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Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate: Want to re-read the Self-Governance articles from recent issues of our Sota Iya Ye Yapi?

Whether or not the Tribe assumes administrative authority over your health services is a BIG DEAL. What do you know about it?

Here they are:

Self-Governance Articles from past Sotas

  Obituaries Editorials Editor's column Education
Legals
Trading post

 

 

Vol. 48 Issue No. 17

Anpetu Iyamni, Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Inside this Edition –

Chairman Flute updates the Oyate

Six file for Vice-Chair special election

SWC Career/Transfer Fair this Wednesday

Picturing progress inside Dakota Crossings, the Tribe's supermarket

highlights of Earth Day 2017 Walk at Agency Village

TZ students to participate in PBLO Exit presentations

Reminder: Deadline to submit copy for consideration in the Sota is Friday noon

Chairman's Corner:

Updating the Oyate

My friends and relatives:

As always, our thought and prayers to those that have lost loved ones this past week.

Dakota Crossings grocery store

The parking lot, sidewalks and curb and gutter will be getting poured during the next two weeks. Tribal Council and Executives met with the general contractor and discussed the signage and decor that will be displayed outside and inside Dakota Crossings. We are also looking forward to the upcoming job fairs. These job fairs will be an opportunity for those to apply that have been inquiring about jobs for Dakota Crossings grocery store.

Lagoon at Agency Village

LTUC has been draining and upgrading this lagoon for better service and possibly help reduce the smell. There are many other projects they are working on and look forward to seeing continued progress across the reservation. Finally, I will revisit the possibility of creating a public utilities commission to assist and provide support to the future goals for the Tribe. It is my understanding this was proposed to Tribal leadership but never acted upon.

Detention Facility

As we approach the end of the month, Congress will more than likely act on a continuing resolution and work off of the current budget. We will then be able to adjust our lobbying efforts and go back to D.C. and lobby our Congressional leadership to assist us in funding the on-going Justice Center project. We are also exploring the possibility of building a detention facility somewhat like San Carlos Apache. The reason for this is BIA is looking for a Midwest tribal detention facility that they can contract for services. San Carlos has a $3M facility that meets and exceeds BIA standards. The last discussion I had with the BIA Director is they would enter into an agreement immediately with us if we have a regional facility that would meet their needs. The advantage of this possibility is BIA would contract beds from us at a substantial rate thus generating program income and relieve the Tribe of some of the subsidies we give law enforcement. It would also create some jobs. However, if we do not move on this opportunity, someone else will, and BIA will contract with them instead of with us. We are looking at a 60-bed facility. We need an average of 20 beds per month and would contract the other 40 or 50 to BIA. It is basically the same concept as Roberts County tried to do; but the difference is rather than assuming our beds would be contracted our beds are guaranteed to be contracted via contract between SWST and BIA. Regardless, we are still pressing ahead with establishing a justice center for our community.

Buffalo Calf

We had a beautiful pipe ceremony and feed for the twin calf that was born but orphaned. Keeping our culture strong and enforcing our rites is essential for youth and for our Tribe in general. I was moved to see so many of the next generation participate in this ceremony. I want to say publicly to all that participated, wopida tanka!

Tribal Law/Housing

In upcoming weeks I will be pushing Tribal Council to amend our codes and ask them to work on increasing penalties for those that continue to manufacture meth and smoke meth in our community. I say this publicly, "If anyone out there seeks treatment, come see me and I will help you get into treatment." However, what bothers me is I get calls every week from good hard-working people that need a housing unit but the list is long and building homes is not moving fast enough; it is a crisis. Also, we have beautiful housing homes that have been boarded up because of meth and now have to be renovated for tens of thousands of dollars. I am in favor of Banishment; it is an inherent rite of our people to enforce traditional law. I propose three levels of Banishment for meth. First time offenders 1 year Banishment from all Tribal property. Second offense 5-year Banishment. And third offense 25 year to life Banishment. Enough is enough! Also, Housing Board and Director need to be more aggressive and assertive of their policies: If you refuse to enforce and or strengthen your policies then I recommend Tribal Council abolish the Housing Board and assume the duties until we get people in these positions that will not travel and choose to stay home and fix the issues with what's going on in our housing sites. I have been as cordial as I possibly can with Housing and some of the Board, however, as Tribal Chairman I am at wits end with the housing system and lack of good hard work and fixing the issues of meth, waiting lists and the lack of moving on projects with a sense of urgency. I am dissatisfied with SWHA. There was an elder disabled Vietnam veteran that was locked out of his complex and sat in the rain for an hour. He came to see me because nobody at Housing was answering his calls. I called Housing and told management this situation was unacceptable. Housing told me they solved the problem. However, the very same night I got a call from the same disabled Vietnam vet and he was AGAIN locked out of his complex – UNACCEPTABLE!!! I am tired of hearing excuses of why Housing can't do this and Housing can't do that. I am saying it publicly: Get it fixed and if you refuse to act and move with a sense of urgency then I suggest Council abolish the Board as has been done in the past, or put Housing under my Executive office and I will make something happen. This is one of those boards that get to go on the "good" trips! I suggest Council suspend all travel of the Board and Director; you have the authority as Housing falls under the colors of the SWST.

I look forward to next week's regular Council meeting and expect to see some action taken by Tribal Council.

Respectfully, Dave Flute-Chairman.

Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe.

Six file for Tribal Vice-Chair special election

Deadline was last Tuesday, April 18th, for filing to run in a special election to fill the vacant Tribal Vice-Chairman post.

Filing for the election (but not yet certified) are:

Danielle DeCoteau.

Charles James.

Floyd Kirk Jr.

William LaRoque.

Olivia Locke.

Robin Quinn.

The special election is necessary to fill the remainder of Donovan White's term. Mr. White was removed from office on April 3, 2017.

The election is scheduled to be held Tuesday, May 16, 2017.

Date for the Reservation Election Board (REB) to determine a list of certified candidates is this week, Wednesday, April 26th.

Watch for a notice for the special election and list of certified candidates to be published.

For more information, contact REB members:

Josie Bertsch: 605-237-4067

Jenny Payne: 605-237-2956

Angie Johnson: 605-467-9737

Dustin Opsal: 605-268-9006

Or email REB@swo-nsn.gov

Earth Day 2017 highlights

The SWST Office of Environmental Protection (OEP) held its annual Earth Day clean-up on Friday, April 21st.

Volunteers turned out at Agency Village to take part in picking up trash around the area.

There were drawings for prices, and t-shirts were distributed to the volunteers.

SWST Head Start also participated, with special incentives for children and families.

There were games and a "color run," with participants getting blasted by paintball guns dripping with many colors!

(Editor's note: Thank you to Camille Sine and Al Morsette for posting these photos on Facebook.)

Blackfeet Nation votes to approve water agreement with Montana and United States

Browning, Montana – April 20, 2017 – A majority of Blackfeet Nation voters Thursday approved a water rights agreement with Montana and the United States.

An unofficial count had 75 percent of the votes in favor, approving the Blackfeet Water Compact and Blackfeet Water Rights Settlement Act.

The compact confirms and quantifies the Tribe's water rights and also confirms its jurisdiction over those rights on the Reservation.

"This is a historic day for the Blackfeet people," said Harry Barnes, chairman of the Blackfeet Tribal Business Council. "All of the time and effort by Blackfeet staff and leaders over the past four decades was well worth it. The benefits of the water compact will be seen for generations to come."

"My faith in the wisdom of the people's vote has come to reality," continued Barnes.

The Tribe's approval was the final element needed for the compact to become effective. Montana ratified it in 2009 and Congress provided federal approval in December.

The compact will provide the Tribe with $422 million in federal funding and $49 million in state funding for water-related infrastructure projects on the Reservation. The money will be available to the Tribe over a number of years and will support projects such as new or improved irrigation systems, development of community water systems, development and management of fisheries, and land acquisition.

"I'm proud to be a part of an agreement that's going to have long-lasting benefits for the Tribe and the Blackfeet people," said Jerry Lunak, Water Resources Director of the Blackfeet Nation.

Next, the Blackfeet Nation will be working to fully implement the settlement, including development of a community-based plan for infrastructure projects and future development in communities with input from its tribal members

Additional information about the Blackfeet Water Compact and Settlement Act can be found at http://blackfeetnation.com/watercompact/ or on the Blackfeet Nation/Blackfeet Tribal Business Council Facebook page.

(Editor's note: The Blackfeet Nation's water rights agreement ought to encourage the SWST to assert its water rights on the Lake Traverse Reservation. This is part of what the grassroots SWO Mni Wiconi has been talking about for several years.)

DENR reissues General Permit for CAFOs

Pierre, SD – April 21, 2017 – The Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) announced today the General Water Pollution Control Permit for Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations has been reissued and is now effective.

 There are 429 livestock operations covered under the existing general permit for concentrated animal feeding operations.

 "While the existing permit has been successful in protecting water quality in South Dakota, those operations now have one to four years to apply for and obtain coverage under the new reissued permit," said Kent Woodmansey, administrator of DENR's Feedlot Permit Program. "DENR will send letters to all permitted operations with information about the process and deadlines for applying."

 Livestock operations need coverage under the general permit if they are a large concentrated animal feeding operation, or are required to obtain state permit coverage by units of local government. Producers may also voluntarily apply for and obtain permit coverage.

 Large concentrated animal feeding operations confine at least 1,000 beef cattle, 700 dairy cows, 2,500 swine weighing 55 pounds or more, 10,000 swine weighing less than 55 pounds, 500 horses, 10,000 sheep, 55,000 turkeys, or 30,000 geese. Large concentrated chicken and duck operations range between 5,000 to 125,000 animals based on the type of operation and whether a liquid or solid manure containment system is used.

 The content of the reissued general water pollution control permit for concentrated animal feeding operations includes:

*State and federal requirements for the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of  manure management systems to protect surface and ground water quality.

