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Volume 46 Issue No. 16

Anpetu Iyamni, April 22, 2015

Inside this Edition –

SWO Earth Day events underway this week

TZTS students voice opinion about whose face ought to be on the US twenty dollar bill

SWO 7Gov youth attend Rapid City Native leaders conference

SWO Baby Fair this Wednesday, April 22nd

BIA 700 detour begins this week; Please use alternate routes

SD Governor Daugaard to visit Lake Traverse Reservation

Nicole Welch named Vice President of NDSU Native student organization

Deadline for receipt of copy is Friday noon

From the office of SWO Tribal Chairman Bruce Renville –

SD Governor Daugaard to visit SWO

Agency Village, SD – April 15, 2015 – South Dakota Governor Daugaard’s office has confirmed he will be visiting the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate on Wednesday morning, May 13th.

Secretary of Tribal Relations Steve Emery and Secretary of Game Fish & Parks Kelly Hepler will be joining him.

Agenda and more details to follow at a later date.

Please put on your schedule for the day and build awareness with staff.

If you have questions, suggestions or concerns, please contact Nicolette Knudson in the Chairman’s office.

SWO 7th Generation Voices (7GOV) attends leaders conference

Submitted by Kateri Bird

Meth & Suicide Prevention

SWO Dakotah Pride Center

Seventh Generation Oyate Voices (7GOV), Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Youth Council Attend the Todays Native Leaders Conference in Rapid City on April 10-12th.

Motivational trainer Jeri Brunoe, Wasco Tribe, and Marcus Guinn, Osage and Potawatomi Tribes, were there to lead the youth in several different activities.

South Dakota State Democratic Representative Kevin Killer was an invited speaker. Killer, Oglala Lakota, is from the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.

United National Indian Tribal Youth, also known as UNITY, in partnership with the Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) hosted the "Today's Native Leaders" (TNL) youth leadership event at the Hilton Garden Inn in Rapid City.

The free TNL training, focused on culturally relevant leadership development, included:

*Team building activities.

*Action planning and event promotion.

*Developing community service projects.

*How to create a UNITY youth council.

*Opportunity to present at a national conference.

About Today's Native Leaders

Today's Native Leaders results from a four-year cooperative agreement between UNITY and the US Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP). The project is designed to offer regional and national trainings and learning opportunities for American Indian youth to increase positive outcomes in their school, community and family environments.

7GOV will be presenting to the community their project plans, which focus around building resilience in our youth by educating them about their Dakota History, Language and Culture. They look forward to talking and working with the community on this project: supporting Dakota Youth Identity.

If you would like more information about 7GOV call 605-268-0914. 7GOV, SWO Youth Council is a group of youth who believe in living a Dakota way of life that is healthy in the Mind, Body and Spirit that believe in helping their community. So their community can be strong.

Oyate Wicospaye Wasaka Kta Okihi.

BIA 700 closes for construction

Detour in effect beginning this Monday, April 20th

David Spider, SWO Construction Management office, has announced the closing BIA 700 between Agency Village and Sisseton starting this Monday, April 20th.

Refer to the detour map accompanying this article.

Also note that the gravel road cut across, BIA 706 will also be closed during construction as the road is not suited to handle any additional traffic volume and additional deterioration occurred with overuse during the fall construction of last year. So PLEASE use the detour route for travel purposes as limited access from roads will be given only to those homeowners, farmers, etc. along the route. Tribal Law Enforcement will also be present monitoring the construction site and road closures.

Code 31-28-23. Tampering, molesting, or interfering with markers, signs, or control devices--Violation as misdemeanor--Liability for costs. No person may, without lawful authority, attempt or actually alter, deface, injure, knock down, remove, or in any manner molest or interfere with any official highway marker, sign, guide board, traffic-control device, interstate highway gate, or any railroad sign or signal, barrier, warning device, or sign erected in connection with highway maintenance or construction activities. A violation of this section is a Class 1 misdemeanor. Any person who violates this section is responsible for the cost of repairing or replacing such markers, signs, signals, barriers, or devices.

David writes, “Please bear with us during construction and understand that while we must go through one more summer of construction we will have a brand new, wide with shoulders, 7 mile road that has been in dire need of replacement along with the many culverts and box culverts along the way.”

“We are also looking at completely repairing BIA 706 if enough funding remains to adequately address this summer. If not for sure BIA 706 will be our top priority for next year.”

Manning: These 15 Native American Students Want Wilma Mankiller on the $20

By Sarah Sunshine Manning

Indian Country Today - April 16, 2015 - Recent public discussion of the proposed $20 bill change has caught the attention of native youth on the Lake Traverse Indian Reservation in northeast South Dakota.

The late Wilma Mankiller, former Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation, is among the final four women being for considered to grace the new currency, anticipated to be introduced in the year 2020. Harriet Tubman, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Rosa Parks are also on the final ballot.

For the organization proposing the change, Women on 20s (W20), the effort is about elevating women who shaped American history. But to high school students at Tiospa Zina Tribal School (TZTS) on the Lake Traverse Reservation, it is about much more than just elevating women. With Wilma Mankiller, among the ranks of other trailblazing candidates, the issue is also one of elevating the true history and accurate image of Native Americans.

Having a Native American leader on the face of American currency could potentially institute a redirection in American consciousness concerning Native Americans.

America has long continued a history of generating and justifying stereotypes concerning Native Americans, ranging from the dehumanizing language in nationally treasured historical documents, such as the Declaration of Independence, to the scores of disparaging Indian mascots. Such stereotypes have shaped popular American consciousness while simultaneously damaging the psychological development of Native American youth, and moreover, keeping the greater Native American community relegated to the sidelines of American society.

Today, Native American youth speak out, and students at Tiospa Zina Tribal School are taking action. Having background knowledge and coursework in Tribal Government, Federal Indian Policy, and American Indian History, TZTS high school students took to the online ballot to cast their votes for Mankiller.

Here, Tiospa Zina Tribal School students weigh in on the discussion, and speak to what it would mean to them to have a Native American woman on the face of the new $20 bill:

1. Demi Dumarce, Senior

Demi Dumarce, Senior. "To me, having a Native American woman replace Andrew Jackson on the $20 bill is empowering because it shows how resilient native people are. It shows everyone that even though Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act to get rid of indigenous people, we persevered and we're still here today, 185 years later." -Demi Dumarce, Senior, Sisseton Wahpeton Dakota

2. Terrell Cook, Junior, Sisseton Wahpeton Dakota: “This would bring a lot of pride to all Natives. She will be remembered as one of the Native American leaders, and it’s for positive change.”

3. Jarrod Appenay, Junior

Jarrod Appenay, Junior. “A president who targeted the Cherokee nation could possibly be replaced by a Cherokee woman, which would be pretty cool.” -Jarrod Appenay, Junior, Shoshone Bannock/Sisseton Wahpeton Dakota

4. Jennifer Rondell, Junior

Jennifer Rondell, Junior. "It is important to have a Native American female figure to look up to. I think having Wilma Mankiller on the $20 bill is a big deal in Indian Country. She is my role model, and I'm sure many people/children look up to her." -Jennifer Rondell, Junior, Sisseton Wahpeton Dakota

5. Fidelity Eastman, Senior, Sisseton Wahpeton Dakota/Sicangu Lakota: “It’s good to show equality between men and women. We need to be represented just as much as men. It’s awesome that Wilma Mankiller is Native American too. Every other race is represented in history, so we should be, too. She needs to be known.”

6. Gabe Derosier, Jr., Senior

Gabe Derosier, Jr. Senior. "It would mean a lot to me considering that Andrew Jackson moved Native Americans onto reservations and he signed the Indian Removal Act. I think it would be cool seeing a native person take his spot." -Gabe Derosier, Jr., Senior, Sisseton Wahpeton Dakota/Anishinaabe

7. Julissa Max, Junior

Julissa Max, Junior. "If she got put on the $20 bill it would be so cool because finally natives would be remembered. But it would also be amazing to know that finally a woman is being on the same level as a man on the currency." -Julissa Max, Junior, Sisseton Wahpeton Dakota

8. Jurae Renville, Junior, Sisseton Wahpeton Dakota: “She represents our native culture, and with respect. She is showing that all native people are humans too.”

9. Savannah Pomani, Junior

Savannah Pomani, Junior. "If Wilma Mankiller replaced Andrew Jackson on the $20 bill, I would be very pleased. In my opinion, I think that they should have a Native American woman on the $20 bill to show that all men, women, children, and elders from all races are equal." -Savannah Pomani, Junior, Sisseton Wahpeton Dakota

10. Matthew German, Junior

Matthew German, Junior. “It would mean a lot to me because Native Americans are making a move- getting noticed.” -Matthew German, Junior, Sisseton Wahpeton Dakota

11. Dominicque Souksavath, Freshman, Oglala Lakota: “It is important to me because our people have been mistreated and disrespected for years, and this is a step closer to acceptance of us.”

12. Alyssa Redday, Junior

Alyssa Redday, Junior. "She is a role model to people who lost relatives on the Trail of Tears. And plus, it would be nice if we had a woman on the $20 bill." -Alyssa Redday, Junior, Sisseton Wahpeton Dakota

13. Mona Jackson, Junior

Mona Jackson, Junior. “I think it would be a positive change. Changing the bill would bring our people a little relief. I think it will also help the true history of our people be known.” -Mona Jackson, Junior, Potawatomie/Sisseton Wahpeton Dakota

14. Keisha Kirk, Senior, Sisseton Wahpeton Dakota: “It would mean a lot to have Wilma Mankiller on the $20 bill, because she’s one of our people, and it will show that we are equal with everyone else, and this would make us feel better.”

15. Tyler Bellonger, Junior

Tyler Bellonger, Junior. "I think having a Native American figure on the $20 bill would do a lot of healing, especially for the Cherokee. Andrew Jackson did a lot of damage to Native Americans for their land. Replacing him is just what we need, and I think it will help change how people look at natives and maybe they will become more understanding. Hopefully this will help us in the future." -Tyler Bellonger, Junior, Sisseton Wahpeton Dakota

The growing public dialogue regarding the proposed change gives voice to the history of the first nations of America, our truth, and our existence today as beautiful thriving people. We are still here, and with each small victory, the savage Indian myth is fading.

