never been seen again and no evidence of her death has been discovered.

Over the past year, the Pennington County Sheriff's Office has led an aggressive, two-pronged attempt to find Serenity – an investigative track that has sought to rule out foul play and search nationwide for Serenity; and the search track that has engaged 1,200 trained personnel from more than 65 agencies using scent and cadaver dogs, aircraft and thermal devices to look for Serenity's body or any evidence.

Pennington County authorities have not ruled anything out, but their working theory is that Serenity ran into the woods, got lost and froze to death or died of hypothermia.

Yet until Serenity or any evidence is found, her disappearance will remain a mystery that has captivated, saddened and in some cases angered people in South Dakota and beyond.

As the one-year anniversary of Serenity's disappearance approaches, South Dakota News Watch interviewed several people close to Serenity or her case. The reporting has led to several discoveries, including:

*Serenity was known to run away frequently from her family home in Sturgis. Runaway prevention was part of the reason for her placement and part of her treatment plan at Black Hills Children's Home. Serenity tried to run away one week before her final escape and was placed on a protocol of "arm's length only" monitoring. But for reasons unexplained, the strict runaway-prevention effort was ended a day or two before her fateful Feb. 3 escape, according to Serenity's adoptive father and his wife, who are her primary caretakers.

*The children's home, run by the non-profit Children's Home Society, was cited by state and federal regulators after Serenity's disappearance for waiting 80 minutes to call 911, for having radios that were on different channels and for lacking planning and training in runaway prevention.

*Two people with direct physical oversight of Serenity at the time of her disappearance were fired after she ran away, according to Children's Home Society Executive Director Michelle Lavallee. But the on-call supervisor who advised employees on the scene to search longer on their own before calling 911 remains employed, as does the director of the home, who refused an interview request from News Watch.

*Although the home society has engaged new protocols to heighten runway prevention and training for employees at the Black Hills home, those same methods have not been fully implemented at the society's residential treatment home in Sioux Falls. Also, as of late January 2020, security cameras and doors with security alarms were planned but not yet installed at the Black Hills home, nearly a year after Serenity's disappearance. Similar security mechanisms are proposed for the Sioux Falls home but won't be purchased or installed until the society receives a funding grant it has applied for, Lavallee said.

*Serenity's adoptive parents, now divorced, and their loved ones have had their sorrow and stress worsened by criticisms and outrageous false statements on social media and a website created about the case. Serenity's adoptive mother has been accused of involvement in her disappearance, even though she was at work when the girl went missing and investigators do not suspect any of the parents. Serenity's adoptive father has had strangers take pictures of his other children playing outside his home and has been accused of giving his daughter a phone in a plot to help her escape.

*Sheriff's officials say Serenity had only a 3-minute to 5-minute head start on the first searchers. Two eyewitnesses who saw Serenity run away reported it and then searched for her. The eyewitnesses lost sight of Serenity for only 3 to 5 minutes before trying to follow Serenity's path.

Deputy Jamin Hartland, the Pennington County Sheriff's Office lead detective on the case, said the investigation is the most extensive in Pennington County history, and so far has shown no evidence of an abduction or other form of foul play.

"In this investigation, as in any investigation, obviously we can't rule out any possibility until we know exactly what happened to Serenity," Hartland told News Watch. "We just have no solid evidence thus far to suggest that this was an abduction or anything other than a girl who ran away from a facility and has yet to be found."

Pamela Jean Dunn: Missing from Watertown, SD since 2001

Dunn was last seen by her mother, whom she dropped off at her residence in Watertown, South Dakota at 6:00 p.m. on December 9, 2001. At 8:00 p.m., Dunn's daughter called her and Dunn mentioned that her own ex-boyfriend, David Asmussen, was her house.

At 11:00 p.m., Dunn told her mother on the phone that David Asmussen had called her and she was upset. She has never been heard from again. She was missed after she failed to show up for work on December 1 . Dunn's car was found at her own residence. Her home was locked and her purse and keys were on the table.

Foul play may have been involved in Dunn's disappearance. Her relationship with Asmussen was troubled and she got an order of protection against him after she began seeing another man.

The order prohibited Asmussen from contacting Dunn in any way, but after it was implemented he called her at least 17 times in less than two weeks and left at least three threatening messages on her answering machine.

Asmussen admitted he was at Dunn's house the day she disappeared, and he is believed to have been the last person to see her before she went missing. He was, however of stalking Dunn after she vanished and sentenced to 40 years in prison. He appealed, but the conviction was upheld.

On the very same day the appeals court ruled against Asmussen, he was charged with kidnapping Dunn. The charges accuse him of kidnapping Dunn to facilitate aggravated assault or stalking and/or to terrorize her. Authorities stated the charges came about due to the recent discovery of new evidence.

Asmussen was convicted of kidnapping in 2007 and sentenced to life in prison.

Dunn may have traveled to Florida after her disappearance. Her body has not been found and Asmussen has not been charged with causing her death, but foul play is suspected in her disappearance due to the circumstances involved.

(Last updated August 15, 2008.)

Open letter to the Oyate

January 27, 2020

On March 7, 2020, our Oceti Sakowin prisoners in the main penitentiary will host a powwow and a gathering of our people.

We invite our Dakota tribes from all over to come into our prison camp and visit with us.

Honor our circle with your presence. People like Donovan White, Jake Thompson, Danny Seaboy, Dennis Gill, and Gabe DesRosier are legendary leaders. These men are fearless and keep our people safe at all times.

With the buffalo spirit of our sacred nations we ask Gina Motah, Crystal Owen, Dianne DesRosier, Tamara St. John, Myrna Thompson, and other Dakota women to join us.

We ask Geri Opsal to bring a military force of veterans for the protection of our people, our flags, our circle, and our country. Geri is a powerful woman.

Bryan Akipa is a master flute player and we ask him to perform for us. We commend him for believing in this spiritual ability that he knows and teaches.

We humbly invite Waziyatawin and all of the Dakota Commemorative Marchers to be an important part of our gathering.

Our prisoners will present an eagle feather staff to Perry Little and Jim Hallum who are coordinators of a sacred horse ride they will be doing in March of 2020, from the Isanti homelands in Nebraska, through Fort Thompson, and to the White Stone Hill massacre site north of the Sisitunwan camps.

We ask our Dakota tribes to send us a drum group, dancers, and women who can wicaglata.

Call Mary Montoya at 605-367-5008 or email her at mary.montoya@state.sd.us to get on our guest list. Our deadline is February 19, 2020.

George Blue Bird, Sioux Falls, SD.

In Christ We Trust & Obey

By Harry Renville

John 3:16-18, Acts 17:30-31, Romans 6, Ephesians 2:8-9, Colossians 1:27, 1 John 1:7-10

"Let every soul be subject to the governing authorities for there is no authority except from God, and authorities that exist are appointed by God. Therefore whoever resists the authorities resists the ordinance of God, and those who resist will bring judgment on themselves." Romans 13:1-2

Dear friends, brothers and sisters and all who can truly see,

I know not how long it will be when you will again hear from me;

So whether or not this message gets through once more I must try,

For God is not willing that any of us eternally die.

(Prov. 24:11-12, Ezekiel 3:19, 1 Thess. 5:14, 2 Peter 3:9)

I've just come through a valley full of temptations and doubt.

Yet, since we are God's children, He will always show us a way out;

Honesty is always the answer whatever we will face today,

Humbly I again thanked God for once more showing me the way.

(Psalm 23, Romans 8:8-16, Romans 8:28, Ephesians 4:14-25)

Knowing the Scriptures truly helps when snares have been laid for me,

I don't know it all but His Holy Spirit has helped me to see;

He will guide and strengthen me as I grow in His knowledge and love.

And most assuredly, I will obey the Scripture written above.

(John 14:15-26, Ephesians 6:10-17, Colossians 3:16, 2 Peter 3:17-18)

"Finally, my brethren, be strong in the Lord and in the power of His might. Put on the whole armor of God that you may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil…..above all, taking the shield of faith with which you will be able to quench all of the fiery darts of the wicked one and take the helmet of salvation, and the sword of the Spirit, which is the Word of God;….."

God has been so loving, merciful and patient with me and you,

For 2,000 years we've not been dealt the penalty we are all due;

Instead, Christ gave His own life so eternal life we could receive,

If you haven't yet, turn and live for Him when you do come to believe.

