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TZTS Summer 2017 Film Camp videos online on YouTube

 

Search YouTube for:

TiospaZinaTribalSchool@gmail.com

 

Film Camp behind the scenes:

https://youtu.be/pEc83D_s2Hk

 

Ivy:

https://youtu.be/7lH27IOsRNo

 

Dylan:

https://youtu.be/nJYfMAlYee4

 

 

Mystic Fight Scene:

https://youtu.be/CxZQo2FOf3U

 

 

Anhother behind the scenes look at camp:

https://youtu.be/y7_0YiFFhTE

 

 

Redwing:

https://youtu.be/N-uKyMAiDhM

 

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate: Want to re-read the Self-Governance articles from past issues of your Sota Iya Ye Yapi?

Whether or not the Tribe assumes administrative authority over your health services is a BIG DEAL. What do you know about it?

Here they are:

Self-Governance Articles from past Sotas

  Obituaries Editorials Editor's column Education
Legals
Trading post

 

 

Vol. 49 Issue No. 3

Anpetu Iyamni, Wednesday, Jan. 17, 2018

Inside this Edition –

This edition mailed on Tuesday due to Martin Luther King Jr. holiday Monday

REB: Special Tribal Secretary election Tuesday, Jan. 30th; Certified candidates list to be released Wednesday, Jan. 17

SWST joins other tribes in lawsuit against opiod manufacturers

Winter 2017 General Council reports, part four

Tiospa Zina Tribal School accreditation report

KXSW-TZTS now on cable television

Wopida Tanka from organizers of December 2017 Dakota W.A.T.E.R. Ride/Run & Walk

Reminder: Deadline to submit copy for consideration in the Sota is Friday noon

Special election to fill Tribal Secretary post Jan. 30th

The Reservation Election Board has announced the special election to fill the vacant Tribal Secretary post will be held next Tuesday, January 30th.

Hours will be from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m. at the District centers.

Deadline to file was last Monday, January 8, 2017.

Here is a list of persons who filed:

*Lorinda Lavina Sampson

*Shannon Delia White.

*David C. Gill.

*William Richard LaRoque.

*Jesse Alan Larsen.

*Crystal Fern Owen.

*Edmund "Eddie" Johnson Jr.

*Sierra L. Wolcott.

*Lisa M. Jackson.

Please note: These candidates are not yet certified. A list of candidates eligible to run in this special election will be released by REB this Wednesday, January 17th.

Final certified candidates will be listed in the January 31st edition of the Sota, which is scheduled to be printed and mailed on Monday, January 29.

In order to vote in this election, you are required to fill out a voter registration form. (See the form elsewhere in this edition of the Sota.)

The form is required due to changes to the election code approved in December 2017.

For more information, contact:

Reservation Election Board

P.O. Box 509

Agency Village, SD 57262

or

Josie Bertsch: 605-237-4067

Marjory Bissonette: 605-698-8275

Jenny Payne: 605-237-2956

Angie Johnson: 605-467-9737

Dustin Opsal: 605-268-9006

Email: REB@swo-nsn.gov

http://www.swo-nsn.gov/Government/BoardsComm/REB.aspx

Developing a master plan for Dakota Connection expansion: Continuing stakeholders discussion

By CD Floro

Sota Editor

Agenda topics:

*Gaming

*C-Store/Truck Plaza

*Race Track

*Tire Store

*Hotel

*Retail

*RV Park

*Restaurants

*Other commercial opportunities

*Housing

*Administration/Media Office – office building

*Buffalo Lake District/Bowling alley/Hotel

*Museum/cultural center

*Sewer, water, utilities

Sota readers may recall our coverage of the "kickoff session" for developing a master plan to expand the Dakota Connection complex alongside the Sisseton I-29 interchange. It was held the first week in December. LeeAnn TallBear, Tribal Planner, called together a large working group from the Tribe, outside agencies and consultants; Reservation Planning Commission (RPC) Chairman DelRay German served as MC. That first session took place in Dakota Connection's conference room, and it was a very "tight fit." Future meetings, it was decided, would be held at Tribal headquarters. So, the second in this series of planning meetings was held last Wednesday, January 10th, in Tribal Council chambers.

SWST Chairman Dave Flute welcomed Council and stakeholders and turned the meeting over to DelRay German.

DelRay thanked Council and stakeholders who had come, emphasizing how "very important" it is to maximize this "very high value location – SD Highway 10 and I-29."