On their website, W20 stated "Our money does say something about us, about what we value." To Native American youth, even just the possibility of having one of their own on American currency, says that they are valued. In Wilma Mankiller, they see a true reflection of themselves that represents strength, compassion, intelligence, and resiliency. They finally see themselves, in an authentic reflection of who the first nations of America truly are, and always have been.

“It’s important to me to have Wilma Mankiller on the $20 bill because she is a great role model and leader. She not only was the first female chief of her nation, but was also one of the first women to break the idea that only men can be leaders. She set and defied women’s roles in society.” -Amber Anderson, Senior, Sisseton Wahpeton Dakota

(Editor’s note: Photos are courtesy of Sarah.)

USDA awards grants to help rural communities

Grow SD is recipient of $250,000 grant

Huron, SD, April 16, 2015 – Agriculture Under Secretary Lisa Mensah announced the selection of 31 community-based organizations in 17 states and the District of Columbia to receive grants to help small rural communities create jobs and boost economic development, including a $250,000 grant to Northeast South Dakota Community Action Program, Inc. in South Dakota. The grants are being made available through USDA Rural Development’s Rural Community Development Initiative (RCDI) program.

“These grants bring increased economic opportunities to rural residents and communities by strengthening the capacity of the regional organizations that serve them,” Mensah said. “They help organizations that are experienced in economic development create more job opportunities for rural residents. RCDI grants are an important part of USDA’s ongoing efforts to address rural poverty. They help boost growth in our most economically vulnerable rural communities.”

In South Dakota, the Northeast South Dakota Community Action Program, Inc. (also known as GROW South Dakota) based in Sisseton, is receiving a $250,000 grant for technical assistance and training for housing, community facilities and economic development activities in South Dakota.

Rural Community Development Initiative grants support rural housing, community facilities and economic development projects. Funds may be used to develop child care facilities; provide education, technical assistance and training; conduct strategic planning, and conduct other projects that help local communities develop their capacity. Eligible grant recipients are non-profit housing and community development organizations.

USDA is awarding $6.3 million in grants for 31 projects nationwide under this announcement. Funding is contingent upon the recipients meeting the terms of their grant agreements. View the list of recipients.

Seven states, including South Dakota, receiving support through this announcement are part of USDA’s StrikeForce for Rural Growth and Opportunity initiative, which coordinates USDA assistance in the Nation’s most economically challenged rural areas. Through StrikeForce, USDA works with community partners to feed kids, assist farmers, secure safe homes, conserve natural resources and create jobs. USDA StrikeForce teams are working with more than 500 community partners to address rural poverty in more than 800 counties in 21 states and Puerto Rico.

President Obama’s historic investments in rural America have made our rural communities stronger. Under his leadership, these investments in housing, community facilities, businesses and infrastructure have empowered rural America to continue leading the way – strengthening America’s economy, small towns and rural communities.

National Park Service proposes regulation for Gathering Plants

Rule covers members of federally-recognized American Indian tribes

Washington, DC – April 17, 2015 – The National Park Service has proposed to modify the regulation governing the gathering of plants in national parks. The rule would allow members of federally recognized Indian tribes with traditional associations to areas within specific units of the National Park System to gather and remove plants or plant parts for traditional purposes. The gathering and removal allowed by the rule would be governed by agreements that may be entered into between the National Park Service and the tribes, and would also be subject to permits that identify the tribal members who may conduct these activities. The rule would prohibit commercial uses of gathered materials.

To be published Monday April 20 in the Federal Register, 36 CFR Part 2, Gathering of Certain Plants or Plant Parts by Federally Recognized Indian Tribes for Traditional Purposes, will be open for public comment for 90 days through Monday, July 20, 2015.

“The proposed rule respects tribal sovereignty and the government-to-government relationship between the United States and the tribes,” said National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis. “It also supports the mission of the National Park Service and the continuation of unique cultural traditions of American Indians.”

Many units of the National Park System contain resources important to the continuation of American Indian cultures. Indian tribes have actively sought the ability to gather and use plant resources for traditional purposes such as basketry and traditional medicines while ensuring the sustainability of plant communities in parks. At the same time, park managers and law enforcement officers need clear guidance regarding their responsibilities for enforcing park regulations with respect to the use of park resources by American Indians. The proposal provides an approach to plant collecting by members of federally recognized tribes that can be applied across the National Park Service.

In drafting the proposed rule, National Park Service staff met with or contacted more than 120 Indian tribes. Tribal consultation that followed indicates that the approach taken in the proposed rule would address the need for gathering while respecting tribal sovereignty.

Comments on the proposed rule should reference the National Park Service and Regulation Identifier Number (RIN) 1024-AD84, and can be submitted online through the Federal Rulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov, which provides instructions for submitting comments; or by mail to: National Park Service, Joe Watkins, Office of Tribal Relations and American Cultures, 1201 Eye Street NW, Washington, DC 20005. The National Park Service will accept public comments on the proposed rule through Monday, July 20, 2015.

Comments and suggestions on the information collection requirements in the proposed rule should be sent to the Desk Officer for the Department of the Interior at OMB-OIRA by fax at (202) 395-5806 or by e-mail to OIRA_Submission@omb.eop.gov. Please provide a copy of your comments by e-mail to madonna_baucum@nps.gov or by mail to: Information Collection Clearance Officer, National Park Service, 1849 C Street, NW, Washington, DC 20240. Please reference “1024-AD84” in the subject line of your comments. You may review the Information Collection Request online at http://www.reginfo.gov. Follow the instructions to review Department of the Interior collections under review by OMB. Comments on the information collection requirements must be received by Wednesday, May 20, 2015.

Helps lead House on Death Tax repeal

Washington, DC – April 16, 2015 – Representative Kristi Noem today helped lead the House in passing a full and permanent repeal of the death tax with bipartisan support. Noem’s family farm was hit by the death tax after her father passed away.

“Shortly after my dad passed away in a farming accident, my family got a letter from the IRS telling us that we owed a tax because he had died,” said Noem. “I have never understood why the federal government thought it was appropriate to go after families with this double tax – especially in a time of crisis. My dad had already paid taxes on the equipment, the land, and any money we had in the bank. Now, we had to pay taxes on it again because he had passed away. It’s not right. No family should have to go through that. I am committed to repealing the death tax and today we took a big step toward accomplishing that.”

A member of the House Ways and Means Committee, Rep. Noem joined Reps. Kevin Brady (R-TX), Sanford Bishop (D-GA) and Devin Nunes (R-CA) in introducing H.R.1105, the Death Tax Repeal Act of 2015, on February 26, 2015. The bill fully repeals the estate and generation-skipping transfer taxes – more commonly known as the “death tax.” The legislation will now be sent to the Senate.

Standing Rock Chairman speaks at UTTC

Bismarck, ND – April 16, 2015 –The Native American Development Center hosted a good crowd for its April Native American Leadership Speakers Series at noon at the Jack Barden Center.

Guest presenter was Standing Rock Tribal Chairman David Archambault.

Purpose of the monthly series is to bring community together to learn about "Who We Are" – from the Native American-led platform within our community for Native Americans to share their own life experiences to educate who we are.

We are empowering our own Native American people by providing them with answers, support, and motivation.

The platform educates the Bismarck-Mandan community sharing our life experiences, what we overcame, and how we did it.

Interior and Justice announce effort to update BIA’s 1988 Model Indian Juvenile Code

Discussion draft of model code will be circulated for comments before formal tribal consultation sessions begin

Washington, DC – April 14, 2015 – In furthering President Obama’s efforts to support American Indian and Alaska Native families and protect tribal communities, Department of the Interior Assistant Secretary – Indian Affairs Kevin K. Washburn and Department of Justice Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) Administrator Robert L. Listenbee today announced that the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and the Department of Justice are seeking to update the 1988 Model Indian Juvenile Code designed to assist federally recognized tribes in creating individual codes focused on juvenile matters and specifically addressing issues affecting Indian youth arrested for alcohol and/or drug-related offenses in Indian Country.

“Like the BIA’s guidelines and regulations for state courts and agencies that implement the Indian Child Welfare Act, the Bureau’s Model Indian Juvenile Code has long needed updating,” said Assistant Secretary Washburn. “Tribes know best what will work in their communities, but the model will be updated to provide better federal guidance to tribes in an effort to insure proper respect for the rights and responsibilities of Indian juveniles arrested for alcohol or drug-related offenses and those of their parents, guardians or custodians. It also will provide tribes and their court systems greater clarity and flexibility in dealing with such cases.”

“Safeguarding the fair and equitable treatment of all youth in the juvenile justice system is paramount to the mission of DOJ’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention,” said Administrator Listenbee. “This is an important step forward in ensuring tribal courts have the resources they need to respond effectively to at-risk and delinquent youth in Indian Country, and is a direct result of our collaboration with the Bureau of Indian Affairs.”

The BIA’s Office of Justice Services Tribal Justice Support Directorate (TJSD) has been working with the Department of Justice’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention since 2012 to update the existing 1988 Model Indian Juvenile Code. That code was published in 1988 following passage of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 5601 et seq.) and pursuant to the law (25 U.S.C. 2454) directing the Secretary of the Interior to develop a Model Indian Juvenile Code, including provisions relating to the disposition of cases involving Indian youth arrested or detained by BIA or tribal law enforcement for alcohol or drug-related offenses. The Department of Justice’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention has provided significant insight into the new draft provisions.

The Interior and Justice departments are seeking to develop an updated code that reflects changes in the field of juvenile justice since 1988, particularly with the enactment in 2010 of the Tribal Law and Order Act (P. L. 111-211) and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (P. L. 111-148), and to comply with a provision in a 2011 Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse Memorandum of Agreement between the Interior and Justice departments to develop such a code in accordance with 25 U.S.C. 2454.