(Psalm 103:8-14, Ezekiel 18:32, 1 Cor. 15:1-4, 2 Cor. 5:15-17)

Let us not grumble and complain when someone has done us wrong,

For all will answer to God some day and it may not be too long;

And whatever they may take from me, God will help me make it through,

I'll stay faithful to His Word and brethren, do stay faithful, too.

(Psalm 48:14, Romans 12:19, Phil. 2:12-16, 1 Peter 2:19-25)

But as it was in the days of Noah, so it is today,

Even in this once God-fearing nation, there has been a falling away;

Evil thrives where God's Holy Word used to be honored you see,

Still let us never give up, brethren, God will strengthen you and me.

(Genesis 6:5-9:17, Psalm 9:17, Psalm 12:8, Matthew 24:36-39)

"The wicked prowl on every side, when vileness is exalted among the sons of men." Psalm 12:8

"I will not change my lifestyle for anyone", she promptly did say,

How badly I just want to move on and forget that lonely day;

Pressing on toward the Blessed Hope, I've received for tomorrow now,

Til then, I'll use God's gift that others may be reached somehow.

(Proverbs 23:29-35, John 14:1-3, Ephesians 5:15-21, Phil. 3:13-14)

Only God can change your heart though, no matter what I have to say,

But as I was writing this, know that for you, I did stop to pray;

I won't always be here so today I at least had to try you see,

For it is certain, one day God will call me home for eternity.

(Psalm 139:16, Ezekiel 11:19-20, John 6:65, 1 Thess. 4:13-18)

Yes, there are so many who still live a life contrary to God's Holy Word,

Even shunning the truth that could save their souls which they all once heard;

If your eyes were only opened, then you, too, could finally see,

Then you would know why I am so concerned for your eternal destiny.

"Jesus said to her, 'I am the resurrection and the life. He who believes in Me, though he may die, he shall live. And whoever lives and believes in Me shall never die. Do you believe this?'" John 11:25-26

Doctor sentenced to five lifetime terms for sexually abusing boys

Former IHS pediatrician Stanley Patrick Weber abused patients in Montana and SD between 1995 and 2011

Rapid City SD – Wall Street Journal – Feb. 11, 2020 – An Indian Health Service pediatrician who was convicted of sexually abusing young Native American boys in his care over two decades and became an emblem of the federal agency's long-term failures was sentenced Monday to five lifetime prison terms.

Stanley Patrick Weber, 71, groomed and abused Native American boys as young as about 9 years old on reservations in Montana and South Dakota between 1995 and 2011, according to court documents. His supervisors in the federal government buried their own suspicions about his conduct, tried to silence others who raised concerns, and transferred the doctor from one reservation to another after managers concluded he might have molested his patients, The Wall Street Journal and the PBS series Frontline reported last year.

The agency's handling of Weber revealed broader dysfunction at the U.S. agency that provides health care to 2.6 million Native Americans, often in some of the nation's poorest and most remote communities. The Journal and Frontline later reported that the agency had hired dozens of doctors with track records of malpractice, licensure sanctions and even criminal convictions who went on to harm patients at IHS hospitals.

Weber was convicted in South Dakota in September of abusing four of his patients at the IHS's Pine Ridge hospital and his government housing unit there. One victim testified at the trial that Weber had used narcotics to subdue him before sexually assaulting him, and another described escalating assaults during a series of visits in hospital exam rooms.

In delivering the sentence, Chief U.S. District Judge Jeffrey Viken described his four-decade legal career before pronouncing he had never seen anything like the "abuse of trust you have inflicted on these men." Judge Viken imposed 45 years and an $800,000 fine in addition to the five life sentences.

Three of the victims he was convicted of abusing were present in the crowded courtroom and spoke of the impact of Weber's crimes. "I need help, I try to get help," said one of the victims. "But I refuse to go to the IHS."

In 2018, Weber was convicted in a separate trial in Montana for abusing two former patients there, and sentenced to more than 18 years in prison. He appealed that conviction, but a higher court affirmed it Monday, hours before his South Dakota sentencing.

An IHS manager in Montana concluded in 1995 that Weber might be molesting his patients, and ordered his supervisor to fire him. But, just weeks later, Weber re-emerged with another agency job, at Pine Ridge. There, he survived multiple investigations and years of complaints by colleagues about the parade of boys who visited his home at night.

After hearing his sentence Monday, Weber had no visible reaction. His lawyer, Harvey Steinberg, declined to comment as he left the courtroom.

U.S. Attorney Ron Parsons said the case had focused the federal government's attention on accountability for such abuses. "This has been a wake-up call for everyone, including us," he said.

Rear Adm. Michael Weahkee, the director of the IHS, said in a statement, "The actions of this individual were reprehensible, and we sincerely regret the harm caused to the children involved."

The investigation that led to the convictions began after a prosecutor at the Oglala Sioux Tribe, which is based at Pine Ridge, began looking into the case in 2015. The prosecutor, Elaine Yellow Horse, learned the name of one boy who had earlier told associates that Weber had abused him.

Ms. Yellow Horse, now a law student, attended the sentencing hearing Monday in Rapid City, at times looking down and wringing her hands as victims described the damage Weber had inflicted. She said, "I hope they can restart their lives now that they have had their voices heard."

The tribe, which doesn't have jurisdiction over non-Native American offenders, passed the lead on to investigators at the Bureau of Indian Affairs, which in turn enlisted the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of the Inspector General. Those federal agents then identified a series of other victims spanning the two states.

The Oglala Sioux Tribe's current president, Julian Bear Runner, addressed the court, saying Weber had told him when he was a teenager that he didn't need to bring an adult for a return visit.

Reports by the Journal and Frontline about Weber have prompted at least five federal investigations. One of them, an independent review commissioned by the IHS, recently ended. A private contractor hired by the IHS reviewed three decades of agency records concerning Weber and interviewed about 50 people involved in the case, people familiar with the findings show.

But the agency has declined to disclose the report, arguing it is a confidential quality-assurance record that is not public by law. IHS told congressional offices it plans to eventually release a summary of "broad findings and recommendations."

Mark Butterbrodt, a former IHS pediatrician who repeatedly accused Weber of sexual misconduct, said he was interviewed by investigators in that probe. He said they showed him records indicating an IHS official had signed off on renewing Weber's patient-care privileges at Pine Ridge just one day after the disgraced doctor had submitted a form alerting the agency he was under investigation by the South Dakota board of medicine.

Dr. Butterbrodt, speaking at the hearing Monday, described his efforts over about 15 years to call attention to Weber's conduct. "Not one physician stood with me on that medical staff," he said. Instead, he said, they snickered about their colleague's behavior.

A top medical official at the hospital at the time said her colleagues investigated allegations against Mr. Weber but found no hard evidence of misconduct.

At the height of the courtroom drama that unfolded Monday, the first victim, who now is incarcerated, shook his head and remained seated in shackles when a prosecutor asked if he wished to speak.

Then, two of his childhood friends—also victims of Weber—spoke to the court about their experiences. One turned to the shackled man who'd kept his silence and said, "I love you."

The prisoner changed his mind. In a strained speech, he told the court he had lost his ability to trust anyone as a result of Weber's abuse: "I look at each and every one of you as potential predators."

And he turned to his friends seated in the audience and told them, "You gotta stay strong."

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

ESDS holds science fair

Submitted by J. Jeannine Metzger

Instructional Principal

Enemy Swim Day School held its Science Fair last Thursday, February 13.

The students and staff worked hard applying the scientific process to learn many exciting things.

Here are a few photo  highlights from the day!

All students were awarded a participation certificate and medal for competing.

Our Kindergarten through 3rd grade was judged as a whole class.

Fourth through 6th grade were judged in groups of three or four in a group for the places of 1st, 2nd and 3rd place.

Seventh and 8th grade all competed individually for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place.

Here are the winners for 1st, 2nd and 3rd places for 4th-8th grade:

4th grade: 1st place went to Sage Redday, Niya Eastman and JoJo Redday; 2nd place went to Mattison Keoke, Wetu Manning-Peters, Tina Brown and Todd Keoke; 3rd place went to Feather Campbell, Theo Goodsell, and Lorelei Gill.

5th grade: 1st place went to Jared Oreskovich, Jesse Hopkins, and Elijah BlackThunder Jr.; 2nd place went to Kia Pruitt, Kaya Running Hawk and Vicky Brown; 3rd place went to Cali Eagle, Wakinya Eastman, and Abreille Cloud.

