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Volume 46 Issue No. 20

Anpetu Iyamni, May 20, 2015

Inside this Edition –

UVA, Kit Fox honor guards to hold Memorial Day ceremonies across Lake Traverse Reservation

Statement from the Chairman’s office on attending President Obama’s address to LATI graduates

SD Governor Daugaard visits Lake Traverse Reservation; Ag, Natural Resources, cooperation major issues

Oyate stage rally urging Governor to reopen investigation into disappearance of A.J. Lufkins five years ago

Highlights of “Balanced Woman, Balanced Family” workshop

Note from the SWO Research Office

Grief workshop this Wednesday

TZTS Language Bowl, Wacipi

Sota editorials: “What’s been happening here” and President Obama’s straight talk on trade

Shay Dirtseller dedicates her column to suicide prevention

Deadline for receipt of copy is Friday noon

Statement from the office of SWO Tribal Chairman Bruce Renville –

Students represent the Oyate at Lake Area Technical Institute

SWO Tribal Chairman Bruce Renville and four students - Gabe Derosiers, Jr., Demi Dumarce, Taylor Gaikowski, and Dominic White - attended the Commencement for Lake Area Technical Institute on Friday, May 8. President Barack Obama was the Commencement Speaker, and his speech was memorable with many true stories of perseverance by the students and LATI leadership.

It's a good time to focus on higher education and with the number of students that attend Lake Area Technical Institute in Watertown, perhaps a partnership with them would be appropriate to build capacity and help local students get the degree they desire.

When asked, our own SWO students gave their plans for the immediate future. Dominic said he is planning on attending North Dakota State University.

Taylor is going to the University of Minnesota.

Demi plans to attend the University of Minnesota-Morris.

Gabe remains undecided.

Congratulations to all the students that are graduating this spring – from Head Start all the way to those getting their college degrees!

It took your hard work earned those degrees, and you make the Oyate very proud!

(Editor’s note: Chairman Bruce Renville and SWC President Harvey DuMarce were given access to President Obama during his visit to LATI. Photos will come from the White House Photographer soon. Also, Demi has said she will provide a narrative of the experience – after taking her finals and going through the TZTS graduation ceremonies first!)

Ag, Natural Resources, OEP, Education programs featured during this visit –

SWO hosts SD Governor Daugaard

Photos by the Editor and Reporter/Photographer John Heminger

By CD Floro

Sota Editor

Tribal Facilities Management staff spruced up the SWO Tribal administration building and many programs set up eye-catching exhibits on tables spread in a circle around the rotunda last Wednesday, May 13th. Purpose was to put the Tribe’s best foot forward for the first visit here by South Dakota Governor Dennis Daugaard.

SWO Tribal Chairman Bruce Renville greeted the Governor and his delegation at the door of the administration building and led them to a private meeting in his office. Also in attendance were several program managers.

Afterwards, the Governor and his party were given presentations in Council chambers on the Tribe’s Natural Resources.

Presenters included Charlene Miller, Karena Miller and Chad Ward.

Besides a look at what the Tribe is doing, the Governor was told of some shortcomings:

“Lack of resources … funding … for effective enforcement of the codes, issues with fee land.”

“Revenue from hunting and fishing licenses are not enough to cover costs.”

The Tribal reps requested “a fair share” of the SD Game Fish & Parks revenue.

Later in the morning, during a tour of the program exhibits, the Governor was presented a star quilt by SWO veterans and Service Office Geri Opsal.

The presentation took place at a table that Sisseton BIA Superintendent/former Chairman Russell Hawkins helped prepare. On the table were medals and memorabilia for several of the SWO veterans honored for exemplary service, including his father, Medal of Honor recipient the late Master Sgt. Woodrow W. Keeble. Read more in the Report to Akicita by TVSO Geri Opsal elsewhere in this issue.

Although starting the morning ahead of schedule, the group was running behind by noon and was pressed for time. Following the visit, the Governor had a flight scheduled to Sioux Falls in order to speak at a ceremony for US Army Air Guard troops being deployed that afternoon to Afghanistan.

He apologized over lunch, saying that the deployment had “come up” after plans had already been made to come to the Lake Traverse Reservation.

While pleased with the groundwork for promised cooperation on shared concerns with the Governor, it was disappointing he didn’t meet personally with family and friends of AJ Lufkins. AJ’s mom Sheila, and grandfather Carl, were still waiting outside the building after the Governor had already left through the back door – wanting to share their signs and stories with him.

SWO Tribal Chairman Bruce Renville and Tribal Secretary Crystal Owen had, however, raised the issue of AJ Lufkins’ disappearance with Governor Daugaard in a private meeting held early in the morning with the Governor.

Please see our accompanying photo highlights of the Governor’s visit and read this more complete report on the Governor’s visit from the Tribal Chairman’s office.

Report from the office of SWO Tribal Chairman Bruce Renville –

SWO Tribe hosts SD Governor Daugaard, Cabinet members at Tribal headquarters

Months ago, in January, Governor Daugaard's office contacted the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate requesting to schedule a visit to the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate. The Governor's office said that he had yet to visit the Lake Traverse Reservation and he was interested in meeting the recently elected Chairman, Executives, and Council.

One of the goals for the visit was to highlight a program or two on the Lake Traverse Reservation. This was a very difficult task, as there are many outstanding programs within the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate. In the end, the Natural Resources Department, led by Charlene Miller, was selected, and the theme of the visit became primarily Natural Resources. This focus prompted Secretary of the Game, Fish and Parks, Kelly Hepler, to join the visit along with Secretary of Agriculture Lucas Lentsch. Secretary of Tribal Relations Steve Emery also returned for the day.

On the day of arrival, the Governor asked for some one-on-one time with Chairman Renville, where they spoke about crucial issues like the enforcement of the Indian Child Welfare Act in South Dakota, fee-to-trust land issues, water quality and rights, and other important topics. At the same time, a Meet and Greet in the Council Chambers allowed the Secretaries to meet with the Council and Executives. Finally, some time was spent as a group discussing jurisdictional and boundary issues, with Councilman Dave Flute, Tribal Education Director Sherry Johnson and Captain of Police Gary Gaikowski providing input from each of their perspectives.

Charlene Miller, Karena Miller and Chad Ward gave an excellent and well-received presentation on Fish & Wildlife activities, the Buffalo Farm and Cobell. The Governor, Secretaries and other members of the audience had a number of questions, which the presenters handled very well. Secretary Hepler pledged to help with some of the issues that Charlene Miller raised in creating a better working relationship with the State and he is already planning a return trip.

Many of the other Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate programs set up a booth in the rotunda. The visiting delegation made their way around, stopping to chat with the program managers, examine the displays and to take numerous photos with community members. There were many wonderful displays and everybody did a great job presenting their information.

The visit ended with the sharing of a meal. The lunch also stayed true to the theme of highlighting Natural Resources. The menu, prepared by Shilo Renville, included fresh-caught walleye from the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate's fisheries, buffalo from our buffalo herd, wild rice, wojapi and frybread. The Chairman and Governor Daugaard both made statements about the day's activities.

The goal of any Nation's leadership is to establish relationships with surrounding municipalities and States, even if they do not always agree politically. This visit was a step forward in creating those relationships to work more closely with the State of South Dakota on issues that impact tribal members both as Dakotah People and as South Dakotans - issues like water rights and sovereignty, and the protection of our natural resources.

Investigation into disappearance of AJ Lufkins

The disappearance of Andrew (AJ) Lufkins and the resultant investigation was discussed during Governor Daugaard's visit to the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate.

The Governor's briefing stated that they have interviewed witnesses, and searched vehicles, homes, sloughs and suspected area with men, helicopters and cadaver dogs. Since it has been so long, there is little more to do unless someone who knows something comes forward with more information.

After the meeting with Governor Daugaard, the Department of Justice and Attorney General Marty Jackley's office have contacted the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate about meeting with the investigative agencies to see if there is anything more that can be done at this time.

If anyone in the community knows anything more about the disappearance of AJ Lufkins, please, please contact someone so it can be forwarded on to the Investigators.

You can contact the Tribal Police, Sisseton Police, the SD Department of Criminal Investigations or the FBI.

(Editor’s note: See the notice of reward published in this edition of the Sota.)

"From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer"

GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov

Phone 605-698-3388

*Thank you all who helped set up our Veterans Table for the Governor’s visit this past week. Thank you Russell for bringing out the Congressional Medal of Honor Medal and all other medals/helmet; we also had the Code Talker Medal out for display along with some other memorabilia of our SWO Veterans. The Governor Daugaard was very impressed as well as Secretary of Tribal Government Relations Emery. Our Tribe is rich with history, we have so many unsung Heroes and we find out about them daily! Thank you to the Chairman's Office for including us and inviting us to have a display! It was a great day for the Oyate and the staff did a great job with the whole visit!

*Our Veterans Cemetery meeting was a very long meeting this past week. There is progress being made most of which of course is paperwork! I want to thank the Commanders of each group for always being there - we need that core group for our meetings; it's how our decisions continue to be made! Kudos to UVA! *Attention: Bataan Death March Memorial Walk/Run Meeting: Tuesday May 26, 2015 (TVSO Office) at 5:00 PM for the planning of the Bataan Death March Walk we will have on July3rd, 2015. Family of Winfield Thompson, Sr. & Louis Williams both survivors of the Bataan Death March please attend for any input.

*I am proud to state that our SWO had the honor of submitting a design for the Code Talker Monument that will be placed in Pierre on the Capital grounds. We gave Ella Robertson and verbal idea of what we wanted and she worked her magic and provided us a design of a Code Talker Statue. We presented it at the Rosebud meeting and ours was selected as part of the monument that will honor our Code Talkers. KUDOs to Ella Robertson. SWO and to the SWO as being in the forefront of this huge honoring. Our Honor Guards will all be asked to partake in the unveiling of this statue in Pierre in 2016.

*REMEMBER: We are here to serve you our fellow Veteran, widows, dependents. Call us at 698-3388 or cell 268-0502.

*American Legion Post #314- Delano Renville, Commander Cell:# 268-0354 / Vietnam Veterans Kit Fox Society - Dayton Seaboy, Commander Phone:# 698-3901 ask for Doc / Desert Era Veterans - Danielle DeCoteau, Commander Cell#: 268-1765. For GAS ASSISTANCE: Geri Opsal 698-3388

Have a good week.

Geri Opsal, Tribal VSO.

We must look for the opportunity in every difficulty instead of being paralyzed at the thought of the difficulty in every opportunity." -Walter E. Cole, Korean War Veteran.

Highlights of last week’s presentation for SWO women, families

By Sierra Wolcott

For the Sota

"A Balanced Woman, for a Balanced Family" presentation is the result of examination into several interrelated traumas that affect the health of communities, and was inspired by public health priorities expressed by the Tribal Chairmen and Tribal Health Directors in the Northern Plains area in recent years. The presentation provides an overview of:

*Historical Trauma: collective and emotional and psychological injury that occurs both over the lifespan and across generations, stemming from a variety of traumatic experiences;

* Adverse Childhood Experiences (or ACEs): specific categories of trauma experienced during childhood (including abuse, neglect, and household dysfunction); and,

*Toxic Stress: long-term, unresolved stress experienced by a child during gestation, infancy, or early childhood which can have lasting effects on brain development.

Each of these topics is described in terms of their causes and consequences for short- and long-term health and well being, and their connection to downstream maternal and child health (MCH) concerns like drug and alcohol use, domestic violence, incarceration, and others. The presentation ends with a discussion of resilience - psychological strength which can help us adapt in positive ways to negative life events - and how it can be fostered. This latter segment, as well as that regarding ACEs, was prepared Carol Redding of Sparrow Consulting, LLC, an expert on the CDC's ACE Study and the topic of resilience.

The presentation will be facilitated by three members of the Northern Plains Tribal Epidemiology Center (NPTEC) staff:

Jennifer Giroux, Medical Epidemiologist, Administrator

Dr. Giroux serves as a medical epidemiologist for the Great Plains Tribes and the Great Plains Area Indian Health Service (GPA-IHS). In this role, she leads the management of outbreaks for 17 Tribes and 1 service area in the four-state region of South Dakota, North Dakota, Nebraska, and Iowa. Dr. Giroux also serves as the Administrator for the Northern Plains Tribal Epidemiology Center (NPTEC).She was pivotal in starting NPTEC and Rocky Mountain Tribal Epidemiology Center.   She provides public health and epidemiology technical assistance and leadership to Tribes, to the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's Health Board (GPTCHB, where NPTEC is housed), to state health departments, and to other organizations, with a focus on building collaborations to meet the public health needs of NPTEC's partner Tribes. Dr. Giroux is a member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. She completed her undergraduate degree at Montana State University and graduated with her MD from the Indians Into Medicine (INMED) Program at the University of South Dakota. She completed her Master of Public Health in Epidemiology at the University of Minnesota.

P.J. Beaudry, Administrative Coordinator

Mr. Beaudry completed his undergraduate degree at Boston University with a BA in Health Science. From there, he completed his MPH at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health with a concentration in Health and Human Rights. Currently he serves as NPTEC's Administrative Coordinator and as the Principal Investigator and Program Director for GPTCHB's Sexually Transmitted Infections and Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program. In addition to his MPH, Mr. Beaudry has been Certified in Public Health by the National Board of Public Health Examiners.

Amy Muchna, Evaluation Coordinator

Ms. Muchna has a B.S. in Physiology from the University of Arizona College of Medicine. She continued her studies at the University of Arizona where she completed a Master of Public Health degree with an emphasis in Global Maternal and Child Health. Currently working as NPTEC's Evaluation Coordinator, she provides technical assistance to tribes in the Great Plains area within evaluation and other topics, and contributes to additional NPTEC activities/projects.