Starting this month, TJSD will circulate a discussion draft embodying an updated Model Indian Juvenile Code to gather comment and suggestions from tribal leaders and interested parties. The discussion draft is based on a Model Juvenile Code developed in 2013 by Professor Ron Whitener of the University of Washington School of Law. Whitener also serves as chairman of the Center of Indigenous Research and Justice in Seattle. This new Model Code has been modified with input from the departments of Justice and Interior and presents a comprehensive and flexible code which encourages the use of alternatives to standard juvenile delinquency, truancy, and child-in-need of services. The Model Code also reflects a core commitment to providing tribes with examples of juvenile statutes designed to assure the fundamental rights of children and their parents, guardians and custodians and focus on allowing the opportunity for restorative diversion at each decision point in the juvenile process.

Professor Whitener presented the discussion draft at the Federal Bar Association’s 40th Annual Indian Law Conference in Scottsdale, Ariz., on April 9.

TJSD will provide additional opportunities for comments and input from the public at other national American Indian and tribal justice conferences during 2015. These additional opportunities for comment on the discussion draft are slated for the summer and fall of 2015. The exact dates will be published in the near future.

Following this information-gathering phase, TJSD will revise the discussion draft based on the comments and information it has received and publish the new draft in preparation for conducting formal tribal consultation sessions on it.

The Assistant Secretary – Indian Affairs oversees the BIA, which is headed by a director who is responsible for managing day-to-day operations through four offices – Indian Services, Justice Services, Trust Services, and Field Operations. These offices directly administer or fund tribally based infrastructure, economic development, law enforcement and justice, social services (including child welfare), tribal governance, and trust land and natural and energy resources management programs for the nation’s federally recognized American Indian and Alaska Native tribes through 12 regional offices and 81 agencies.

The Office of Justice Services Tribal Justice Support Directorate furthers the development, operation, and enhancement of tribal justice systems by providing guidance, technical support, and advisory services to tribal courts and Courts of Indian Offenses (also known as CFR courts). For more information, visit http://indianaffairs.gov/WhoWeAre/BIA/OJS/ojs-services/ojs-tjs/index.htm.

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention in the U.S. Department of Justice provides national leadership, coordination, and resources to prevent and respond to juvenile delinquency and victimization. OJJDP supports states and communities in their efforts to develop and implement effective and coordinated prevention and intervention programs and to improve the juvenile justice system so that it protects public safety, holds offenders accountable, and provides treatment and rehabilitative services tailored to the needs of juveniles and their families. For more information, visit http://www.ojjdp.gov/.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

Scientists warn of Hormone impacts From Benzene, Xylene, other common solvents

Researchers warn that benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene may disrupt people’s hormone systems at levels deemed “safe” by feds

"Hormones are how the body communicates with itself. Interrupt that, you can expect all sorts of negative health outcomes." —Susan Nagel, University of Missouri-Columbia

By Brian Bienkowski

Environmental Health News

(Published on Wednesday, April 15, 2015 by Environmental Health News.)

Four chemicals present both inside and outside homes might disrupt our endocrine systems at levels considered safe by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, according to an analysis released today.

The chemicals – benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene – are ubiquitous: in the air outside and in many products inside homes and businesses. They have been linked to reproductive, respiratory and heart problems, as well as smaller babies. Now researchers from The Endocrine Disruption Exchange (TEDX) and the University of Colorado, Boulder, say that such health impacts may be due to the chemicals’ ability to interfere with people’s hormones at low exposure levels.

“There’s evidence of connection between the low level, everyday exposures and things like asthma, reduced fetal growth,” said Ashley Bolden, a research associate at TEDX and lead author of the study. “And for a lot of the health effects found, we think it’s disrupted endocrine-signaling pathways involved in these outcomes.”

Bolden and colleagues – including scientist, activist, author and TEDX founder Theo Colborn who passed away last December – pored over more than 40 studies on the health impacts of low exposure to the chemicals.

 (Colborn also co-authored "Our Stolen Future" along with Dianne Dumanoski and Pete Myers, founder of Environmental Health News and chief scientist at Environmental Health Sciences.)

They looked at exposures lower than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s reference concentrations for the chemicals, which is the agency’s estimated inhalation exposure level that is not likely to cause health impacts during a person’s lifetime.

Many of the health problems – asthma, low birth weights, cardiovascular, disease, preterm births, abnormal sperm – can be rooted in early disruptions to the developing endocrine system, Bolden said.

The analysis doesn’t prove that exposure to low levels of the chemicals disrupt hormones. However, any potential problems with developing hormone systems are cause for concern.

“Hormones are how the body communicates with itself to get work done. Interrupt that, you can expect all sorts of negative health outcomes,” said Susan Nagel an associate professor at the University of Missouri-Columbia Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women's Health School of Medicine who was not involved in the study.

Cathy Milbourn, a spokesperson for the EPA, said in an emailed response that the agency will "review the study and incorporate the findings into our work as appropriate."

The "EPA is screening thousands of chemicals for potential risk of endocrine disruption," she said. "As potential risk of endocrine disruption is identified, these chemicals are assessed further."

The four chemicals are retrieved from the wellheads during crude oil and natural gas extraction and, after refining, are used as gasoline additives and in a wide variety of consumer products such as adhesives, detergents, degreasers, dyes, pesticides, polishes and solvents.

Ethylbenzene is one of the top ten chemicals used in children’s products such as toys and playground equipment, according to a 2013 EPA report. Toluene is in the top ten chemicals used in consumer products such as fuels and paints, the report found.

All four get into indoor and outdoor air via fossil fuel burning, vehicle emissions and by volatizing from products. Bolden said studies that measure the air in and around homes and businesses find the chemicals 90 to 95 percent of the time.

Katie Brown, spokeswoman for Energy in Depth, a program of the Independent Petroleum Association of America, said in an email that the study suggests “products deemed safe by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission are more dangerous than oil and gas development.

Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene are added to gasoline and emitted to the air during combustion. (Photo: joiseyshowaa/flickr/CC BY-SA 2.0) “Contrary to their intentions, what this report actually shows is that people should be no more afraid of oil and gas development than products in their home,” she said.

The Consumer Specialty Products Association, a trade group that represents companies that manufacturer consumer goods including cleaning products, pesticides, polishes, would not comment on the study but a spokesperson said that member groups typically don’t use the chemicals mentioned.

In several of the monitoring studies Bolden and colleagues examined, levels of the chemicals were higher in indoor air than in outdoor air, suggesting that people might be exposed within their homes.

“A lot of time indoor air is poorly circulated,” Bolden said.

Nagel cited a “huge need” to look at the impact of exposure to ambient levels of these chemicals. The study highlights “a whole lot we don’t know” about how these compounds may impact humans, she said.

Using human tissue cells, Nagel’s lab has previously shown that the chemicals can disrupt the androgen and estrogen hormones.

The authors said regulators should give air contaminants the same attention they’ve given greenhouse gas emissions recently.

“Tremendous efforts have led to the development of successful regulations focused on controlling greenhouse gases in an attempt to reduce global temperatures,” the authors wrote in the study published today in Environmental Science and Technology journal.

“Similar efforts need to be directed toward compounds that cause poor air quality both indoors and outdoors.”

Brief editorial comments from the editor’s desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

We are glad to see the sincere efforts to involve Oyate youth directly into the solutions of problems impacting lives on their homelands.

See the article on page one about 7GOV and how these young leaders shared stories with their counterparts from other reservations and learned from presenters at the UNITY conference in Rapid City a week.

Pidamiya Kateri for sharing!

This week, thanks to Sarah Sunshine Manning we feature TZTS students standing up and making a difference in the national dialog to remove a genocidal general’s face from the US twenty dollar bill and instead feature Wilma Mankiller!

We have our Damakota Youth Group voicing their opinions on racism in sports and team mascots.

And week after week we see the continued momentum of Aliive Roberts County, which leads our community youth away from drug and alcohol abuse.

All of these are part of a broader movement, which includes volunteers teaching Dakotah Language, drum and songs, bead-working and other arts, and dance.

How especially exciting that Dustina Gill and Sara McGregor-Okroi were invited to the White House two weeks ago to talk about what’s happening here on our Reservation with Oyate youth!

Everyone involved is to be commended and supported.

And we’d like to see a groundswell of support for their cooperative network!

*****

As so many others we are excited that President Obama will be returning to South Dakota while in office. We recall Senator Tom Daschle introducing then-Senator Obama to us during the campaign.

The President will be giving the spring 2015 commencement address for Lake Area Technical Institute in Watertown, which has been consistently ranked in the top ten across the United States for serving needs of its students.

A footnote to his public appearance at the southern tip of our Reservation is that SWO member/OEP Director DeVon Bursheim has been tasked to make a satin star quilt for the LATI administration to present as a gift to President Obama.

And while there have been rumors about possibility of a visit by the President to TiWakan Tio Tipi, none seem credible. The visit to Watertown is scheduled to be brief, with the focus on the technical school, faculty, students, and their families.

There is one person I wish were still alive to see the President come to LATI.

While spending weeks and months in a Sioux Falls nursing home waiting for a leg infection to clear so that I could get a new knee, I became acquainted with Ike Oleson.

We often shared meals in the dining room and swapped stories. We had mutual friends.

He talked about his life and family, but visiting was difficult due to health problems, including pneumonia. I met his wife when she would visit, his son and daughter also.

Ike knew that he was losing strength and, with his family, decided to change his care from rehab to hospice.

Our visits continued right up until he passed away on January 30th.

Why would Ike have appreciated our President coming to LATI?

Ike helped create the school, and the state’s other three vocational schools – working with local school boards.

Here is an excerpt from his obituary:

Emmett B. ”Ike” Oleson, 90, died on Friday, Jan. 30, in Sioux Falls, almost exactly 50 years after he began work as South Dakota's first Director of Vocational Education.

Beginning in 1965, and for a dozen years, Oleson was architect in establishing South Dakota's post high school technical school programs such as Western Dakota Tech in Rapid City.

At Watertown, District 5 Sen. Ried Holien said Monday that he was working with the family and others in the legislature toward recognition of Oleson's contributions to vocational education in the state.

"I'm hoping to do a commemoration for him to acknowledge all that he has done," Holien said. "It seems like he was a gentleman who never sought the spotlight."

After a dozen years heading South Dakota's vocational education services, Oleson had a similar role in Wyoming and finally as the Special Consultant to the Department of Education for American Samoa.