6th grade: 1st place went to Savannah Janise, Echo O'Riley and Memory BlackThunder; 2nd place went to Miley Contreras, Del Frenier, and LeiAuna Bugg; 3rd place went to Avery Bernard, Julie DeLoera, and Eliana Owen.

7th grade: 1st place went to Isabelle Herrick; 2nd place went to Tessa Eberhardt; 3rd place went to Serenity Squirrel Coat.

8th grade: 1st place went to Leticia DeLoera; 2nd place went to Alvan Jackson; 3rd place went to Brianna Robertson.

ESDS honors students of the month

Submitted by Rebecca Dargatz

School Community Director

Toka Nuwan Wayawa Tipi honors one student from each grade for each full month that school is in session.

The Students of the Month are chosen because they demonstrate the four school wide expectations consistently or have shown great progress toward them.

The school wide expectations are:

*Awanicihdka: Be Safe.

*Waokihi: Be Responsible.

*Waunsida: Be Caring.

*Woohoda: Be Respectful.

Home room teachers choose the Students of the Month in collaboration with the paras and other teachers who serve a particular candidate.

Students of the Month are honored during opening ceremony on the first Monday following each full month of school.

Students of the Month receive a student of the month shirt and a dinner hosted by ESDS.

The January 2020 Students of the Month are: Kindergarten – MarleyMae Crawford, 1st Grade – Eagan Fayant, 2nd Grade – KJ Eskridge, 3rd Grade –Ian Danley, 4th Grade – Niya Eastman, 5th Grade – Victoria Brown, 6th Grade – Kingston Ryan, 7th Grade – Sydney DeCoteau, and 8th Grade – Stacia Redday.

Announce Governor's student art competition

Pierre, SD – Feb. 12, 2020 – Governor Kristi Noem today announced the South Dakota Governor's Student Art Competition, a new program to promote visual art among students in South Dakota.

"The arts play a significant role in growing South Dakota's economy and enhancing our way of life," said Noem. "This year, I am excited to launch the first annual Governor's Student Art Competition that will recognize and encourage budding artists in our state."

I am very excited to be a part of the investment the governor is making in cultivating the next generation of South Dakota artists," said District 26 Representative Rebecca Reimer. "I look forward to experiencing all the works of art that are yet to be created and the stories they will tell."

"This is a great opportunity for our young people to be able to showcase their talent, and we are able to look at the world through their eyes," said Senate Minority Leader Troy Heinert. "I'd like to thank Governor Noem for bringing this initiative forward."

"I was only seven years old when I entered and won my first art contest, which propelled me into an incredible self-discovery," said Bria Neff, a 7th grade student artist from Sioux Falls. "Art gives children the gift of imagination that will color their world with possibilities."

"I want to thank Governor Noem for prioritizing this program and putting student artists in the spotlight," said Dale Lamphere, South Dakota Artist Laureate. "I hope this program shows our promising young students that South Dakota is a great place to live and work as an artist."

"Without artists, we wouldn't have Mount Rushmore or Crazy Horse. We wouldn't have the Redlin Art Center or the Dignity Statue. The Faulkton murals wouldn't exist, and people wouldn't have the opportunity to admire the beauty that is the Arc of Dreams. South Dakota is a canvas that inspires creativity, and I'm thrilled to use this competition to encourage our students to pursue art right here in South Dakota," concluded Noem.

This spring, the South Dakota Arts Council will distribute program information to schools throughout the state, and submissions will be accepted in the fall. More information on logistics and criteria will be announced in the coming months.

Contributing millions of dollars to local revenues each year, the arts play a significant role in South Dakota's economy. South Dakota is home to more than 1,300 arts-related businesses that employ nearly 6,500 people.

Legals

Request for Bids

Requesting proposals for:

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Budget Office is requesting Statements of Qualifications from selected CPA firms to assist the Tribe in training our Program Directors and Office Managers in regards of Grant Management and Uniform Guidance. In order to make sure our employees are properly administrating their Federal/ Grant dollars, our Office would like to inform all on:

Policies and regulations

Internal controls

Audit requirements.

Cost reporting

Information to Include:

Consulting firms responding to this RFQ are to provide the following:

1.  Proposed Scope of Work or Work plan

2.  Staff qualifications

3.  Firm qualifications

Evaluation:

The Tribe reserves the right to evaluate SOQs received in response to this RFQ in a way that best suits the interest of the Tribe. While a definite schedule for the training has not been determined, the Tribe seeks to proceed with the training quickly and may choose to select a CPA firm for the project on the bases of its SOQ without soliciting proposals from other firms.

The deadline for SOQ submittals is February 21, 2020 at 4:00 pm CST. Interested firms shall submit a copy of their SOQ to:

SWO Procurement Office

Attn: Lennie Bernard- Peters

PO Box 509

Agency Village, SD 57262

By 4:00 pm on Friday, February 21, 2020

All interested parties acknowledge that any Agreement executed and performed within the Tribe's exclusive jurisdiction is subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the Tribal Court of Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation. All interested parties acknowledge that they must comply with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Ordinances: TERO Chapter 59 Requirements, Wage Rates & Compliance Plan; Business License Ordinance Chapter 53 and Tax Ordinance Chapter 67; and Chapter 75 Sex Offender Registration.

7-2tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

IN TRIBAL COURT

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

Sisseton Wahpeton Office of Child Support Enforcement Agency,

vs.

VARIOUS DEFENDANTS AS SHOWN BELOW

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

& NOTICE OF HEARING

It has been established that the SWOCSE and the Court cannot locate or serve the following Defendants in the following cases:

CAMERON CHARBONEAU, Multiple cases Scheduled for February 18th, 2020 @ 9:00 o'clock a.m.

HARLAN DUMARCE, Multiple cases Scheduled for February 18th, 2020 @ 9:00 a.m.

GAYLA GERMAN, Multiple cases Scheduled for February 18th, 2020 @ 10:00 a.m.

Therefore, it is hereby ORDERED that Notice by Publication is hereby provided herein on the various HEARINGS FOR CHILD SUPPORT and that a hearing will be held on the dates and times as shown, to occur at the Tribal Court, SWO Admin Building, Old Agency, South Dakota.

ALL ABOVE DEFENDANTS ARE HEREBY GIVEN NOTICE AND ARE ORDERED TO ATTEND THE HEARINGS AND THAT FAILURE TO DO SO MAY RESULT IN A WARRANT FOR YOUR ARREST.

Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the pleadings/filings describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of December 2019.

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Gina Ruggieri

Presiding Judge

ATTEST:/S/

Melinda Carlson

SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

IN TRIBAL COURT

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

Sisseton Wahpeton Office of Child Support Enforcement Agency,

vs.

VARIOUS DEFENDANTS AS SHOWN BELOW

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

& NOTICE OF HEARING

It has been established that the SWOCSE and the Court cannot locate or serve the following Defendants in the following cases:

CASEY HEMINGER, I-20-021 Scheduled for February 19th, 2020 @ 9:00 o'clock a.m.

ALANA REDDAY, I-14-169 Scheduled for February 19th, 2020 @ 9:00 a.m.

TIFFANY BERNARD, CS-16-034 Scheduled for February 19th, 2020 @ 10:00 a.m

ANNETTE BLACKTHUNDER, CS-03-203 Scheduled for February 19th, 2020 @ 10:00 a.m

KATHRYN THREE LEGS REDDAY, CS-09-026 Scheduled for February 19th, 2020 @ 10:00 a.m

CHARLA RENCOUNTRE, I-11-074 Scheduled for February 19th, 2020 @ 10:00 a.m

BRANDON YANKTON, CS-16-184 Scheduled for February 19th, 2020 @ 10:00 a.m

Therefore, it is hereby ORDERED that Notice by Publication is hereby provided herein on the various HEARINGS FOR CHILD SUPPORT and that a hearing will be held on the dates and times as shown, to occur at the Tribal Court, SWO Admin Building, Old Agency, South Dakota.

ALL ABOVE DEFENDANTS ARE HEREBY GIVEN NOTICE AND ARE ORDERED TO ATTEND THE HEARINGS AND THAT FAILURE TO DO SO MAY RESULT IN A WARRANT FOR YOUR ARREST.

Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the pleadings/filings describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of December 2019.

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Gina Ruggieri

Presiding Judge

ATTEST:/S/

Melinda Carlson

SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

IN TRIBAL COURT

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

Sisseton Wahpeton Office of Child Support Enforcement Agency,

vs.