Notes from the SWO Research Office

By Dawn Eagle

The Research office has been diligently working towards passage of the Research Code.  We will be going to all the districts' meetings to handout copies of the proposed Research Code and we will be coming to a district near you!

Why do we need a Research Code?  Historically, our people have been researched to death, literally.  Western science treated our people less than human.  Bio-piracy was rampant and there were no safeguards in place for our people.  Then, in 1928, a report called the Merriam Report exposed and brought to light many of the inhumane injustices that were imposed on our people. Yet, few safeguards were put in place. Today, various tribal nations have become more proactive and have enacted their own safeguards.  Tribes such as the Oglala Sioux Tribe, Ho-Chunks in Wisconsin, Colorado River Indian Tribes, and the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa have now stepped forward and enacted a Research Code.  This is a huge first step.

Therefore, it is important to develop protections for our people.  Overall, research needs to be transparent, show a demonstrated need for the proposed research, and there needs to be informed consent.  We don't need any bio-colonialists coming here to save our people nor do we need bio-pirates.  There have been far too many instances where this has happened in the past.    This is where we can have a voice and assert our sovereignty.  That is why YOUR VOICE is important.  We have an obligation to protect our children and our grandchildren.

You are more than welcome to call my office at 605-698-8400 and I would be more than happy to assist you or answer any questions or concerns you may have.  Pidamiyaye!

SWC announces its Sex Offender Policy

In the interest of campus safety and in compliance with the Jacob Wetterling Act, and the provisions of the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act, as amended by the Campus Sex Crimes Act, the Sisseton Wahpeton College (SWC) will disclose information concerning registered sex offenders.

The purpose of this reporting is to ensure that member of campus community have information available concerning the presence of registered sex offender. Any person who is required to register as a sex offender shall provide notice as required under Federal, State, and Tribal law to both law enforcement and to the SWC Registrar’s Office.

The information regarding sex offenders at SWC is available to students through the SWO Sex Offender Registry: http://swo.nsopw.gov/

The Registry of Sex Offenders in South Dakota is available through the State Sex Offender Website: http://www.homefacts.com/offenders/South-Dakota/html

Procedures:

*Registered Sex Offenders are not barred from enrollment at SWC.

*Registered Sex Offenders must register with the SWC Registrar’s Office and with law enforcement as required by Federal, State, and Tribal Law.

*Registered sex offenders will be posted on the web site set forth above.

*All registered sex offenders are required to self-report their status to SWC upon enrollment. Failure to self-report may result in disciplinary action up to and including expulsion.

*Pursuant to the Sisseton Wahpeton College Board of Trustees Resolution, Registered Sex Offenders are prohibited from attending extracurricular activities at SWC. This includes extracurricular activities sponsored by the College and its Student Organizations or any activities for youth.

*Registered Sex Offenders are prohibited from being within the SWC campus housing.

The Sex Offender Registry database is made available to alert possible victims of potential danger, not to punish or embarrass offenders.

Shell gets approval to drill in the Arctic

By Alanna Petroff

CNN Money – May 12, 2015 – Shell has finally won approval to drill for oil in the Arctic, overcoming years of setbacks and fierce opposition from environmental campaigners.

The U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management gave Shell's controversial exploration plans the green light on Monday, with strings attached.

The oil giant will need a few more approvals from other organizations, including the U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement.

The U.S. regulator said it had considered "significant environmental, social and ecological resources in the region" in assessing Royal Dutch Shell (RDSA)'s proposal.

The oil exploration and drilling project is set to take place in the Chukchi Sea, which lies between Alaska and Russia.

Related: Lego ditches Shell partnership after Arctic oil protests

Shell has been trying to move into the region since at least 2009. Environmental groups warned the risks were as great as ever.

"Instead of holding Shell accountable and moving the country towards a sustainable future, our federal regulators are catering to an ill-prepared company in a region that doesn't tolerate cutting corners," said Greenpeace senior research specialist Tim Donaghy. "[This] could lead to a disaster in the Arctic."

Greenpeace has been vocal about its opposition to Arctic oil exploration. Late last year, the organization successfully pressured Lego to end its 50-year relationship with Shell by using a viral video showing Lego figures in a pristine Arctic landscape being enveloped by an oil spill.

Related: 5 solar stocks that should be on your radar

Shane Tomlinson, an energy expert at the Royal Institute of International Affairs, said Shell would have to tread carefully as it moves forward with its Arctic plan, not least because low oil prices may mean a low return on its investment.

Oil prices are trading around $60.50 per barrel, down from over $100 a barrel last summer.

Shares in Shell fell by about 1.3% in London on Tuesday. But they were still performing better than the overall market, which was off by about 1.6% at midday.

--CNN's Chris Liakos contributed to this report.

(Editor’s note: We are hoping that the U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement will find fault with this unnecessary, perhaps even unprofitable and obviously dangerous drilling in Arctic waters.)

Announces $2 million in grants to build capacity of Tribal Education departments

Funds will enable tribes to plan for directly operating BIE-funded schools on their lands and improving student educational outcomes

Washington, DC – May 14, 2015 – Assistant Secretary-Indian Affairs Kevin K. Washburn today announced that grants ranging from $25,000 to $150,000 per fiscal year are available for federally recognized tribes and their education departments. The grants are designed to help tribes assume control of Bureau of Indian Education (BIE)-funded schools in their communities, promote tribal education capacity, and provide academically rigorous and culturally appropriate education to Indian students on their reservations and trust lands.

Eligible tribal governments may apply for these grants by responding to the Request for Proposals that the BIE published on May 15, 2015, in the Federal Register.

“This grant program reflects President Obama’s commitment to tribal self-governance and self-determination, and will support tribal educators who best understand the unique needs of their communities as they strengthen their capacity to assume full control of BIE-funded schools on their reservations,” said Secretary Jewell, who chairs the White House Council on Native American Affairs. “It is a critical step in redesigning the BIE from a direct provider of education into an innovative organization that will serve as a capacity-builder and service-provider to tribes with BIE-funded schools.”

“With this announcement, we are taking the next major step in our efforts to return the education of Indian children to their tribes,” Assistant Secretary Washburn said. “We understand that tribal leaders, educators and parents have the greatest need to ensure that their children receive a world-class education, and with this effort, we will see to it that tribes can assume total control over the BIE-funded schools in their communities to improve the educational outcomes for their students. We're grateful Congress understands the importance of this process and appropriated funding to support this effort.”

“This grant solicitation carries out recommendations of Secretary Jewell and Education Secretary Arne Duncan’s Blueprint for Reform to transform the Bureau of Indian Education from a school administrator into a capacity builder and service provider to support tribes in educating their children and youth,” said BIE Director Dr. Charles M. “Monty” Roessel. “These grants will help tribes and their tribal departments of education to assume control of the BIE-funded schools serving their communities.”

The Blueprint for Reform, issued in June 2014 following consultation with tribal leaders, is an initiative of the White House Council on Native American Affairs, chaired by Secretary Jewell.

President Obama established the Council as part of his commitment to engage in a true and lasting government-to-government relationship with federally recognized tribes in a more coordinated and effective manner, including promoting and sustaining prosperous and resilient tribal communities.

Jewell then issued a Secretarial Order to begin restructuring BIE from solely a provider of education to a capacity-builder and education service-provider to tribes. The goal of this transformation is to give tribes the ability themselves to provide an academically rigorous and culturally appropriate education to their students, according to their needs.

The Blueprint made several recommendations regarding the BIE’s budget. Interior should invest in the school system’s infrastructure, including new school construction, and align its budget to support tribal self-determination by requesting and increasing tribal grant and Tribal Grant Support Costs for tribally controlled grant schools.

Under the solicitation announced today, grants will range from $25,000 to $150,000 per fiscal year depending on the project, number of educational programs impacted, project design, and expected outcomes. Subject to the availability of appropriated funds, grants will be provided for three years and, depending on performance, may be renewed for additional two-year terms.

Grant funds will support program goals for the following areas that promote tribal education capacity-building:

· To provide for the development and enforcement of tribal educational codes, including tribal educational policies and tribal standards applicable to curriculum, personnel, students, facilities, and support programs;

· To facilitate tribal control in all matters relating to the education of Indian children on reservations and on former reservations in Oklahoma; and

· To provide for the development of coordinated educational programs on reservations and on former reservations in Oklahoma by encouraging tribal administrative support of all BIE-funded educational programs, as well as encouraging tribal cooperation and coordination with entities carrying out all educational programs receiving financial support from other federal agencies, state agencies or private entities.

Top priority will be given to applicants that meet the following conditions:

· Serves three or more BIE-funded schools (less priority will be given if the applicant has less than three schools, but with at least one BIE-funded school).

· Provides coordinating services and technical assistance to all relevant BIE-funded schools.

· Monitors and audits its grant funds by or through its Tribal Education Department (TED)

· And offers a plan and schedule that provides for:

*Its TED to assume all assets and functions of the Bureau agency office associated with the tribe to the extent the assets and functions relate to education;

*The termination by the BIE of all such functions and office at the times of such assumption; and

*The assumption to occur over the term of the grant, unless mutually agreeable to the tribal governing body and the Assistant Secretary – Indian Affairs, the period in which such assumption is to occur may be modified, reduced or extended after the initial year of the grant.

The BIE will assist tribes in the development and operation of TEDs for the purpose of planning and coordinating all educational programs of the tribe. Each proposal must include a project narrative, a budget narrative, a work plan outline, and a project coordinator to serve as the point of contact for the program. The project coordinator is ultimately responsible for ensuring that the TED fulfills the obligations of its grant.

The BIE will provide pre-grant application training at several sites to support tribes and TEDs in applying for grants. Details on location and times will be made available here.

The BIE oversees 183 elementary and secondary schools, located on 64 reservations in 23 states, serving more than 48,000 students. Of these, 59 are BIE-operated and 124 are tribally operated under Indian Self Determination and Education Assistance Act contracts or Tribally Controlled Schools Act grants. BIE also funds or operates off-reservation boarding schools and peripheral dormitories near reservations for students attending public schools.

USDA invests $6.5 million to help conserve Water, improve Water Quality in Ogallala Aquifer region

Washington, DC – May 14, 2015 – Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced today that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is investing $6.5 million in the Ogallala Aquifer region this year to help farmers and ranchers conserve billions of gallons of water and improve water quality. Funding will be targeted to seven priority areas to support their primary water source and strengthen rural economies.

"This funding assists conservationists and agricultural producers in planning and implementing conservation practices that conserve water and improve water quality," said Vilsack. "This work not only expands the viability of the Ogallala Aquifer but also helps producers across the Great Plains strengthen their agricultural operations."

Underlying the Great Plains in eight states, the Ogallala supports nearly one-fifth of the wheat, corn, cotton and cattle produced in the United States. It has long been the main water supply for the High Plains' population and is being depleted at an unsustainable rate. The reservoir was created more than a million years ago through geologic action and covers about 174,000 square miles; mainly in Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas (also known as the High Plains). The aquifer also covers part of South Dakota, Wyoming, Colorado, and New Mexico.

Through the Ogallala Aquifer Initiative (OAI), USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is directing funding in fiscal 2015 to support targeted, local efforts to improve the quality and availability of this vital water supply. This year's work is planned in seven priority areas in five states and will continue for up to four years. It will conserve billions of gallons of water per year, extending the viability of the aquifer for multiple uses. This conservation investment builds on $66 million that NRCS has invested through OAI since 2011, which helped farmers and ranchers conserve water on more than 325,000 acres. The Secretary noted that much of the funding invested by USDA has been matched or supplemented by individual producers.

The fiscal 2015 priority areas include:

Northern High Plains ground water basin in Colorado: NRCS will focus on helping producers install new technologies on irrigated operations to more efficiently use water. These technologies include weather stations, sensors and telemetry for soil moisture and nutrients and advanced irrigation systems. Water and conservation districts are also developing incentive programs for producers. This conservation work will conserve 2.1 billion gallons of water over four years. Priority areas in Kansas: NRCS will work with producers to reconvert irrigated cropland to dryland farming in high priority areas. The state identified these areas in the Kansas Water Plan as Priority Ground Water Decline and Quick Response Areas, meaning they are the ones most in need and where conservation can have the biggest impact on recharging the aquifer. The conservation work will conserve 1.8 billion gallons of water over four years. Priority areas in eastern New Mexico: NRCS will work with producers to convert irrigated cropland to dryland cropping systems and restore grasslands. NRCS will work with producers to reduce pumping on 1,190 acres each year over four years. This conservation work will conserve 1.56 billion gallons of water over four years, helping ensure water for agricultural lands, cities like Clovis and Portales, N.M. and Cannon Air Force Base.

"Water is a precious resource, and the Ogallala Aquifer Initiative helps our farmers and ranchers use it wisely," NRCS Chief Jason Weller. "This is especially important in a place like the Ogallala, where drought conditions have prevailed in recent years. We know we can't change the weather, but we can help producers be ready for it."

Many western states were affected by a historic drought earlier in the decade, and that drought continues in areas including California and the southwest. NRCS works with producers to provide innovative, field-based conservation technologies and approaches, leading to improvements like enhancing soil's ability to hold water, evaluating irrigation water use and installing grazing systems that are more tolerant to drought.

For more on technical and financial assistance available through conservation programs, visit www.nrcs.usda.gov/GetStarted or a local USDA service center.

Editorials –

Sota editorial –

What’s been happening here?

Not to be unduly negative, but … what has been happening here?

We recall the early days of Indian gaming.

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe, under then-Chairman Russ Hawkins, put its foot down onto this new economic revenue-generating ground with the bingo hall in Watertown.

The Seminole Tribe in Florida assisted for a while.

This was a big deal.

There were threats of being shut down by the state.

Threats that Tribal officials would be sent to prison.

But it grew.

The Watertown gaming moved to Agency Village and became Agency Bingo Hall in the Veterans Memorial Gym.

Of course, we know what later happened.

Dakota Sioux Casino grew.