Oleson retired to Watertown in 1989 - where one of the four schools continues today.

RIP. We hope other educators follow your example.

*****

Plan to participate in the Annual Earth Day Walk this Wednesday morning, April 22nd, 2015.

Besides the SWO Head Start, the Sisseton Wahpeton College is also sponsoring a clean-up.

Sign-in is at 10:30 a.m. at the SWO Head Start Middle Building, Agency Village, SD.

Besides the annual walk, the SWO OEP will provide a demonstration of how to create compost in the garden. T-shirts will be given to participants, and there will be a scavenger hunt.

Volunteers are needed to come out and help pick up trash that has accumulated!

Please see the notices elsewhere in this issue of your Sota.

*****

Please note that the location of Great Plains Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board’s (GPTCHB) fifth annual health summit – “Share the Vision: Solutions for Sustaining a Healthy Future” – has been changed from Rapid City, S.D., to Spearfish, S.D.

We’ve been running notices for several weeks’ this issue has the updated information with Spearfish as the location.

We are not certain if the relocation has to do with the blatant racist attack on students from Pine Ridge attending the hockey game in Rapid City, but it does – good.

*****

We’d like to make some corrections to last week’s commentary on Joe Williams.

While Tribal Court did provide for an easement to be granted for access to Joe’s home on the property (whose legal owner is Jamie) and a stay of the eviction, BIA documents show that the homesite was never legally conveyed from the late Sam Max to Joe.

If that is the case, then Jamie owns not only most of the parcel but also the 2-plus acre site where Joe’s home was built. All of the property then belongs to her.

Another point, it should have been beans not squash.

Joe also has raised squash, but it is the half century old bean seeds for which he is best known.

Once again, we’d like everyone to help to resolve the issues rather than to take sides and vilify one or the other.

*****

We received this notice too late for last week’s paper, but it’s exciting to see the activism going on the “retire” racist mascots and team names.

Here is what was scheduled for this past Saturday, April 18th in Minneapolis:

March and Rally Against Racism to Retire the Cleveland Indians and Their Chief Wahoo:

Minneapolis, MN (April 16, 2015) The National Coalition Against Racism in Sports and Media is hosting a march and rally against racism and the Cleveland Indians and their Chief Wahoo logo on Saturday April 18th at Target Field, Gate 34 before the Minnesota Twins and Cleveland Baseball game.

There will be a press conference held at the Target Field Plaza Gate 34 at 12:30 PM to address the dehumanizing and racist effects of the Cleveland Indians name, Chief Wahoo and all Native mascots.

Speakers at the press conference include David Glass, President of the National Coalition Against Racism in Sports and Media; Henry Boucha, 1972 Olympic Silver Medalist and Vice President of the National Coalition Against Racism in Sports and Media; Clyde Bellecourt, cofounder of the American Indian Movement and the National Coalition Against Racism in Sports and Media; Norma Renville, National Coalition Against Racism in Sports and Media; and representatives of the NAACP.

The National Coalition Against Racism in Sports and Media calls on all supporters who marched against the Washington Football Team on November 2nd to join us again to end racism in sports and media.

*****

It is terribly unfortunate to get public relations releases from “leaders” in Washington who are supporting the trans-Pacific trade and other “free” trade agreements.

The only beneficiaries are the corporations that lobby and even write the letter of the law for their own benefit.

Please, let your Congressional delegates know that fast free trade proposals are playing too fast for us!

Just read this crap that came from our senior Senator John Thune:

“Enacting TPA will be a boon to the economy, expanding opportunities for American workers and giving American farmers, ranchers, and manufacturers access to new markets for their goods.”

WASHINGTON, D.C.—U.S. Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.), member of the Senate Finance Committee, which has jurisdiction over trade-related matters, issued the following statement on today’s announcement of bipartisan trade promotion authority (TPA) legislation introduced by U.S. Sens. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) and Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.):

“Today’s announcement is much-needed good news for American workers and businesses. Enacting TPA will be a boon to the economy, expanding opportunities for American workers and giving South Dakota farmers, ranchers, and manufacturers access to new markets for their goods,” Thune said. “The challenges facing our nation are best solved when members of both parties come together to find solutions for the American people, and I commend Sens. Hatch and Wyden and Chairman Ryan for their efforts on TPA and other trade-related issues.”

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"Our people don't come in parts. Either you are Indian, or you are not." -- Nippawanock, ARAPAHOE

We really need to take a look at how Indian People are talking about Indian People. We say there are Rez Indians, Traditional Indians, Urban Indians and Breeds. This type of thinking will keep us separated. An Indian is an Indian, a brother is a brother, a sister is a sister. We are all related. Today, let us respect ourselves and our people. Today, let me realize Indians are Indians. Great Spirit, let me see the Unity of the People. Indians are Indians.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

Remember that as a teenager you are at the last stage of your life when you will be happy to hear that the phone is for you. Fran Lebowitz (1950 - ), Social Studies (1981)

I never know how much of what I say is true. Bette Midler (1945 - )

New York now leads the world's great cities in the number of people around whom you shouldn't make a sudden move. David Letterman (1947 - )

The great thing about television is that if something important happens anywhere in the world, day or night, you can always change the channel. From "Taxi"

Knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers. Alfred Lord Tennyson (1809 - 1892)

Television enables you to be entertained in your home by people you wouldn't have in your home. David Frost

A person is never happy except at the price of some ignorance. Anatole France (1844 - 1924)

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Note –

No obituaries are reported in this week’s Sota.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor’s note: The following comes from the editor’s column and the Sota “deadlines and policies” statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Poems from the pen of Elden Hayes

Amazing Grace

We didn't have the money for a crib

or any type of wind up swing,

we didn't have indoor plumbing

drinking water came from a spring.

A hammock was fashioned in the corner

lullabies come from a small radio,

the wood stove crackled in tune

and managed to emit a rosy glow.

The fire wood was stacked up high

the kerosene lamp and the night dueled,

the dark was able to prevail

the little lamp always needed fuel.

Food was scarce too many times

empty stomachs gnawed at the soul,

sometimes life wants to run away

but staying alive is the goal.

Poverty has never been choosy

crossing over many racial lines,

society is not a finicky eater

it has never cared on whom it dines.

We are here but for awhile

and then we move to our Father's place,

it is only our faith being tested

before we live in His amazing grace.

 

written: 11/17/10

Man

They say that it's a man's world

a man travels with fire and ice,

in order to be a man's man

you need to be able to be nice.

There needs to be a heart of kindness

the ability to admit there are fears,

along with the tough exterior

there is the capability of tears.

A woman will temper a man

always his equal in every task,

together their love is strong

and in this life that is all you ask.

A man tries to be a role model

pass on the good that he has learned,

he is always looking to the future

no regrets for the bridges burned.

As a man grows in years

and sickness begins to make house calls,

he knows the sand exits the hour glass

the years fly by where once they had crawled.

Hair that is called salt and pepper

wrinkles that show he loves to smile,

life is too short to carry frown lines

man is here for only a while.

written: 11/09/10

Slow Death

We follow the path of drunken steps

and we have turned into the same kind

the dangerous pain of addiction

remains for generations to find

there is shame that is whispered about

guilt does not seem a consequence

drunken rituals follow into adulthood

some have never been the same since

there is harm that remains hidden

the future wears disfiguring scars

worn by the ones who will follow

the road to liquor stores and bars

a legacy that no one will claim

although most have lived that lifestyle

there is a pattern of insanity

but everyone carries denial

new drugs invade the chaos

the lie that is called crystal meth

more addictions attach themselves

it hurries and prods the slow death….

4-15-15

Strong Heart

Drowning in the sea of depression

swallowed by a world of despair

stress is the yoke that is worn

it seems the whole world doesn't care

attempting to fight the emptiness

there's a battle inside raging on

there will be a winner and a loser

when the person that is me has gone

I walk the lonely streets of yesterday

but all that I see is broken glass

their reflection is distorted

a recording of a painful past

my friends took the journey

that is a loss that's hard to swallow

they walked into the great beyond

a path that each of us will follow

it's easy to retreat into self- pity

living is the most difficult part

to carry on when all feels lost

will show the true strength of a strong heart.

4-9-15

Jungle latest Twin Cities theater to usher in change

By Gradon Royce

Star Tribune – March 31, 2015 – The theater has named a new artistic director: Sarah Rasmussen, a nationally connected young director.

The leadership of major Twin Cities theater companies continued its evolution Monday as the Jungle Theater announced that Sarah Rasmussen, a director with Minnesota connections, will succeed Bain Boehlke as artistic director. Boehlke, who founded the Jungle in 1991, previously had announced he would retire this summer.

Rasmussen, head of the MFA theater directing program at the University of Texas-Austin, will assume the job on July 1. Her hiring continues a sea change that is gathering in the Twin Cities theater community. She joins Joseph Haj, who also starts July 1 as new Guthrie artistic director, taking over from Joe Dowling, who had held the post for a record 20 years.

She is part of a cohort replacing longtime founders of midsize theaters, which are the backbone of the local scene. Randy Reyes replaced Rick Shiomi at Mu Performing Arts and Sarah Bellamy has assumed leadership from her father, Lou, at Penumbra.

“I’m thrilled to be a part of that next new wave,” Rasmussen said Monday from Texas. “It’s an exciting time to be there to watch the next generation blossom.”

Boehlke founded the Jungle after a long career with the Children’s Theatre Company and as a freelance director. The theater led a resurgence of economic and cultural development in the Lyndale-Lake neighborhood of Minneapolis.

The troupe is one of the Twin Cities’ significant venues for classic American work. Boehlke has become legendary not only for his directing but also for his articulate set designs.

“Bain is such a singular artist and a visionary,” Rasmussen said. “I don’t know many like him.”

Boehlke was effusive in praising Rasmussen as a valuable asset for the Jungle, a good fundraiser and well-connected nationally.

He said he will move to Seattle this summer, partly to give space to the new Jungle administration. “Being in town would be very difficult because my feet would want to bring me down here every day,” he said. “I love that she loves the Jungle, and I need to give them space to work.”