VARIOUS DEFENDANTS AS SHOWN BELOW

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

& NOTICE OF HEARING

It has been established that the SWOCSE and the Court cannot locate or serve the following Defendants in the following cases:

CHRISTOPHER FAYANT, CS-10-028 Scheduled for February 20th, 2020 @ 9:00 a.m.

BRIANNA GOODTEACHER, CS-18-062 Scheduled for February 20th, 2020 @ 9:00 a.m.

NICHOLAS JOHNSON, CS-02-191 Scheduled for February 20th, 2020 @ 9:00 a.m.

Therefore, it is hereby ORDERED that Notice by Publication is hereby provided herein on the various HEARINGS FOR CHILD SUPPORT and that a hearing will be held on the dates and times as shown, to occur at the Tribal Court, SWO Admin Building, Old Agency, South Dakota.

ALL ABOVE DEFENDANTS ARE HEREBY GIVEN NOTICE AND ARE ORDERED TO ATTEND THE HEARINGS AND THAT FAILURE TO DO SO MAY RESULT IN A WARRANT FOR YOUR ARREST.

Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the pleadings/filings describing the matter.

Dated this 20th day of December 2019.

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Gina Ruggieri

Presiding Judge

ATTEST:/S/

Melinda Carlson

SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

IN TRIBAL COURT

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

Sisseton Wahpeton Office of Child Support Enforcement Agency,

vs.

VARIOUS DEFENDANTS AS SHOWN BELOW

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

& NOTICE OF HEARING

It has been established that the SWOCSE and the Court cannot locate or serve the following Defendants in the following cases:

ALLAN OWEN, Multiple cases Scheduled for February 18th, 2020 @ 10:00 o'clock a.m.

ROSANNA RENCOUNTRE, Multiple cases Scheduled for February 19th, 2020 @ 9:00 a.m.

THOMAS IYARPEYA, I-20-049 Scheduled for February 19th, 2020 @ 9:00 a.m.

STANLEY HOLMAN, I-20-055 Scheduled for February 19th, 2020 @ 9:00 a.m

SCOTT DUMARCE, CS-00-228 Scheduled for February 19th, 2020 @ 10:00 a.m.

CHANTEL EAGLE, CS-08-315 Scheduled for February 19th, 2020 @ 10:00 a.m

DALLAS LACROIX, CS-20-008 Scheduled for February 19th, 2020 @ 10:00 a.m

LUONDA STEVENS, I-09-117 Scheduled for February 19th, 2020 @ 10:00 a.m

SHANE SYVERSON, CS-09-107 Scheduled for February 19th, 2020 @ 10:00 a.m

MICHAEL WIGGINS, CS-15-052 Scheduled for February 19th, 2020 @ 10:00 a.m

KENDALL LEITH, CS-14-182 Scheduled for February 19th, 2020 @ 10:00 a.m

Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the pleadings/filings describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of January 2020.

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Gina Ruggieri

Presiding Judge

ATTEST:/S/

Melinda Carlson

SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

& NOTICE OF HEARING

It has been established that the SWOCSE and the Court cannot locate or serve the following Defendants in the following cases:

ROBERT STOPS aka BOBBY WILLIAMS aka ROBERT IRIZARRY, CS-20-038 Scheduled for February 20th, 2020 @ 9:00 o'clock a.m.

BRANDON GOODTEACHER, CS-16-210 Scheduled for February 20th, 2020 @ 9:00 a.m.

Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the pleadings/filings describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of January 2020.

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Gina Ruggieri

Presiding Judge

ATTEST:/S/

Melinda Carlson

SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

IN TRIBAL COURT

CASE NO. D-20-253-058

In the Matter of:

AVANT LITTLE WIND, Minor Child.

And concerning:

AMBER DRUM and MARCUS LITTLE WIND, Parents.

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION

THE COURT being satisfied by Affidavit duly filed herein that personal service cannot well be made, it is Ordered that Amber Drum and Marcus Little Wind, who are the Respondents in the above entitled matter, be notified by three (3) weeks publication in full of the Notice of these proceedings in the regular issue of a qualified newspaper.

Dated this 4th day of February, 2020.

/S/

Gina Ruggieri, Tribal Court Judge

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

IN TRIBAL COURT

CASE NO. D-20-253-058

In the Matter of:

AVANT LITTLE WIND, Minor Child.

And concerning:

AMBER DRUM and MARCUS LITTLE WIND, Parents.

NOTICE OF HEARING

Take notice that a Petition To Terminate Parental Rights of the above-named child has been filed and a hearing will be held at the above named Court, Agency Village, outside the city of Sisseton, Roberts County, South Dakota on the 10th day of March, 2020, at the hour of 3:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 5th day of February, 2020.

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Gina Ruggieri, Tribal Court Judge

ATTEST:

Lois Kohl, Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-18-361-157

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE OF NAME OF:

BRYSEN LEE BOYD, Minor Child,

And concerning:

VANCE DEMARRIAS, JORDAN FEATHER, Parents.

ORDER AND NOTICE OF

HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from BRYSEN LEE BOYD to BRYSEN LEE DEMARRIAS shall be heard before the Honorable Gina Ruggieri, Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at 2: 30 P.M. on the 17th day of MARCH, 2020.

Dated this 11th day of February, 2020.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Gina Ruggueri, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST:

E. Pfeiffer, CLERK OF COURTS

8-3tc

January 2020 Tribal Council proceedings

REGULAR TRIBAL COUNCIL MEETING

Tuesday, January 7, 2020, 9:00 AM

TiWakan Tio Tipi Council Chambers

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT:

BIG COULEE:                      Lisa Jackson

BUFFALO LAKE:                 Louis Johnson

ENEMY SWIM:                     Cheryl Owen

HEIPA/VEBLEN:                  Winfield Rondell Jr.

LAKE TRAVERSE:               Francis Crawford

LONG HOLLOW:                 Curtis Bissonette

OLD AGENCY:                     Milton Owen

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES PRESENT: Tribal Chairman Donovan White (9:17), Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr., and Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson

 

CALL TO ORDER: Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr. called the meeting to order at 9:13 AM with two (2) Executives and seven (7) Council members from seven (7) Districts answering Roll Call. Opening Prayer for the Tribal Vice-Chairman said by Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr.

 

MOTION NO. 1: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Milton Owen, question by Francis Crawford, to approve the Regular Tribal Council Meeting Minutes of Tuesday, December 3, 2019.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 1: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 2: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to amend Tribal Council Motion No. 84, of 12/4/19, to change the funding source, to now read: "to authorize payment of the invoice submitted by Arrowhead Construction, in the amount of $40,000.00, for work completed on the Elderly Village Project, with the Detention Center Set-aside account as the funding source, as presented by Tribal Chairman Donovan White."

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 2: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 3: made by Francis Crawford, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Milton Owen, to approve the Regular Tribal Council Meeting Minutes for Wednesday, December 4, 2019.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 3: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 4: made by Francis Crawford, second by Milton Owen, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Special Tribal Council Meeting Minutes for Friday, December 13, 2019.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 4: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 5: made by Francis Crawford, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Lisa Jackson, to approve the Special Tribal Council Meeting Minutes of Wednesday, December 18, 2019.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 5: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 6: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Francis Crawford, to approve Executive Resolution No. 19-09, "Authorization to Submit the SWO Draft Hemp Code to the United State Department of Agriculture".

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 6: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Executive Resolution No. 19-09

 

MOTION NO. 7: made by Francis Crawford, second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Tribal Chairman report, as presented by Tribal Chairman Donovan White.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 7: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 8: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to approve the following budgets for FY 2020; Planning - Census Committee Grant, Early Head Start & Head Start, Diabetes Center - Astra Zeneca Grant, Diabetes Center - Community Directed Grant, Child Protection - BIA carryover, Realty - Appraisal carryover, DLI Income, Buffalo Farm Income, THPO Income, Planning - ATG carryover, as presented by Budget Supervisor Lexie Fancher.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 8: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 9: made by Francis Crawford, second by Milton Owen, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Tribal Vice-Chairman report, as presented by Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 9: 16 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 1 Abstained: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 10: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Milton Owen, to approve the Tribal Secretary report, as presented by Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 10: 16 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Opposed. 1 Abstained: Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 11: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Milton Owen, to approve the resolution, "Recognition and Adoption of the Long Range Transportation Plan", as presented by SWO DOT Director Cliff Eberhardt.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 11: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 2 Absent From Vote: Francis Crawford (2). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Resolution No. SWO-20-001

 

MOTION NO. 12: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to approve the SWO Department of Transportation report, as presented by Director Cliff Eberhardt.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 12: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 13: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Milton Owen, question by Cheryl Owen, to authorize the Office of Child Support Enforcement to purchase an Intimus Paper Shredder, from ACE Hardware, in the amount of $5,097.00, with the OCSE budgets as the funding source, as presented by Director Diana Canku.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 13: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 14: made by Cheryl Owen, second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Francis Crawford, to approve the Office of Child Support Enforcement report, as presented by OCSE Director Diana Canku.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 14: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

Note: Lake Traverse Tribal Council Member Francis Crawford excused from meeting to attend a funeral.