*Nutrient management plan requirements to ensure that nitrogen and phosphorus in the manure are properly land applied as a fertilizer for crop production.

*A roadmap for livestock producers, design engineers, and crop consultants to reach environmental compliance in South Dakota.

The process to reissue the general permit for concentrated animal feeding operations began two years ago during April 2015, when DENR staff started meeting and talking informally with agricultural groups, producer groups, and other interested parties. After a statewide webinar was held, DENR public noticed a draft general permit on Oct. 8, 2015, but it was contested by 11 intervention petitions. A contested case hearing initially scheduled for December 2015 was delayed, rescheduled, and held on Sept. 27-29, 2016. Petitioners represented at the hearing included Dakota Rural Action, South Dakota Cattlemen's Association, South Dakota Dairy Producers, South Dakota Pork Producers Council and Sonstegard Foods.

 After listening to two-and-a-half days of testimony at the contested case hearing, DENR Secretary Steve Pirner, acting as hearing chairman, approved revisions and adopted a final permit. Attorneys for the DENR Feedlot Permit Program submitted to the Secretary proposed Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law. Dakota Rural Action's attorney submitted to the Secretary objections to the proposal. On March 10, 2017, the Secretary adopted final Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law. Parties to the hearing had 30 days to appeal the Secretary's decision to circuit court. Since the Secretary's final Findings were not appealed, the general water pollution control permit for concentrated animal feeding operations is reissued and in effect.

More information about the reissued general permit can be found on DENR's Feedlot Permit Program website at http://denr.sd.gov/des/fp/cafo.aspx.

(Editor's note: The reissue means that hearings will need to be held for recertification, opportunities for public input concerning damage being done especially by the large CAFOs to the water, land, and air quality. But air quality does not matter in South Dakota, because this state has adopted no air quality standards.)

Dakota Crossings: Photo highlights of interior construction progress

Here is a Sota photo essay from last Thursday, April 20th. It shows progress being made inside the Tribe's new grocery store, Dakota Crossings on east Highway 10 in Sisseton. Electrical conduit and plumbing are being set in place, and preparations for pouring the floor. Watch for periodic photos showing ongoing construction.

Plans are to have the business completed and open by July – in time for the 150th annual Fourth of July Wacipi.

Tribal leaders have been holding meetings with Dakota Nation Development, the Tax and Human Resources offices, and others, to prepare for the store being up and fully running by the completion date.

Please note the notice elsewhere in this Sota, informing the Oyate of upcoming job fairs. These public events are being held to provide information about job openings at the grocery store, and applications.

Here is a list of dates, times and locations:

*Sisseton Wahpeton College omniciye tipi (auditorium): this Wednesday, April 26, 9:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m.

*SWST administration building rotunda: Tuesday and Thursday, May 2 and 4, 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. each day.

*Dakota Connection Casino bingo hall: Tuesday and Thursday, May 9 and 11, 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. each day; and Tuesday and Thursday, May 16 and 18, 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. each day.

Completed applications will be entered at each event for a drawing for door prizes.

For more information about employment opportunities at Dakota Crossings, please contact any of the following: Denise Kranhold 605-698-8304; Darrell Quinn Jr. 605-698-8328; or Josh Flute 605-698-2002.

Supporting law enforcement, public safety in Indian country

Washington, SD – April 18, 2017 – As part of the department's efforts under the Task Force on Crime Reduction and Public Safety (Task Force), Attorney General Jeff Sessions today announced a series of actions the department will take to support law enforcement and maintain public safety in Indian Country.

"It is paramount that tribal police have the tools they need to fight crime and maintain public safety in their communities," said Attorney General Sessions. "Law enforcement in Indian Country faces unique practical and jurisdictional challenges and the Department of Justice is committed to working with them to provide greater access to technology, information and necessary enforcement."

The following three actions were announced today:

1. The department will deploy the Tribal Access Program for National Crime Information (TAP) to 10 tribal sites, beginning today with the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in Montana. This expanding program, which was first implemented in 2015 as a successful pilot program with nine tribes, is designed to provide federally-recognized tribes access to national crime information databases for both civil and criminal purposes;

2. In support of the Task Force, the Office of Tribal Justice will coordinate a series of listening sessions with tribal law enforcement officials and tribal leaders to ensure the unique perspective of law enforcement in Indian Country is taken into account; and

3. The Office of Tribal Justice has created the Indian Country Federal Law Enforcement Coordination Group, an unprecedented partnership that brings together sworn federal agents and other key law enforcement stakeholders from 12 federal law enforcement components, including: the Department of Justice's Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, the Drug Enforcement Administration; the Federal Bureau of Investigation Criminal Justice Information Services and Indian Country Crimes Unit, the U.S. Marshals Service and the Office of the Inspector General; The Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management and Bureau of Indian Affairs, Office of Justice Services; the Department of Health and Human Services; the Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency, U.S. Customs and Border Protection and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Homeland Security Investigations. This partnership will increase collaboration and coordination with the goal of enhancing the response to violent crime in Indian country.

The Attorney General will continue to receive and act upon recommendations from the Task Force as they become available and is committed to combatting violent crime and maintaining public safety in tribal lands.

Seeks applications to support rural businesses, create jobs

Huron, SD – April 21, 2017 – U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development Acting State Director Bruce Jones has announced the agency is accepting applications for the Rural Business Development Grant (RBDG) program.

"This grant promotes long-term economic growth and community vitality in rural areas," said Jones. "We encourage non-profits, tribes and public agencies to apply."

The Rural Business Development Grant (RBDG) is designed to assist with startup and expansion of small and emerging private businesses and/or nonprofits in rural communities. Eligible applicants include public bodies, government entities, Indian tribes, and non-profit organizations. Funds can be used for business incubators, leadership and entrepreneur training, acquisition or development of land or buildings, capitalization of revolving loan funds to be re-lent to local businesses and many other purposes – all to assist small businesses.

For example in 2015, Brookings Economic Development Corporation (BEDC) leveraged their own funds with RBDG funds towards workforce education efforts with the South Dakota Education Campus (SDEC) located in Brookings. SDEC works closely with Brookings businesses and provides training in the areas needed by those businesses. In some cases, they have individuals who want to learn a new skill so they can get a job or develop new skill sets that will support their career development. Examples of training provided include CNAs, welders, and carpenters, as well as classes in Quicken, Excel, and other computer programs. Their emphasis is in STEM, and have worked with MN West Community College in Granite Falls, MN as well as the Brookings School District. In 2015, BEDC also leveraged their own funds with RBDG funds towards the Brookings community entrepreneurship growth strategy that they titled Makerspace. The Brookings Area Makerspace provides affordable access to unique space and specialized equipment in several areas. Categories include wood shop, kitchen area, industrial sewing machine, 3-D printer, electronics bench, welder, CNC router table, laser engraver, plus more. The Makerspace is intended to be used by entrepreneurs, artists, makers, and hobbyists to collaborate on projects and experiment on innovate ideas – to encourage learning and entrepreneurship.

Funds have been set aside nationally to assist Native Americans, and additional monies will be allotted among the states for non-set aside applicants. All grants will be awarded competitively, based on several areas including:

Evidence showing job creation to occur with local businesses.

Percent of nonfederal funding committed to the project.

Economic need in the area to be served.

Consistency with local economic development priorities.

Experience of the grantee with similar efforts.

Complete applications must be received by USDA Rural Development at the South Dakota state office no later than 4:30 p.m. on Friday, April 28, 2017. If you are planning to submit an application in South Dakota, we encourage you to contact a local Business & Cooperative Program Specialist or the State Office for more details about the application requirements and process:

 

Dana Kleinsasser, Rural Business & Cooperative Programs Director (Huron State Office)

Phone: (605) 352-1142

Email: dana.kleinsasser@sd.usda.gov

 

Cayla Hilbrands, Assistant (Huron State Office)

Phone: (605) 352-1137

Email: cayla.hilbrands@sd.usda.gov

 

Shelby Kraemer, Assistant (Aberdeen)

Phone: (605) 824-3627

Email: shelby.kraemer@sd.usda.gov

 

Gary Wedel, Specialist (Mitchell)

Phone: (605) 299-3339

Email: gary.wedel@sd.usda.gov

 

Clark Guthmiller, Specialist (Pierre)

Phone: (605) 301-3409

Email: clark.guthmiller@sd.usda.gov

 

Hettianne Cekalla, Specialist (Rapid City)

Phone: (605) 342-0301, Ext. 118

Email: hettianne.cekalla@sd.usda.gov

 

Jolene Pravecek, Specialist (Yankton)

Phone: (605) 655-3516

Email: jolene.pravecek@sd.usda.gov

GROW SD receives State Farm grant to prepare homebuyers

GROW South Dakota recently received a Good Neighbor Citizenship Grant from State Farm for its Preparing Homebuyers project. The purpose of the project is to support prospective homebuyers in evaluating their readiness to purchase a home, preparing to apply for a mortgage, and building their understanding of all aspects of owning a home.

The grant will fund the preparation of an information sheet on basic steps in preparing for homeownership as well as coaching by GROW South Dakota staff to make a successful application for a home mortgage. The project has a goal of particularly supporting low-income potential homebuyers. The grant also will support technology training for staff.

For more information about GROW South Dakota housing, community and business development programs visit www.growsd.org or call (605) 698-7654.

About State Farm®:

The mission of State Farm is to help people manage the risks of everyday life, recover from the unexpected, and realize their dreams. State Farm and its affiliates are the largest providers of auto, home and individual life insurance in the United States. Its 18,000 agents and more than 65,000 employees serve more than 83 million policies and accounts - nearly 81 million auto, home, life, health and commercial policies, and nearly 2 million bank accounts. Commercial auto  insurance, along with coverage for renters, business owners, boats and motorcycles, is available. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company is the parent of the State Farm family of companies. State Farm is ranked No. 35 on the 2016 Fortune 500 list of largest companies. For more information, please visit http://www.statefarm.com.