He said the Tribe must "maximize every square inch" of this property.

Looking over the "stakeholders," each with different wants and needs, he said there is "opportunity here for everyone to bring something … opportunity for everyone to gain from its use."

From that point, SEH Inc. consultant Karl Weissenborn – present with Scott Sannes representing the firm contracted to provide master plan consultation – facilitated the meeting.

Karl characterized the December kickoff as "a good open discussion."

He presented an agenda for the day and said purpose of today's meeting is "to drill down, get more specific."

Karl had those present identify themselves and tell what stakeholders they represent.

He said the purpose of this day is "to get useful information that will form the master plan document for Dakota Connection."

Here is an excerpt from the SEH-prepared agenda:

"We want you, the stakeholders and decision makers of various SWO facilities, to provide us detailed information on the below subjects. (See outline list at the top of this article.) This is a time for you to bring forward a wide range of issues – ranging from practical operational concerns to big dream visioning of what the future could hold."

First on the agenda was gaming.

DNGE CEO Eddie Lynn talked about the importance of the I-29 access, about "opportunities to increase gaming revenues."

There was a lengthy discussion of how the complex will be "laid out."

The race track came up, with some preliminary costs presented.

Stakeholders were reminded that this session was primarily to "get out the visioning," putting down the components that ought to be considered – not for "problem solving" at this point.

Discussion shifted to the hotel and what "amenities" should be available.

What is the target customer?

Truckers or families.

Big Coulee District Councilman Alvah Quinn Sr. asked if an environmental assessment will be required.

LeeAnn TallBear responded, saying that it would not be necessary for the master plan, but there will be environmental assessments of some kind required by funding sources.

Alvah said, "Then we need to know what we want beforehand."

LeeAnn agreed, "Let's know what we want on the table before."

She asked, "Is there room for two types of hotels, and RV park?"

The conversation went back to Eddie Lynn.

What type of gaming experience is desired?

Chairman Flute emphasized hunting, fishing, and tourism/culture.

"There's no better place in South Dakota," he said.

"This is the direction we need to go."

He spoke about how the Tribe can offer "the last of the 'West' experience."

"I'm out there hunting and fishing," he said, "and see out of state license plates."

He said there is now a Tribal member providing guide services, and spoke of how hunters and fishermen often have large financial resources available to support their experiences.

The Chairman recommended that a brand name hotel be built to cater to their needs.

Here "is opportunity," he said.

About the race track, he recommended getting data from other tracks before deciding to go with it … but "should at least keep it on the table."

The talk went back to gaming.

If an expanded casino here has room for more machines, then that needs to be figured into a new gaming compact with South Dakota he told the group.

And compact negotiations are due to happen now, he said.

Chairman Flute said there needs to be authentic Native American "show" attractions – aesthetics, dances, singing.

"We need to show (visitors) what the last real Indians look like."

LeeAnn agreed with the need to factor in hunting and fishing into the complex.

She asked too about what different experience might be offered at Dakota Connection, different than at Dakota Magic.

There, she said "young people want loud music."

Here, perhaps, the experience might be better suited to older customers.

She talked of the need to take advantage of bus loads of travelers, calling it "another market."

LeeAnn also talked about the need to provide easy access and parking for semi-trucks, busses, and for RVs.

Discussion was held on what type of architecture or design is desired.

What building materials?

Glass, steel, modern look?

Or earth tones, sandstone, traditional?

Chairman Flute weighed in again, giving his "personal view."

The main point he made was that whatever is constructed must "sustain itself."

He suggested whatever materials are used, that construction should be modest – "not so extreme."

"But," he added. "American … not Chinese."

That drew some laughter.

He spoke against lodge pole design, because of its inevitable "cracking … and (need to) replace in 20 years."

The Chairman reminded stakeholders of the precast design of Dakota Crossing, and recommended pre-cast with "some glass."

Lake Traverse District Councilman Francis Crawford added his advice: "The exterior … no need to be extravagant."

"The attraction is inside."

"Same with the hotel," he said.

Francis pointed to Stone's Truck Stop in Watertown, and admonished "We're missing the boat here."

LeeAnn spoke of the need to extend South Dakota's "cultural corridor" to Sisseton.

At present, she noted again (as in the kickoff meeting) the state's tourism department has that corridor ending in the East at Watertown.

She said that that goal should be kept in mind in terms of exterior look landscaping:

"Native?"