The bingo hall moved to Sisseton where it became Dakota Connection Casino.

We gathered alongside the interstate north of the ND-SD state line and listened to traditional prayers and the Wambdi drum group in the field that was to become Dakota Magic Casino … now Casino and Hotel. And Convention Center. And golf course.

Gaming was always, back then anyway, considered a “short term window” of opportunity.

The late Gary Johnson, when he served as Tribal planner, set up a plan whereby 25 percent of gaming revenue would go directly into Tribal economic development.

The Tribe was to have its own wholesale grocery market – patterned after the former Prairie Market in Watertown.

The Tribe was to have its own car dealership and garage.

The Tribe was to have any number of businesses, including laundromat, you-name-it, with the funding available and Tribal members eager to work, this was supposed to happen.

Well, some of it has happened … and quite well. Yes.

The Tribe has the c-stores, fuel business, and fast food places – at the casinos and at Agency Village.

But we can’t help but be disappointed by the lack of discipline required to hold to the plan.

And there is more that could have been done beyond simply creating “businesses.”

What about the combined justice center that has been talked about, studied – with feasibility studies since the mid-1990s – and proposed?

Such a local detention/treatment center would help so much in creating the “restorative justice” that we’ve heard talked about in our grassroots solutions meetings this past year.

Folks at Dakotah Pride Center point out that such a treatment center would be substantially sustained by taking in revenue for treating persons with addictions from other reservations.

As it is, Dakotah Pride lacks resources for even all our own Oyate. Many are sent to Keystone and other facilities in the state and region, at a financial burden to the Tribe.

But funds for building the designs we’ve seen on the drawing board have never been set aside.

The most recent resurrection of the plan was in 2010.

But … no money to build. Even phase one of several phases that were proposed then.

Approval has just been given to borrow for another multi-million dollar expansion of the gaming operation. What does that mean? That its revenue cannot even support itself? Much less provide the intended growth elsewhere on the Lake Traverse Reservation?

Again, not to spread negativity, but … what has been happening here?

-- CDF

Sota guest editorial –

President Obama gives his “take” on his trade initiative

(Editor’s note: Until reading this message from President Obama, talking with behind-the-scenes trade negotiators, and … well, perhaps consulting some tea leaves, I was more than just a skeptic of the administration’s Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP). Along with other friends, I would post messages of doom if Congress approves the plan, seeing it as giving additional power to multinational corporations. But now … well, today, I have changed my mind. Not that I do not still fear the power of the corporations, no, or the power of other nations to impact our lives here in this country. I do. What I believe is that the President and his team are negotiating the best deal – “infrastructure for future global trade” one of his negotiators calls it – we can get. And if we don’t get this now, we will have to depend upon what is imposed upon us in coming years. Think about that. Politics is not black and white, it is a whole bunch of gray. I’m going to hang with President Obama on this despite my recent strong criticisms.)

Statement from the White House

I want to set the record straight.

Right now, we have an opportunity to set the most progressive trade agreement in our nation's history -- with enforceable labor and environmental protections we simply can't count on other nations to pursue.

Here's why this means so much to me: I want to make sure that any deal we reach reflects our nation's values, in a way that hasn't always been true in the past. That's why I've said I'll refuse to sign any agreement that doesn't put American workers first.

But as long as 95 percent of our potential customers live outside our borders, we don't have the option to sit back and let others set the rules. We need to take this opportunity to level the playing field -- because when we're competing on equal ground, American workers win.

I've staked my presidency on middle-class economics, and fought hard for policies that ensure that anyone who's willing to work hard and play by the rules can get a fair shot.

We've made a lot of progress over the past six years -- rebounding from the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression, strengthening our manufacturing sector, and growing forward-looking industries like renewable energy.

We can't go back -- and we can't leave it to nations like China to write the rules for the global economy.

This is personal for me. I understand the skepticism about this, or any, trade deal. I've met folks across the country who still feel burned by agreements of the past. Those are the people I came to Washington to fight for.

That's what this is about for me. This is our chance to do better, to get it right.

I hope you'll agree. Over the last few months, OFA supporters across the country have stood up to ask the hard questions on this issue -- to make sure the outcome is good not just for our economy, but for working families.

Thank you,

Barack Obama.

http://www.cbsnews.com/videos/obama-my-democratic-critics-on-free-trade-are-wrong

Brief editorial comments from the editor’s desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

We heard many positive comments about the visit to SWO headquarters by South Dakota Governor Dennis Daugaard.

He met with SWO Tribal Chairman Bruce Renville, Execs and Council, and a host of program managers and staff.

The focus was on Natural Resources and Agriculture, but the Governor was also given a look into the Tribe’s Education, THPO, and many other key programs. He was also given a close look at the SWO Akicita medals and memorabilia.

Tribal VSO Geri Opsal and other SWO veterans presented the Governor with a star quilt when he came to the Akicita display table.

We hope that this experience helps pave the way for improved cooperation in the future between the Tribe and State. The past has been a rocky adventure.

Included in any renewed cooperation, we urge the Governor to reopen the investigation into the disappearance of AJ Lufkins.

Those who came carrying signs rallying to bring AJ home were disappointed last week.

Now it is up to the Governor to show that even though he did not meet with them personally he has heard their voices.

It has been too long without anything being done.

*****

After writing our editorial for this edition, we’ve become aware of a new series of business incubator training for Tribal members.

This is precisely what the original plans were for use of gaming revenue – that 25 percent set-aside.

A series of six “business incubator” sessions are being scheduled for Oyate interested in starting or expanding their own business enterprise.

Watch for details from Harold in the Planning Department!

*****

On Thursday, South Dakota’s Acting US Attorney Randolph Seil, BIA Officer Mario Redlegs and aides to Senator Thune and Representative Kristi Noem made an unannounced visit to SWO Tribal headquarters.

They met with Capt. Gary Gaikowski of SWO Tribal Law Enforcement and several Council members.

Capt. Gaikowski gave them a tour of the old detention/law enforcement center.

The prospect of building a new justice center was discussed.

While we did not learn of the meeting until after the fact, its topic fits with what we have shared as one of the top priorities in our quest for “restorative justice” for the Oyate.

We hope to have follow-up information from the visit.

*****

It was disappointing last week that the Grant County Zoning Board approved another large dairy operation – this one near Summit.

The approval came over objections of environmentalists and neighboring landowners.

What is alarming from my perspective is that there was no Tribal consultation whatsoever.

Yet this 5,000-plus head dairy will be taking water resources for which the SWO have first usage rights.

We need to be involved in the permitting process.

During the multiple expansions of the once-small Veblen dairy operation into the largest dairy in the state of South Dakota, the Tribe has never to my knowledge been part of the permitting process!

*****

Congratulations to all the many Oyate graduates, from pre-school and kindergarten, to eighth grade, twelfth grade, and college!

This is the season for graduation, and we will be sharing highlights as reports come in over the coming weeks.

It is everyone’s responsibility to help see that future of these students – whether advancing to a higher grade or heading into a career, is paved with hope and possibility.

This is the way out of oppression!

Everyone’s help is needed.

*****

We are still working to bring to light cases of racism in the local community.

Watch for reports as we sift through information we’ve been given.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"If the Great Spirit wanted men to stay in one place He would make the world stand still; but He made it to always change..." -- Chief Flying Hawk, OGLALA SIOUX

The Elders tell us change occurs in two directions. They say, "That which is built is constantly being destroyed; that which is loose is being used to build the new." In other words, change is constantly going on. Many times we hear people say, "I hate change." Does it make sense that the Great Spirit would design people to hate it? The Great Spirit designed people with change abilities such as visioning, imagery and imagination. Maybe we need to learn to use these tools and then we'll look forward to change.

Great Spirit, today, let me see the harmony of Yours, truly changing world.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

An economist is a man who states the obvious in terms of the incomprehensible. Alfred A. Knopf

The only thing that saves us from the bureaucracy is inefficiency. An efficient bureaucracy is the greatest threat to liberty. Eugene McCarthy (1916 - 2005), Time magazine, Feb. 12, 1979

A jury consists of twelve persons chosen to decide who has the better lawyer. Robert Frost (1874 - 1963), (attributed)

Nothing is more conducive to peace of mind than not having any opinions at all. Georg Christoph Lichtenberg (1742 - 1799)

Patriotism is often an arbitrary veneration of real estate above principles. George Jean Nathan (1882 - 1958)

If absolute power corrupts absolutely, does absolute powerlessness make you pure? Harry Shearer

If man does find the solution for world peace it will be the most revolutionary reversal of his record we have ever known. George C. Marshall (1880 - 1959)

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Mass held for Jackie Hisgun-Ferrier

Funeral Mass for Jacqueline Faye Hisgun-Ferrier, 52, of Sisseton, SD was held Monday morning, May 11, 2015 at St. Catherine's Catholic Church, Sisseton, SD with the Rev. Fr. Jerry Ranek and Pastor Vern Donnell officiating.

Pianist was Billy Kohl. Drum Group was Buffalo Lake Singers.

Pallbearers were Tracy White, Gary Brant Jr., Stacy Brant Jr., Dustin Brant, Tyson Brant, Redstar "Duta" Brant, Joe Eastman, Justin LaCroix and Gabe DuMarce. Honorary Pallbearers were Jason Adams, Francine Small, Marsha LaFontaine, Angie Eastman, Carrie Hisgun, Wanda LaBatte, Marie Renville, Alma Renville, Mary Ann Wanna and "all the Rangers."

Interment is in St. Matthew's Cemetery, Veblen, SD.

There were all-night wake services Saturday and Sunday at St. Catherine's Hall, Sisseton, SD.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel was in charge of arrangements.

Jacqueline Faye Hisgun-Ferrier was born on February 25, 1963 to Dennis Hisgun Sr. and Charlotte Grey Owl in Sisseton, SD. She attended school in Sisseton.

Jacqueline was lovingly called "Jackie" by her family and friends. She traveled all over the country and was always visiting friends. She enjoyed her adventures and time spent with these family and friends.

She lived in Minneapolis, MN, Sisseton, SD, and Las Vegas, NV.

Jackie enjoyed reading books and beading. She was very well known for her bead work.

Jackie was also known for her big beautiful smile and her infectious laugh. No matter what the situation, she always had a big smile on her face.

Jacqueline passed away on May 7, 2015 in Fargo, ND.

Jacqueline is survived by her father, Dennis (Vernie) Hisgun Sr. of Mahnomen, MN; children, Jared (Carrie) Hisgun of Sisseton, SD, Amanda Hisgun of Perham, MN, Gary Brant Jr. of Sisseton, SD, Prairie Hellevang of Sioux Falls, SD, ChyAnna (Joe) Hisgun-Nutter of Hutchinson, MN, JoLisa Goodman of Hinckley, MN, and Weston Hisgun. Siblings DeLinda Hisgun of Duluth, MN, Dennis (Carlene) Hisgun Jr. of Detroit Lakes, MN, Mary Ann Hisgun, Nancy Hisgun, Nicole Hisgun all of Mahnomen, MN, Seth (Jenelle) Hisgun of Waubun, MN, Lucas Hisgun, Aaron (Rachel) Hisgun, Andrew Hisgun, Aimee (Hector) Hisgun, and Samantha Hisgun all of Mahnomen, MN; eight grandchildren and an uncle Bernard Grey Owl of Ft. Thompson, SD, and aunts JoAnn Hisgun of Minneapolis, MN and Wanda LaBatte of Sisseton, SD and many relatives from Crow Creek.

Jacqueline was preceded in death by her mother, Charlotte Grey Owl; paternal grandmother Melvina LaBatte, a sister Iva Hisgun; a granddaughter Ivory Inez Brant and aunt Melvina Grey Owl, and nephews Noah Hisgun, and Jordan Aguilar.

For Jacqueline's obituary and on-line registry please visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com

Funeral service for LaVonne Ortley

Funeral Service for LaVonne June Ortley, 69, of Browns Valley, MN was held last Thursday afternoon, May 14, 2015 at the Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD with the Rev. Paul Warnier officiating.

Pallbearers were Jeff, Jordan, Roger, Erik, Gary, and John Ortley. Honorary Pallbearers were "All of LaVonne's friends and family."

Interment is in Ascension Presbyterian Cemetery, Big Coulee, SD.

There was visitation on Wednesday at the Cahill Funeral Chapel in Sisseton, SD.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel was in charge of arrangements.

LaVonne June Ortley was born on January 6, 1946 near Wilmot, SD to Silas and Rosalie (Burke) Ortley Sr. She attended country school, Peever elementary school and graduated from Browns Valley High School the class of 1964

 LaVonne was confirmed at Zion Lutheran Church in Browns Valley, MN.

She lived with her grandmother Julia Clara (Miller) Heminger and she helped to raise her brother Kenneth and he called her mom.

She helped to raise numerous children who also called her mom or sister because of her good heartedness.

LaVonne loved to read, and take walks, especially in the rain, she would laugh when people had to duck under her umbrella to she who she was because she was so short.

She loved the outdoors and cutting grass on her riding lawnmower. She also had numerous hobbies to keep her busy.

LaVonne passed away on May 11, 2015 in Fargo, ND.

LaVonne is survived by ten children, John, Rosie, Julia, Jordan, Jeff, Janet, Adam, Scott, Jason Ortley, and Roger Ortley; one sister Mary Ortley, and four brothers, Edmond TwoStars, Silas Ortley Jr. Kenneth Ortley, and Gary Ortley; eleven grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.

LaVonne was preceded in death by her parents, three children, Lisa Ann, Jay Luke, and Jennifer, one brother James Burke, one sister Felicia Ortley, and her grandmother, Julia Clara Heminger.

For LaVonne's obituary and on-line registry please visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor’s note: The following comes from the editor’s column and the Sota “deadlines and policies” statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Open letter to the Oyate

By Sica Lohnes

Human rights and indigenous people of the five continents of the world there are 300 million indigenous people in the world that face social and economic disadvantage in the societies in which they live. In the past, some of the world's worst violations of human rights have less access to education and welfare than other members of the industrial society.