 

MOTION NO. 15: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to hire MBA Engineering, Inc. to assess our I.T. Systems to ensure the recent virus has been cleared from our systems, in the not-to-exceed amount of $24,000.00, with the Tribal Vice-Chairman to determine the funding source.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 15: 8 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Lisa Jackson (2) Winfield Rondell Jr. (3). 7 Opposed: Curtis Bissonette (2); Milton Owen (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 16: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to acknowledge the receipt of the Big Coulee District Minutes for the meeting held December 19, 2019.

Big Coulee District Minutes for meeting held December 19, 2019:

1.             Before the SWO approve the Hemp Plan, this plan must come back to the Districts and have SWO Planning Director do a presentation at each District to explain the Hemp Plan.

2.             BCD support the SWHA 10-year plan to keep the funding.

3.             BCD support the cutting off Non-Indian rifle tags for the 2020-21 season.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 16: 12 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Opposed. 2 Abstained: Curtis Bissonette (2). 1 Absent From Vote: Tribal Secretary (1). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 17: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Curtis Bissonette, question Cheryl Owen, to acknowledge the receipt of the Heipa District Minutes for the meeting held December 15, 2019.

Heipa District Minutes for meeting held December 15, 2019:

1.             Support the SWHA 10-year plan and that they still receive the 1 million dollars from the Tribe.

2.             SWHA include Heipa/Veblen District area for housing site in the 10-year plan.

3.             District that prepared their own audits receive the $3000 from the tribe.

4.             Get a financial statement for Dakota Crossing from General Manager.

5.             The Tribal Central Government be reinstated back into the TERO Ordinance.

6.             Approve Youth-to-Adult Membership: Jesee McKay, Avory Renville, and Parker LaFromboise.

7.             Accept the 3 buffalo from the Tribe.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 17: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 1 Absent From Vote: Tribal Secretary (1). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 18: made by Louis Johnson, second by Milton Owen, question by Cheryl Owen, to acknowledge the receipt of the Buffalo Lake District Minutes for the meeting held December 19, 2019.

Buffalo Lake District Minutes for meeting held December 19, 2019:

1.             Approve Adult Membership: Sterling Barse.

2.             Request support from the SWO Tax Commission and approval from the Tribal Council once again to allow reprieve and or stay from any and all Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate taxes that would be due on behalf of the Buffalo Lanes/Bowling Alley.

3.             Tribal Council approve on behalf of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Housing Authority the on-going need for funds in the amount of one million dollars from the SWO section 7 funds on behalf of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Housing Authority's 10-year plan presently in place for new homes/housing construction to be built for the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 18: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 1 Absent From Vote: Tribal Secretary (1). 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

Note: Enemy Swim District did not have a District meeting in December 2019.

 

Note: Lake Traverse District did not have a District meeting in December 2019.

 

Note: Long Hollow District did not have a District meeting in December 2019.

 

Note: Old Agency District did not have a District meeting in December 2019.

 

MOTION NO. 19: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Louis Johnson, question by Edmund Johnson Jr., to approve the DCA Resolution, to seat Stephanie Jo Lufkins as the Long Hollow District Representative on the SWO Judicial Committee.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 19: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 20: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Milton Owen, question by Louis Johnson, to send the Section 7, Distribution, and Planning budgets to the Districts for review, as presented by the District Chairman's Association.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 20: 12 For: Louis Johnson (1); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 3 Opposed: Cheryl Owen (3). 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 21: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Milton Owen, question by Louis Johnson, to have Planning Director Michael Roberts submit a Section 7 Budget modification to reallocate the $1 million to the SW Housing Authority for FY 2020.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 21: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 22: made by Milton Owen, second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Louis Johnson, to approve the District Chairman's Association (DCA) report, as presented by DCA Members; Kenneth Johnson, Jessie Chanku, Norma Perko, and Brenda Bellonger.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 22: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 23: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Lisa Jackson, to adjourn.

MEETING ADJOURNED 3:31PM.

Respectfully Submitted, Lindsey Abraham, Recording Secretary Asst.

 

REGULAR TRIBAL COUNCIL MEETING

Wednesday, January 8, 2020, 9:00 AM

TiWakan Tio Tipi Council Chambers

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT:

BIG COULEE:                      Lisa Jackson

BUFFALO LAKE:                 Louis Johnson

ENEMY SWIM:                     Cheryl Owen

HEIPA/VEBLEN:                  Winfield Rondell Jr.

LAKE TRAVERSE:               Francis Crawford (9:29)

LONG HOLLOW:                 Curtis Bissonette

OLD AGENCY:                     Milton Owen

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES PRESENT: Tribal Chairman Donovan White, Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr., and Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson

 

CALL TO ORDER: Tribal Chairman Donovan White called the meeting to order at 9:08 AM with three (3) Executives and six (6) Council members from seven (7) Districts answering Roll Call. Opening Prayer for the Tribal Vice-Chairman said by Old Agency Tribal Council Member Milton Owen.

 

MOTION NO. 24: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Lisa Jackson, to authorize the purchase of the 61.25 acres of land offered for sale by Virginia Max, in the amount of $185,474.07, with the Cobell account as the funding source, as recommended by the Reservation Planning Commission, and as presented by Realty Manager Jerry Eastman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 24: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 25: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Milton Owen, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Realty Office report, as presented by Realty Manager Jerry Eastman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 25: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 26: made by Louis Johnson, second by Francis Crawford, question by Lisa Jackson, to approve the 2020 Light Geese Season Fact Sheet, 2020 Spring Turkey Fact Sheet, and the 2020 Fish & Wildlife Spring Spearing/Stream Fishing Fact Sheet, as presented by Fish & Wildlife Manager Charlene Miller.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 26: 16 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.          1 Absent From Vote: Tribal Secretary (1).  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 27: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Lisa Jackson, to approve the Fish & Wildlife Office report, as presented by F&W Manager Charlene Miller.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 27: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 28: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to approve the Education Assistance FY 2020 budget, and the 115 JOM carryover budget, as presented by Education Director Dr. Sherry Johnson.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 28: 16 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  1 Absent From Vote: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1).  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 29: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Cheryl Owen, question by Lisa Jackson, to approve the reimbursement to Enemy Swim Day School, in the amount of $6,495.00, for 5 iPad Pros, with the Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi Grant as the funding source, as presented by Education Director Dr. Sherry Johnson.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 29: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 30: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Lisa Jackson, to approve the resolution, "Publicly and Equitably Funded Community Based Indigenous Model Schools Legislation", as presented by Education Director Dr. Sherry Johnson.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 30: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

                Resolution No. SWO-20-002

 

MOTION NO. 31: made by Myrna Thompson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Francis Crawford, to approve the resolution, "Indian Community Development Block Grant Application Enemy Swim Day Care Facility – New Construction", as presented by Education Director Dr. Sherry Johnson.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 31: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

                Resolution No. SWO-20-003

 

MOTION NO. 32: made by Edmund Johnson Jr., second by Cheryl Owen, question by Curtis Bissonette, to approve the Education Office report, as presented by Education Director Dr. Sherry Johnson.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 32: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 33: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to go into Executive Session, at 10:10am.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 33: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 34: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Milton Owen, question by Francis Crawford, to come out of Executive Session, at 1:05pm.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 34: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 35: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to approve the December 2019 CACFP Food report, and the December 2019 Attendance report for Head Start and Early Head Start, as submitted by Head Start Director Lynn Halbert.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 35: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 36: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the resolution, "The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate (SWO) Agrees to the Public Law 93-638 Contract for the Planning/Design/Construction of the SWO Adult Detention Facility and the Secretary's Award of $5,175,000 for the SWO Adult Detention Facility Center", as presented by Tribal Chairman Donovan White.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 36: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  3 Absent From Vote: Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1).  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