Or "neon?"

The Chairman suggested that a multi-storied building be considered in the plans.

That opened up discussion of the proposed office building.

It would provide up-to-date technology to those entities desiring space. Identified so far as possible tenants are the Gaming Commission and Dakota Nation Industries, Inc.

Conversation shifted to utilities infrastructure, what will be required.

Engineer Vine Marks talked about the high water table generally at the site.

"We need to know where everything is going to be placed," he said, "before designing water and sewer."

Richard White, Tribal Roads Manager, also brought up that point.

He said "the parking lot, layout of the land, must consider the water table."

Several spoke about the open acreage west of Dakota Connection, adjacent to the northbound on-ramp to I-29.

It was suggested, by DNI CEO Josh Flute and Alvah Quinn, that it accommodate the truck plaza/commercial site, and that fuel storage tanks could be relocated there.

Alvah Quinn went to the wall where the SEH consultants had displayed an aerial map of the site.

He pointed to land south of SD Highway 10 (south of the existing casino/bingo hall and c-store).

Alvah asked Angie Marshall, who was present representing the Housing Authority, to confirm what he was saying.

 "Here are 160 acres owned by the Tribe."

He pointed to a small structure, "… with an Artesian well."

Housing, he told stakeholders, has had plans for building "country-style" housing here.

They were drawn up, he told them, "five or six years ago."

He said this housing develop could be done in conjunction with the overall expansion.

LeeAnn said that USDA Rural Development is available to assist different aspects of the overall expansion, including housing.

(On Friday, representatives of Rural Development met with Director JC Crawford and others of Sisseton-Wahpeton Housing Authority at their office in Sisseton. Their meeting could have covered a wide range of projects, including this site and Barker Hill II.)

The afternoon was set aside for Buffalo Lake District and THPO.

The agenda provided for discussion of how Buffalo Lake District wants to expand its commercial interests.

This includes the bowling alley and possible hotel.

THPO was there to discuss, in more detail than at the kickoff, plans they have already had for several years, for construction of a museum and cultural center.

Chairman Flute thanked stakeholders for their input, saying he was "glad for what we got accomplished."

That sentiment was shared by the Tribal Planner LeeAnn, EDA Planner Will Fish, and the SEH consultants.

*****

Developing a master plan for the Dakota Connection expansion wasn't the only strategic planning undertaken last week.

Tribal Council devoted the following day, Thursday, January 11th, to work on multiple projects. That session was held at Dakota Magic Casino.

Tiospa Zina Tribal School accredited by AdvancED and COSA

By Superintendent Dr. Roger Bordeaux

Tiospa Zina Tribal School (TZTS) is accredited by AdvancEd.

AdvancED serves as a trusted partner to 34,000 educational institutions-employing more than four million educators and enrolling more than 20 million students-across the United States and 70 other nations.

AdvancED was created through a 2006 merger of the Pre-K-12 divisions of the North Central Association Commission on Accreditation and School Improvement (NCA CASI) and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Council on Accreditation and School Improvement (SACS CASI) and expanded through the addition of the Northwest Accreditation Commission (NWAC) in 2012. (http://www.advanc-ed.org/about-us)

An important aspect of this accreditation is that "an AdvancED school shall accept and classify transfer credits earned or grade placement from schools that are accredited by a recognized national, regional or state accredited agency."

(http://www.advanc-ed.org/sites/default/files/documents/AdvancED-Policies-and-Procedures.pdf, section 2.02-f).

This means that over 34,000 schools around the world are required to accept transfer credits from Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Tiospa Zina Tribal School is also accredited COSA.

The Commission for Oceti Sakowin Accreditation was organized, in 2016, for the following purposes:

(a) to provide an accreditation that promotes quality learning, continuous improvement and student success,

(b) to support educational programs relevant to Indian culture, history, art, language and tradition to be used in educational systems,

(c) to further the educational alternatives available to parents of Indian children,

(d) to advocate, sponsor and support the availability and utilization of resources and personnel to aid in the advancement of educational opportunities of Indian children, and

(e) to formulate and enhance educational curricula relevant to the needs of Indian people and communities, plus advance Tribal sovereignty and Indian self-determination.

COSA has agreements with the state of South Dakota and AdvancED.

The South Dakota agreement recognizes that non-public schools are not required to be accredited by the state of South Dakota while the AdvancED agreement sets a procedure to "create and define the framework by which the Parties can collaborate to establish educational excellence for all schools and/or member organizations served by Accreditation Partner." (Accreditation Partnership Agreement - Non-public Institutions, November 1, 2016.)