For centuries indigenous people have lived on the margins of national and international life. Some have continued to live according to their own in traditional ways and have not adopted the predominant language or religion of the country that oppresses them. Many have been outcasts in their own lands. Rarely have they been incorporated by the larger societies in which they live. They have been denied citizenship by the authorities who have taken their land without payment.

The ancestral lands of indigenous people were discovered by colonial powers and then allocated to foreign settlers. In many countries the indigenous people were forced to live on reserved territories or confined to inaccessible or inhospitable regions. Some governments or most of them viewed indigenous people as inferior because they did not share the lifestyle or the cultures of the majority. These nations tended to view nomads or hunting peoples with fear and disgrace and had no respect for these people. Many indigenous people were doomed to extinction.

In the year 2000 the number of languages and dialects spoken throughout the five continents is only half of what it had been in the 1900s.

The modern world will therefore prove to have been a great destroyer of languages, traditions, and cultures. Cultures threatened with extinction, hundreds of years of genocide committed against indigenous people brings a hard twist to the realities of our times. The murders of these innocent people make clear the savagery of civilized people in quest for riches at the expense of moral law continues and is expanding with the world market.

Indigenous people will continue to be victims of this greed as long as we have lands and territories with natural resources, or until the values of civilization change. In the year 2000, indigenous people of the five continents of the world suffer from the highest unemployment rate, the highest rate of poverty, the highest infant mortality rate, the highest rate of teenage suicide, the highest rate of diabetes, the greatest incidence of malnutrition, the highest susceptibility to disease, the lowest per capita income, the shortest life expectancy, the poorest education, the highest imprisonment rate, and the lowest standard of living.

In the year 2000, the indigenous people of the five continents of the world are an endangered species and may soon, like the rain forests in South America disappear forever.

Poems from the pen of Elden Hayes

Losing Mother Earth

I do not dance the traditional way

I am very proud of those who do,

culture needs to be passed on

those customs that belong to the Sioux.

We are the tenders of mother earth

we watch over the sacred land,

in a time of global warming

people have failed to understand.

Mother earth is slowly dying

and man once again is the culprit,

it feels like we ruin everything

from the rainforest to the pulpit.

We still belong to the sweat lodge

and we still use the vision quest,

mother earth sits on the jury

and the guilty ones should confess.

Stop the slaughter of the trees

let mother earth draw a deep breath,

there is a need to work together

and make green- house gas die its death.

Crowded cities keep getting bigger

animal habitat slips away,

humans are always the reason

I know that we will be made to pay.

Glaciers are starting to melt

soon we will lose the polar bear,

everything will become extinct

there will be no one left to care…..

9-28-13

Guarded Wall

Locked behind the guarded wall

inside of the self-made dungeon

created to keep erosion out

and keep the world from getting in

 

placing faith in the wrong solution

robbed all the trust that I have had,

I know that the world can be so cruel

but seldom has it seemed so bad

 

they say we walk in the end times

generations have said that before

they have sought a glory in dying

trying to see what's behind the door

 

in the mean time life moves on

new generations have not changed things,

the poor man has no excuses

he's just living life for what it brings

 

we've proven that we are survivors

even though there's  nothing to show

retreating behind a make believe wall

where pain is not allowed to go.

7-28-11

Optimistic on Trade Promotion Authority Bill despite setback

Washington, DC – May 12, 2015 – U.S. Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.) issued the following statement after Senate Democrats obstructed consideration of H.R. 1314, the TPA legislation:

“The sooner Congress renews the bipartisan trade promotion authority legislation, the sooner South Dakota consumers, workers, and job creators can experience the benefits of a healthier economy. Unfortunately, Senate Democrats have chosen to block their own president’s agenda, uniting against one of his top policy priorities while, so far, President Obama has failed to adequately make his case among his own party. This is a setback, but I am hopeful that the Senate can find a path forward to pass this legislation, which is essential to securing free and fair trade agreements and providing access to new markets for American farmers, ranchers, and manufacturers.”

Permafrost thaw would have runaway effect on Carbon release

By Tim Radford

Climate News Network – May 15, 2015 – LONDON—An international team of scientists has settled one puzzle of the Arctic permafrost and confirmed one long-standing fear: the vast amounts of carbon now preserved in the frozen soils could one day all get back into the atmosphere.

Since the Arctic is the fastest-warming place on the planet, such a release of greenhouse gas could only accelerate global warming and precipitate catastrophic climate change.

That the circumpolar regions of the northern hemisphere hold vast amounts of deep-frozen carbon is not in question.

The latest estimate is 17 billion tonnes, which is twice the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and perhaps 10 times the quantity put into the atmosphere by burning fossil fuels since the start of the Industrial Revolution.

Hazard underlined

In recent weeks, researchers have already underlined the potential hazard. But the big question has been that if some of the trapped carbon must be escaping now, where is it going?

Researchers have checked the mouths of the Arctic rivers for the telltale evidence of ancient dissolved organic carbon—partly-rotted vegetable matter deep-frozen more than 20,000 years ago—and found surprisingly little.

Now Robert Spencer, an oceanographer at Florida State University, and colleagues from the US, UK, Russia, Switzerland and Germany report in Geophysical Research Letters that the answer lies in the soil—and in the headwater streams of the terrestrial Arctic regions.

Instead of flowing down towards the sea, the thawing peat and ancient leaf litter of the warming permafrost is being metabolised by microbes and released swiftly into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide.

“We found that decomposition converted 60% of the carbon in the thawed permafrost to carbon dioxide in two weeks”

The scientists conclude that the microbes, once they get a chance to work at all, act so fast that half of all the soil carbon they can get at is turned into carbon dioxide within a week. It gets into the atmosphere before it has much chance to flow downstream with the soil meltwater.

The researchers centered their study on Duvanny Yar in Siberia, where the Kolyma River sluices through a bank of permafrost to expose the frozen organic carbon.

They worked at 19 different sites—including places where the permafrost was more than 30 metres deep—and they found tributary streams made entirely of thawed permafrost.

Measurement of the carbon concentration confirmed that it was indeed ancient. The researchers analysed its form in the meltwater, then they bottled it with a selection of local microbes, and waited.

Used by microbes

“We found that decomposition converted 60% of the carbon in the thawed permafrost to carbon dioxide in two weeks,” says Aron Stubbins, assistant professor at the University of Georgia’s Skidaway Institute of Oceanography. “This shows that permafrost carbon is definitely in a form that can be used by the microbes.”

The finding raises a new—and not yet considered—aspect of the carbon cycle jigsaw puzzle, because what happens to atmospheric and soil carbon is a huge element in all climate simulations.

At he moment, permafrost carbon is not a big factor in projections by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Dr Spencer says: “When you have a huge frozen store of carbon and it’s thawing, we have some big questions. The primary question is, when it thaws, what happens to it?

“Our research shows that this ancient carbon is rapidly utilised by microbes and transferred to the atmosphere, leading to further warming in the region, and therefore more thawing. So we get into a runaway effect.”

Social “helper” column dedicated to young generation Oyate –

Wawokiyape

By Shay Dirtseller

Good morning Oyate. This week’s topic is the mentality of our younger generation and an explanation from people I have spoken with.

Now, this is just a theory so bear with me in this explanation. I spoke with a group of teenagers and asked their opinions as to why so many teens feel suicide is the only way out. These are the responses (*names are withheld*).

- I think they might have done it because they felt alone. Like they had no one to confide in because a lot of us grow up away from our parents and our grandmas raise us.

- Maybe it’s because of the feeling of hopelessness. (I asked what they meant by hopeless.) Well, some of us will never leave this place... we will never get off the rez because we don't have the money neither do our parents … there are barely any jobs around the rez … we have nothing.

- I have thought about suicide myself … but for me it was because my mom was always out and it felt like I was the mother you know? I had two younger siblings and I was the one who had to change their diaper, wash their clothes, make sure they were fed and up for school each day since the time I was about 9. By the time I turned 15, it felt as though I had kids … not my mom. Finally, I was so overwhelmed, depressed and lost that I thought death would be a better place to be then living with my mother but ... I couldn’t leave my little brother and sister ... the ones I raised because I didn’t want them to go through what I did. That’s what I think though.

- Well, death is easier than being in this place. No one encourages us to do anything with our lives I never got told I could be a doctor or whatever. My grandma would always yell at me and say I'd be just like my dad, a drunk with no job. It’s abuse by the people who are supposed to protect and love you but instead run you into the ground on a daily basis! I'm just saying.

- Bullying and being picked on would be my guess. It hurts to be told that you’re ugly or be called names by peers ... It happens a lot!

These are some of the heart breaking responses that I have heard. It is very unnerving that these teens feel this and their families do not even take notice. The parents or grand-parents don't see the damage being done by their actions and words.

This generation has so much potential but we, the adults, need to tell them we love them, encourage them and motivate them. Let them know that it is possible to be something in life and that there is hope and life off the reservation.

In closing, death is a permanent solution to a temporary problem! Nothing in life is ever that bad and if it is then there are people out there that can help. Psychiatrists, doctors, counselors and therapists are all there for you. There is no shame in admitting you need help or someone to talk to. Prayers to the families of suicide victims.

Respectfully, Shay.

 

 

Health –

Healthy Kids –

Behavioral Disorders in Childhood contribute to a lifetime of poor physical health

By Sonia J. Magat, D.O., Ph.D.

Childhood disorders that have behavioral, social and economic origins are prematurity, obesity and behavioral health. It is recognized that early life stress is the main contributor to childhood behavioral disorders. The study on Adverse Childhood  Experiences (ACE) have reported that toxic stress resulting from exposure to violence, physical and sexual abuse, neglect or substance abuse, are associated with heart disease, psychiatric illnesses, obesity, diabetes and cancer in adulthood.

The first 3 to 5 years of a child's life is important to health success in later life. Behavioral disorders during early childhood have been shown to contribute to poor physical and behavioral health not only of the children but across their lifespan (Thomas F. Boat MD, JAMA, April 21, 2015).

Differentiating normal misbehavior from serious behavioral problems requires knowledge about child development. Parents need to be aware of normal social, emotional and sexual development in each age group.

There are some warning signs to look for (http://discipline.about.com):

1.  Difficulty controlling anger, frustration or disappointment in age- appropriate means. Temper tantrums are not normal for school age children.

2.  Difficulty managing impulses. As a child grows older, he is able to manage impulses and refrain from physical aggression.

3.  Behavior that does not respond to discipline. When parents take appropriate disciplinary action, it is not normal for kids to continue to misbehave.

4.  Behavior that interferes with school performance and relationship with family or friends.

5.  Self- injuring or talk about suicide is abnormal behavior and requires evaluation by professional care provider.

Behavioral disorders are more than just occasional temper tantrums or defiant behaviors.

Types of Behavioral Disorders:

1.  Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) - predominantly hyperactive-impulsive, predominantly inattentive or combination of both.

2.  Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) - persistent defiance and disobedience toward authoritative figures (parents and other adults).Characterized by frequent arguing with adults and refusing to follow rules.

3.  Conduct behaviors- repetitive patterns of violation of other people's rights and age-appropriate social rules.

*Showing physical aggression toward people and animals

*Stealing

*Deliberate fire setting

*Destroying properties (vandalism)

*Running away from home

*Skipping school

*Staying out late at night despite curfew rules.

Treatment for behavioral disorders require a team of professionals including:

1.  Child psychiatrist- to identify child behavior and prescribe medication when needed.

2.  Therapists- to assist children to learn skills in managing emotion and behavior.

3.  Psychologist- perform testing to rule out learning disabilities and other underlying mental health issues.

4.  Special Education Services may be necessary.

Behavioral problems in childhood, if not treated may result in poor physical health in adulthood.

Interventions directed at enhancing parental skills, providing safe and supportive home environment and offering health promoting programs in preschools have been shown to improve the outcomes in disadvantaged children (Thomas F. Boat, MD, JAMA April 21, 2015).

This progression from early childhood adverse experiences to behavioral disorders in childhood and then to psychiatric illnesses, obesity, diabetes heart disease and cancer in adulthood is being studied at the molecular level to rescue children from "inevitable early trauma". Early identification of trauma-induced physical and behavioral problems will promote best outcomes for the children.

Partnership of primary health care providers with communities to support these efforts are necessary for "promoting behavioral health in children to improve lifetime health."

SWO Honeybee Project

By Ella Robertson

SWO Community Planner

May of this year marks exactly one (1) year since we started our Honeybee Project. It has been an eye-opening, learning experience! Beekeeping has helped us to become more environmentally conscious of our chemical use. Especially in regard to chemical use by farmers and ranchers that lease our lands, we are more aware. Our bees are teaching us how to be better stewards of our environment.

In our first year we wintered our bees here, yes, bees can survive the harsh South Dakota winter. The hives are strong a productive, so we are planning on extracting our first cycle of honey come July. Steve estimates that we can get 70 pounds of honey per hive. The honey that we harvest will be available to sale in our local businesses. Help support our honeybee project by purchasing our honey!

Since the inception of this project we have gained support from our sister programs and the Tribal Police have graciously donated the old dog pound to our project to be converted into a Honey House. At the Honey House we will winter our bees, and process our honey. Thank you so much to Gary and staff for your support of our project!

This week we will be moving our bees to their summer locations. We are very thankful for the Natural Resources Department for always offering a helping hand when we need our bees to be transported and they are so willing to learn so thank you to Charlene Miller and her awesome helping hands.