                Resolution No. SWO-20-004

 

MOTION NO. 37: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Milton Owen, question by Francis Crawford, to approve the revised Policies and Procedures for the SWO Warming Shelter for the Homeless, as presented by Tribal Chairman Donovan White.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 37: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  2 Abstained: Curtis Bissonette (2).  1 Absent From Vote: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1).  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 38: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Milton Owen, to approve the Sponsorship Agreement with Skyforce Basketball, LLC, for the Sioux Falls Skyforce, in the amount of $10,000.00, with the Youth budget as the funding source, and to authorize Tribal Chairman Donovan White to execute the Agreement, pending legal review, as presented by Youth Coordinator Derrick McCauley.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 38: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  2 Opposed: Francis Crawford (2).  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 39: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Milton Owen, to approve the Rapid Skillz Coaching Program Proposal, for basketball training and development for coaches and athletes, in the amount of $12,000.00, with the Youth budget as the funding source, as presented by Youth Coordinator Derrick McCauley.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 39: 14 For: Louis Johnson (1); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.      3 Absent From Vote: Cheryl Owen (3).  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 40: made by Milton Owen, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Lisa Jackson, to approve the SWO Youth Center report, as presented by Youth Coordinator Derrick McCauley.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 40: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 41: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Project Manager 1 position, with the Indirect Cost budgets as the funding source, as presented by Planning Director Michael Roberts.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 41: 10 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Lisa Jackson (2).  7 Opposed: Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 42: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Cheryl Owen, question by Lisa Jackson, to approve the Planning Department report, as presented by Director Michael Roberts.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 42: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 43: made by Milton Owen, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, in resolution form, to enroll into the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate the one (1) applicant as listed in Exhibit A, as presented by Enrollment Officer Zelma Flute.

                Barse, Jamie Jermaine

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 43: 16 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  1 Abstained: Louis Johnson (1).  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

                Resolution No. SWO-20-005

 

MOTION NO. 44: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Milton Owen, question by Cheryl Owen, in resolution form, to enroll into the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate the ten (10) applicants as listed in Exhibit B, as presented by Enrollment Officer Zelma Flute.

                Bissonette, Raya-Joy Hope                               Eagle, Raymond John, Jr.

                Hill, Rylan Warren                                                                Just, Joseph Lloyd II

                Just, Liam Thomas                                                             Just, Malena Jashaun

                Meng, Andie Kristine                                           Rock, Royal Azrael

                Wanna, Cobain Reign                                        Watts, Frances Marie Ann

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 44: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

                Resolution No. SWO-20-006

 

MOTION NO. 45: made by Milton Owen, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Curtis Bissonette, in resolution form, to enroll into the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate the eight (8) applicants as listed in Exhibit C, as presented by Enrollment Officer Zelma Flute.

                Balderrama, Jordan Celena Cruz     Casiano, Vahna Soliece

                Graham, Naomi Incarnation              Greene, Cassidy James

                Greene, Gunner Allen         Haug, Neftali Aragon

                Maar, Adrienne Christine Charlea    Stachowski, Jr., Brian Robert Vance               

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 45: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

                Resolution No. SWO-20-007

 

MOTION NO. 46: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Milton Owen, to approve the Enrollment Office report, as presented by Enrollment Officer Zelma Flute.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 46: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 47: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Planning – ATG carryover budget, as presented by Budget Supervisor Lexie Fancher.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 47: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 48: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Cheryl Owen, to authorize the payment to SWO Fuel, Inc., in the amount of $12,212.67, for services provided to the Little Steps Daycare, with Gaming revenue as the funding source, as recommended by Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr., and as presented by Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 48: 12 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Milton Owen (2); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Lisa Jackson (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  5 Opposed: Francis Crawford (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Louis Johnson (1).  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 49: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Lisa Jackson, to adjourn.

                MEETING ADJOURNED 3:20PM.   

Respectfully Submitted,  Lindsey Abraham, Recording Secretary Asst.

 

SPECIAL TRIBAL COUNCIL MEETING

Monday, January 27, 2020, 10:42 AM

TiWakan Tio Tipi Council Chambers

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT:

BIG COULEE:                      Lisa Jackson

BUFFALO LAKE:                 Louis Johnson

ENEMY SWIM:                     Cheryl Owen

HEIPA/VEBLEN:                  Winfield Rondell Jr.

LONG HOLLOW:                 Curtis Bissonette

OLD AGENCY:                     Milton Owen

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT:

LAKE TRAVERSE:               Francis Crawford

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES PRESENT: Tribal Chairman Donovan White and Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES ABSENT: Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr.

 

CALL TO ORDER: Tribal Chairman Donovan White called the meeting to order at 10:42 AM with two (2) Executives and six (6) Council members from seven (7) Districts answering Roll Call. Opening Prayer for the Tribal Vice-Chairman said by Old Agency Tribal Council Member Milton Owen.

 

MOTION NO. 50: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Myrna Thompson, question by Milton Owen, to approve the draft resolution, "Authorizing Request for and Approving Withdrawal of ILCA Land Purchase Funds Held in Trust by OST to Purchase On-Reservation Trust or Restricted Interests from Richard Owen", 22.33 acres, in the amount of $101,191.22, as recommended by the Reservation Planning Commission, and as submitted by Realty Manager Jerry Eastman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 50: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

Resolution No. SWO-20-008

 

MOTION NO. 51: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Myrna Thompson, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Tribal Health Department Organizational Chart, as presented by Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 51: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Secretary (1). 0 Opposed. 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 52: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Curtis Bissonette, to adjourn.

MEETING ADJOURNED 11:03AM.

Respectfully Submitted, Verlyn Beaudreau, Recording Secretary.

 

REGULAR TRIBAL COUNCIL MEETING

Wednesday, January 29, 2020, 9:00 AM

TiWakan Tio Tipi Council Chambers

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT:

BUFFALO LAKE:                 Louis Johnson

ENEMY SWIM:                     Cheryl Owen

HEIPA/VEBLEN:                  Winfield Rondell Jr.

LAKE TRAVERSE:               Francis Crawford (9:21)

LONG HOLLOW:                 Curtis Bissonette

OLD AGENCY:                     Milton Owen (9:13)

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT:

BIG COULEE:                      Lisa Jackson (bereavement)

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES PRESENT: Tribal Chairman Donovan White, Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr. (9:14), and Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson

 

CALL TO ORDER: Tribal Chairman Donovan White called the meeting to order at 9:09 AM with two (2) Executives and four (4) Council members from seven (7) Districts answering Roll Call. Opening Prayer for the Tribal Vice-Chairman said by Heipa Tribal Council Member Winfield Rondell Jr.

 

MOTION NO. 53: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Myrna Thompson, question by Cheryl Owen, to authorize the Child Protection Program to purchase eight (8) HP Probook Notebooks and accessories, from Connecting Point, in the amount of $10,085.00, with the CPP budgets as the funding source, as presented by CPP Manager Deborah Devine.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 53: 10 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

Note:      Old Agency Tribal Council Member Milton Owen now present at meeting.

 

MOTION NO. 54: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Cheryl Owen, question by Louis Johnson, to authorize SW Law Enforcement/Emergency Management to purchase four (4) Kenwood digital radios and accessories, from Vantek Communications Inc., as a sole source purchase, in the amount of $12,866.80, with the 2019 Homeland Security Grant as the funding source, as presented by Emergency Manager Jim Pearson.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 54: 10 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  2 Abstained: Milton Owen (2).  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

Note:      Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr. now present at meeting.

 

MOTION NO. 55: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Cheryl Owen, to authorize SWO Law Enforcement/Emergency Management to accept the 2020 grant award from the Department of Homeland Security, in the amount of $12,866.80, as presented by Emergency Manager Jim Pearson.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 55: 13 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

Note:      Lake Traverse Tribal Council Member Francis Crawford now present at meeting.