The founders of Tiospa Zina Tribal School were early leaders of Tribal Sovereignty and Indian Self-determination by battling for the right to determine the education program for their children.

The current Sisseton Wahpeton School Board has continued to advance Tribal Sovereignty and Indian Self-determination by discontinuing state accreditation effective July 1, 2017.

In addition, TZTS will go through a synchronized engagement review of AdvancED and COSA accreditation during the 2018-2019 school year.

Part four –

SWST Winter 2017 general council reports

By CD Floro, Sota Editor

and

Sierra Wolcott, Assistant Sota Editor

This is the fourth in the Sota series on the winter 2017 general council session, held Monday and Tuesday, December 18-19, 2017. Here we pick up with the Tribal Education Department, presented by Dr. Sherry Johnson on day two.

Continued from last week's report

Tribal Education Program

Annual report

Dr. Sherry Johnson presented the annual Tribal Education report.

As Director of Education, Dr. Johnson said "I look at what we need to do for our community. I look at what we need for our sovereignty."

"I'm worried about President Trump, I'm worried about the Bureau of Indian Education. Our schools have not even gotten the second half of their funding, which was due December 1st."

 "As the BIE is struggling," she said, "we don't know what is going to happen yet."

Many other tribes are looking at we are doing and we have to be ready to run our own education system, because we don't know what is coming.

She affirmed, "We are here to support all of our students, whether they are at the Tribal schools or the local public schools."

"We are working with all local schools to have Tribal consultation."

Staff: Dr. Sherry Johnson, Tribal Education Director; Bonnie Haines, Education Specialist; Jaimie Anderson-Renville, Office Manager; Janell Williams, Higher Education Director; Tyler Birney, SIE Director; Phyllis Robertson, SIE Education Coordinator; Heather Larsen, Research Specialist; Heather Flute, Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi Chief Academic Officer; Josh Max, WE Administrative Support Specialist; Charlotte Almanza, Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi Student Services Specialist; Chanda Joseph, Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi Academic/Technology Specialist; Jessica Tiger, Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi Language & Cultural Specialist; Winona Nicolar, Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi Early Childhood Specialist; Mali Souksavatah, Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi College and Career Specialist; Melissa Huff, Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi Research Assistant.

Program Summary and Responsibilities:

To work collaboratively with a network of partners, to educate and promote cultural awareness; preserve the Dakota language; strive for excellence in education standards that meet or exceed standards; and develop strategies to increase persistence, retention, and graduation rates at all levels of education from pre-school to college.

Sisitunwan- Wahpetunwan Oyate wounspe Ata Awangwicayakapi toked yuha skanpte ka tuwe owas wicayuwitayapi oniciyapte ka heced tokatakiya tohanya yanig hehanya wowaste unspeniciyapte.

It is the mission of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Education Department to provide a comprehensive network of services for quality lifelong learning.

Tribal Education Department Goals:

*To ensure education is effective, appropriate, and relevant to provide a means to prepare tribal members for life.

*To work collaboratively with all education providers for the attainment of academic excellence and high, but realistic, expectations for all students.

*To review the condition of education and develop programs and policies to meet specific goals and objectives.

*To promote competence in Dakota language and knowledge of Dakota culture, government, economics and environment.

FY 2017 accomplishments:

1. NYCP Grant Approval Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi- second year funding level- $823,057 (3 more years) Goals are based on needs: College and Career Readiness, Dakota Language and Culture, Early Childhood Readiness, Academic Performance, At Risk Prevention, Attendance. Results: Implementation plan, management plan and evaluation plan

2. NB3 Foundation (goals are youth physical activity and healthy eating/drinking) and NB3 grant for Technical Assistance for Media for Storytelling training. Successful and initiatives will be sustained through local efforts. Results: Grant Successfully Closed out.

3. Sovereignty in Education Grant. To build the infrastructure of the Tribal Education Department. Results: Award approval. Evaluation Plan

4. Certification on Oceti Sakowin Accreditation (COSA) ESDS & TZTS are in the process of certification. Results: Council Approved. Accreditation process and forms etc. completed.

5. FERPA Agreement approved by Tribal Council and Bureau of Indian Education. Agreement will allow the TED to access data directly. Disclosure parent forms are being implemented to share attendance data with Education Staff. Results: Agreement in Place. Student incentives will be awarded from data.