*****

GROW SOUTH DAKOTA is an Equal Opportunity Lender, Provider, and Employer Complaints of discrimination should be sent to: USDA, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave SW, Washington DC 20250-9410.

Policy needed to help wind power

Grand Forks, ND – April 20, 2017 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today reinforced the need to support a robust wind industry as part of building and growing an all-of-the-above energy strategy during her visit to LM Wind Manufacturing, which employs about 1,025 people in Grand Forks.

Heitkamp has been a champion of policies that encourage the expansion of wind energy projects in North Dakota, and was instrumental in passing a long-term extension of the Production Tax Credit (PTC) to support wind energy development in December 2015. Prior to her work to secure lasting PTC support, hundreds of wind energy workers were laid off nationwide, including in North Dakota. Now that more certainty has been restored across the industry, in part due to her legislative work, demand for wind-energy jobs has been booming – LM Wind added nearly 200 employees in the past several months alone. During her visit today – which also included a tour of TP&L's wind blade loading facility – Heitkamp underscored the need to bolster policies that increase jobs and diversify North Dakota's energy sector.

In fact, North Dakota is the No. 1 state in the nation for wind energy jobs per capita, and third in the country for clean energy jobs per capita. In 2016, the wind industry employed more than 100,000 people – and demand is growing. In fact, the median salary of workers that maintain wind turbines – now the fastest-growing occupation in the United States – is expected to more than double between 2014 and 2024.

"Across the country, demand for wind power is booming – and by producing that resource, North Dakota companies like LM are not only helping grow hundreds of jobs in Grand Forks, they are reinforcing our state's commitment to a robust, all-of-the-above energy strategy," said Heitkamp. "Our state has been rich with wind power for years and we have continued to see huge growth in wind energy and wind energy jobs in North Dakota, but we still only use a faction of our potential. When you see that wind-turbine technicians are the fastest growing occupation in the country, we know we must keep advocating for smart wind energy policies to increase our potential across the board in this industry – and push back on wrong-headed efforts to slow this growth. I had the opportunity to see up close how the hardworking folks at LM are making strides to do just that, and I'll keep fighting for the support and certainty they need grow local jobs, strengthen our economy, and continue to make our state's diverse energy policy a model for the country."

Long an advocate for all of North Dakota's energy workers and a strong proponent of a diversified national energy strategy, Heitkamp worked for a year and a half to bring both Republicans and Democrats to the table on her bill to lift the nation's 40-year ban on crude oil exports. The bill, which passed in Congress' year-end spending bill in December 2015, also contained provisions Heitkamp long pushed for to support prolonged certainty for renewable energy workers across North Dakota – including a five-year retroactive extension of PTC through 2019 which will encourage more energy efficient, job-creating solutions for years to come.

In 2015, up to 3,000 jobs were supported by the wind production industry in North Dakota – and the industry is growing. Last year, up to 5,000 jobs were supported by the industry directly or indirectly.

This visit continues Heitkamp's strong record of supporting renewable energy businesses by visiting and speaking firsthand with workers on the ground. Last July, Heitkamp attended the ribbon-cutting ceremony for Xcel Energy's Border Wind Farm, a project that is expected to employ about 150 North Dakotans during peak construction. In April 2015, Heitkamp toured Fargo's 70-year-old Ulteig Engineers to discuss the direly needed build-out of North Dakota's energy infrastructure with a particular focus on providing certainty to wind energy industry workers. In January 2014, Heitkamp toured Iberdrola Wind Farm near Rugby and in May 2013, Heitkamp attended a ribbon-cutting ceremony for Bison Wind Energy Center near New Salem. She also visited an Otter Tail Power Company and NextEra Energy Resources wind farm near Edgeley in October 2014.

Comments on Weather Research and Forecasting Innovation Act

"The results of this legislation will be better warning about extreme weather events and changes to long-term forecasting that give farmers better information about what and when to plant …"

Washington, DC – April 19, 2017 – U.S. Sen. John Thune (R-S.D), chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, which has legislative jurisdiction over the National Weather Service (NWS), issued the following statement on the announcement that President Donald Trump has signed into law H.R. 353, the Weather Research and Forecasting Innovation Act of 2017. The bill, of which Thune was the lead Senate sponsor, includes sweeping reforms to federal forecasting to improve seasonal forecasting, monitoring and clearly communicating information about extreme weather events, the availability of aircraft systems for hurricane tracking, and the use of commercial data that have been collectively called "the first major piece of weather legislation adopted since the early 1990s."

"I appreciate the efforts of President Trump and the bipartisan supporters of weather reform in both the House and Senate," said Thune. "These sweeping reforms will make needed changes in weather forecasting to reflect and build upon advancements in satellite technology, how we use the internet to communicate, and scientific advancements that can help better predict coming changes in heat and moisture from season to season. The results of this legislation will be better warning about extreme weather events and changes to long-term forecasting that give farmers better information about what and when to plant and local transportation departments more time to prepare for unusually harsh winters."

The Senate approved H.R. 353 with amendments on March 29, 2017, and the House of Representatives cleared the amended bill for White House consideration on April 4. Click here for the full final text of H.R. 353.

Summary of H.R. 353:

Seasonal forecasting – Directs the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and its component agency the NWS to create usable, reliable, and timely subseasonal and seasonal forecasts, and determine the impact of these forecasts. Through an authorization of $26.5 million out of funds appropriated to NWS through fiscal year 2018, the legislation lays the groundwork for significant improvements in usable and reliable forecasts for time periods of 2 weeks to 2 years. This improvement in forecasting would, for example, allow farmers to make more informed decisions about when and what to plant.

Forecast communication – Requires the NWS to designate at least one employee in each of the established 122 weather forecast offices as the warning coordination meteorologist. Even when forecasters accurately predict dangerous weather events, preventable deaths, injuries, and property losses occur due to shortcomings in communications about what is happening and what at-risk populations should do. Warning coordination meteorologists will focus on the regional area covered by the weather forecast office and work with local officials, media, and other channels to maximize the usefulness and effectiveness of emergency communications.

Tornado and hurricane forecasting – Focuses on forecasting improvements and new research into extreme weather events. Establishes a tornado warning improvement and extension program for federal cooperation with private sector and academic partners to focus on developing and extending accurate tornado forecasts and warnings beyond one hour. It also creates a similar collaboration program for improving hurricane forecasting and communication of storm surges.

Tsunami warning – Authorizes NOAA to put tsunami sensors onto commercial and federal telecommunications cables as a cost-effective improvement to the tsunami detection network and research efforts regarding tsunamis. Also authorizes grant funding to survey for "paleotsunamis"— evidence of devastating waves in prehistoric times, or periods before records were kept. By understanding past threats, communities can prepare better for future disasters.

Satellite governance – Reforms NOAA's satellite procurement efforts by requiring consideration of existing systems and the overall cost of integrating new ones. The reform comes after the agency experienced costly difficulties in integrating new equipment with current ground and space systems. The bill further requires NOAA to enter into a pilot program contract to assess the private sector's capabilities in providing weather data.

Contracting disclosures – Addresses concerns about some agency employees abusing the contracting process to enrich themselves with lucrative post-retirement contracts. The bill requires NOAA to annually disclose information about full-time equivalent contractors and those who formerly worked at the agency as federal employees.

"Hurricane Hunter" backup – Requires NOAA to establish a backup for the capabilities of its "Hurricane Hunter" aircraft systems. NOAA operates two WP-3D Orion turboprop aircraft that fly through hurricanes and penetrate the eyewall of storms?. These aircraft deploy instrumentation that transmits measurements of pressure, humidity, temperature, and wind speed while also scanning the storm with the aircraft's tail Doppler radar. NOAA also operates one G-IV jet that flies above and around the storm gathering high-altitude data with deployable instrumentation and tail Doppler radar.

Radar study – Requires NOAA to identify areas where there are gaps in radar coverage and provide recommendations on the supplemental observations necessary to improve public safety.

Editorials –

Sota editorial –

Reflections on the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate's Earth Day 2017

By CD Floro

Sota Editor

We were moved by listening to what we could of Crystal Owen's "Getting Real About Life on the Rez" on KXSW last Thursday morning. Wish we had a transcript to publish.

How appropriate for Crystal to interview Sarah Sunshine Manning the day before our Oyate observed "Earth Day 2017."

Sarah shared a valuable message, about what has happened to our First Peoples.

Once connected, deeply, to the earth and all of its many life forms. Knowing that ultimately, we are all parts of one.

"We are all relatives" was more, so much more than a saying, or slogan.

It was a way of life for people who understood who they were.

And what happened?

With colonization…

Subjection to religion… religion with foreign ideas about conquest, manifest destiny, and controlling the earth and its life forms.

Sarah's words make us think about how our Oyate's cultural roots, their very identity, as a people and as individuals, was ripped away.

But by recognizing what has happened, acknowledging it, healing is possible. Reconnection.

She calls everyone to become part of the awakening, renewal of the identity of the Oyate.

And what better time than as we reflect on this Earth Day about our connectedness to the land, the water, to the sky, to one another and to all life.

We encourage everyone to become more involved in assisting the young ones to discover their identity, and their connectedness to Ina Makoce and all that lives.

Here are a few lines from Sarah herself:

"Happy Earth Day"

It is odd to say those words. To be sure, the Earth is our Mother, and yet our world today makes it so easy for us to forget.

We take for granted our connection.

We forsake our relationship, taking, and taking, forgetting to give back.

Give back in the same way that our Mother Earth gives to us.

Give back through song, through reverence, and love.

Love our Earth Mother, every day.

Let this one day just be an opportunity to reflect, on just how much we are inextricably linked to the Earth and all life. Protect, defend, and honor.

It truly is a way of life.