Rasmussen grew up in South Dakota and graduated from St. Olaf College in Northfield in 2001. She has worked with several Twin Cities companies, including the Jungle, where she directed “In the Next Room” in 2012. Like the Guthrie’s newly appointed Haj, Rasmussen has significant national associations.

“She knows everyone — one of the most-connected people I know,” said Mixed Blood artistic director Jack Reuler, who encouraged Rasmussen to apply for the Jungle job when Boehlke announced his retirement last year.

“When new leaders come in with relationships with national connections, that rubs off,” said Bill Rauch, artistic director of Oregon Shakespeare Festival.

Rasmussen served for three seasons as resident director for Oregon’s Black Swan Lab, a new-work development program. Last season, she directed an all-female production of “The Two Gentlemen of Verona” for the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, which is the nation’s largest nonprofit regional theater.

“She is imaginative and a fierce advocate for inclusion and diversity,” said Rauch. “And in a field where tempers and egos can get away sometimes, Sarah is thoughtful and calm — very professional. Obviously I’m a big fan and I’m cheering this appointment.”

Rasmussen said it’s too early for her to reveal what she’ll program at the Jungle in 2016, her first season. She is known to be a champion of new work and has strong connections at the Playwrights’ Center in Minneapolis.

“Bain has created such an exquisite theatergoing experience,” she said. “I look forward to building on that legacy. New work is a passion of mine, but that will play out over time.”

Michelle Hensley, artistic director of the Twin Cities troupe Ten Thousand Things, praised Rasmussen for her advocacy of work by women and artists of color, and expressed confidence that she will reflect the diversity of the community. Hensley, another of the founder/artistic directors instrumental in building the local community, also said she’s excited by the advent of new, young leaders.

“It’s time for a changing of the guard,” she said. “We can be grateful to all those people who started these companies in the ’70s and ’80s, and the ’90s. Now it’s time to pass along the torch and see what a younger generation can bring.”

Social “helper” column dedicated to young generation Oyate –

Wawokiyape

By Shay Dirtseller

Dear Shay,

After moving back to my reservation and witnessing all the hardships we, as Native Americans endure at the hands of our tribal government and our own people, you would think someone would stand up and say enough is enough! You would think that we would have honest, trustworthy police and good hearted human beings in office that wanted change for the betterment of our tribe and youth.

But instead we got sneaky, conniving, embezzling and dishonest people as council people. The positions of chairman, vice chairman and secretary are not being used to make better changes for the tribes as a whole but rather to get a huge paycheck and to take lavish trips to where ever they go or be in the paper. You don't see them living in housing houses no more or even speaking to the oyate as equals. No, these people in seats of power speak as though they are celebrities or someone above the rest of us. They walk around with a sense of entitlement and an ego so big you could see it miles away. They don't care that many of our youth are committing suicide, strung out on meth and binge drink or are abused daily. No from what I have seen is that these criminals get a slap on the wrist! They sell and use meth, heroin and cocaine in housing homes and some employees at housing know about it but as usual, it’s a relative of some sort so they are allowed to keep their homes. Children are left to live with strung out parents or be traded for their fixes. I know our tribal police aren’t blind! They know who these people are same with other tribal workers but is anything done? NO!

I suggest that these new people in office start getting out there and speaking to our people! Know what is going on in our tribe instead of acting like you’re too good to speak to elders and others with concerns. Don't brush us off when we bring something we think is important to you! Actually answer your work phones instead of always sending us to voicemail and LISTEN to the concerns of your people, the people who elected you all.

It’s time to stand together as one Oyate instead of looking out for just this family or that family! Is that too much to ask? Is it too much to ask that we better our reservation housing units instead of building new admin buildings or parks?

I just wanted to say what I wanted to say and now that I did I will end this letter here. THANK YOU.

Submitted by fed up!

Dear fed up,

Thank you for your words. I believe your letter speaks for its self and therefore all I will do is share it with our newspaper.

Again thank you for writing to me and voicing your opinion!

Respectfully, Shay.

Vaccines & Preventable Diseases

Gypsy Wanna

SWO Wellness Coordinator

In honor of National Infant Immunization Week (April 18-25), the Community Health Education program would like parents and grandparents to understand the importance of getting immunizations on time for children.

There are several vaccines children should receive to help them stay healthy. One of the vaccines is for chickenpox. Chickenpox is another highly contagious disease that is spread through the air or from contact with the fluid from the blisters. The disease begins with a rash on the head that spreads to the rest of the body. There can be 250-500 blisters that develop on the skin which can become infected. If they become infected, there can be scarring. Along with the blisters, chickenpox can cause fever, headaches and tiredness. Although chickenpox can be serious and result in death most children recover completely in one week. Complications from chickenpox include infected blisters, pneumonia, bleeding disorders, and swelling of the brain.

To find out what immunizations your child needs, you may contact the Public Health Nursing Department or the clinic at the Woodrow Wilson Keeble Memorial Health Care Center at 698-7606. You may also contact the SD Department of Health at 698-4183.

There will be a "Baby Health Fair" this Wednesday, April 22nd from 5:00-7:00 p.m. at the Woodrow Wilson Keeble Memorial Health Care Center in the PHN Conference Room.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Reforming Medicare payments helps ensure access to better care

By Senator John Thune

Thousands of South Dakotans, including my own father back in my hometown of Murdo, depend on Medicare to help with the cost of their health care. Since 1997, beneficiaries’ access to quality care has been threatened due to Medicare’s use of a flawed physician reimbursement formula known as the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR). The formula was implemented to help curb the increasing costs associated with the Medicare program. Unfortunately, rather than helping to rein in costs, the caps associated with the SGR would have made large payment cuts to Medicare physicians, providing a disincentive for doctors to accept Medicare patients. Since then, Congress has been kicking the can down the road, patching this defective payment system 17 times.

Congress recognized how important it is to provide certainty to Medicare beneficiaries and physicians, which is why on April 14, the Senate approved the bipartisan Medicare Access and Children’s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act. This legislation repeals the flawed SGR formula and modernizes Medicare payments to incentivize high-quality, low-cost care for seniors.

I am pleased that Medicare payment modernization included a provision I championed that gives rural providers sufficient technical assistance to ensure they are able to effectively transition into new payment models. Additionally, I am pleased that the bill included provisions that I helped spearhead that would improve access to durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics, and supplies through Medicare. These are just a few of the many reforms included in the bill that are vital to ensuring that South Dakota seniors continue receiving high quality, affordable health care.

Not only do our seniors deserve access to quality and efficient health care, but our physicians should be paid for the quality of care they provide, not the volume of services they provide. I will continue working to strengthen Medicare to ensure beneficiaries receive the best care possible, while improving access to care in rural communities. There is more work to be done to protect and preserve this important program, but the passage of the Medicare Access and Children’s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act was an important first step to ensure we make needed reforms that will continue putting South Dakota seniors first.

Diarrhea dilemma

By Richard P. Holm MD

A twenty-something gentleman presented to the walk-in clinic a few years ago with severe diarrhea. He was working at a feed-lot where he was exposed to cattle and all their byproducts, and he admitted that his hand-washing skills were not ideal. He had been ill for a few days, was getting dehydrated, and now there was blood in the stool, more than you would expect from just hemorrhoids.

An estimated two to five billion episodes of diarrheal illness occur every year worldwide, mostly from infection in infants. In 2013 more than one and a quarter million people, mostly babies, died from dehydration due to diarrhea, the consequence of contaminated water.

It is in the amazing small intestine and colon is where roughly two gallons of fluid flow-through daily only to be reduced to about a half-a-cup of fluid that exits in the stool, that is unless something goes wrong. The word diarrhea literally means through-flow.

The electrolyte explanation for what causes diarrhea runs-on like a chemistry teacher on too much caffeine. But suffice it to say that we are still learning the complexities of such a system that, when working correctly, turns the stuff we shove into our mouths into micronutrients and water and then carries the necessary parts of this slurry into the blood stream in order to keep us alive and working.

The diagnosis for diarrhea is made primarily from the patient's history or story. Non-infectious causes of diarrhea include problems like shortened bowel, partial blockages, immune problems like Crohn's disease and Ulcerative Colitis, and intolerance to certain foods like milk products and the gluten in grain.

Historical clues for an infectious cause can include attending a day care or anywhere diarrhea illness is present; working where there is exposure to animals; eating undercooked or spoiled food; and traveling to another country south of the border. Antibiotics are rarely needed to treat infectious diarrhea, and in contrast, life-threatening diarrhea can result from an exposure to antibiotics.

The most challenging cause for diarrhea comes when a person is burdened with a very nervous and sensitive bowel, called Irritable Bowel Syndrome or IBS. This diagnosis is made when everything else is ruled out. A professional should evaluate any diarrhea lasting longer than a week and produces internal bleeding.

I admitted my patient to the hospital for IV fluid hydration, the diarrhea resolved spontaneously without antibiotics, and he vowed to do better with washing his hands.

Ripple Effect –

Grow a Healthy, No-waste Lawn and Garden

The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) has offered the following tips on how you should care for all of the green and growing things in your yard that can have a big impact on and how much waste your household creates, and on air and water quality. From grass trimmings and leaves to pesticides and water, the eco-impact of your lawn and garden can be significant.

Your lawn and garden’s effect on the environment.

Your lawn and garden can add a lot to what your household needs to discard and recycle. Yard waste and food waste make up 13 percent of what's thrown into the garbage in Minnesota.

Healthy lawns and gardens can be maintained in ways that produce less waste, and you can easily manage what's left by composting at home. A healthy lawn and garden can naturally resist weeds and pests. You don't need a lot of chemicals to keep your yard looking green. Learn to read the signs and find out what's really wrong with your plants. Solve your lawn and garden problems by applying some brainpower before you use pesticides and herbicides.

Mow, fertilize, and rake less.

You don't have to spend so much time maintaining your lawn. Sound incredible? Mowing, watering, fertilizing and raking it less and using no pesticides may be your way to a healthy, environmentally friendly yard.

Mow your grass to a height of 2 ½ to 3 inches.

This is the single most important thing you can do to improve the health of your lawn. By keeping your grass a little longer, he roots grow deeper and can reach more water during dry periods. Longer grass also helps shade the soil surface, making it harder for weeds to get established.