6. SWO Teacher Certification procedure in operations. All SWO teachers are required to be tribally certified. Results: Certificate

7. SWO Math and Communication Standards are Council approved and being utilized in TZTS and ESDS. Results: Standards document

8. Research Protocols and Procedures are approved by LRRB. Results: Document will be utilized by the Local Research Review Board

9. Codes of Educational Conduct for Students and Staff have been developed and being utilized by TZTS & ESDS. Results: Student Code of Conduct and Staff Code of Conduct

10. Analysis of service plans and costs of governmental health insurances and options were made available to the Schools. ESDS opted for the Sanford as a cost savings. Results: Signed plan.

11. Background proposal was developed to be a cost savings to the tribe and educational entities includes a compliance officer. TAP process became available and all agreements were signed. Kiosk is set up and training completed by Tribal Police. Awaiting actual go live. Results: Financial savings to all educational entities for the tribe to be the main repository for all backgrounds.

12. Advocated for a Truancy Interventionist to work with schools, families, legal and students for improvement in attendance. Council approved new position. Results: Improved attendance rates for all students.

13. In the summer of 2017 the Wiyukcan Ka Ecunpi project created various student, youth, and teacher tailored support packages with the intention of creating more well-rounded, culturally knowledgeable, attendance-driven, and behavioral-incident free students. In the same fashion, the Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi project also aids in college and career planning. Results: The following are some of the programs the project supports: Monthly Cultural Events, monthly attendance parties, monthly teacher professional development workshops, Dakota Language Saturdays, one-on-one sessions with the academic specialist, mentoring programs for students and college/career readiness for high school seniors.

14. Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi also supports positive student behavior and suicide prevention. Results: The Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi project brought in various curriculums concerning positive behavioral reinforcement for students within the tribal school's system. A mentoring program has also been set up to help students in need of positive reinforcement outside of the classroom.

15. Education Goals approved by Council. Results: Annual rating of each goal.

Program Needs & Identified Issues:

1. Unmet Need – Tribal Systemic change needs to be supported and carried out to address the attitudes and patterns of families in regards to sending their children to school every day. Research states if good attendance patterns are developed in head start/preschool they tend to be sustained in education and in life. Recommendations: Promoting programs that support every day attendance and its importance.

2. Ongoing Issue or Struggle – Tribal Support for ESDS & TZTS for teacher salary to remain competitive due to SD approving increase in teacher salary funded through sales tax increase. Recommendations: Approve a similar sales tax increase to provide Program Support for teacher salaries.

3. Ongoing Issue or Struggle – Tribal Support for SWC to support the development of needed programs. Recommendations: Approve monthly tribal support.

4. Ongoing Issue or Struggle – Hiring qualified education trained/degreed employees in the schools and the workplace. Recommendations: Develop retention and recruitment programs that support employees

FY 2018 goals and objectives:

1. Updated Ed Code. Draft #1 completed and draft #2 in process. Working with legal for process. Getting ready to submit to Judicial Committee. Results: Approval of revision.

2. Meet Education goals objectives/goals successfully. Results: Data tracked according to measures and evaluation.

3. Develop Research Project supporting youth mentoring. Results: Research Approval.

4. Finalize the SWO Math and Communication Standards. Working draft approved by Council. Results: Council final approval.

5. Develop the SWO Science Standards incorporating Culture and school standards. Results: Draft approval.

6. The Wiyukcan Ka Ecunpi project goals for the 2018 year is to increase math and reading scores, cultural awareness, and attendance rates, while also decreasing student behavior referrals. Results: Mentoring program in place. Continuation with project specialists to help guide these goals through.

7. Wiyukcan Ka Ecunpi project is intending to be more social media orientated to promote the project's goals, intentions, and programs. Results: Data collection from Facebook, twitter, snapchat, and Instagram pages.

Additional Information: Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Approved Education Goals

Academics:

*Math & Reading goals each year - 50% of the student in grades K-11 will show growth that is greater than the mean normative growth.

*95% of students in Pre-K programs will be assessed in Math & Reading. (After the benchmark year baseline goals will be determined.)

Dakotah Language-Each of the educational entities will increase the number of Dakota Language, Dakota Culture, Dakota History, Dakota Government, and Dakota learning opportunities for all students.

Attendance:

*By June 2022, the Head Start through 8th grade attendance rate will be at least 94%.