And what we give, generations of our children and grandchildren will get back.

-- Sarah Sunshine Manning

Brief editorial comments from the editor's desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

Please read Chairman Flute's update to the Oyate in this week's Sota.

*****

The Reservation Election Board has no public notice this week, but see our news article on page one about the special election to fill the Vice-Chair post.

The election is set for Tuesday, May 16, 2017.

Candidates will be certified this Wednesday, so watch for a finalized list in the next Sota.

*****

We are thankful that many answered the call to take part in last week's ceremony and prayers on behalf of the Oyate's twin bison calves.

The adopted heifer calf can be an important symbol for the people, and we are glad that she is being honored.

Readers will notice that the Sota is not carrying any photos of the gathering for this occasion.

These are not public events to be publicized.

*****

We have learned that Viva Seaboy-DuBois will be a candidate in the upcoming Sisseton School Board election.

Please consider voting for Viva.

We need representation for our Oyate youth on the public school board.

She will be among candidates for three vacancies on the board.

*****

We share photos of the work underway how at Dakota Crossings, the Tribe's grocery store.

It looks like a big open space on the inside of the walls now, but the utilities are in place and the floor will be poured.

We hope to bring readers pictures of the stages of construction periodically, until it is ready for opening by the time of the 150th annual wacipi.

*****

Thank to everyone who helped organize, and those who turned out to assist in the Earth Day 2017 Walk and Clean-up at Agency Village.

It is especially heartening to see youth and families taking part. Thanks not only to OEP, organizer of the walk and clean-up, but Head Start for the "color run" and making it fun for the kids.

We hope that everyone reflects on the meaning of Earth Day, and how we all are called to reconnect with the Earth daily.

We are all responsible for her, and for all the relatives.

We are all connected, as Sarah Sunshine Manning reminds us.

See photo highlights of the walk provided by Camille Sine and Al Morsette.

*****

Please note that the Sisseton-Wahpeton Head Start graduation will be held on Saturday, May 6th.

Time is 11:00 a.m., in the Tiospa Zina Tribal School gym.

*****

Sisseton Wahpeton College graduation will be held on Saturday, May 13th, at 10:00 a.m. at the SWC omniciye tipi.

*****

The Tiospa Zina Tribal School high school graduation will be held Saturday, May 20, 2:00 p.m. at the TZTS gym.

*****

Enemy Swim Day School will hold its 8th grade graduation on Friday, May 26.

The ceremony will be held at 8:00 p.m. at the ESDS gym.

*****

We encourage all members to be actively involved in Tribal and District business.

If you are unable to come to Tribal headquarters to attend a Council meeting, these meetings are now being broadcast live over Tribal radio station KXSW-FM and live-streamed over the internet by announcer Tom Wilson.

Check out KXSW 89.9 FM and the station's Facebook page.

*****

We post a notice in each edition, and include it in this column, but we want to remind everyone that the deadline for receiving copy for consideration to be published – news and advertising – is 12:00 noon on Friday.

Always, we will accommodate reports of emergencies and obituaries, until the paper has been submitted to the central printing plant.

Thank you to everyone who respects the deadline.

And, yes, we realize that we all sometimes forget things on our "to do" list. So, if this happens, please go ahead and submit your copy even if it is late. We will try to get it included.

We are all human. And, if you've taken a good look around, none of us is perfect.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"You must be prepared and know the reason why you dance." –Thomas Yellowtail, CROW

Inside every human being is a need to dance. We dance to music. Have you even wondered why people are moved when they hear an Indian Drum? The drum is the heartbeat of the Mother Earth. Every Indian dance is for a purpose and a reason. Every Song is for a reason. The beat of the drum makes our bodies, minds, and spirits join together in harmony. It allows us to connect to Mother Earth and to each other. The dance aligns our minds to think spiritual thoughts. Dancing to the drum is healthy.

Great Spirit, today, I dance to honor you.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

The older I grow the more I distrust the familiar doctrine that age brings wisdom. H. L. Mencken (1880 - 1956)

The past is not dead. In fact, it's not even past. William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Silence is the virtue of fools. Sir Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

The people I distrust most are those who want to improve our lives but have only one course of action. Frank Herbert (1920 - 1986)

There is a tragic flaw in our precious Constitution, and I don't know what can be done to fix it. This is it: Only nut cases want to be president. Kurt Vonnegut (1922 - 2007), "Cold Turkey", In These Times, May 10, 2004

We should be taught not to wait for inspiration to start a thing. Action always generates inspiration. Inspiration seldom generates action. Frank Tibolt

Irrationally held truths may be more harmful than reasoned errors. Thomas H. Huxley (1825 - 1895)

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Services held for John Thompson

Funeral service for John F. Thompson, Sr., 53, of Sisseton, SD were held Monday morning, April 27, 2017 at the SWST community center at Agency Village, SD with Fr. Brian Simon, Pastor Milton Owen, LaVern Blackthunder and St. Mary's Episcopal Lay Readers officiating with a drum group.

Pallbearers were Jacky White, Russell Smith, Jesse Thompson, Jack Thompson, Brian Rodlund (proxy) Harold LaFromboise and Joseph Owen (proxy) Richard Mireau.

Honorary pallbearers were Justin Cloud, Hokey Marks, Paul Keeble, Leon Koeppe, Floyd Thompson, Gerald German, all of John's close friends and "The Boys."

All-night wake service was held at the community center Sunday night.

Interment is at the St. Matthew's Cemetery, Veblen, SD.

Cahill Funeral Chapel of Sisseton, SD was in charge of arrangements.

John was born on January 3, 1964 to Nathaniel Thompson Sr. and Susie Ann Nelson in Sisseton, SD.

Johnny attended Sisseton Middle School.

He liked Pow Wows, singing and always respected the Indian Traditions.

He was a handyman and liked to help people with cutting grass, racking and shoveling snow. He loved horses and being a cowboy. He loved his little Takojas.

Johnny lived his whole life in the Sisseton area.

John passed away on January 25, 2017 at rural Veblen, SD.

John is survived by one son, James Martin Thompson of Sioux Falls, SD; two daughters, Ida Mae Thompson of San Bernardino, CA and Imogene Thompson of Morris, MN; and his brothers and sisters, Marylou Thompson of Sisseton, SD, Gerald Thompson Sr. of Sisseton, SD, Harold LaFromboise of Sioux Falls, SD, Francis Thompson of Watertown, SD, Anna Marie Thompson of Watertown, SD, Christine Smith of Watertown, SD, James Thompson of Oren, UT, Nathaniel Thompson Jr. of Aberdeen, SD, Raymond Thompson of Fort Totten, ND, Brian Rodlund Jr., Moses Rodlund, Scottie Rodlund, Brendon Rodlund, many nieces, nephews and cousins.

John was preceded in death by his parents Nathan and Susie Ann Thompson, one sister, Elizabeth Thompson, and one son John Thompson Jr.

Our Tiospaye return him to our ancestors.

For Johnny's obituary and on-line registry please visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com

Funeral held for Rosanna LaBelle-Barse

Funeral service for Rosanna Lena LaBelle-Barse, "Wicanhpi Ska Win" White Star Women, 42, of Sisseton, SD were held Wednesday afternoon, April 19, 2017 at the SWST community center, Agency Village, SD, with Fr. Charles Chan and Episcopal Lay Readers. Pianist was Billy Kohl and soloists were Devola Haug-Shey and Jaylee Crawford.

Pallbearers were Garen Montreal, Whitley Montreal, Justin Barse, Jack Barse, Austin Barse, Troy Barse, Nick Schaller, Gary Montreal Jr., Arnold Williams and Reno Greeley.

Honorary pallbearers were Lanise Montreal, Devonna Goodteacher, Andrea White, Kaylene Bird, Winona Thompson, Devola Haug, Paige Chalarski, Nadine Labelle, Andrea Cobenias, Lynette Spider, Annie Wakeman, Camille White, Steven Barse, and all of her very special aunties.

Wake services were held at the community center Monday evening and all-night Tuesday.

Internment is in St. Mary's Episcopal Cemetery, Agency Village, S D.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton SD was in charge of Funeral arrangements.

Rosanna Lena LaBelle-Barse was born on July 10, 1974 in Sisseton, SD to Frank Barse Jr. and Judy Labelle.

She attended school in Sisseton and Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Rosie lived mostly in Sisseton up until her adult age. She worked at various places, Dakota Magic, old Carlson Mini Mart, Loopy's, and I-29.

She then moved to Rapid City until she became ill. In Rapid City she worked at the School of Mines and she received an award from Governor Daugaard for her outstanding performance.

Rosie was a member of St. Mary's Episcopal Church.

She enjoyed going to different thrift stores in the surrounding towns. Her favorite shopping buddies were her mother and Aunt Brenda.

She also liked to take road trips.

Most of all Rosie loved being around her children, family and friends. She always looked forward to the family reunion in July.

When she became sick she returned to Sisseton. During her battle with her illness Rosie was surrounded by her parents, siblings, children, grandchild, aunts, uncles, cousins and friends.

Rosie had an illness that had no cure. Rosie journeyed to the spirit world on April 14, 2017 surrounded by her family.

Rosanna is survived by four children, Megan LaBelle, Whitley Montreal of Sisseton, SD, Garen Montreal of Sioux Falls, and Kaitlyn Wakeman of Flandreau, SD; her parents, Frank Barse Jr. and Judy LaBelle, of Sisseton, SD; eight sisters, Lisa Barse of Sisseton, SD, Jonita Barse of Sisseton, SD, Sha-la Mora of Oklahoma, Gina Labelle of Sisseton, SD, Josalena LaBelle of Sisseton, SD, Janessa Barse of New Effington, SD, Kayla LaBelle of Sioux Falls, SD, and Renita LaBelle of Sisseton, SD. Four brothers, Jack Barse of Sisseton, SD, Justin Barse of Sisseton, SD, Austin Barse of Wheaton, MN and Arnold (Janel) Williams of Sisseton, SD; grandchildren, Izabella Rose LaBelle, Laveah Journey LaBelle-German, Lena Ann LaBelle and Timothy Jones Jr.; numerous nephews, nieces, cousins and friends.