 

MOTION NO. 56: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Cheryl Owen, question by Myrna Thompson, to hire Tamarah Begay of Indigenous Design Studio & Architecture, as a consultant for the SWO Detention/Justice Center Project, as recommended by Tribal Lobbyist/Consultant Mark Van Norman, with the Detention Center Set-Aside as the funding source, as presented by Tribal Chairman Donovan White.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 56: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.      0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 57: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Cheryl Owen, question by Louis Johnson, to authorize the payment to Calhoun Communications Inc., in the amount of $18,724.00, for hardware, parts, and installation/repair services for the KXSW Radio tower/transmitter, with the Capital Improvement budget as the funding source, as presented by Station Manager Garryl Rousseau Sr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 57: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.      0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 58: made by Francis Crawford, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Louis Johnson, to have Legal Counsel Greg Paulson draft Contracts for Tribal Council review for: Delaney Nielsen Sannes Law Firm, to provide legal services for the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate; and David Geyer, to provide public defender services for Tribal Court.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 58: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.      0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 59: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Milton Owen, to approve the Dakota Western Corporation report, as presented by General Manager Robert Huff.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 59: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.      0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 60: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Cheryl Owen, question by Myrna Thompson, to approve the SWO Fuel, Inc. & Agency C-Store report, as presented by General Manager James Bird.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 60: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.      0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 61: made by Myrna Thompson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Milton Owen, to go into Executive Session, at 11:08am.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 61: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.      0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

Note:      Tribal Chairman Donovan White briefly left the meeting. Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr. now chairing the meeting.

 

MOTION NO. 62: made by Francis Crawford, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Curtis Bissonette, to come out of Executive Session, at 11:39am.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 62: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 63: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Milton Owen, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Dakota Crossing Grocery Store report, as presented by General Manager Todd O'Riley and Assistant Manager Christylee Jensen.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 63: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

Note:      Tribal Chairman Donovan White returned to chair the meeting.

 

MOTION NO. 64: made by Myrna Thompson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Francis Crawford, to approve the Agreement with REDW, to perform the FY2019 SWO audit, and to authorize Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr. to execute the Agreement, pending legal review, as presented by Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 64: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.      0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 65: made by Francis Crawford, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the North Dakota Designated Usage of Funds report, and authorize Tribal Chairman Donovan White to sign the report, as presented by Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 65: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.      0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 66: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Francis Crawford, to authorize the current Tribal Executives to sign and update all signature cards at Dacotah Bank, as presented by Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 66: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.      0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 67: made by Myrna Thompson, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Milton Owen, to approve the I-29 Motel written report, as submitted by Manager Nicole DuMarce.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 67: 13 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  2 Opposed: Francis Crawford (2).                 0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 68: made by Winfield Rondell Jr., second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Cheryl Owen, to authorize Dakota Magic Casino to submit the payment to Lutheran Social Services, in the amount of $25,000.00, for Problem Gambling Counseling and Services, in accordance with the North Dakota Gaming Compact, and as presented by DNGE CFO Weston Quinn.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 68: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.      0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 69: made by Francis Crawford, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Louis Johnson, to authorize Dakota Magic Casino to submit the payment to the United Tribes Gaming Association, in the amount of $15,000.00, for membership fees, as presented by DNGE CFO Weston Quinn.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 69: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.      0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 70: made by Myrna Thompson, second by Francis Crawford, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to authorize Dakota Connection Casino to relocate their Bingo and Slot Machine areas, and to select Ridge Electric, to upgrade the electrical systems for this move, in the amount of $11,622.00, with the DCC Operating budget as the funding source, as presented by Interim General Manager Chris Seaboy.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 70: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.      0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 71: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Francis Crawford, to approve the Dakota Connection Casino report, as presented by Interim General Manager Chris Seaboy; the Dakota Sioux Casino report, as presented by General Manager Robert Mudd; the Dakota Magic Casino report, as presented by Interim General Manager Wanda Varns; and the Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise report, as presented by CFO Weston Quinn.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 71: 15 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.      0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

Note:      Old Agency Tribal Council Member Milton Owen excused from the meeting.

 

MOTION NO. 72: made by Myrna Thompson, second by Francis Crawford, question by Winfield Rondell Jr., to select Aaron Solberg as the First Associate Judge for the SWO Tribal Court, and to select Tucker Volesky as the Second Associate Judge for the SWO Tribal Court, as recommended by the Judicial Committee and Chief Judge Gina Ruggieri, and to authorize Aaron Solberg to serve as the Judge for the Office of Child Support Enforcement, as presented by Chief Judge Gina Ruggieri and OCSE Director Diana Canku.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 72: 13 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 73: made by Francis Crawford, second by Edmund Johnson Jr., question by Myrna Thompson, in resolution form, to authorize the Youth Department to apply for the Systems of Care (SOC) Expansion and Sustainability Grants, as presented by Youth Coordinator Derrick McCauley and Prevention Coordinator Missy Huff.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 73: 13 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

                Resolution No. SWO-20-010

 

MOTION NO. 74: made by Francis Crawford, second by Edmund Johnson Jr., question by Curtis Bissonette, to approve Youth Department report, as presented by Youth Coordinator Derrick McCauley and Prevention Coordinator Missy Huff.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 74: 13 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 75: made by Francis Crawford, second by Winfield Rondell Jr., question by Curtis Bissonette, to approve the resolution, "2019-2022 SWO PL 102-477 Plan", as presented by ET Services Manager Elias Mendoza.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 75: 13 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

                Resolution No. SWO-20-009

 

MOTION NO. 76: made by Francis Crawford, second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Cheryl Owen, to authorize the payment to Kelly Insurance Agency, for General Liability Insurance, in the amount of $20,583.00, with the General Fund as the funding source, as presented by Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 76: 13 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 77: made by Francis Crawford, second by Louis Johnson, question by Curtis Bissonette, to authorize the payment to Tribal Workers Compensation Corp., for the 2020 Workers Compensation coverage, in the amount of $132,006.00, with the Payroll account as the funding source, as presented by Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 77: 13 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 78: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Francis Crawford, question by Edmund Johnson Jr., to authorize the payment to Tribal Workers Compensation Corp., for the balance of the 2019 Workers Compensation coverage, in the amount of $41,282.00, with the Payroll account as the funding source, as presented by Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 78: 13 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 79: made by Francis Crawford, second by Edmund Johnson Jr., to adjourn.

MEETING ADJOURNED 2:33PM.   

Respectfully Submitted, Verlyn Beaudreau, Recording Secretary.

Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following position(s):

Cook's Helper/Transportation/Inventory Clerk, Tribal Elderly

Prosecutor, Tribal Court

DVPP Case Manager, Department of Health and Social Services

Field Operation Supervisor, Fish & Wildlife

Data Entry/Clerk, Tribal Elderly

Youth Service Coordinator, TREE

Closing Date: February 21st, 2020 @ 04:30PM

College and Career Specialist, Education Department

Closing Date: February 28th, 2020 @ 04:30PM

Special Needs & Mental Health Manager, Head Start

Teacher (2 positions), Head Start

Teacher Aide, Head Start

Teacher, Early Head Start

Browns Valley After-School Van Driver, JOM

Parole Agent, Department of Parole

In-House Attorney, Tribal Executive Committee

Sexual Assault Advocate, Behavioral Health

Positions Open Until Filled

Application can be emailed to ArnoldW@SWO-NSN.GOV or DeniseH@SWO-NSN.GOV. Contact can also be at Arnold Williams 698-8238 or Denise Hill 698-8251 with questions.

(Tribal preference will apply).

 

Job Openings

1. KXSW radio station is looking for a worker.

2. Little Steps daycare is looking for 4 daycare workers and a manager.

3. Employment Training is looking for a GED Tutor.

If you are interested call Chris Heminger at the Employment Training office, 605-698-8324.

Deadline to apply will be Friday, February 28, 2020.

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Sisseton Wahpeton College

Has the following vacancies:

Educational Specialist/Tutor Coordinator:

Sisseton Wahpeton College has an opening for a full-time Educational Specialist/Tutor Coordinator. This position is responsible for developing and implementing enhanced student support system to improve literacy in mathematics, reading comprehension, and writing to increase the success of current and potential students. Requirements for the position are: Master's Degree in Education, with experience in Special Education, Mathematics, and/or Language Arts. Previous work experience with Native American students is preferred. Previous work experience in a higher education institution is preferred. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application, or contact the HR Office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118. Position closes at 4:30 p.m. on Friday, February 21, 2020.

Elementary Education Coordinator

Sisseton Wahpeton College has an opening for a full-time Elementary Education Coordinator. This position is responsible for developing and implementing the elementary education baccalaureate degree for the College. Once the Elementary Education Program is approved, this position will be responsible for the management of the Department. Requirements for the position are: Master's Degree in the field of Education. Experience in higher education. Previous teaching experience at the K-8 level. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application, or contact the HR Office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118. Position closes at 4:30 p.m. on Friday, February 21, 2020.