Use a sharp mower blade when cutting your lawn to make it less susceptible to disease.

Leave grass clippings on the lawn.

Grass clippings can provide the equivalent of about one application of fertilizer per year. Sweep your sidewalk, driveway, or street so clippings don’t pollute nearby lakes or streams.

Test your soil to determine the right mix of fertilizer for your lawn. You may need less than you think. The University of Minnesota Soil Testing Lab and some garden centers offer testing.

Wait before you water.

In Minnesota, most grass can survive without watering, although it may enter a dormant “brown” stage during the summer. Water only when it hasn't rained for at least seven days. You don't need to water on a routine basis. To get the most water to the plant and reduce evaporation:

Water early in the morning. Grass blades need to dry out to minimize disease.

Water close to the ground.

Water slowly, deeply, and less frequently. Root growth is influenced by water depth and time of the year. Frequent shallow watering that keeps surface soils wet encourages shallow root growth, greater proneness to certain diseases, and reduced stress tolerance.

Only water grass. Make sure water is not lost by landing on or running off the grass onto hard, impervious surfaces.

Aerate your lawn if soil is compacted or there is significant thatch build-up. You can do this by using a lawn aerator available from most rental stores. Use the type that removes small cores of soil from the ground and places them on the lawn surface. Leave the cores to decompose naturally, contributing to a decrease in thatch, while the holes poked into the ground help improve soil aeration for healthier root systems.

What are your weeds telling you?

Weeds can tell you something about what's wrong with your lawn. Take time to identify your weeds and treat them appropriately to strengthen and improve your lawn. A weed-free lawn is not necessarily a healthy one.

Plantain may indicate the soil is compacted or poorly drained.

Creeping Charlie may indicate the site is too shady or the soil is poorly drained. Dandelions may indicate that the is too thin. Moss may indicate that the site is too shady or too wet for grass to survive. For more tips on a healthy yard and garden, go to http://www.pca.state.mn.us.

Until the next Ripple Effect, The Red River Basin Commission (RRBC).

*****

The RRBC is a grassroots organization that is a chartered not-for-profit corporation under the provisions of Manitoba, North Dakota, Minnesota, and South Dakota law. Our offices in Fargo, ND and Winnipeg, MB can be reached at 701-356-3183 and 204-982-7254, or you can check out our website at www.redriverbasincommission.org.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

ESDS Students of the Month honored

Enemy Swim Day School honors one student from each grade for each full month that school is in session.

The Students of the Month are chosen because they demonstrate the four school wide expectations consistently or have shown great progress toward them.

The school wide expectations are:

*Awanicihdka: Be Safe

*Waokihi: Be Responsible.

*Waunsida: Be Caring.

*Woohoda: Be Respectful.

Home room teachers choose the Students of the Month in collaboration with the paras and other teachers who serve a particular candidate.

Students of the Month are honored during opening ceremony on the first Monday following each full month of school.

Students of the Month attend dinner with two guests on the Wednesday evening following each Students of the Month honoring.

The March Students of the Month are: Kindergarten - JJ Redday, 1st Grade - Dominic Hopkins, 2nd Grade -Grant Bourelle, 3rd Grade - Isiac Goodsell, 4th Grade - Adryan Hopkins, 5th Grade - DJ Campbell, 6th Grade - Anna Rencountre, 7th Grade - Elijah Goodbird, and 8th Grade - Tristin Renville.

INMED and Master of Public Health programs offer American Indian students opportunity

Grand Forks, ND – American Indian students at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences have a new opportunity to pursue a graduate degree in public health. UND’s Indians Into Medicine Program (INMED) and the Master of Public Health Program have partnered to provide training for four students each year to study and earn a master’s degree. INMED and the MPH programs are a part of the UND SMHS.

Through discussions between the directors of the INMED and MPH programs about the value of public health for American Indian communities, a plan was developed to create an INMED–Public Health collaboration similar to that between INMED and UND’s clinical programs.

“The INMED Program at UND has long supported American Indian students in the health professions of medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, medical laboratory science, clinical psychology, counseling, dietetics and nutrition, psychology, social work, and others,” said Raymond L. Goldsteen, DrPH, professor, Family and Community Medicine, and founding director, UND Center for Comparative Effectiveness Analytics and the MPH Program.

“Additional educational opportunities for members of U.S. federally recognized tribes have been created because of the collaboration between the Master of Public Health Program and the Indians Into Medicine Program,” said INMED Director Eugene DeLorme, J.D.

Goldsteen said the INMED–MPH collaboration has been developed to support American Indian students training for interventions that stress prevention and health promotion. “This is important to address health problems that disproportionately affect American Indians, including unintentional injuries, suicide, alcoholism and subsequent chronic liver disease, homicide, and diabetes,” he said. “The morbidity and mortality rates from these conditions among American Indians exceed those of every other minority group and the population as a whole. These conditions are best prevented and treated through public health programs and policies that incorporate cultural understanding. American Indian students who obtain the MPH degree will be prepared to help communities address these health issues.”

Both programs are physically located across the hall from each other at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences on the campus of the University of North Dakota. DeLorme said, “Participants would enjoy all the support services offered by the Indians Into Medicine Program, including access to INMED’s learning resource center, tutoring services, computer lab, dedicated study rooms, academic and financial aid counseling, as well as a supportive community occupied by staff and other educationally committed American Indian health professions students.”

Applicants to the MPH Program through INMED must be enrolled members of federally recognized tribes; applications are accepted on a rolling basis until the class is full.

INMED website: www.med.UND.edu/indians-into-medicine. Contact: INMED Program, (701) 777-3037, inmed@med.UND.edu

MPH website: www.med.UND.edu/master-of-public-health/. Contact: Ashley Evenson, program manager (701)-777-6368, ashley.n.evenson@med.UND.edu

Ag Secretary Vilsack proclaims April 2015 National Garden Month

Washington, DC – April 17, 2015 – Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has declared April National Garden Month. Throughout the month, USDA will celebrate the contributions of home, school and community gardens in providing healthy food for the table; pleasant surroundings and recreational benefits for people; and beneficial habitat for wildlife across the Nation.

"National Garden Month is an opportunity to learn more about USDA's People's Garden Initiative begun in 2009," said Secretary Vilsack. "Today, 2,116 People's Gardens thrive on public and private lands across the United States and its territories and in 12 foreign countries. These People's Gardens serve as models for uniting individuals, groups and neighborhoods in a common effort to benefit communities, promote food security, utilize sustainable practices, help mitigate pollinator habitat loss, and address environmental issues."

In addition to being beautiful, gardens provide a positive setting for pollinators, such as bats, bees, birds, butterflies, beetles and other animals that contribute substantially to the economy and play a role in keeping fruits, nuts and vegetables in our diets.

The declaration was made via an official proclamation signed by Secretary Vilsack.

The People's Garden Initiative is a USDA Department-wide effort that is administered through USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service.

Spring Flowering Shrubs to try in your landscaping

Column by John Ball

SDSU Extension Professor & Forestry Specialist

Early spring flowering shrubs have a special place in our landscapes as they are the heralds of the warm weather yet to come.

While our home landscapes should have interest year around, from spring and summer flowers to summer fruit to brilliant autumn foliage, a space or two should be devoted to an early spring flowering shrub or two.

One of the most commonly planted early flowering shrubs is the forsythia (Forsythia) also known as golden bell for its bright yellow pendulous flowers that lace every cane. Unfortunately, the most commonly planted species in much of the country, the border forsythia (F. x intermedia) and its many cultivars, are not flower bud hardy in South Dakota.

While the canes of the border forsythia can survive our cold winters, its flower buds are often killed when the winter temperatures dip below 10 degrees Fahrenheit - a frequent event during our South Dakota winters. Therefore, it is common in the spring to see border forsythias blooming only along the lower canes, the ones that were beneath the insulating snow.

Fortunately, there exists forsythia cultivars that are flower bud hardy to the Northern Plains. Probably the best known is 'Meadowlark,' a joint release by North Dakota State University and South Dakota State University that is flower bud hardy to below 35 degrees Fahrenheit.

'Meadowlark' forsythias are now in bloom across much of South Dakota and, despite the recent cold weather, almost every cane can be found lined with brilliant yellow blossoms. There are two other flower bud hardy forsythias for our region. One is 'Northern Sun', introduced by the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum and is flower bud hardy to below 30 degrees Fahrenheit and 'Northern Gold' which is also flower bud hardy to below 30 degrees Fahrenheit.

Forsythias Forsythias reach a mature height and spread of about 6 to 10 feet so they need plenty of room in the home landscape. They also will slowly sucker out so will need to be occasionally cut back from taking over an adjacent flower bed.

Forsythias thrive under most growing conditions, except wet sites and are tolerant of slightly alkaline soils.

Forsythias are truly a single-season shrub as they lack interesting fruit, bark or autumn foliage color. They have only about one or two weeks of landscape interest during the spring flowering, but it's a pretty week or two during April.

Corneliancherry Another spring flower shrub that blooms at the same time as forsythia is the corneliancherry (Cornus mas) which despite the word "cherry" in the name, is actually a dogwood. This European native is prized for its mid-April yellow flowers that appear before the leaves veiling every branch with its blossoms. The flowers bloom for several weeks and withstand frosts.

The name corneliancherry comes from its cherry-like fruit. While the mid-summer fruit does resemble a cherry, bright red, though more pear-shaped than round, the taste will tell the two apart as corneliancherry fruit is very tart and a little too sour to eat right off the shrub.

The "cherry" is easy to harvest as you do not have to fight the birds for them but they should be picked fully ripe. The easiest way is to place a sheet beneath the shrub and collect the fruit as it falls. It is used for jams and preserves and even sherbet.

Corneliancherry is not hardy throughout the state and is best planted south of Highway 14 and east of the Missouri River. There are also a few nice specimens in the Black Hills. The shrub almost becomes a tree when planted southeastern South Dakota where it reaches 10 feet or more. Corneliancherry is tolerant of most soils, though performs best on moist, well-drained sites that have neutral or only slightly alkaline soils. Protection from the north wind winds is necessary if planted near the northern limits of its range.