Rosie was preceded in death by her maternal grandparents, Lena and Rudy LaBelle; paternal grandparents, Frank and Violet Barse Sr.; two infant brothers; one sister, Candace LaBelle; two nephews, Jalen Barse and Shawn Saddler Jr., and one cousin, Loni Barse.

For Rosanna's obituary and on-line registry visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com

Services for Joseph Lufkins Jr.

Joseph Leroy Lufkins Jr., age 79, of Sioux Falls, South Dakota and formerly of Sisseton, South Dakota Journeyed to the Spirit World on Monday, April 17, 2017 at his residence surrounded by family.

He was born on March 5, 1938 in Sisseton, South Dakota the son of Joseph Lufkins and Ellen Harris.

Joseph was a member of The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate and was formerly employed as a construction worker.

He was an elder of the tribe and a men's traditional dancer.

He was his daughter's and his grandkids' biggest fan and attended many of their extracurricular activities.

He loved sports from baseball to football to bull riding, he had them all covered.

He belonged to the First Presbyterian Church in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

Survived by his loving wife Julia A. Lufkins; a daughter Jessica S. Hansen; six grandchildren, including Damien, Hannah and Imara all of Sioux Falls, South Dakota; a brother John (Peggy) Redday of Sisseton; a sister Gloria Nelson of Appleton, Minnesota; many other relatives and friends.

Preceded in death by his parents, a son and by brothers and sisters.

A traditional wake was held Friday, April 21st, at the Long Hollow District center.

Happiness gatherings were held on Saturday morning at the Long Hollow District center, and again Monday. April 24, at 6:30 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church in Sioux Falls, SD.

The Chilson Funeral Home in Winsted, Minnesota is serving the family. Online condolences may be made to www.chilsonfuneralhome.com

Services for Bill Bird Sr.

Services for Bill Bird Sr., of Flandreau, SD, were scheduled for this Monday, April 24, 2017 at 1:00 p.m. at Wico Icaga Otipi, Flandreau, SD.

An all-night wake service was held Sunday.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Recognized for 30 years service to NESD Head Start

Peggy Fisher has been recognized by the Northeast South Dakota Head Start program for thirty years of service.

Here is what Jaci Wolf said in announcing the award: "Congratulating Peggy Fisher for 30 years with our NESD Head Start Program. I personally want to say "Thank You" for all your time and dedication safely transporting our preschoolers to and from school all these years! You're awesome!"

Open letter to the Oyate

Criminal activity in government, stealing money, which belongs to all Tribal members, is a crime. Misusing funds, mis-management of the Tribal budget, should be a crime. Corruption will not go unpunished, you will end up in prison.

All Tribal members, we must hold these corrupt officials in Tribal government responsible for their actions. And debt by the Tribe and Districts will be investigated.

FBI will be involved.

The people voted you in office to serve the Tribe, all members. Not to rip us off.

Be honest, or you will end up in an orange suit.

Are you corrupt?

You know who you are.

You belong in prison.

Resign now.

Out with the crooked, or you will be doing time.

Follow the money.

It will lead to the criminal.

My opinion.

Larry Nerison, Oyate.

Request for help preparing for 135th year of service

Easter Sunday 2017 we worship God, baptize our blessed children, have fellowship and share a meal. Easter Sunday 135 years ago was the first worship service in our cherished St. Mary's Episcopal Church. On August 12, 2017, we will be celebrating our 135th anniversary of St. Mary's.

To share a little history of the church, 145 years ago in 1877 several of our Dakota relatives trekked 10 days 300 miles to Yankton, SD to request help in building a church on the Lake Traverse Reservation to share the Word of God with our people. With donations from different people and organizations, their request became a reality in the year 1882.

With the help of all family, friends, and relatives we are requesting your willingness to assist in the next goal, which is to prepare St. Mary's church for the 135th year of service to our people and the community.

We are in the process of doing some renovations to the church. We will be installing stained glass windows, re-siding and insulation, drywall, painting and someday repair the bell. In order to complete all we can with these renovations, we are in need of funding and are requesting donations to help cover these costs.

One fundraising project we have been discussing is creating a memorial booklet of our loved ones that have gone on to the spirit world. We would like to include their picture, name (English and Dakota), date of birth and date of death. We would like the family to include an appropriate eulogy, scripture reading or memorial to their loved one. You may include names of those donating. Time is of the essence to get this completed and available by the celebration in August.

Pictures and memorials should be emailed to mdlafontaine59@gmail.com or can be dropped off with me and I can scan the pictures and return to you.

Michael LaFontaine Sr., Lay-Reader for St. Mary's Episcopal Church Old Agency.

Poems by Trinity Thompson

Tainted Dreamz

swirl, creating unwanted pain & tears...

they cast a shadow upon

a world of possibility

that once lead me to a future

beyond realistic limitations,

I no longer visualize the happiness

we danced in and smeared each other's soul with,

loneliness has cried out in search of your smile...

only to find hope upon its knees

picking up the broken pieces...

as these tainted dreams come to pass

I nourish what remains

to see that our love and strength only increases,

a blessing in disguise a wonder to cherish...

in this twilight existence

let only the tainted dreamz perish.

©Trinity L Thompson

E-ternal Entertainment

Mistakes Don't Matter

When life seems blind to all the pains

where do we turn to find change,

we've been suffering all we know is the struggle

ain't nobody care though to eat is to hustle,

one thing in life that I really hate...

when history exposed our weakness in one drink,

yea' it's been like this from that day...

how much longer are we gonna suffer

before we see fade,

all we have in these times is what's given...

and still we're dying from this rez life livin',

it's time to open our eyes and hold on tight..

a rare breed we're less than 75,000

time to stand tall every day & night,

because once we're dead and gone end of story...

who's gonna remember us and share our glory,

the last of a dying breed it's all or nothing

holler Native Prides

Mistakes don't matter

it's the consequences we live by.

©Trinity L Thompson

E-ternal Entertainment

"Days of Spring and What They Bring"

By Secretary Zimmerman

SD Dept. of Veterans Affairs

April 2017

As children we always heard our mothers saying "April showers bring May flowers," while under our breath we were saying "rain, rain, go away, come again some other day." Now, as an adult and as a veteran, I know that landscapes and weather conditions have played a role in every conflict we have fought. Weather and terrain shaped the experiences of our troops and directly dictated their actions.

The next time you get caught outside in windy conditions, a rain storm, hail storm, dust storm or ice storm, please remember our service members are out in these very elements defending our freedoms every day.

Weather conditions can make it uncomfortable to train and defend. Uniforms and boots are soaking wet, tents and creek beds are flooded, and roads and bridges are washed out. I can still vividly see a vehicle belonging to the 211th Sapper Company that was caught in a raging river bed which had been dry days before.

Wet, damp, and miserable conditions give soldiers an extra sense of hardship while observing or defending the enemy, or relocating their unit and equipment.

As you begin to mow your lawn, pick your tulips, and trim your hedges, please remember to keep our troops in your thoughts. They are the prime guardians of our national integrity and security. They are widely respected for their bravery, discipline, and unconditional patriotic values and they have fought adversities and locked horns with intruding enemy forces to ensure freedom, safety and security for all of us.

Funding to combat Opioid abuse

Bismarck, ND – April 20, 2017 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced $2,000,000 in federal funding for North Dakota to combat opioid abuse through prevention, treatment, and recovery.

"We must have a comprehensive approach to tackling the opioid crisis that is destroying lives and families all across North Dakota and our nation," said Heitkamp. "I have been working with my Senate colleagues to make sure the federal government helps provide the resources needed to help folks who suffer from opioid addiction find the treatment and recovery they need and to help prevent abuse in the first place. These federal funds will help North Dakota meet the rising needs in our communities so those struggling can get the treatment services they need and to provide public education to prevent it, keeping our communities stronger."

In March, Heitkamp convened local leaders in Minot to discuss challenges the Minot community is facing in dealing with a major increase in opioid addiction and abuse, as well as announce the bill she helped reintroduce to help make sure communities are equipped with the resources and tools they need to fight the growing crisis. This discussion was the fifth in a series of listening sessions Heitkamp has been hosting across the state that included Bismarck, Grand Forks, Fargo, and Jamestown.

These federal funds are administered through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. The federal funds are made possible through the 21st Century Cures Act, that Heitkamp helped pass in December that authorizes the State Targeted Response to the Opioid Crisis Grants. This grant program makes federal funding available to all 50 states to combat the opioid crisis and are awarded to states based on the number of deaths from opioids and to fill in the gaps to meet states' needs.

Bill signed to extend, reform VA Choice Program

Bismarck, ND – April 19, 2017 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp released the following statement today after the president signed into law a bipartisan bill she helped introduce and pass earlier this year to extend and reform the VA Choice Program and make sure veterans can get care closer to home.

"It's our duty to stand up for our veterans and make sure they get the health care they deserve," said Heitkamp. "The bill the president signed into law today—which I helped introduce and pass—extends the Choice Program so veterans can get care closer to home, while making needed reforms to cut down on costs and confusion for veterans in North Dakota and around the country. But the job isn't done. Until the Choice Program works for veterans across our state, I'll keep pushing for reforms to guarantee veterans don't have to drive hundreds of miles to life-saving cancer treatments, check-ups, or other medical care they need."

Heitkamp helped introduce the bill with U.S. Senator Jon Tester of Montana as a compromise to extend the program and address some of the concerns with the program through provisions to improve care coordination and to make VA the primary payer. The bill reduces out-of-pocket costs and confusion for veterans, and improves medical record sharing. The Choice Program was set to expire on August 7.