*By June 2022, the High School attendance rate will be at least 94% or Customized Learning adjusted.

Graduation- By June 2022, the graduation rate will be at least 80%.

Behavior-The number of behavior referrals and/or incidents that results in the loss of instructional time, per 100 students, decreases by 5% each year.

School Readiness-By June 2022, 75% of the students entering Kindergarten will have proficient scores on the fall Literacy assessment.

College & Career Ready:

*By June 2022, 80% of all students who take the ASVAB assessment will pass.

*By June 2022, 50% of all students who take the ACT assessment will score 18 or higher.

*By June 2022, 85% of all students who take the college assessments in Math, Reading and English will be proficient.

Life Skills-By June 2022, every 5th-12th grader will have successfully completed a life skills application unit each year. Units will include: financial literacy, personal hygiene, cleaning, cooking, gardening, community service, healthy weight maintenance, babysitting, etc.

Tribal Education Summary:

Collaboration between all education programs needs to be a major focus in order to improve the Education of Native Children. Good communication and development of student first classrooms are needed. Continuing to build wrap around programs that develop resilient youth need to be implemented to serve and protect students.

The implementation of Research based programs for students is helping but it needs to be paired with instruction that appeals to the affective side of students. Through the adoption of the new ESSA law there is less focus on test scores and more Music, Drama, Art, and CTE coursework is being brought back into the school systems. Student motivation for learning will increase.

Teachers that facilitate high level curriculum that have high expectations positively impacts learning. Improving teacher effectiveness will help student academic retention. Critical thinking skills through instruction need to be worked on. Improvement in educational delivery, content and materials must be a concentrated effort. Although education formally starts and ends with the teacher, parent involvement is huge! Parent support of the child's education makes the difference to how well they do in school.

Developing programs that prepare youth for life, college, armed services, or the work place is needed. Starting this process with the Early Learning Programs (Head Start, Face, ie.) and continuing support through as a child's transitions through their education life, will greatly increase their highest potential. The Education Department is helping our children develop skills and providing an education that will teach our children to identify goals and reach high to achieve them.

Higher Education Program

Annual report

Janell Williams, Program Director, gave the Tribe's Higher Education Program report.

Janell pointed out, "When this program started in 2008 we had 800 participants."

"We now provide support for 1,400 students."

Program Summary and Responsibilities:

The Higher Education Program has distributed program funds to tribal members attending post-secondary institutions both on and off reservation.

2017 Goal and Objectives of the program:

*Promote Cultural Awareness.

*Provide post-secondary benefits to pay or reimburse in whole or in part tuition costs and living expenses (both on and off-campus) to eligible enrolled members of the Tribe at the undergraduate and graduate level.

*Networking with Tribal education entities.

*Increase tribal member attendance in post-secondary education and degree completion

*Comply with all applicable policies and procedures.

*Identify and recommend scholarship opportunities

FY 2017 accomplishments:

1. Provide educational benefits to students that earned post-secondary credit hours. Results: Increase completion rates and increase number of tribal members attending post-secondary schools.

2. Policy Revision. Results: Reflects budget and accommodate student needs such as programmatic costs for study abroad e.g.

3. Training/Professional Development. Results: Access knowledge that will better assist students with post-secondary information, resource availability within the school.

4. Networking with educational entities. Results: Collaboration, gathering data, sharing vital information for grant opportunities, engaging in meetings, trainings, and support efforts that provide educational opportunities.

FY 2018 goals and objectives:

1. Provide tuition reimbursements/cost of living to students attending post-secondary schools based on credit hours earned. Results: Increase post-secondary completion rates among SWO

2. Collaboration with educational entities. Results: Engage in activities, trainings, meetings, etc.

3. Policy Revision. Results: Revisions made to accommodate student needs such as programmatic costs or more than one student has same need.

4. Identify and Recommend scholarship opportunities. Results: Decrease some of the financial hardship that students incur while attending post-secondary institutions.

Program statistics:

Student(s)                     Fall 2016-17     Spring 2017      Summer 2017   Diploma           Total

Enrollment

Undergrad                    199                  172                  51                    26                    267

Grad                                         28                    26                    18                    4                      36

Total Student(s)            227                  198                  69                    30                    303

Credits/Sem. Grad         262.2               176.1               72

Credit/sem. UG            2111                1902.5             311

Total Credits                 2373.2             2078.6             383                                          4834.8

Leo A Daly Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Architecture/Engineering Scholarship:

This scholarship is established for the further educational advancement of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate students with priority to its enrolled members that are committed to enroll in a major area of study related to the architecture or engineering disciplines. Students must be a junior or senior undergraduate at an accredited post-secondary college or university with a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 out of a 4.0 grading scale and be enrolled full-time each semester. This scholarship does not fund summer semesters.