We want to share the knowledge we have in beekeeping with our community. So we are offering beekeeping classes. Here is our schedule:

Tuesday, May 26th – 5:00-6:00pm – An Introduction into Beekeeping

Tuesday, June 9th – Basic Beekeeping

Tuesday, June 23rd - Basic Beekeeping

Tuesday, July 7th – Extracting Honey

Tuesday, July 21st – Beekeeping

Classes are offered by our own tribal member and experienced beekeeper, Steve Owen. Currently, Steve is working with Ella Robertson in the Planning office to make this project a thriving business! We invite you to come to our classes to gain insightful information, hands on experience and maybe sample a little of our honey!

For more information about the Honeybee Project or the classes being offered contact: Ella Robertson, Community Planner by email, ellar@swo-nsn.gov or 605-698-8215.

Grief workshop in Sisseton

Dr. Marcie Moran, Clinical Director of Catholic Family Services, Sioux Falls, will present “Grieving the Loss of a Loved One,” Wednesday, May 20, from 7:00-9:00 p.m., St Catherine Parish, Sisseton, SD.

This educational program is for adults who are struggling with the loss of a loved one.

“Because each loss is unique, it effects us differently,” says Dr. Moran.

“So whether it’s been two months or ten years, all are welcome to join in learning how to adjust and cope with that loss.”

The presentation will include information on the different aspects of the grief process; manifestations of grief; how loss can effect us and those around us; grief & spirituality and much more.

There will be time for Q & A's and group discussion.

You can actively participate or simply listen and take it in.  The public is welcome and there is no charge to attend.

For more information please contact Catholic Family Services, 605-988-3775, 800-700-7867 or email cfs@sfcatholic.org

'The Mess of Meth': What happens to a Meth House?

By London Swan

KDLT News – May 12, 2015 – Fort Thompson, SD – Meth use is a problem that's been glamorized in the hit television show, "Breaking Bad." And it's an epidemic that may exist right in your own backyard.

Who really knows what happens behind closed doors.

“It really can be deceiving and it really could be anywhere where somebody is cooking or making meth,” said Officer Sam Clemens, Sioux Falls Police Dept.

According to the United States Drug Enforcement Administration, there were 19 methamphetamine lab incidents in South Dakota in 2014.

Officer Sam Clemens says meth use has always be an issue in Sioux Falls. The only thing that's changed is how the drug is made.

“In the past what we saw was big meth labs and people were producing a big quantity of that doing so using a lot of different chemicals,” said Officer Clemens.

Sioux Falls Police say the new trend is meth in smaller quantities. Meth makers are using pop bottles.

But...what happens after a meth lab is discovered? That's up to the property owner.

“There are no laws that say that we have to condemn a place or board a place up,” said Officer Clemens. “It's really just that recommendation and trying to make that house as safe as you can after somebody has been making meth."

KDLT News traveled 167 miles to Fort Thompson to speak with an expert on cleaning meth houses.

“I think it's tedious work to go into a unit or any home to clean for meth,” said Ronnette Kirkie, Fort Thompson Resident.

Ronnette Kirkie has been cleaning up meth houses for two years. She works with contracting companies to clean up 12 to 15 units at Crow Creek Housing.

“It basically just started out from a report that some syringes and stuff were found in the unit,” said Kirkie. “And there's speculation that there might be some meth use.”

It may look like an ordinary home. But step inside and it's a different story.

“You’d see the bottles, you'd see the light bulbs and syringes,” said Kirkie. “The smell was different."

Kirkie says the residue from cooking or smoking meth is "basically invisible" in a home. That's why cleaning companies like Santi-Kleen based in Marion, South Dakota are called into action.

“It was very tedious and they had to wear hazemat suits too,” said Kirkie.

Crews use trash bags, paper towels and chemicals to clean up meth houses.

“Basically it was labor, a lot of labor,” said Kirkie.

Kirkie says it can cost as much as $24,000 to clean up a meth lab. In a worst case scenario, the home could be a total loss.

“You had to have a solid waste truck there to take care of the debris, the garbage and whatever was being taken out that was being thrown away,” said Kirkie. “You couldn't keep a lot of the stuff."

Everything that belonged to the family is now ruined…except for the few photographs that will serve as a reminder of life before meth.

In South Dakota, state law requires prior meth-related activity in a property to be disclosed.

Last year, police uncovered more than 9,000 meth labs in the United States. Of the state's that surround South Dakota, Iowa had the most meth labs by far with 141. Minnesota only had eight.

(Editor’s note: Meth and its consequences are all around here on the Lake Traverse Reservation. Everyone in the community is hurt by this epidemic. Last year, during one of our grassroots solutions meetings, Housing Authority officials said it can cost up to $7,000 to clean a unit before a new family can move in.)

Breathless

By Richard P. Holm MD

There is probably no more urgent symptom in general medicine than when people are having trouble catching their breath. This accounts for about five percent of all Emergency Room visits and occurs during about 50 percent of all admissions to the hospital. Most challenging is that breathlessness may be anywhere from a low risk problem to one life threatening.

The business owner came into the emergency room with the feeling of impending doom, chest pressure radiating into his neck, down his left arm, and he couldn't catch his breath. The blood clot in his coronary artery was diagnosed by history, with a little help from an electrocardiogram, and his breath came back after a clot busting IV drug.

The college student came to the ER dramatically short of breath, and had a normal lung exam, CXR and blood tests. She was emotionally overwhelmed by impending finals and when we walked her in the hall, she felt better and her breathing calmed down.

The trucker had noticed his legs swelling for a week, and now he couldn't catch his breath. The life threatening pulmonary emboli or blood clots from leg to lung were proven by lung CT and effectively treated with anticoagulation.

The teacher had a remarkably pale white face and was extremely short of breath. Profound anemia was proven by blood test and leukemia by bone marrow test. She lives a normal life now twenty years after her bone marrow transplant.

The twelve-year-old struggled with deep and rapid breathing, the air around her smelled fruity, her lungs sounded clear by stethoscope, the blood test found a high blood sugar, and her blood pH that was acidic. Diabetic ketoacidosis was resolved over eight hours with insulin, and her breathlessness went away.

The lifetime smoker came down with influenza given to him by his non-immunized four-year-old grandson, and his usual breathlessness occurring with any exertion worsened to the point that he was breathless just lying there. He died after three weeks of intensive care, steroids, antibiotics, and even breathing assistance on a respirator.

I was a grade school kid having difficulty breathing and sleeping at night as the blossoming tree pollen blew across my bed. It was my prairie doctor from DeSmet who heard my story, listened to my heart and lungs, correctly diagnosed asthma, and provided the inhaler medicine that gratefully allowed me to sleep.

The causes for breathlessness span almost all the organ systems of the body... one symptom potentially due to many problems. If you can't get your breath you need to get some help.

Ripple Effect –

What’s all the Buzz about Pollinators?

You may have heard quite a bit lately about Pollinators and their importance. But what exactly is all this buzz about? The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has provided this useful information on the importance of Pollinators and how you can help them thrive.

Pollination happens when wind, water, or wildlife carry pollen from the anther (male part) to the stigma (female part) of flowers. Almost 90% of the world's flowering plant species rely on animal pollinators.

Pollinators help us to enjoy well-balanced diets and healthy ecosystems. They provide nutritious fruits, vegetables, and nuts like blueberries, squash, and almonds. This food is important for wildlife, too. Black bears, for example, eat raspberries that are pollinated by bumble bees.

Pollinators also create stable environments. They pollinate plants that stabilize the soil and prevent erosion. These plants can buffer waterways, store carbon, and provide habitat for other wildlife. Plus, flowering landscapes are beautiful. Without pollinators, our environment would look very different.

Among all pollinators (hummingbirds, bats, butterflies, flies and some beetle), bees are unique. In addition to sipping nectar to fuel their own flight, they are one of the few animals to actively gather large amounts of pollen (and hence inadvertently scatter some of it widely between flowers). Rich in protein, the pollen of many plant species serves as the principle food source for developing bee larvae.

While honey bees pollinate most of our crops, other bees are also important pollinators. In addition to crop pollination services, honey bees are responsible for producing all U.S. honey. While other bees are important as pollinators of crops and wild plants, all the honey we enjoy is produced by honey bees. Sadly, honey yields even in the Upper Midwest are declining due to the replacement of flowering plants with large monocultures of corn and soybeans. Also, the ubiquitous use of herbicides kills off flowering nectar plants along crop borders, ditches and roadsides.

You can help restore the bee population by:

Bee Friendly Flowers

Planting more nectar producing – bee friendly plants will help our bees stay healthy and help our beekeepers produce more honey! If you have a large tract of land or yard, consider sowing it in clover or alfalfa. These legumes will fix nitrogen, improving the health of your soil while providing nectar and pollen for bees. Or, plant native flowering plants, many of which are good nectar and pollen producers: http://www.xerces.org/pollinator-conservation/

Nesting Habitat

By leaving exposed, undisturbed soil in your yard, you can attract ground nesting bees. Most bees (between 60 and 70%) dig burrows in the ground. These bees prefer dry, sandy soil bare of vegetation, often on hillsides.

You can attract cavity-nesting bees (the other 30-40%) by providing tunnels in a man-made structure called a bee house—like a bird house for bees. Three common types of bee house are stick bundles, wood blocks and observation blocks.

Join the Great Sunflower Project, http://www.greatsunflower.org/ along with more than 100,000 other citizens to plant bee-friendly plants and hunt for bees -- a great school project!

For more information, go to the MNDNR website http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/pollinators/index.html

*****

The RRBC is a grassroots organization that is a chartered not-for-profit corporation under the provisions of Manitoba, North Dakota, Minnesota, and South Dakota law. Our offices in Moorhead, MN and Winnipeg, MB can be reached at 701-356-3183 and 204-982-7254, or you can check out our website at www.redriverbasincommission.org.

(Editor’s note: The SWO Tribe has undertaken a beekeeping project to bring back these important pollinators to the Tribal homelands. It was one of the exhibits on display in the rotunda last week that caught the attention of Governor Daugaard. We all need to do whatever possible to restore harmony and health to the environment and our food supplies. See the article submitted by Ella Robertson also in this Sota.)

Can Avian Influenza be passed in Eggs?

Brookings, SD – With the recent avian influenza outbreaks in commercial poultry flocks in Minnesota, South Dakota, Wisconsin and Iowa, South Dakotans should not be worried about eating eggs, explained Lavonne Meyer, SDSU Extension Food Safety Field Specialist.

"According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the chance of infected poultry or eggs entering the food chain is extremely low due to the many safeguards in place," Meyer said.

She explained that even when avian influenza is not a concern, the FDA has mandatory inspections and testing programs in place to protect the food system and prevent the chance of infected poultry or eggs entering the food chain.

"In addition to these safeguards, hens infected with avian influenza (AI) usually stop laying eggs. This is one of the first signs of illness, even if infected hens would lay a few eggs they generally would not get through washing and grading because the shells are weak and oddly shaped," Meyer said.

If one hen is found to have AI, Meyer explained, the flow of eggs from a facility is stopped at the first suspicion of an outbreak according to FDA regulations. "They do not even wait for a confirmed diagnosis," she said. "Because of this, eggs in the marketplace are unlikely to be contaminated with AI."

Proper cooking prevents avian influenza transmission In the unlikely chance that poultry meat or eggs from a bird infected with avian influenza does enter the U.S. food system, Meyer reminds consumers, the virus is killed by properly cooking poultry or eggs. "Cooking poultry, eggs and other poultry products to the proper temperature and preventing cross-contamination between raw and cooked food is the key to safety," Meyer said. "You should follow the same handling practices that are recommended to prevent illness from common foodborne pathogens such as Salmonella and Campylobacter."

Proper food handling procedures include:

* Wash hands with warm water and soap for at least 20 seconds before and after handling raw poultry and eggs.

* Clean cutting boards and other utensils with soap and hot water to keep raw poultry and eggs from contaminating other foods.

* Sanitize cutting boards by using a solution of 1 Tablespoon of chlorine bleach and 1 gallon of water.

* Cook poultry to an internal temperature of at least 165° F.

* Cook eggs until the yolks and whites are firm. Casseroles and other dishes containing eggs should be cooked to 160° F.

* If preparing a recipe that calls for eggs that are raw or undercooked when the dish is served, use shell eggs that have been treated to destroy Salmonella by pasteurization or another approved method, or pasteurized egg products.

Avian influenza 101 Since December 2014, USDA has confirmed several case of avian influenza (AI) in the Pacific, Central and Mississippi bird flyways. More recently, there have been reports of AI in commercial flocks in Minnesota, South Dakota, Wisconsin and Iowa. AI is commonly called the "bird flu."

Avian influenza cannot be transmitted through safely handled and properly cooked eggs, chicken or turkey.

As a reminder, all eggs, chicken and turkey should be cooked thoroughly and at the recommended temperatures to reduce the risk of food-borne illnesses.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

Tiospa Zina Tribal School graduation ceremony, inipi and wacipi

Tiospa Zina Tribal School will honor its 2015 graduating class with several ceremonies:

*Graduation Wacipi Thursday, May 21, 2015 at 6:30 p.m.

*Graduation Inipi will be held Friday, May 22nd: 12:00 noon girls; 2:00 p.m. boys.

*A traditional graduation ceremony will be held on Saturday, May 23, 2015 at 2:00 p.m.

Students graduating in the Class of 2015 are:

Jarell Adams, Amber Anderson, Justin Barse, Demi DuMarce, Kobe Carlson, Fidelity Eastman, Tate Eastman, Gabe Desrosiers, Megan High Eagle, Bruce Gunderson, Therese Keeble, Tyrell Keeble, Gokoh Brown, Tyrel Eastman, Shaylene Keeble, Keisha Kirk, Dustin LaBelle, Alyssia Knight, Jeff Max, Bethany Robertson, Enrique Pagen, Graceland Renville, Lane Quinn, Ashley Rousseau, Austin Shepherd.

Class Colors: Royal Blue, White and Black.

Class Flower: White Rose with Blue Tip.

Class Quote: “Success is not a matter of chance, it is a matter of choice. It’s not a thing to be waited for; it is a thing to be achieved.”