Heitkamp has long worked to reform the Choice Program, which aims to allow veterans who have difficulty obtaining a timely appointment with the VA, or live more than 40 miles from a VA health care facility, to seek care from local providers. In August, Heitkamp held a roundtable to discuss fixes to the program and heard from North Dakota veterans and health providers about serious challenges in the program.

To improve the program, Heitkamp successfully pushed for the Fargo VA to directly take over scheduling for area veterans last year. That has helped in some cases, but Heitkamp continues to push to reform the program so veterans can access care near home more smoothly.

The Choice Program was created in 2014 when Congress passed a bipartisan bill to reform the VA and improve access to care, and since then Heitkamp has pushed to make sure it's implemented properly.

In March 2016, Heitkamp helped introduce a bill to reform the Choice Program by giving the VA flexibility to improve care for North Dakota veterans by streamlining and consolidating community care programs, while eliminating bureaucratic obstacles preventing veterans from accessing care.

The privilege of driving when Young and when Old

By Richard P. Holm, MD

As a teenager, like many others, I yearned for independence and resisted my parents' rules and restrictions. Now I realize my parents struggled with how much freedom to allow me while best guiding me into adulthood. It's an old story: kids want freedom; parents are reluctant to give up control. Think back when you first obtained a driver's license and borrowed the family car. Remember, after some error in judgement or indiscretion, how the car-privilege was taken away and, even when justified, how devastating that was?

Now the tables may be turned, and the aging parent is threatened or devastated by losing the car-privilege after some error in judgement or just because of advanced age. As a Geriatrician, I have heard too many adult children ask me to tell their parents to stop driving. To the adult child, this is protecting his dad. To the elderly person, this is a double blow: losing the car-privilege feeling of independence AND the freedom to be mobile. Think about it, who's more dangerous on the road: an 18-20-year-old male in a muscle car, a 16-year-old female with a cellphone, or grandma?

There are three lessons here. First, elderly persons who are 'competent' should be allowed to make their own choice when to stop driving. In my years of practice, I have advised many competent elderly people, "If you think you might be putting others or yourself at risk, then YOU decide when to stop or cut back on driving." When night vision is poor, neck flexibility is reduced, reflexes are slowed, hearing is poor, posture is bad-then think about it. If you can't decide or this is a borderline question, consider a 'Driver Improvement Course for Seniors' through the American Automobile Association (AAA) and test yourself. Then you make that choice.

The second lesson: elderly persons who are NOT 'competent' shouldn't drive. When their 'learn-a-new-thing' memory is poor and when accidents start piling up, then it's time for someone step in. The elderly person first needs to see the doctor for evaluation. Afterwards, if declared incompetent, it means no driving, will-making, check-writing, or consenting to an operation.

The third lesson is for everyone and every family to realize how important is the freedom to drive, especially for individuals trying to grow up with independence OR age with dignity. We should all recognize what a precious freedom and right it is to drive.

*****

Dr. Rick Holms wrote this Prairie Doc Perspective forn "OnCall®," a weekly program where medical professionals discuss health concerns for the general public. "OnCall®" is produced by the Healing Words Foundation in association with the South Dakota State University Journalism Department. "OnCall®" airs Thursdays on South Dakota Public Broadcasting-Television at 7 p.m. Central, 6 p.m. Mountain. Visit www.oncalltelevision.com

Ripple Effect –

Conservation districts: Untapped resource for landowners, or not?

How are you using your local conservation district? Or the lets rephrase, are you using your conservation district? If you are utilizing your local conservation district, Great! If you aren't, then I am glad we have reached you.

The Red River Basin is fortunate to have a great presence from our conservation districts throughout North Dakota, Minnesota and Manitoba.

What is a Conservation District? Conservation districts are local units of government who are required by state law to carry out natural resource management programs.

Districts work with landowners and operators who are willing to help them manage and protect land and water resources on all public and private lands in the US and in Canada.

In Manitoba, Conservation District programming is directed by the policies and actions outlined in local integrated watershed management plans. A watershed-based approach to land and water management provides benefits that include: understanding how activities on the landscape influence water quality and quantity, fostering a connection to the landscape we live in, and ensuring activities upstream are respectful of downstream residents.

Minnesotans count on SWCD technical assistance with conservation practices that protect the quality of Minnesota's greatest treasure - their natural resources. One crucial niche districts fill is that of providing soil and water conservation services to owners of private lands. Privately owned lands make up 78 percent of the land surface in Minnesota. Managing these private lands, whether agriculture, forest, lakes, or urban, is key to Minnesota's quality of life. Minnesotans trust SWCDs to provide needed technology, funding and educational services because they are established in each community.

The purpose of the North Dakota Association of Soil Conservation Districts is to further the widespread application of sound and practical soil and water conservation practices in North Dakota. A soil conservation district has established boundaries, usually along county lines, that have the authority to conduct surveys, investigations and research relating to soil erosion and the prevention and control measures needed.

The Minnesota Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts provides a list of advantages in supporting and utilizing a Soil and Water Conservation District:

*Non-regulatory: Landowners freely cooperate, expanding and exercising their own commitment to stewardship. Proven more productive than regulatory coercion.

*MPCA, BWSR, USDA, USFWS, MNDNR provide standards and specs for implementation of natural resource management practices to the District. The agencies recognize the technical competence of the SWCD staff.

*SWCDs, state-wide, share data on resource protection and initiate new treatment techniques continually testing and improving land treatment solutions to gain more cost effective means of improving water quality.

*Staff is technically accountable to the standards used. Annual inspections are made of applied practices to ensure continued quality.

*Knowing the land owners, knowing the land, knowing the solutions, and experience applying the solutions makes the SWCD staff uniquely and exceptionally qualified to apply practices and to create opportunities.

*Cost share dollars available to landowners are tied to the engineering standards practiced by the SWCD. Practices may not be cost shared unless they meet the standards used by the SWCD.

*Able to coordinate resources from outside the County to on the ground implementation of the Plan.

*The District leverages additional resources to implement the action items of the County surface water plan.

To learn more about Conservation Districts near you and the programs and services offered, please visit the following websites:

North Dakota Association of Soil Conservation Districts: http://ndascd.org/wp/

Minnesota Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts: https://www.maswcd.org/

Manitoba Conservation Districts Association: http://www.mcda.ca/

*****

The RRBC is a grassroots organization that is a chartered not-for-profit corporation under the provisions of Manitoba, North Dakota, Minnesota, and South Dakota law. Our offices in Moorhead, MN and Winnipeg, MB can be reached at 701-356-3183 and 204-982-7250, or you can check out our website at www.redriverbasincommission.org.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

All TZ students to participate in PBLO Exit presentations

During the 3rd and 4th week of May 2017 all students who attend Tiospa Zina Tribal School will be required to complete a Performance Based Learner Outcomes Presentation. Prior to this year the school required all students in grades 2, 5, 8 and 12 to do the presentations.

Each student, with help from instructional staff, are preparing a presentation that will show evidence of progress toward the PBLO's expectations using the work they have learned throughout the year. During the student presentation, students provide evidence of their current level of proficiency of the Performance Based Learner Outcomes and the Core Academic Areas. The exit interview is a culmination of the students' academic experience and a way of demonstrating to themselves, their families, the community, and the faculty that they possess a strong set of skills, knowledge and understandings which has prepared them for their next stage of life and learning. The basic outline for the presentations are:

1.  Introduction in Dakota plus review of grades, attendance and behavior.

2.  Showing of evidence.

3.  Closing including self-reflection with strengths and improvements needed at Tiospa Zina.

The Performance Based Learner Outcomes represent a framework that defines expectations of our learners. There are six Performance Based Learner Outcomes:

*A Balanced Individual is one who demonstrates the ability to express themselves clearly and in all aspects of life.

*The Creative Thinker uses a variety of problem solving techniques and resources to resolve challenges facing them.

*Effective Communicators, demonstrate the ability to express themselves clearly in all aspects of life.

*An Enlightened Representative incorporates principals of Dakota culture, modern and traditional values, and tribal affairs into their daily lives.

*The Global Citizen demonstrates respect for and acceptance of cultural diversity.

*The Self-Directed Achiever formulates goals and priorities, and continually evaluates their progress.

There are six Core Academic Curricular Areas: Communications, Dakota, Mathematics, Science, Social Science, and Technology. Each Core Academic Curricular area has a mission statement, standards, and benchmarks. The Core Academic Curricular areas have course descriptions, topics and timelines by grade level that assist teachers. In the Tiospa Zina curriculum there are Extended Curricular area such as Physical Education, Art, Music etc. These Extended Curricular areas have standards and benchmarks that are used to measure student progress.

Superintendent Dr. Roger C. Bordeaux believes, that in time, this process will become more reliable and valid and will be a strong indicator of student knowledge, skills and attributes based on the PBLO's.

ESDS students of the month recognized

By Rebecca Dargatz

School Community Director

Enemy Swim Day School honors one student from each grade for each full month that school is in session.

The Students of the Month are chosen because they demonstrate the four school wide expectations consistently or have shown great progress toward them. The school wide expectations are:

Awanicihdka: Be Safe.

Waokihi: Be Responsible.

Waunsida: Be Caring.

Woohoda: Be Respectful.

Home room teachers choose the Students of the Month in collaboration with the paras and other teachers who serve a particular candidate.

Students of the Month are honored during opening ceremony on the first Monday following each full month of school. Students of the Month attend dinner with two guests on the Wednesday evening following each Students of the Month honoring.

The March Students of the Month are: Kindergarten - Kahlily Spider, 1st Grade - JoJo Redday, 2nd Grade - Wakiya Eastman, 3rd Grade - Keandre Grant-Campbell, 4th Grade - Lyndon BlueDog, 5th Grade - Brent Sazue, 6th Grade - Xavier White (not pictured), 7th Grade - DJ Campbell, and 8th Grade - Destinee Bunner.