To learn more, visit iGrow.org.

Garden Corner

Submitted by Eric Hanssen

Browns Valley, Minnesota 56219

Pruning Flowering Shrubs

Flowering shrubs require pruning to look their best. Forsythias and spireas, both noted for their bountiful sprays of blooms lining every cane, may gradually be reduced to a few sporadic flowers if these shrubs are not routinely pruned. This does not necessarily mean annual pruning but this task should be performed at least every two to three years since flowering occurs on the younger wood. Pruning not only benefits flowering but can also enhance bark color for shrubs with colorful canes. The dogwoods, prized for their vibrant red or yellow canes, can become thickets of gray stems if pruning is neglected since the younger canes have the brightest colors. Most shrubs arise from multiple canes, which are long, relatively unbranched stems. The best means of maintaining an attractive and natural appearance to these shrubs is to prune with heading cuts. This is a type of pruning cut that stubs off the cane at about 2-inches above the ground. These heading cuts result in the formation of numerous new shoots that arise just below the cut and quickly grow as long canes. The heading cuts should be made cleanly and straight across the cane; cutting at an angle is not necessary. While flowering is enhanced by this pruning, the timing is critical. Spring-flowering shrubs bloom from flower buds formed the previous summer. These shrubs should be pruned immediately after they finish flowering. If instead, they are pruned during the fall or winter, the flower buds will be removed. Summer-flowering shrubs bloom from flower buds formed during the current year, meaning their flower buds are formed the same season they bloom. Summer-flowering shrubs should be pruned during the dormant season, usually just before bud-break, sometime during March or early April. While shrub pruning is accomplished by heading cut, the number of canes removed may varies depending on the objective. If the shrub is overgrown, almost choked-out by an excessive number of canes and flowering poorly, all the canes can be pruned out, a technique referred to as rejuvenation pruning. Rejuvenation pruning can be done every dormant season for low-growing summer-flowering shrubs such as bumalda spireas and potentillas. Overgrown shrubs, regardless of size or flowering time, can be pruned in this manner. However, pruning a 15-foot common lilac to 2 inches will mean forfeiting flowers for several years while the plant recovers. Loppers are the best tools to make these cuts as the long handles provide the leverage to cut through thick canes, however, on small canes, those less than 1/2-inch in diameter, a hand-pruner may be used. If the plant is not overgrown, then renewal pruning can be applied. Renewal pruning involves removal of about 1/5 to 1/3 of the oldest and largest canes by heading cuts. If this task is performed annually, than over a three to five-year time period, the entire shrub will be completely renewed. The season to do renewal pruning depends whether the shrub is spring or summer flowering. Spring-flowering shrubs should be renewal-pruned right after they finish flowering. Summer-flowering shrubs should be pruned during the dormant season.

Information in this article comes from professor John Ball, SDSU Forestry Specialist in his Pest Update publication available online at http://sdda.sd.gov/legacydocs/Forestry/educational-information/PDF/pest-alert-2015-Apr-1.pdf.

Legals

Note –

There are no legal line notices in this week’s Sota.

Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Job Openings

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Director, Head Start

CAA 103 Coordinator, Office of Environmental Protection

Project Coordinator, Construction Management

Warehouseman (Must have Driver's License), Food Distribution Program

Closing Date: May 1st 2015 @ 04:30 PM

All interested applicants may obtain application and job description information at the Human Resource Department, of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate or contact Arnold Williams at (605) 698-8238 or Denise Hill at (605) 698-8362. (Tribal preference will apply.)

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

JOB ANNOUNCEMENT

Teller/Loan Processor Part Time position

Duties and Responsibilities: Prepare applications for loans, type and disperse loans to members, receive and disperse shares to members, open new accounts, sell and process money orders, assist in month and quarterly reports, print quarterly reports to members, handle incoming and outgoing mail transactions, must be able to handle large amount of cash and be accountable for personal bank, must be able to type, must be knowledgeable of computers, must have good customer service. Assist in other areas as directed by immediate supervisor, Vice-President or President.

Starting wage:  $9.00

A complete job description is available at the SWFCU office.

Applications will be accepted until 3:00pm Friday, April 24, 2015.

 

Dakota Nation Development Corporation

Fuel Inc. - General Manager

Summary: Responsible for the leadership, growth, and development of the propane, fuel and HVAC departments of Fuel Inc. in addition to the Agency C-Store. Ensures efficient asset use, cost controls, and establishes benchmarks for performance of Fuel Inc. and Agency C-store.

Supervision: Fuel Inc. and Agency C-Store personnel.

Position Requirements: Demonstrates experience in personnel management and effective leadership 5 to 7 years direct work and leadership experience in a propane company or similar business. Ability to effectively prioritize and execute tasks in a high-pressure environment is crucial. Experience in strategic planning, contracting and negotiating. Experience in formulating policy, developing and implementing new strategies and procedures. Ability to develop financial plans, manage resources and interpret financial data. Work requires professional written and verbal communication, interpersonal skills and ability to communicate with officials at all levels of government. Must pass a background check, drug test and must be culturally sensitive.

Qualifications: Bachelor's Degree in Business Administration or Management preferred. Associate's Degree in Business Administration or Management related field required with 3 years of successful work experience as manager or a position of equal level responsibility. Please contact Dakota Nation Development Corporation for complete a Job Description. 1-605598-3200 or dndc2@venturecomm.net

 

Dakota Nation Development Corporation

Fuel Inc. Senior Bookkeeper

Summary: Responsible for the accounting operations of Fuel Inc. and Agency C-Store including the production of periodic financial reports, maintenance of accurate systems of accounting records, and a comprehensive set of controls designed to mitigate risk and enhance the accuracy of the companies' financial results in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. Assists the General Manger with the Human Resources functions of Fuel Inc. and Agency C-Store.

Position Requirements: Experience and proficiency with accounting software programs, inventory programs and Microsoft Office programs. Flexible and motivated. Strong written and oral communication skills. Ability to effectively prioritize and execute tasks in a high-pressure environment is crucial. Technically competent with various software programs for presentation and analysis. Must pass a background check, drug test and must be culturally sensitive.

Qualifications: Bachelor's Degree in Accounting or Finance preferred. Associate's Degree in Accounting or Finance required. 5 to 7 years direct work experience performing accounting functions in a propane company or similar business.

Please contact Dakota Nation Development Corporation for complete a Job Description. 1-505-698-3200 or dndc2@venturecomrn.net

 

Employment Opportunity

GROW South Dakota is seeking a Full or Part-time Program/Loan Associate to be based in Sisseton, SD. Applications will be taken until Monday, May 4, 2015. To request a job application and job description, contact GROW SD, 104 Ash St. E., Sisseton, SD 57262 or call (605)-698-7654 or 1-888-202-4855. EOE

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Sisseton Wahpeton College

Has the following vacancies:

Behavioral Science Instructor

Sisseton Wahpeton College has an opening for a full time Behavioral Science Instructor. Must have a Master's Degree in one of the behavioral science fields (psychology, anthropology, sociology, or political science. Previous teaching experience. Position is open until filled. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a full job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118.

Director of Institutional Advancement

Sisseton Wahpeton College has an opening for a full time Director of Institutional Advancement. A Bachelor's Degree with a minimum of 3 years' experience is required. (This is not a grants writer position.) Position is open until filled. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a full job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118.

Nursing Instructor, RN

Sisseton Wahpeton College has an opening for a full time Nursing Instructor needed. Must possess current SD nursing license, BSN is required, Master's Degree preferred. Position is open until filled. Visit our website: www.swc.tc for a full job description and application or contact the HR office at 605/698-3966, ext. 1118.

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Employment Opportunities

2014-2015 School Year Vacancies:

Substitutes needed for custodial, kitchen, teaching, and transportation - starting at $10/hr, varies per position Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma (please contact the HR office for more information) Applications are accepted on an on-going basis

Vacancy: Elementary Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for an Elementary Teacher Opening Date: January 22, 2015 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Reading Coach Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Reading Coach Opening Date: October 30, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Bus Monitor ($13/hr) Qualifications: High School Diploma/GED+; currently has/willing to obtain CPR and First Aid certification Opening Date: November 21, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

2015 Summer Program Vacancies - Program Dates are June 8-25:

Vacancy: Teacher (10) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification. Opening Date: April 10, 2015. Closing Date: April 24, 2015.

Vacancy: Paraprofessional (6) Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma and 461+ points on the Paraprofessional Praxis; 48+ College Credits. Opening Date: April 10, 2015. Closing Date: April 24, 2015.

Vacancy: Bus Driver (2) (June 8 to July 9) Qualifications: Current Bus Driver CDL with Passenger and Air Brakes endorsement and 1 year directly related experience. Opening Date: April 10, 2015. Closing Date: April 24, 2015.

Vacancy: Special Education Teacher (3) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Special Education Teacher Certification. Opening Date: April 10, 2015. Closing Date: April 24, 2015.

Vacancy: Custodian (June 1 to July 24) Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma and 1 year directly related experience. Opening Date: April 10, 2015. Closing Date: April 24, 2015.

Vacancy: Cook (June 1 to July 24) Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma and 1 year directly related experience. Opening Date: April 10, 2015. Closing Date: April 24, 2015.

Vacancy: Assistant Cook (2) (June 1 to July 24) Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma and 1 year directly related experience. Opening Date: April 10, 2015. Closing Date: April 24, 2015.