Class song: “See You Again.”

Watch for photo highlights of the activities next week in your Sota.

ESDS honors 8th grade graduates

By Carolyn Soles

Administrative Office Assostant

Congratulations to our 8th graders that will be moving on to high school after next week!

Terran BearHill

Itancan Christenson

Xavier LaCroix

Sabrina Miller

Johnni Renville

Tristin Renville

Sam Shepherd

Timothy Walker

Luci Valtierra

 Dinner will be provided by the families of the graduating 8th graders and served at 5:00 p.m.

 The Honoring Ceremony for the 8th graders will be held at 6:30 p.m. inside the gym.

 GRAND ENTRY will be at 7:00 pm. Dancers will be paid day money; drum split. Everyone is invited to attend.

 LAST DAY OF SCHOOL IS THURSDAY, MAY 21st, 2015….WACIPI is FRIDAY, MAY 22nd!

SWO Library to hold annual Summer Reading Program

This year's theme will be, "Every Hero Has A Story."

We begin registering children pre-school age through sixth grade level om Tuesday, May 26th from 8 AM-4:30 PM.

The program agenda of all events featured will be handed out at this time.

Participants reporting on the books they have been reading will begin Monday, June 1st From 8A M - 4:30 PM.

All pre-school age children up to the 3rd grade must have an adult with them to register.

We will have a SWC Library Store in which the children can spend their earned library dollars on the last day of the program on Friday, June 26, 2015.

We Purchase crafts, prizes, toys and snacks for each scheduled event day with the generous support of local SWO Business Owners, local donations from community members, SWO Districts, and various SWO Tribal Programs. The donations would be greatly appreciated and are a vital part of the SWC Library Summer Reading Program each year.

If you would like to be a sponsor and give a donation, please make checks payable to: SWC Library, P.O. Box 689, Agency Village, SD 57262.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact any SWC Library staff: Delight Robertson, SWC Librarian at 698-3966 Ext. 1320; Christine Hill, SWC Library; Hildreth Rodlund, SWC Librarian Assistant at 698-3966 Ext. 1322.

Kid Kare -Babysitting Clinic planned

Babysitting is not just a job - it is a responsibility. If someone you know is beginning to take on this responsibility to earn spending money this summer, Kid Kare is for them.

The SDSU Extension Office in Roberts County is coordinating Kid Kare, a babysitting clinic designed for youth ages 10 to 14. It will be held on Tuesday, June 9th at the Grace Lutheran Church in Sisseton. The workshop will begin at 8:30 a.m. and conclude by 3:30 p.m. The workshop will include sessions on the responsibilities of child care, emergency preparedness, infant care, snacks, learning activities, behavior management and first aid/choking. The cost is $15, which includes snacks, lunch and program materials. The program material will be a good start to their Babysitting Kit.

The workshop is limited to 40 participants on a first come, first serve basis. The registration form and payment must be returned to the Roberts County Extension Office by May 29nd.

For further information, contact Tracey Lehrke, 4-H Youth Program Advisor at the SDSU Extension- Roberts County Office at 698-7627 or email at tracey.lehrke@sdstate.edu

UTTC students told opportunities await

Biskmarck, ND – UTN – “I feel like Chief Dan George when he said ‘my heart soars,’” said A. Gay Kingman, looking out over the graduation caps and gowns at United Tribes Technical College. “When I look at you my heart feels so good.”

Kingman was guest speaker for the college’s spring commencement ceremony May 8 in Bismarck. Ninety-one students, representing 19 different tribal nations, were arrayed before her in the college gymnasium along with 600 family members and friends of the Class of 2015.

“It’s my hope that what you’ve experienced here at UTTC will instill in you the ability to be a leader,” she said speaking from experience.

Kingman is an enrolled citizen of the Cheyenne River Tribe in South Dakota. Her 50-year career in tribal leadership and public policy-making is rooted in the field of education. She served 25 years as a teacher and administrator and was a founder and the first principal in 1973 of Theodore Jamerson Elementary School at United Tribes.

“We hear a lot today about the Indian Self Determination Act, but the tribal leaders who formed UTTC were ahead of that,” she said. “It shows the leadership from this region and what they had in mind for educating students. You today are recipients of that forward thinking.”

Kingman currently directs the Great Plains Tribal Chairman’s Association and is passionate about all matters affecting Indian Tribes.

“You are our data-bank for the future, our base of support going forward, and we’re going to depend a lot on you,” she told the graduates.

“Today, it’s a global economy. You’re entering an exciting world with many opportunities,” she said. “The Seminoles now own all the Hard Rock Cafes. The Mohegan’s are meeting with South Korea to establish gaming there. Dennis Banks is selling wild rice internationally.”

“What I’m saying is the future is yours. Graduation marks the end of one special time in your life and the beginning of a beautiful future. So, go forward and be the pathfinder you’ve been educated to be.”

2014-15 Academic Year The commencement ceremony concluded the 2014-15 academic year. Grads earned bachelor and associate degrees and certificates in the college’s two dozen academic, vocational and workforce training programs.

The event was attended by four North Dakota tribal chairs who are members of the college’s governing board: Richard McCloud, chairman of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa and chair of the UTTC Board; Mark Fox, chairman of the Three Affiliated Tribes of the Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara Nation; Myra Pearson, chairwoman of the Spirit Lake Tribe; and Dave Archambault II, chairman of the Standing Rock Tribe. Bruce Renville, chairman of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, was unable to attend because he was in Watertown, SD for a visit there by President Barack Obama. A traditional meal followed in the college cafeteria. The drum group Flying Low rendered ceremonial and honor songs. Earlier in the day a pinning ceremony was conducted for 16 graduates of the college’s Practical Nursing program.

United Tribes Technical College 2014-15 Graduates

* Dec 2014 Grads, **Double Majors, ***Summer 2014 Grads, †Honors; hometown Bismarck unless otherwise noted.

ART/ART MARKETING Fine Arts – AAS: Karlee T. Fast Wolf, Eagle Butte, SD

ART/ART MARKETING Graphic Arts – AAS: *Xavier A. Austin (Standing Rock), *Veronica Ann Bohrer (Standing Rock), †*Gene Ramon Declay (White Mountain Apache), †Logan H. Maxon (TAT), Jeremiah James Nadeau (Turtle Mountain); SiMone Danielle Wilson (Lower Brule) Mandan, ND

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY Certificate: Roseanna M. Eagleman (Rosebud)

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY AAS: Chad J. Conner (Three Affiliated) Mandan, ND; Aaron Michael Lakota (Oglala) Oglala, SD; †Michael L. Montclair (Standing Rock) Ft. Yates, ND; Daniel R. Szklarski Grafton, ND; Courtney Michelle Thomas (Northern Arapaho) Arapaho, WY

SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Certificate: Shawn J. Allery (Turtle Mountain)

SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT AAS: LaSheena E. Afraid of Hawk (Cheyenne River), Aaron T. Irwin (Three Affiliated), Dustin T. Milk (Rosebud) Sisseton, SD; Alvena J. Oldman (Northern Arapaho) Ft. Washakie, WY

BUSINESS OFFICE TECHNOLOGY Administrative Assistant – AAS: †*Ashley C. Clements (Oglala), *Lenni E. Traversie (Cheyenne River), Krista Kay Sheridan (Three Affiliated) Sioux City, IA

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AAS: Tova M. Howard (Standing Rock) Ft. Yates, ND; Grayson R. Medicine Cloud (Northern Arapaho Tribe) Riverton, WY; Erica J. Weston-Two Lance (Oglala) Oglala, SD; **Lydale N. Yazzie (Dine) Shiprock, NM

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BS: Victoria Lynn Buffalo (Standing Rock); †Marian Declay (White Mountain Apache) Whiteriver, AZ; Lisa M. Deleon (Oglala) Manderson, SD; †Heather Sharay Demaray (Three Affiliated), Lauren Louise Derrick (Standing Rock) Solen, ND; †Teresa G. His Chase (Northern Arapaho), Wynette Lynn Mills (Cheyenne River), †*Dawnelle J. Red Horn (Standing Rock), **Lydale N. Yazzie (Dine Nation) Shiprock, NM

COMPUTER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Certificate: Erica Weston–Two Lance (Oglala Sioux) Oglala, SD

CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY Certificate: Derek James Brewer (Oglala) Batesland, SD; Rainee J. Kills In Water (Rosebud) St. Francis, SD

CRIMINAL JUSTICE AAS: ***Tasha Lynn Bordeaux (Rosebud), Bonita Charley (Navajo) Crownpoint, NM; †Lindsey Lorraine Isburg, Chamberlain, SD; *Erica S. Jones (Crow Creek) Ft. Thompson, SD; †*Terri Lyne Lambert, †Anthony J. Potter (Cheyenne River) Eagle Butte, SD; *Bruce Robert Ward (Oneida) Oneida, WI; *Lonnie Virgil Wise Spirit (Standing Rock)

CRIMINAL JUSTICE BS: Jacenta Rae Milk (Sisseton-Wahpeton) Sisseton, SD; Carlos M. Quarry (Three Affiliated) Mandan, ND

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AAS: †*Kelley M. Bitz

ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY Certificate: Jerome J. Addison (Northern Arapaho) Riverton, WY; Robert L. Left Hand Bull Jr. (Rosebud) Parmelee, SD; †Brandon Anthony Maenza (Turtle Mountain) Lincoln, ND

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION AAS: †*Kendra M. Froelich, *Valene Kathy Pretends Eagle (Standing Rock) †*Antonia Rayne Valdez (Northern Arapaho) Fort Washakie, WY

HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION & RECREATION AAS: *Myles L. Frazier (Santee) Eagle Butte, SD; †Joshua L. Standing Elk (Three Affiliated)

HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MEDICAL CODING Certificate: †*Valeria Marie Carvallo (Standing Rock), *Talana Jade Hale (Three Affiliated) †*Tammy Candace LaFountain (Northern Cheyenne) Billings, MT; *Jacqueline Kay Lee-Meisch (Turtle Mountain), *Loni J. Many Bears (Three Affiliated), *Kiri A. Schumacher (Cheyenne River) Timber Lake, SD; Amanda J. Woodbury

HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR – COMMERCIAL DRIVING PROGRAM Certificate: †*Carl Raymond Aberle, †*Tanner Reese Krenz, Darold Marlin Mad Bear (Cheyenne River) Wakpala, SD

PRACTICAL NURSING AAS: †Rebekah M. American Horse (Standing Rock) Cannonball, ND; Ladonna Love Belile (Oglala), Charlene E. Bolton, Christy J. Chelashaw (Fort Peck), Amanda Jessica Cline (Omaha Tribe of Nebraska) Walthill, NE; Victoria Marie Cocio, Ceres, CA; Rose Cama Darius, Joshua Caleb Edwards, Ceres, CA; Rolene R. Feather Earring (Oglala) Rapid City, SD; Danielle Doris Hardy, Washburn, ND; Raygina M. Johnson (Crow Creek), Jessica Ann Miller, Dina O. Nygard, NGaounde’re’, Chelsey M. Poitra (Turtle Mountain) Grace Marie Renner, Mandan, ND; Morgan L. Renner, Alamo, TX; Wallace Charles Running Eagle (Oglala) Oglala, SD; Michelle Leigh Vetter, Mandan, ND

PRE PROFESSIONAL NATIVE AMERICAN WORKFORCE LEADERSHIP AAS: Nicholas W. Azure (Standing Rock) Denver, CO; †Kimberlee Dawn Blevins (TAT) New Town, ND; Ashly Dawn Hall (Crow Creek) Minot, ND; *Courtney Rose Lawrence (Spirit Lake)

NUTRITION & FOOD SERVICE Certificate: Peter D. Stone

NUTRITION & FOOD SERVICE/WELLNESS AAS: *Tommi Jean McLaughlin (Cheyenne River) Isabel, SD; Tony M. Walking (Oglala) Pine Ridge, SD; Jennifer A. Whiteman (Crow)

TRIBAL ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AAS: **†Clarence Chugger Davis (Turtle Mountain) Belcourt, ND; †Devin F. Dragswolf (Three Affiliated)

ENVIRONMENTAL LAB TECHNICIAN AAS: **Clarence Chugger Davis (Turtle Mountain) Belcourt, ND

WELDING Certificate: *Bailyn J. Bursheim (Sisseton Wahpeton) Sisseton, SD; †*Shade L. Crow Ghost (Standing Rock Sioux) Mandan, ND; *Catlyn M.J Kirkaldie (Three Affiliated) Mandan, ND; *Kellen S. Marrowbone (Cheyenne River) Fort Yates, ND

Heitkamp to Fort Berthold Community College Graduates: You Light the Path to ND’s Future

New Town, ND – May 15, 2015 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today delivered the keynote address at the commencement of Fort Berthold Community College’s graduating class of 2015 on MHA Nation.

During her remarks, Heitkamp congratulated the class for overcoming outstanding obstacles to achieve academic success and encouraged the graduates to continue to thrive and grow, making North Dakota a better place both for Native young people and for future generations.

“All across North Dakota, I’ve seen the tremendous perseverance and the drive that comes from a deep inner light that shines in our Native young people – and that light is burning bright in each and every one of you today,” said Heitkamp. “Today, each of you can stand tall and proud knowing that your success and your ability to thrive strengthens the resolve of not just your graduating class – but Native children across this country who often grow up with the odds stacked against them. Today, you are not just an inspiration – you are a living, breathing proof of the cultural strength that overcome the adversity that far too many Native children face. As you step out into the world to walk the path to success, never forget that all of us are rooting for you. Now you have the power to change the course of generations and strengthen tribal nations and the state of North Dakota.”