Teens learn to be teachers of technology for older citizens

Mason Gray, Tana Lick and Matthew Moen completed training as a youth volunteer technology trainer Wednesday, April 14. This unique role reversal-teens teaching adults-will be starting within the next month at the Sisseton Public Library.

The ideas of using youth to teach technology to the aging population is part of the TeachSD program, an intergenerational technology program which was created by SDSU Extension. The pilot project was launched in Spearfish in May 2015. Recently program leaders identified a need to utilize this program on the eastern side of South Dakota. Tracey Lehrke, Youth Program Advisor in Roberts County and Jayne Nieland, Head Librarian of the Sisseton Memorial Library has partnered to provide this program to the local area.

Leacey Brown, SDSU Extension Gerontology Field Specialist explains youth will be taking time to share their smart phone and iPad technology expertise with adults 50 and older. The training is an opportunity for teens to learn about aging, disability, experiential learning, learning styles and strategies to teach older adults to use technology. "The fastest growing group of new technology users is older people," said Brown.

During the training, participants were part of a simulation where they were given a scenario adults routinely encounter as they age. Youth wore goggles to simulate cataracts, gloves to limit touch sensitivity, and noise cancelling ear phones. The teen trainers had to learn how it feels to have these limitations, in order to come up with way to properly communicate with adults that may come in to seek their technology guidance services.

At the Sisseton Memorial library, youth volunteer technology trainers will be available to provide individualized lessons to adults with technology questions. Youth will be able to help with a variety of different technology aspects. They can help navigate the web, install apps, or set up a Facebook account. They can also teach those in need to assistance how to use their specific dev

Adults interested in learning more about using technology from the teens should contact the Sisseton Memorial Library at 605-698-7391 to set up an appointment.

Additional youth who are interested in becoming tech teachers should contact Tracey Lehrke, 4-H Youth Program Advisor, at 605-698-7627.

Audition for MCT production at Sisseton

An audition will be held for the Missoula Children's Theatre (MCT) production of RUMPELSTILTSKIN for Sisseton Public School District students on Monday, May 1 in the Ben Reifel Gymnasium from 4:00 to 6:00 pm. All those auditioning should arrive at 4:00 and plan to stay for the full two hours. Some of the cast members will be asked to stay for a rehearsal immediately following the audition.

Among the roles to be cast are Rumpelstiltskin, Queen Beatrice, Clara, a Jester, King Whatsat, Villagers, Gnomes, Wizards, Knights and Bees. Students, ages Kindergarten through 12th grade are encouraged to audition. No preparation is necessary. Assistant Directors will also be cast to aid in rehearsals throughout the week, and to take on essential backstage responsibilities.

The Missoula Children's Theatre touring productions are complete with costumes, scenery, props and makeup. The MCT Tour Actor/Directors will conduct rehearsals throughout the week from 4:00 to 8:15 pm each day.

RUMPELSTILTSKIN, which celebrates Sisseton's 35th year with MCT, will be presented on Friday, May 5 at 7:00 pm at the Sisseton Performing Arts Center. This week is part of the Missoula Children's Theatre's unique international touring project and is presented locally by the Sisseton Public School District and Sisseton Arts Council, with funding provided by the South Dakota Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts. For more information, please call or email Alexis Monroe at 605-698-7613x2 or alexis.monroe@k12.sd.us.

The Missoula Children's Theatre (MCT), the nation's largest touring children's theatre, has been touring extensively for 42 years now from Montana to Japan, and will visit nearly 1,200 communities this year with up to 47 teams of Tour Actor/Directors. A tour team arrives in a given town with a set, lights, costumes, props and make-up, everything it takes to put on a play...except the cast. The team holds an open audition and casts 50-60 local students to perform in the production. The show is rehearsed throughout the week and one public performance is presented at the end of the week. All MCT shows are original adaptations of classic children's stories and fairytales . . . a twist on the classic stories that you know and love. Also included in the residency are three enrichment workshops presented by the Tour Actor/Directors. Creativity, social skills, goal achievement, communication skills and self-esteem are all characteristics that are attained through the participation in this unique, educational project. MCT's mission is the development of life skills in children through participation in the performing arts.

2017 4-H Archery participants & state qualifiers

The 2017 Roberts County 4-H Archery program had 54 youth enroll in the program. Starting February 27th, these 4-H members ages 8-18 came to the 4-H building in Sisseton during their time slot on Monday and Tuesday evenings.

Each week the 4-H motto, To Make the Best Better is followed as the 4-H youth strive to achieve their best archery score. 4-H shooting sports instructors/volunteers Richard DeLoughery, Mark Dysktra, Dean Shultz, and Lori Shultz along with 4-H volunteers Rozana Dockter, Ross Nelson, and Jayne Nieland provided the leadership to assist the youth in reaching their archery goals.

This archery program is coordinated by the SDSU Extension 4-H Program in Roberts County.

Over 2500 youth from across the state have registered to compete at the 4-H State Shoot in Fort Pierre on April 28-30.

This is one of the largest youth shooting events in the nation.

There are seven divisions in 4-H archery youth can choose from: compound without sights, compound with sights, compound with sights & release, recurve without sights, recurve with sights, open compound, and recurve open.

Roberts County 4-H members who have qualified to participate this year at the state event are: Jaslyn Peterson, Tessa Dykstra, Bryson, Allen, Zoey Gruby, Brock Syverson, Madisyn Pistorius, Dean Shultz III, Jaxen Dockter, Adam Schubert, Catina Renville, Mason Shultz, Jaxtin Currence, Gage Hanson, Emmalee Nielsen, Talia Lee, Valerie Myrum, Kaden Schram, Tegen Lee, Rachel Richards, Kellen Rempp, Reed Gray, Mason Gray, and Isabelle Skarnagal.

UTTC renews tuition waiver for Native students

Upcoming deadline to apply is June 29

BISMARCK (UTN) – United Tribes Technical College (UTTC) has renewed its Native American Tuition Waiver program for the 2017-2018 academic year.

The program was launched last year on a trial basis for students who are enrolled members of federally-recognized tribes.

"When we began offering this our goal was to help make higher education attainable for the population we serve, which has some of the lowest annual income averages in the entire nation," says UTTC President Leander R. McDonald. "Now we have data to show that it's successful for the students and the college."

Ending Student Loans

The move was aimed at helping students avoid relying exclusively on student loans. UTTC ended its participation in the federal student loan program in 2016. Experience shows that student loans are a burden on families that are without savings accounts or access to credit.

"Waiving tuition is realistic financial assistance that helps make the start of college accessible for Native students," McDonald says.

Win-Win

During Fall Semester 2016 the waiver sparked UTTC enrollment to jump by over 22 percent. A corresponding positive impact occurred on student academic performance.

"We can see the positive results," says DeLana Wendland, UTTC Vice President of Student Services, about increases in GPA, class completion and student retention. "Students who applied for and received the waiver turned out to be more successful in these areas compared to their counterparts."

During the 2016-17 academic year 210 Native students received the waiver and interest continues to run high. The college's enrollment staff processed 58 percent more accepted applications. For next school year, FAFSA applications (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) are up 189 percent over this time one year ago.

The waivers' impact on college finances has been offset by greater income brought about by having more students on campus.

"It's pretty clear that if the same trends continue, this is the kind of policy we should institutionalize for the long term," says Wendland.

Apply Early

The college's board of directors on April 7th endorsed the program's continuation. Tuition waivers will be extended for Fall Semester 2017, Spring Semester 2018 and Summer Semester 2018. Currently the waiver is in effect for Summer 2017.

Eligible are new and current UTTC students. The next application deadline is Thursday, June 29. This is for Fall Semester 2017. Students are urged to move forward on the enrollment application process as soon as possible.

New students and those students who wish to return to school are required to complete an admissions application and the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. Returning students must meet the same requirements and also be pre-registered for classes.

Helpful Checklist

The UTTC Native American Tuition Waiver is based on unmet financial need. It applies only to tuition and not to other college costs such as fees, books, housing, and meals.

The college has placed a helpful checklist of application requirements and a step-by-step application form under the 'GET STARTED' tab of the UTTC website, www.uttc.edu.

Those who fail to meet the June 29 deadline will be considered as part of the college's regular admissions process and subject to UTTC tuition. The college's Admissions and Financial Aid department will determine who has successfully met the application requirements by the deadline.

Other types of student financial aid are also available to qualifying non-Native students who attend UTTC. Non-Native students number approximately 13 percent of the student body.

For more information, contact UTTC Admissions at 701-255-3285 x 1447.

Legals

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-176

SWOCSE/ Boyd Keeble, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SHAWNA LUFKINS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Establish Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of April, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 22nd day of March, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

16-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-050

SWOCSE/ Mason Kohl, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SHAWNA LUFKINS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of April, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 22nd day of March, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

16-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 16-170

SWOCSE/ Lorae Mercado, PLAINTIFF

VS.

KATERI RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Establish Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of April, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 22nd day of March, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

16-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-042

SWOCSE/ Charity Davila, PLAINTIFF

VS.

KATERI RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of April, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 22nd day of March, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

16-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 17-043

SWOCSE/ Jennifer Backer, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ADAM BACKER, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of April, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of March, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

16-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 17-053

SWOCSE/ Lana Barse, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BARRY WHITE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of April, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of March, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

16-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 05-010

SWOCSE/ Gordon Redday, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MARVIN STRONG, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of April, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of March, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

16-3tc

Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Job Openings

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Sexual Assault Services Advocate, Sexual Assault Services

Closing Date: April 28th, 2017 @ 04:30 PM

Tribal Ranger, Fish & Wildlife

Closing Date: May 5th, 2017 @ 04:30 PM

Deputy Public Defender, Public Defender's Office

Closing Date: May 12th, @ 04:30 PM

Application and job description information can be seen at SWO Human Resources Office or http://www.swo-nsn.gov/contact/employment. Application can be downloaded from "Apply Now" and emailed to ArnoldW@SWO-NSN.GOV or DeniseH@SWO-NSN.GOV. Contact can also be at Arnold Williams 698-8238 or Denise Hill 698-8251 with questions. (Tribal preference will apply).