2015-2016 School Year Vacancies:

Vacancy: Dakota Studies Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for Dakota Studies Instructor Opening Date: March 12, 2015 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Elementary Art Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for an Elementary Art Teacher Opening Date: March 13, 2015 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Elementary Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for an Elementary Teacher Opening Date: April 13, 2015 Closing Date: Open until filled

2015-2016 Coaching Vacancies:

A. For List of Coaching Positions Below: Proof of all SDHSAA coaching requirements at the time application is submitted. Requirements are to complete the following courses through the National Federation of High School Sports (NFHS): Fundamentals of Coaching, and First Aid and Safety for Coaches. Must also submit a letter of intent that answers the questions found on form Athletics Coaching Questionnaire. OPENING DATE: April 17, 2015. CLOSING DATE: April 30, 2015

Head Volleyball Coach Assistant Volleyball Coach Junior High Track Coach Assistant Wrestling Coach

If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: September 11, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filledIf you would like to apply to be a part of the TZ tiwahe you may pick up an application from the TZTS HR office located at #2 Tiospa Zina Dr. Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications may also be printed off the HR web page by downloading from links under employment forms to the left. Completed applications may be sent to PO Box 719, Agency Village, SD 57262. Faxed to: 605-698-7686. For further information call 605-698-3953 ext. 208. Indian Preference employer. At will employer. All applicants are subject to a Background Check and Pre-Employment Drug Test, pursuant to SWSB policy.

 

Enemy Swim Day School

FACILITIES ASSISTANT - The Enemy Swim Day School has an opening for a Facilities Assistant. The Facilities Assistant will assist the Facility Manager in maintaining the appearance, safety, efficient operation and cost effective utilization of the entire campus. Must have knowledge and abilities in the areas of building maintenance, equipment usage, cleaning techniques, minor electrical and plumbing practices. Must be physically able to perform duties and operate equipment as required. Must possess a valid SD driver’s license. Please visit www.esds.us for an application and job description. Call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 and ask for Ed to inquire about the position. Indian preference policies will be followed. Closing date is April 30, 2015.

 

Dakota Nation Development Corporation

CEO/Project Manager

Summary:

Working with the Dakota Nation Development Corporation Board of Directors, will provide leadership and oversee tribal non-gaming for-profit business operations to insure production efficiency, quality, services, and cost effective management of resources.

Position Requirements:

Master's Degree in Business Administration or Project Management or Management related with 3 years of successful work experience as manager or a position of equal level of responsibility.

3 years direct work experience in project management/senior management capacity, including all aspects of process development and execution.

Demonstrated experience in personnel management and effective executive level leadership.

Technically competent with various software programs for presentation and analysis.

Knowledge of economic and accounting practice and financial reporting.

Knowledge of and experience with all aspects of 8(a) certification and contracting.

Please contact Dakota Nation Development Corporation for complete a Job Description. 1-605-698-3200 or dndc2@venturecomm.net

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Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

ADMINISTRATION: ASSOCIATE MANAGER (1 PART-TIME). GENERAL FUNCTION: The purpose of this position is to maintain interdepartmental communications to ensure the smooth    operation of the property and promote the highest degree of customer satisfaction. REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or G.E.D. equivalency. Minimum of three years experience in gaming, preferably supervisory experience. Able and willing to work any and all shifts. Thorough knowledge of casino operations, policies and procedures. Excellent communication skills, both written and oral. Able to handle diverse situations. Able to stand/walk for long periods of time. Must obtain a Key Gaming License.

This position will close on April 28th, 2015 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

ADMINISTRATION: ASSOCIATE MANAGER (1 FULL-TIME) GENERAL FUNCTION: The purpose of this position is to maintain interdepartmental communications to ensure the smooth operation of the property and promote the highest degree of customer satisfaction. REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or GED equivalency. Minimum of three years experience in gaming, preferably supervisory experience. Able and willing to work any and all shifts. Thorough knowledge of casino operations, policies and procedures. Excellent communication skills, both written and oral. Able to handle diverse situations. Able to stand/walk for long periods of time. Must obtain Key Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on April 28th, 2015 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

TABLE GAMES: SUPERVISOR/BLACK JACK DEALER (Dual Rate) (2 FULL- TIME). Rotating GENERAL FUNCTION: Must supervise all games and employees to ensure that the department is operating in compliance with all casino, tribal, state, and federal regulations. Must stay in close communication with supervisors and management on all issues. General function: Black Jack Dealer to deal the assigned game in accordance with all applicable policies and procedures as stated in the Dakota Sioux Casino Dealer's Manual. Must be able to perform the functions of Black Jack Supervisor and BJ Dealer when needed. REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. Experience preferred but not necessary. Effective communication skills. Must be able to work any/all shifts. Must be willing to work 8+ hours if needed. Must be able to stand for long periods of time (1 to 2 hours at a time). Must demonstrate excellent attendance practices and customer service skills. Must obtain a Key Gaming License.

This position will close on March 26, 2014 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

ACCOUNTING: DROP TEAM MEMBER (1 FULL-TIME) GENERAL FUNCTION: Responsible for the inventory of Cage/Casino coin and chip assets. Assist in providing and accurate count for daily service drops. Work in accordance with all applicable policies and procedures as stated in the Dakota Sioux Casino Cage Employee Manual. REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or GED equivalent. Accounting background, the ability to work well with numbers and computer knowledge is required as well as willingness to be trained in these areas. Detail orientated, self-starter with ability to work well with others. Ability to lift 40 lbs. or more. Must have a telephone. Heavy lifting, moving, bending, stretching, and standing for long periods of time. Must obtain a Key Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on April 22nd, 2015 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

SECURITY: SECURITY OFFICER (Full-Time) ROTATING. GENERAL FUNCTION: The security officer protects company assets and provides a safe environment for customers and employees. Exhibit a friendly, helpful and courteous manner when dealing with the customers and employees. Maintains security activities and performs credit transactions adhering to company, Tribal, State and Federal guidelines. Work closely with Casino & Hotel Management. REQUIREMENTS: High School Diploma or GED equivalent. Must have basic computer skills. Ongoing training through Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise and respective security department policy and procedures. Medical aid training in CPR and First Aid. Complete departmental training program including CPR, first aid, and TAM. Must complete a 90 day probation period. Must be licensable by SWO Gaming Commission. Must be able to work irregular hours. Must be dependable, punctual, some knowledge in handheld radios, and writing reports. Law Enforcement or Security background useful. Must not have a felony on your record. Must be physically fit and able to lift 40+ lbs. Must complete all security certifications within a year of hire in accordance with the Gaming Commissions rules and regulations.

This position will be advertised until it is filled.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

TABLE GAMES: SUPERVISOR/BLACK JACK DEALER (Dual Rate)(2 FULL- TIME) Rotating. GENERAL FUNCTION: Must supervise all games and employees to ensure that the department is operating in compliance with all casino, tribal, state, and federal regulations. Must stay in close communication with supervisors and management on all issues. General function: Black Jack Dealer to deal the assigned game in accordance with all applicable policies and procedures as stated in the Dakota Sioux Casino Dealer's Manual. Must be able to perform the functions of Black Jack Supervisor and BJ Dealer when needed. REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. Experience preferred but not necessary. Effective communication skills. Must be able to work any/all shifts. Must be willing to work 8+ hours if needed. Must be able to stand for long periods of time (1 to 2 hours at a time). Must demonstrate excellent attendance practices and customer service skills. Must obtain a Key Gaming License.

This position will close on April 29, 2015 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

SLOTS: SLOT Department Supervisor (1 FULL TIME). Reports To: Slot Manager. GENERAL FUNCTION: Maintains authority/supervision over Slot Personal as instructed. REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. Minimum of two years slot experience. Minimum of two years supervisory experience. Effective communication skills. Ability to handle diverse situations and or people. Must obtain a Key Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on April 22, 2015 at 4pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

C-STORE DEPARTMENT:

C-Store Manager (1) full-time; 3. years retail experience; 2 years supervisory experience; computer literate, spreadsheets, point-of-sales software, inventory control, administering software; including adding items, changing prices & configures the POS terminal. Superior people & customer service skills; excellent leadership & management skills; communication skills-both written & verbal. Dependable & available to work any & all shifts; must be at least 21 years old & have a High School Diploma or GED. Salary DOE.

C-Store Shift Supervisor (1) full-time; will assist the C-Store Manager in daily operations & administration of the department; excellent written & verbal communication skills; excellent people & customer service skills; 2 years supervisory experience required; 2-3 years retail experience preferred; computer literate; previous money handling experience, leadership, organizational & motivational skills, knowledge & ability to use necessary equipment; ability to work independently, physical ability to lift up to 40 lbs, Dependable & available to work any & all shifts; must be at least 21 years old & have a High School Diploma or GED.

Opening date: Thursday, April 16, 2015

Closing date: Wednesday, April 29, 2015 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Facilities/Maintenance Department:

Porter (2) full-time; rotating/alternating shifts; day, swing, graveyard, weekends & holidays. Good customer service skills; ability to operate necessary equipment and the physical ability to lift heavy objects up to 20 lbs or more Have physical mobility throughout facility & surrounding grounds; dependable & available to work all shifts. Must be at least 18 years old.

C-Store Department:

Clerk/Cashier (1) full-time; rotating/alternating shifts; day, swing, graveyard, weekends & holidays; math skills essential; ability to operate necessary equipment; physical ability to lift moderate amounts of weight; previous experience working with money preferred; strong organizational skills managing various functions; dependable & available to work any & all shifts. Must be at least 21 years old & have a High School Diploma or GED.

Opening Date: Thursday, April 16, 2015

Closing Date: Wednesday, April 22, 2015 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Bingo Department:

Rover/Drop Team (2) part-time; will be required to work all shifts as needed; evenings, weekends & holidays. Will be responsible to know all positions in Bingo; such as floor clerk, cashier, pack maker, paymaster & caller; must be at least 21 years old & have a High School Diploma or GED. For Drop Team you will be required to work all shifts as needed; day, weekends & holidays; will be responsible for collecting slot drop & bill validator drop, counts, and verifies all boxes; transports bill validators to the vault; prepares appropriate paperwork & makes necessary computer entries; must be physically fit; previous experience working with money preferred; dependable & available to work any & all shifts; must be at least 21 years old & have a High School Diploma or GED and be able to obtain a Key Gaming License for Bingo Rover/Drop Team,

Security Department:

Officer (2) full-time; rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, weekends & holidays; mobility throughout the facility 45% of time; will be stooping, bending, standing, walking for long periods of time; ability to lift up to 40 lbs.; computer skills required for report writing; will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke; appropriate dress code; must be at least 21 years old; have a High School Diploma or GED and be able to obtain a Key Gaming License.

Opening date: Thursday, April 16, 2015

Closing date: Wednesday, April 22, 2015 @4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.