Long an advocate for policies that improve the lives of Native children, Heitkamp introduced her bill to create a Commission on Native Children last Congress as her first bill as a U.S. Senator, where it quickly gained bipartisan momentum – first by unanimously passing the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, then being recommended for creation by Congress as part of the bill to keep the U.S. government running. This Congress, Heitkamp’s bill unanimously passed the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs just two weeks after its reintroduction – the final step before reaching the Senate floor. Shortly after, the Senate recommended funding for the Commission in its annual budget.

Heitkamp’s plan to create a Commission on Native Children would work to identify the complex challenges faced by Native children in North Dakota and across the United States by conducting an intensive study on issues – including high rates of poverty, staggering unemployment, child abuse, domestic violence, crime, substance abuse, and dire economic opportunities – and making recommendations on how to make sure Native children receive the protections, as well as economic and educational tools, they need to thrive and succeed.

Since her time as North Dakota’s Attorney General, Heitkamp has been committed to working with both sides of the aisle and with tribal nations to develop policies that advance Native American priorities, and will continue to work with tribes across the country to improve the lives of Native youth for generations to come.

2015 Bird Tour Registration Deadline May 30

Brookings, SD – The South Dakota Grassland Coalition is organizing the 2015 annual South Dakota Bird Tour; Birds. At Home on the Range, for June 5 and 6, 2015.

"Birds are indicators of rangeland health, and as is the tradition, the Bird Tour will be conducted on a working ranch where participants can experience the interaction of bird conservation, wildlife, and livestock," said Pete Bauman, SDSU Extension Range Field Specialist.

This year's tour is located near Marvin and will be hosted by Abbey Grasslands owner/operator Tracy Rosenberg.

Participants will not only have the opportunity to visit this working ranch on the grounds of the historic Blue Cloud Abbey, they will also have the unique opportunity to lodge at the Abbey of the Hills and hear Rosenberg's unique story of transition from an Iowa crop farm to a South Dakota grass-based cattle operation.

This family friendly event will include birding, presentations, social, meals and hands-on fun including bird banding, creak ecology, and kid's activities.

Registration Deadline is May 30, 2015.

The cost to attend Birds. At Home on the Range is $20 per person. Students are free and meals are included. Make checks payable to the South Dakota Grassland Coalition For planning purposes, registration form and fee must be received by May 30, 2015.

Lodging is on your own. Accommodations include: Abbey of the Hills, 605-398-9200, www.AbbeyOfTheHills.com; or Milbank Super 8 605-432-9288. Mention "Bird Tour" for a special rate. Visit MilbankSD.com for more lodging options. Additional family recreation available including: swimming, adult/parental supervision required; fishing, catch and release only. Bring your own equipment. Inquire at registration.

Direction: From Marvin, travel southeast of town on Hwy 6 approximately 1 mile. Enter Abbey grounds at main sign.

For more information, contact Judge Jessop, Coordinator at judge.jessop@sdconservation.net or 605-280-0127; or Pete Bauman SDSU Extension Range Field Specialist, peter.bauman@sdstate.edu or 605-886-0465.

UND will help shape UAS Technologies Integration & Development across the Nation

Washington, DC – May 8, 2015 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced that the University of North Dakota’s (UND) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) program was selected as a member of the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) Center of Excellence for Unmanned Aerial Systems. The 13-university team will focus on research efforts critical to the safe integration of UAS into the national airspace.

Heitkamp, co-founder of the Senate Defense Communities Caucus, has long been a key supporter of growing the UAS industry in North Dakota, and has consistently promoted the UND’s ability to play an important role in the Center of Excellence effort. Last August, Heitkamp emphasized the need for FAA Administrator Michael Huerta to include UND so the agency can take advantage of UND’s long experience with UAS. And in December, Heitkamp again called Huerta’s attention to the proposal of UND’s Alliance for System Safety of UAS through Research Excellence (ASSURE) team to assist the FAA in moving forward with critical decisions.

“By selecting UND’s top-notch UAS team to assist in the research and integration of UAS into our national airspace, the FAA is again signaling its confidence in and long-term investment in North Dakota ingenuity,” said Heitkamp. “As the FAA’s Center for Excellence for UAS, UND’s ASSURE team will continue to make critical decisions on how to best to develop, incorporate and utilize UAS technologies well into the future. Since last August, I have personally encouraged FAA Administrator Michael Huerta to include UND in this effort, and I’m excited to watch what we can together accomplish now that UND has received this selection.”

Heitkamp has continually pushed to move UAS testing forward by working to remove barriers to testing and investments, and to expand public-private partnerships:

· Lifting Barriers to the Growth of UAS Technologies: Last November, Heitkamp pressed FAA Administrator Michael Huerta for answers on the progress the agency is making to improve the Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Test Site program, and avoid delays that could hinder the growth of the industry. Just three months later the FAA directly addressed her concerns – announcing UAS rule proposals she had been pushing for. Additionally, the White House released its privacy objectives for the UAS technologies testing and use. In November, Heitkamp specifically requested the FAA to safety and privacy guidelines for enhanced research and testing of UAS technologies.

· Opening the Doors to Investments in UAS Research and Development: The business park in Grand Sky provides an opportunity for North Dakota’s UAS industry to take significant strides in development and innovation, capitalizing on Heitkamp’s December 2013 announcement that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) selected North Dakota as one of six official UAS Test Sites nationwide. After the FAA selected Grand Forks as a UAS test site, Heitkamp brought FAA Administrator Michael Huerta to North Dakota in April 2014 to see firsthand the state’s unmanned aerial potential, where he announced it was the first UAS test site to be officially up-and-running.

· Bolstering Public-Private Relationships for UAS Testing: In November 2014, Heitkamp met with representatives from the Grand Forks Base Realignment Impact Committee (BRIC) to discuss efforts to finalize the Grand Sky project. In several meetings, Heitkamp pushed Air Force and Northrop Grumman leaders regarding the positive impact that a fully-functioning Grand Sky business park would have for the Air Force and the private sector. Additionally, Heitkamp met with Colonel Paul Bauman, Commander of the Grand Forks Air Force Base in July 2014, to discuss best strategies to complete the EUL approval process and create a plan for its successful management.

· Helping Develop Long-term Investments at Grand Sky Business Park: The day after the Northrup Grumman signed a Letter of Intent to occupy Grand Sky as a tenant in November, Heitkamp called on the head of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to approve additional authority for North Dakota to provide airspace and flexibility for the North Dakota Test Site. In February, the FAA heeded her call – approving a Broad Area Certificate of Authorization, making North Dakota partnerships more attractive for private industry. Earlier that month, Heitkamp introduced bipartisan legislation to encourage the safe commercial use of UAS, remove undue red-tape for UAS research, open the door to more private investments, and save taxpayers money. Just last month, Heitkamp announced Northrup Grumman as the first official tenant at the Grand Sky Business Park.

Roberts Co. 4-H Youth attend Horse Safety training

Roberts County 4-H Youth Program Advisor Tracey Lehrke coordinated 4-H horse safety trainings on April 18 and May 3rd at the 4-H building in Sisseton. Youth attending one of these trainings are now able to participate in 4-H horse public presentations, hippology, quiz bowl, horse judging and the horse show. 4-H Horse Volunteer Sheila Prins led these educational trainings. Each training ended by following the 4-H phrase, Learn by Doing with the youth completing two safe skills such as backing a horse, cleaning a hoof, demonstrating safe ground handling maneuvers, catching and haltering a horse. Roberts County 4-H youth that attended the trainings are:

Two Oglala Lakota are honored at White House – Champions of Change!

On Tuesday, May 19th, the White House honored twelve former foster youth as “Champions of Change” who are making a difference in their communities.

In addition to honoring these young people for their courage, resilience, and contributions, the event also highlighted their commitment to furthering their education. The event showcased the stories and work of these inspirational leaders as a part of National Foster Care Month. The program featured remarks by U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and Deputy Assistant to the President for Urban Affairs, Justice and Opportunity Roy L. Austin Jr.

The Champions of Change program was created as an opportunity for the White House to feature individuals doing extraordinary things to empower and inspire members of their communities. To learn more about the White House Champions of Change program, visit www.whitehouse.gov/champions.

Two of these outstanding Champions of Change are Oglala Lakota, read more about their story!

Daryle Conquering Bear Crow

Daryle Conquering Bear Crow (Oglala Lakota), is the Healthy Living Program Assistant at the Denver Indian Family Resource Center and is in his senior year of college, on his way to receiving his Bachelors in Human Development and Sports. A proud member of the Oglala Sioux Tribe, he speaks nationwide about native youth who experience the child welfare system and advocates for the enforcement of the Indian Child Welfare Act. Conquering Bear Crow has served on advisory boards for the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, the National Resource Center for Tribes, and Casey Family Programs. He collaborates and has interned with the National Indian Child Welfare Association and currently sits on the North American Council on Adoptable Children board of directors. Daryle Conquering Bear Crow is a senior at Oregon State University.

Eriq Swiftwater

Eriq Swiftwater is 19 years old and a member of the Oglala Sioux Tribe on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. As a freshman in college, Swiftwater studies Business Education and plays on his university’s football team. A graduate of Oelrichs High School in Oelrichs, South Dakota, he served as class president, set records in football, basketball, and track, and graduated as class salutatorian, receiving three academic scholarships, and one athletic scholarship to play football Black Hills State University. At the age of twelve, Swiftwater and his five siblings were placed in foster care, and separated into two different homes. He is currently involved with the South Dakota Gear Up program as Youth Guest Speaker, sharing his story and mentoring students in high schools across the reservation. Eriq Swiftwater is a freshman at Black Hills State University.

The Champions of Change program was created as an opportunity for the White House to feature individuals doing extraordinary things to empower and inspire members of their communities. The event will be live streamed on the White House website. To watch this event live, visit www.whitehouse.gov/live on May 19th at 9:00AM ET. To learn more about the White House Champions of Change program, visit www.whitehouse.gov/champions. Follow the conversation at #WHChamps.

A first-year Money Management Guide for new College grad

By Jason Alderman

A young adult's first months out of college are about personal freedom and finding one's path as an adult. Building solid money habits is a big part of that.

Most grads are managing money alone for the first time – finding work, places to live and if they're in the majority, figuring out how to pay off college loans. For many, these are daunting challenges. If you are a young adult – or know one – here are some of the best routines to adopt from the start:

Budgeting (http://www.practicalmoneyskills.com/budgeting/) is the first important step in financial planning because it is difficult to make effective financial decisions without knowing where every dollar is actually going. It's a three-part exercise – tracking spending, analyzing where that money has gone and finding ways to direct that spending more effectively toward saving, investing and extinguishing debt. Even if a new grad is looking for work or waiting to find a job, budgeting is a lifetime process that should start immediately.

A graduate's first savings goal should be an emergency fund to cover everyday expenses such as the loss of a job or a major repair. The ultimate purpose of an emergency fund (http://www.practicalmoneyskills.com/emergencycalc) is to avoid additional debt or draining savings or investments. Emergency funds should cover at least four to seven months of living expenses.

Retirement may seem a distant spot on the horizon after graduation, but success depends on saving and investing as soon as possible. New grads can benefit from the IRS's Withholding Calculator (http://www.irs.gov/Individuals/IRS-Withholding-Calculator) to determine the right amount of tax is being withheld from weekly paychecks. From there, he or she can evaluate personal retirement savings options and employer's plans as well – both will be necessary to retire effectively. Signing up for automatic deposits into retirement accounts and personal savings allows money to grow without the temptation of spending it first.

Insurance is crucial. Renter's insurance is important not only to cover personal belongings that are lost, stolen or damaged, but most policies cover living expenses in an emergency and offer liability and medical coverage if someone gets hurt at one's apartment. Auto insurance is the law in many states, and even though disability coverage may be available at work, it is important to determine whether additional individual coverage should be purchased. Finally, the Affordable Care Act has made health coverage a must for young adults. New graduates may stay on a parent's plan until the age of 26 even if they have the option for health coverage at work. After age 26, health insurance can be bought privately or through federal and state exchanges.

Young adults should get into the habit of tracking their credit reports from the beginning. By law, everyone has the right to receive all three of their credit reports for free (https://www.annualcreditreport.com) each year, and it is important to stagger requests from the three credit bureaus – Experian, Equifax and TransUnion – to better check for inaccuracies and potential identity theft.

Finally, for those still having trouble making ends meet, moving home for a limited time period could be an option. New grads should negotiate an affordable rent on a fixed timetable and use those savings to create investment accounts that can pay for major goals like a home, a wedding or graduate school. If you're working with a financial advisor already, ask them to weigh in with additional ideas.

Bottom line: The first year out of college, young adults encounter a range of financial challenges that will shape their money behavior for a lifetime. Embracing budgeting, saving and investing is crucial even with the smallest of amount of resources.

*****

Jason Alderman directs Visa's financial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter.com/PracticalMoney.

SDSU Extension offers online and hands-on Food Preservation courses

Brookings, SD – SDSU Extension recently modified its Food Preservation Mentor Program. What was a day-long course now includes online self-study courses and a half-day of hands-on canning with SDSU Extension staff.

Hands-on canning sessions will be hosted statewide beginning June 2, 2015.

"Today, everyone is so busy. This training fits better into our participants' lives," explained Lavonne Meyer, SDSU Extension Food Safety Field Specialist.

She explains that the online course modules, which include short videos and factsheets, are concise and designed for participants to fit into their schedule however works best for them. The hands-on canning sessions allow participants the opportunity to ask SDSU Extension staff questions in a comfortable environment while gaining the confidence through accomplishment.

Meyer will host the five Food Preservation hands-on canning sessions with Joan Hegerfeld-Baker, SDSU Extension Food Safety Specialist and SDSU Assistant Professor.

Before its online launch, Hegerfeld-Baker asked a class of college students to test the online portion of the program. Only one student had prior experience canning. "We wanted to make sure that the online portion of the program would not overwhelm first-time canners," Hegerfeld-Baker said. "The students' said the factsheets and videos worked together well and did not take long to complete."