Maintenance/Custodian:

Sisseton Wahpeton College has a full-time position for a Maintenance/Custodian in our Facilities Department. This position is responsible for all routine maintenance; the repair of the facilities, grounds and equipment; also providing janitorial duties; and assisting with campus security and safety. At times, there may be some construction work when required. This is a hands-on position with some unsupervised responsibilities. A High School Diploma or GED is required. Applicants should have a valid driver's license. A Certificate or AA degree in building maintenance is preferred. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and the application process. Contact HR at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118. Position closes at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, February 20, 2020.

Security/Custodian:

Sisseton Wahpeton College has an opening for a part-time position for a Security/Custodian in our Facilities Department. This position provides security duties which include performing patrols of the college campus to monitor behavior, securing buildings and property, watching for and reporting irregularities, and performing other miscellaneous job-related duties as assigned. This position will also assist with janitorial and/or maintenance duties to ensure a safe, clean, comfortable, and secure environment. Requirements are: A High School Diploma or GED. Previous security experience preferred. Previous janitorial and/or maintenance experience is preferred. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application, or contact the HR Office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118. Position closes at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, February 20, 2020.

Custodian:

Sisseton Wahpeton College has an opening for a full-time Custodian in our Facilities Department. This position is responsible for keeping buildings clean and in an orderly condition, which includes performing heavy cleaning duties. This position must also notify management of any needed repairs they become aware of. Requirements are: High School Diploma or GED. Previous janitorial experience preferred. Physically able to perform assigned job duties. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118. Position closes at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, February 20, 2020.

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TIOSPA ZINA TRIBAL SCHOOL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Tiospa Zina Tribal School is advertising for the position of custodian (two positions).

Deadline to apply is February 21, 2020.

Tiospa Zina Tribal School is advertising for three Elementary Teacher positions.

Open until filled.

For complete job descriptions contact Tiospa Zina Tribal School Human Resources Director Jennifer Williams, 605-698-3953 ext. 208.

Application Materials can be found at the TZTS Documents link: All applicants are required to complete both the Application and *Background check forms.

Tiospa Zina is an Indian Preference employer.

*All applicants and employees are subject to both 25 U.S.C. 3207: The Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act and the 42 U.S.C. 13041: Crime Control Act.

 

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Browns Valley School

Job Opening

Browns Valley School is seeking a long-term 2nd Grade Teacher from March 9-April 21, 2020 School Year. Applicants are required to have an Elementary K-6 License.

Application Process: Application forms may be requested from the district office, 320-695-2103 or downloaded from www.brownsvalley.k12.mn.us.

Send cover letter, three letters of recommendation, resume, copy of transcripts and current Minnesota teaching license to:

Denise Pikarksi

Browns Valley School

Box N 118 Church Street

Browns Valley, MN 56219

dpikarski@brownsvalley.k12.mn.us

Open until filled.

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Employment Opportunity

GROW South Dakota is seeking a full-time Resource Development Director. Position will include research and preparation of proposals for variety of funding programs; reporting on grant projects; marketing; and other responsibilities. Office location may be flexible: Sisseton, Aberdeen, Langford, Webster. Benefits included. Applications will be taken until 02/21/20. To request a job application and job description, contact GROW South Dakota, 104 Ash St. E., Sisseton, SD 57262; (605)698-7654; info@growsd.org. EOE.

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Farm Service Agency

Job Vacancy

The Farm Service Agency has a Program Technician vacancy in the Roberts County Office located in Sisseton, SD.

Opening date is February 12, 2020 and the closing date is February 26, 2020.

To view this vacancy announcement and apply for this vacancy please visit www.usajobs.gov.

FSA is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer.

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Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Foods Department:

Cashier (Full-Time) where needed

Wait Staff (3 Full-Time) Day, Swing

Golf Course Department:

Bartender (Full-Time-Seasonal) Swing

Marketing Department:

Customer Service Technician (Full-Time) Swing

Revenue Audit Department:

Revenue Audit Clerk (Full-Time) Day-rotating weekends

Closing Date: February 21, 2020 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions. Two identifications documents required upon hire.

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE Hankinson ND 58041.

For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582

Indian Preference will apply / EEO (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment).

Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

COUNT:

TEAM MEMBER (1 Full-Time)

STARTING WAGE $12.50 plus excellent benefits package!

GENERAL FUNCTION: Responsible for the inventory of Cage/Casino coin and chip assets. Assist in providing an accurate count for daily service drops. Work in accordance with all applicable policies and procedures as stated in the Dakota Sioux Casino Cage Employee Manual.

REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or GED equivalent. Accounting background, the ability to work well with numbers and computer knowledge is required as well as willingness to be trained in these areas. Detail orientated, self-starter with ability to work well with others. Ability to lift 100 lbs. or more. Must have a telephone. Heavy lifting, moving, bending, stretching, and standing for long periods of time. Weekends are mandatory. Must obtain a Key Gaming License upon hire.

This position will remain open until filled.

Indian Preference will apply / EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

CAGE:

MAIN BANK CASHIER (Full-Time) GRAVEYARD

STARTING WAGE $14.50 plus excellent benefits package!

GENERAL FUNCTION: Responsible for the proper usage and accuracy of appropriate transactions, reporting forms and cage summary sheets, vault and main bank inventory sheets and reconciliation reports.

REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or GED equivalent. Cage Cashier experience preferred. Ability to stand for long periods of time. Able to lift 25 lb., several times throughout shift. Available to work all shifts (Day, Swing and Graveyard). Total accountability for imprest bank. Computer knowledge helpful. Must obtain a Key Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on February 26, 2020 at 4pm.

Indian Preference will apply / EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

HOTEL:

HOUSEKEEPER (1 Full-time)

STARTING WAGE $11.50 plus excellent benefits package!

GENERAL FUNCTION: Clean rooms, halls, restrooms, elevators, and stairways according to standards.

REQUIREMENTS: 1-3 months related experience. Must have the ability to move or lift up to 25 lbs. Must obtain Non-Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on February 19, 2020 at 4pm.

Indian Preference will apply / EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

FOOD SERVICE:

BUFFET WAIT STAFF (1 Full-Time)

STARTING WAGE $10.25/hr +tips and excellent benefits package!

GENERAL FUNCTION: To greet customers immediately, provide excellent customer

service, and to make sure the customer has a wonderful dining experience.

REQUIREMENTS: High School Diploma or GED required. Customer Service experience. Operate cash register, wait tables and counting money. Must be licensable by DNGE Non-Gaming. Stooping, bending, standing for long periods of time, or lifting up to 50lbs. Required to rotate shifts, work holidays and weekends.

This position will close on February 19, 2020 at 4pm.

Indian Preference will apply / EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Position: C-Store Manager

Department: C-Store

Qualifications: Must have High School Diploma or GED. 3 years retail experience, 2 years supervisory experience preferred. Proficient in word processing, spreadsheets, point-of-sales software; experience in inventory control, administering software preferred, including adding items, changing prices & configures the POS terminal. Superior customer relations, excellent leadership, management skills, communications skills-both written & verbal. Dependable & available to work any & all shifts. Must be at least 21 years old.

Hours: Rotating Shifts

Opening Date: Thursday, February 6, 2020

Closing Date: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke.

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Opening

Position: Associate Manager

Department: Administration

Qualifications: B.A.in Business Administration preferred, or High School Diploma/GED with a minimum of 3 years management experience. Supervisory skills, excellent communication skills-both written and verbal, excellent people skills, computer literate. Able to work independently and with direction. Ability to effectively and accurately relay information to employees. Knowledge of Indian gaming. Must be able to obtain a Key Gaming License.

Hours: Rotating Shifts

Opening Date: Thursday, February 6, 2020

Closing Date: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 @ 4:00 pm

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke.

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Opening

Position: Associate Manager

Department: Administration

Qualifications: B.A.in Business Administration preferred, or High School Diploma/GED with a minimum of 3 years management experience. Supervisory skills, excellent communication skills-both written and verbal, excellent people skills, computer literate. Able to work independently and with direction. Ability to effectively and accurately relay information to employees. Knowledge of Indian gaming. Must be able to obtain a Key Gaming License.

Hours: Rotating Shifts

Opening Date: Thursday, February 6, 2020

Closing Date: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 @ 4:00 pm

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke.

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 
 

 

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