 

Sisseton Wahpeton College

Has the following vacancies:

Head Rodeo Coach

Sisseton Wahpeton College (SWC) is seeking a part-time Faculty Member/Head Rodeo Coach. SWC recently added a rodeo program and is seeking a Head Coach. SWC seeks an experienced, energetic coach who will lead the program in league competition next year as a member of the NIRA. The Coach will also teach courses each semester. As a faculty member, this position will have instruction-related duties and responsibilities. A bachelor's degree is required, master's degree preferred. Previous college rodeo experience required. Position to start in August 2017. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and the application process, or you may contact Human Resources at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118. Open until Friday, April 28, 2017.

Farrier Science Instructor

Sisseton Wahpeton College (SWC) is seeking a full-time Farrier Science Instructor. As a faculty member, this position will be responsible for instructing all aspects of farrier science including anatomy and physiology, corrective shoeing, hot and cold forged shoeing. The candidate will also be responsible for advising students, developing and following class syllabi, and developing and evaluating the effectiveness of class presentations. An associates' degree is required, bachelors' degree preferred. Five years of continuous and documented experience as a full-time farrier. Position to start in August 2017. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and the application process, or you may contact Human Resources at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118. Open until Friday, April 28, 2017.

 

Sisseton Wahpeton College

Has the following vacancies:

Dakota Language Learners

There are openings for two full-time Female Dakota Language Learners and two full-time Male Dakota Language Learners in our Dakota Studies Program at SWC. Each of these position is a two-year grant funded position. Upon completion of this project, the Dakota Language Learner will be expected to teach the Dakota Language. Requirements are: High School Diploma or GED. Preference for enrolled members of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate. Proficient with Microsoft Office, office machinery, and social media. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118. Positions close at 4:30 p.m. on May 5, 2017.

17-2tc

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Current Vacancies:

Substitutes needed for custodial, kitchen, teaching, and transportation - starting at $10/hr, varies per position Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma (please contact the HR office for more information) Applications are accepted on an on-going basis

Vacancy: Bus Monitor $13/hr (Sisseton and Wilmot areas) Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma and possesses or willing to obtain First Aid and CPR certifications Opening Date: January 26, 2017 Closing Date: Open until filled

2017-2018 School Year Vacancies:

Vacancy: High School Science Teacher Qualifications: Current Teaching Certification in any state meeting the requirements for the position in which applying Opening Date: March 1, 2017 Closing Date: open until filled

Vacancy: Career and Technical Education Teacher Qualifications: Current Teaching Certification in any state meeting the requirements for the position in which applying Opening Date: March 1, 2017 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Middle School Social Studies Teacher Qualifications: Current Teaching Certification in any state meeting the requirements for the position in which applying Opening Date: March 1, 2017 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Art Teacher Qualifications: Current Teaching Certification in any state meeting the requirements for the position in which applying Opening Date: March 1, 2017 Closing Date: Open Until Filled

Vacancy: Elementary Teacher Qualifications: Current Teaching Certification in any state meeting the requirements for the position in which applying Opening Date: March 1. 2017 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: K-12 Assistant Principal/Dean of Students Qualifications: Master's degree in Educational Administration, Current South Dakota Educational Administrators Certification with appropriate endorsements, current or willing to obtain SWO Tribal Educator's Department Certification, training in behavioral management techniques, and at least one year experience in educational administration. Opening Date: March 31, 2017. Closing Date: April 18, 2017.

Vacancy: Custodian Qualifications: High School Diploma/GED and current South Dakota Driver's License. Opening Date: April 4, 2017. Closing Date: April 28, 2017.

Vacancy: Bus Driver (6 hrs per contract day) Qualifications: High School Diploma/GED and a current South Dakota Commercial Driver's License with both air brakes and passenger endorsements. Opening Date: April 7, 2017. Closing Date: April 28, 2017.

If you would like to apply to be a part of the TZ tiwahe you may pick up an application and background check form from the TZTS HR office located at #2 Tiospa Zina Dr. Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications may also be printed off the HR web page. Completed applications may be sent to PO Box 719, Agency Village, SD 57262. Faxed to: 605-698-7686. For further information call 605-698-3953 ext. 208. Indian Preference employer. At will employer. All applicants are subject to a Background Check and Pre-Employment Drug Test, pursuant to SWSB policy and United States Code Title 25 Chapter 34 - Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention.

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Accounting Department:

Revenue Audit Clerk (2 Full-Time) Day-rotating weekends

C-Store Department:

Clerk (Full-Time) Graveyard

Cage Department:

Cashier (10 Full-Time) Day, Swing, & Graveyard

Supervisor (4 Full-Time) 2 Swing, 2 Graveyard

Trainer (Full-Time) Swing

Foods Department:

Bus Persons (Full-Time) as needed

Cashiers (Full-Time) as needed

Dishwashers (Full-Time) as needed

Wait Staffs (Full-Time) as needed

Hotel Department:

Front Desk Clerk (Full-Time) as needed

Room Attendant (Full-Time) 8:00 am to Finish

Housekeeping Department:

Porter (Full-Time) as needed

Security Department:

Officer (Full-Time) as needed

Surveillance Department:

Observer (Full-Time) Rotating

Closing Date: April 28, 2017  at 4:00 p.m.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions.

Two identifications documents required upon hire.

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE, Hankinson ND 58041.For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO. (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment). Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

The Cage Department

Is Now Accepting Applications For

Position: Manager (1 Full—Time)

Job Description: Direct and supervise the overall operation of the Casino Cage operations to include: the accurate and timely exchange of financial instruments, TITO tickets, and table game chips, training and evaluating the performance of cage personnel, and ensuring the all tribal, state, and federal gaming regulations are followed.

Starting Wage: D. O. E. Required: Bachelor's degree in finance or business related and 4 years of progressive experience in Cage operations of which at least 2 years as a Cage Manager. Associates degree in finance or business related and 6 years of progressive experience in Cage operations of which at least 2 years as a Cage Manager 8 years combination of education and progressive experience in Cage operations of which at least 2 years as a Cage Manager. Ability to train and develop a Tribal member successor.

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department 16849 102nd Street SE Hankinson ND 58041 For complete Job Description contact Heather Williams 701-634-3000 ext. 2426 Indian Preference will apply / EEO (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment)

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

ACCOUNTING: SENIOR ACCOUNTANT (1 FULL-TIME) GENERAL FUNCTION: Assists Controller in maintaining general ledger, account reconciliation and analysis. REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or GED required. Two years previous experience required. AA Degree in accounting required. BS Degree preferred. Organization skills and attention to detail required. Computer literate in excel, word and accounting software. Perform other functions as required. Key Gaming License is required

This position will close on May 4, 2017 at 4 pm

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

SECURITY: SECURITY OFFICER (2 FULL-TIME) ROTATING SHIFTS GENERAL FUNCTION: The security officer protects company assets and provides a safe environment for customers and employees. Exhibit a friendly, helpful and courteous manner when dealing with the customers and employees. Maintains security activities and performs credit transactions adhering to company, Tribal, State and Federal guidelines. Work closely with Casino & Hotel Management. REQUIREMENTS: High School Diploma or GED equivalent. Must have basic computer skills. Ongoing training through Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise and respective security department policy and procedures. Complete departmental training program including CPR, first aid, and TAM. Must complete a 90 day probation period. Must be licensable by SWO Gaming Commission. Must be able to work irregular hours. Must be dependable, punctual, some knowledge in handheld radios, and writing reports. Law Enforcement, Military, Security experience preferred. Must not have a felony on your record. Must be physically fit and able to lift 40+ lbs. Must complete all security certifications within a year of hire in accordance with the Gaming Commissions rules and regulations. (Must be 21 years of age)

This position will close on April 26, 2017 at 4 pm.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Surveillance Department:

Agent (1) part-time; rotating shifts; day, swing, graveyard, weekends, holidays, and the ability to work flexible hours.  Must have excellent written & verbal communication skills, motivational & mechanical skills.  Knowledgeable of Tribal, State, and Federal gaming regulations. Knowledgeable in the operation of Microsoft Word.  1 year previous experience preferred.  Must be at least 21 years old, must have a High School Diploma or GED.  Must be able to obtain a Key Gaming License. 

Bingo Department:

Rover/Drop Team Member (3) part-time; will be required to work any shift assigned during Bingo hours, weekends & holidays, and drop days.  Will also be trained in all positions in the bingo department; such as floor clerk, cashier, pack maker, paymaster and caller.  Will be responsible for collecting slot drop and bill validators drop, counts, and verifies all boxes.  Transports bill validators to the vault.  Prepares appropriate paperwork and makes necessary computer entries.  Previous experience working with money preferred.  Must be 21 years old, must have a High school Diploma or GED.  Must be able to obtain a Key Gaming License. 

Opening date: Thursday, April 20, 2017

Closing date: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Sales & Marketing/Reel Deal Club Department:

Assistant (1) full-time, rotating shifts, week-ends & holidays, will assist the Sales & Marketing Department in the operations and administration of the department.  Excellent communication skills - both written and verbal.  Excellent people skills, and organizational and motivational skills.  Knowledge of and ability to use the necessary equipment, must have some computer experience.  Previous experience of player's club and casino operations preferred.  Ability to work independently. Must be at least 18 years old.  High School Diploma or G.E.D. required.

Opening Date: Friday, April 21, 2017

Closing Date: Thursday, April 27, 2017 @ 4:00 pm

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 
 

 

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