She added that participants can choose either or both of the programs: online modules or attend a hands-on session. They complement one another very well. However, if they want to receive certification as a Food Preservation Mentor, participants must complete both portions of the program.

Hands-on Canning Sessions Begin June 2 The hands-on portion of the course includes training in the following: Canning an acidified or acid food in a boiling water bath canner;

Canning a low-acid vegetable in a pressure canner; and

Canning jelly or jam in a boiling water bath canner. Before attending the hands-on portion of the course, participants are encouraged to complete the online self-study modules however anyone interested in canning is invited to attend, even if they have not completed the online modules. Participants must be 16 or older to attend.

Dates

Redfield: June 2, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. (CDT) at the Redfield High School (502 E. 2nd St.);

Watertown: June 3, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. (CDT) at the Codington County Extension Office (1910 W. Kemp Ave.)

Sioux Falls: June 11, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. (CDT) at the SDSU Extension Regional Center (2001 East 8th Street)

Chamberlain: June 16, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. (CDT) at St. Joseph's Indian School (1301 N. Main Street)

Rapid City: June 18, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. (MT) Pennington County Extension - Walter Taylor Building (601 E. Centre)

Registration: Registration for the hands-on portion of this program is $35. To register, visit iGrow.org/events or contact Lavonne Meyer at 605-782-3290 or lavonne.meyer@sdstate.edu.

Online Modules

There is no cost to access the online modules. Simply go to the iGrow website (www.igrow.org) and click on Healthy Families - Food Safety. There you will find the "Home Food Preservation Self-Study Course." Register to access the course and begin learning the basics of home canning along with access to many tested recipes. Complete the whole course or pick and choose the learning activities you are most interested in.

Home Food Processor Track

Module 1: General Canning Principles which includes information on the following: Using Heat Process; pH of foods; Boiling Water Bath and Pressure Canning; and Adjusting for Altitude.

Module 2: Canning Equipment which includes information on the following: Types of Canners; Jars, Lids, and Utensils; Using a Boiling Water Bath Canner; and Using a Pressure Canner.

Module 3: Acid Foods which includes information on the following: Fruits; Pie Filling; Fruit Syrups; and Jams and Jellies.

Module 4: Acidified Foods which includes information on the following: Acidifying Low-Acid Foods; Tomatoes and Tomato Products; Fermentation; and Pickling.

Module 5: Low Acid Foods which includes information on the following: Vegetables; Meats; and Soups, Stews, and Legumes.

Module 6: Freezing Foods which includes information on the following: Fruits; Vegetables and Meats.

Complete the modules that are of interest to you. If all modules are completed along with an evaluation, a certificate of completion is presented to you.

South Dakota Home Food Processing Mentor Track

In addition to the Home Food Processor Track modules listed above, Module 7: Becoming a Food Preservation Mentor; must be completed if you are interested in becoming a mentor. Home Food Preservation Mentors are individuals who are willing to reach out to individuals in their community who want to know more about safe home food preservation practices.

Completing these courses is not a commitment to be a recognized mentor; however completing the hands-on training is a requirement to become a mentor.

This program is supported in part by the USDA Specialty Crop Block Grant Program (# 12-25-B-1487) through the South Dakota Department of Agriculture. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the USDA.

To learn more, contact Lavonne Meyer at 605-782-3290 or lavonne.meyer@sdstate.edu or Joan Hegerfeld-Baker at 605-688-6233 or joan.hegerfeld-baker@sdstate.edu.

Venture to air State Boys & Girls Track finals

Venture Communications, in cooperation with South Dakota Public TV (SDPB) will partner to bring the 2015 State AA, A and B Boys & Girls Track Finals to Venture video communities. The companies will allow Venture video TV viewers an opportunity to watch the Track Finals live from Rapid City.

Live coverage of the State AA, A and B Boys & Girls Track Finals will be broadcast on Saturday, May 30th on Venture Vision channel #152, starting at 10:00a.m. CST.

Legals

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 10-030

SWOCSE/ TANF/Shannon Hopkins, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DANIEL CAMPBELL, III, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Re-Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 20th day of May, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 22nd day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

CASE NO. CS: 07-101

SWOCSE/ Whitney Hopkins,

PLAINTIFF

VS.

DANIEL CAMPBELL, III,

DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Establish Child Support Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 20th day of May, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 22nd day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATEIN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION      

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTACASE NO. CS: 10-028

SWOCSE/ TANF/Shannon Hopkins, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CHRISTOPHER FAYANT, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Re-Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 20th day of May, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 22nd day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 08-081

SWOCSE/ TANF/Whitney Hopkins, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CHRISTOPHER FAYANT, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Establish Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 20th day of May, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

 

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 22nd day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-212

SWOCSE/ TANF/Janita Abraham, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CHRISTOPHER FAYANT, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 20th day of May, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 22nd day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 02-119

SWOCSE/ MN/Theresa Bubak, PLAINTIFF

VS.

THOMAS DEMARRIAS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 20th day of May, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 22nd day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATEIN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION      

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTACASE NO. I: 14-119

SWOCSE/ Rachel Crawford, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TROY GREELEY, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Paternity and/or Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of May, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 13-187

SWOCSE/ Rhea Follet, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CHAUNCEY HILL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of May, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-155

SWOCSE/ Annette Crawford, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TARAE WHISTLING ELK, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of May, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 09-083

SWOCSE/ Anita Johnson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DENNIS HOPKINS, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of May, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-067

SWOCSE/ Candace Hill, PLAINTIFF

VS.

HAZEN DUMARCE, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of May, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-159

SWOCSE/ Michelle Brant, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MELISSA KEOKE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of May, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 13-071

SWOCSE/ Sharon Hopkins, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DANIELLE WITT, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of May, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 15-053

SWOCSE/ April Perez, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SALVADOR MARTAL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Recognize a Foreign Order and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of May, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 07-043

SWOCSE/ Gladys Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BRENT BROOKS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Establish Child Support Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of May, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 10-063

SWOCSE/ Valerie Bird, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DWIGHT CLOUD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Establish Child Support Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of May, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 09-110

SWOCSE/ Amy Fast Horse, PLAINTIFF

VS.

RANDALL MONTCLAIR, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of May, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 15-068

SWOCSE/ Donald Redowl, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SHASTA LAWRENCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of May, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 06-139

SWOCSE/ Jessica Squirrelcoat, PLAINTIFF

VS.

STEVEN MARKS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of May, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 13-110

SWOCSE/ Sharon Hare, PLAINTIFF

VS.

RODNEY BERBY, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of May, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 15-030

SWOCSE/ Leighlonnie Goodsell, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BODEAN ROBERTS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of May, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 11-051

SWOCSE/ Londa Runnels, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ISIAH RENVILLE, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of May, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 01-149

SWOCSE/ Denitra White, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MAURICE JOHNSON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of May, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 13-128

SWOCSE/ Craig Wanna, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LONNIE RODLUND, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of May, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of April, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

18-3tc

Trading Post ads

For Sale By Owner

Three bedroom, 1 bath home with an office, unfinished basement, approximately 1372 square feet, detached garage on a 66 X 125 foot lot in Sisseton. Recent upgrades include roof, windows, kitchen, bath, floors, and light fixtures. New carpeting on second level. Please contact 742-0219.

 

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Job Openings

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Program Manager, ET Demo (Must have Bachelor Degree in Human Service, Social Services, or related field)

Closing Date: May 22nd, 2015 @ 04:30 PM

Administrative Assistant, Public Defenders Office

Closing Date: June 05th, 2015 @ 04:30 PM

All interested applicants may obtain application and job description information at the Human Resource Department, of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate or contact Arnold Williams at (605) 698-8238 or Denise Hill at (605) 698-8362. (Tribal preference will apply)

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Employment Opportunities

2014-2015 School Year Vacancies:

Substitutes needed for custodial, kitchen, teaching, and transportation - starting at $10/hr, varies per position Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma (please contact the HR office for more information) Applications are accepted on an on-going basis Vacancy: Reading Coach Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Reading Coach Opening Date: October 30, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Bus Monitor ($13/hr) Qualifications: High School Diploma/GED+; currently has/willing to obtain CPR and First Aid certification Opening Date: November 21, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

2015 Summer Program Vacancy:

Vacancy: Bus Driver (1) (June 8 to July 9) Qualifications: Current Bus Driver CDL with Passenger and Air Brakes endorsement and 1 year directly related experience Opening Date: April 10, 2015 Closing Date: Open until filled

2015-2016 School Year Vacancies:

Vacancy: Dakota Studies Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for Dakota Studies Instructor Opening Date: March 12, 2015 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Elementary Art Teacher (Sign-on Bonus) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for an Elementary Art Teacher Opening Date: March 13, 2015 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Elementary Teacher (Sign-on Bonus) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for an Elementary Teacher Opening Date: April 13, 2015 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Kitchen Supervisor Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma and Certified in the South Dakota Child and Adult Nutirition Services - Managers Trainings I and II, State Nutrition Program Tracks I, II, III, and IV, and State School Food Service Certificate - Track 3 Class Certificate in Quantity Food Production (CANS) and 1 year directly related experience. Opening Date: April 21, 2015. Closing Date: May 6, 2015

Vacancy: Gymnasium Custodian Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma, experience in building maintenance, and 1 year directly related experience. Opening Date: April 21, 2015 Closing Date: May 6, 2015

Vacancy: High School English Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School English Teacher Opening Date: April 30, 2015 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: High School Social Studies Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School Social Studies Teacher Opening Date: April 30, 2015 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: High School Science Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School Science Teacher Opening Date: April 30, 2015 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Secondary Special Education Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Special Education Teacher Opening Date: April 30, 2015 Closing Date: Open until filled

2015-2016 Coaching Vacancies:

For List of Coaching Positions Below: Proof of all SDHSAA coaching requirements at the time application is submitted. Requirements are to complete the following courses through the National Federation of High School Sports (NFHS): Fundamentals of Coaching, and First Aid and Safety for Coaches. Must also submit a letter of intent that answers the questions found on form Athletics Coaching Questionnaire.

OPENING DATE: April 17, 2015 CLOSING DATE: Open until filled

Head Volleyball Coach Assistant Volleyball Coach Junior High Volleyball Coach (*certifications not necessary for Junior High Volleyball Coach) Junior High Track Coach Assistant Wrestling Coach

2015-2016 Extra-Curricular Assignment Vacancies:

For List of Extra-Curricular Assignment Below: Applicants are required to have a GED/High School Diploma, be able to fundraise if applicable, identify and recruit students if applicable, meet on a regular basis if applicable, and perform the duties per assignment description (contact Human Resources for description information). OPENING DATE: May 1, 2015. CLOSING DATE: May 15, 2015

AISES Advisor Close-Up Foundation Advisor Desitnation Imagination Advisor Junior Class Advisor (2) Middle School Student Council Advisor Military Club Advisor Horse Club Advisor Senior Class Advisor (3) Technology Mentor (K-2, 3-5, and High School)

Head Volleyball Coach Assistant Volleyball Coach Junior High Track Coach Assistant Wrestling Coach

If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: September 11, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filledIf you would like to apply to be a part of the TZ tiwahe you may pick up an application from the TZTS HR office located at #2 Tiospa Zina Dr. Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications may also be printed off the HR web page by downloading from links under employment forms to the left. Completed applications may be sent to PO Box 719, Agency Village, SD 57262. Faxed to: 605-698-7686. For further information call 605-698-3953 ext. 208. Indian Preference employer. At will employer. All applicants are subject to a Background Check and Pre-Employment Drug Test, pursuant to SWSB policy.

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Foods: Cook I (Full-Time) Swing Dishwasher (2 Full-Time) Day/ Swing KCST (4 Full-Time) Graveyard

Hotel: Room/Laundry Attendant (Full Time) Day 8:00 am-Finish

Purchasing Department: Clerk (Full Time or Part Time) Day

Surveillance: Observer (3 Full-Time) Rotating

Table Games: Dealer (Full-Time) Rotating

Closing Date: May 22, 2015 @ 4:00 P.M.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions

Two identifications documents required upon hire

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE, Hankinson ND 58041.For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO. (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment). Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

ADMINISTRATION: RECEPTIONIST (1 FULL-TIME) GENERAL FUNCTION: Under supervision, performs clerical tasks involving typing, filing, answering switchboard and other work as required or directed. REQUIREMENTS: Must have a high school diploma or GED equivalent. Knowledge of Basic English Usage, spelling, and math. Experience in dealing with the public required. Experience and training in the use Of switchboard preferred. Ability to use a word processor and/or computer equipment. Ability to understand and carry out oral and written directions. Knowledge of office methods, practices, machines, and procedures. Able to sit for long periods of time as well as perform repetitious computer work. Ability to lift 25lbs. Must obtain Non Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on May 20, 2015 at 4 pm.

ADMINISTRATION: RECEPTIONIST (Part-Time) Includes Week-ends/On Call GENERAL FUNCTION: Under supervision, performs clerical tasks involving typing, filing, answering switchboard and other work as required or directed. REQUIREMENTS: Must have a high school diploma or GED equivalent. Knowledge of basic English usage, spelling, and math. Experience in dealing with the public required. Experience and training in the use of a switchboard preferred. Ability to use a word processor and/or computer equipment. Ability to understand and carry out oral and written directions. Knowledge of office methods, practices, machines, and procedures. Able to sit for long periods of time as well as perform repetitious computer work. Able to lift up to 25 lbs. Must obtain a Non Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on May 20, 2015 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

HOTEL: FRONT DESK CLERK (1 FULL- TIME) GENERAL FUNCTION: Staffs the Front Desk to attend to the needs of the guests throughout their stay. REQUIREMENTS: High School Diploma or GED. Three to six months related experience and/or training, or equivalent combination of education and experience. Good people skills, both in person and on the telephone. Must meet the requirement of a non-gaming license upon hire.

This position will close on May 20, 2015 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.