Community Health Education

Annual report

Audrey German gave the annual Community Health Education Program report to general council.

Staff: Audrey German, Program Manager; Liz Anderson, Tobacco Prevention Specialist; Gypsy Wanna, Wellness Coordinator; Sandi Bernard, Wellness Assistant.

Program Summary and Responsibilities:

*Provide health education services to the tribal membership.

*Plan, organize and implement monthly health education initiatives on prevention of chronic diseases and injury prevention.

Unmet Needs:

*Funding for initiatives that will expire with the SWO Health Plan 2016 - 2020. Recommendations: Currently several of our initiatives are funded by year-end, non-recurring funds contracted from the Sisseton Indian Health Service. A grant writer was contracted to write grants for the implementation of the SWO Health Plan. In the coming year we will need to actively start searching for funding opportunities for these initiatives.

Ongoing Issues or Struggles:

1. Enforcement of the SWO Tobacco Policy. Recommendations: That everyone understand the policy and actively work to enforce it. To provide a place for smokers to use that meet the guidelines of the tobacco free policy. This policy includes all tribal offices and building where tribal employees work.

2. Procurement. Recommendations: This issue has been discussed at many Program Manager's Meetings and it seems that leadership is working on a solution.

FY 2017 accomplishments:

1. Provided monthly health education in the community for health promotion and disease prevention. Health education is accomplished through presentations, one-on-one counseling, health fairs, tabling events, classes, social media (CHE facebook page), articles in the paper and mass emails. 1. Breast Cancer Awareness: October is breast cancer awareness month. For 2016 a mini health fair and event was planned at the Tribal Administration building. 136 individuals attended the Indigenous Pink Day with 17 men taking part in the "Take a Walk In Her Shoes" activity. Each month mammogram dates for the Sisseton IHS are advertised in the Sota Iya Ye Yapi, emailed to tribal employees and placed on the CHE Facebook page. CHE also collaborates with the Sisseton IHS Radiology Department to provide incentives to eligible individuals getting their mammogram. 2. HIV/HepC: Each cycle staff provide HIV/HepC prevention education to Dakotah Pride Treatment Center clients, community programs and schools as requested. 202 individuals received prevention education. 3. Heart Health: In collaboration with the Sisseton Public Health Nurses and Sanford Health the program held an event on February 3, 2017, for Wear Red Day. 56 people received education and 43 people completed wellness and point of care screenings. The Sisseton IHS PHN is a major partner with Community Health Education in providing point of care screenings for heart health education at all our health fairs and events. 4. Diabetes: Held a tribal health fair "Healthier One Step at a Time" November 17, 2016. November is Diabetes Awareness Month.

2. The Great Plains Tribal Chairman's Health Board funded two community grants to plan, organize and facilitate cancer prevention education and screening for the Lake Traverse Reservation. 1. Cesdi Happens. Get Yours Checked. Grant period: November 1, 2016 - June 15, 2017. The goal of this initiative is to increase the number of people educated and screened for colorectal cancer. 163 people received education and 87 people returned a colorectal cancer screening kit to the Sisseton IHS Lab. 8 colorectal cancer prevention education community events were held for this initiative. 2. Healthier One-Step at a Time. Grant period: November 1, 2016 - June 15, 2017. The goal of this initiative was to increase cancer knowledge and awareness to 50 tribal employees. Four lunch and learn educational sessions were held reaching 32 tribal employees.

3. Tobacco Prevention/ Tobacco Cessation Initiative. This initiative is funded with year-end, non-recurring funds contracted from the Sisseton Indian Health Service to enhance the level of effort in the IHS Master Contract Scope of Work and to implement Priority 3: Tobacco Prevention/Tobacco Cessation of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Health Plan 2016 - 2020. Results: One staff provides prevention and cessation efforts for our community. Accomplishments for this year are: a. Provided 31 quit consults. b. Recruited and completed a Youth Tobacco Survey. 82 youth to completed the survey. c. Provided second hand smoke education to pregnant moms and companions at 6 Healthy Pregnancy Classes reaching 15 parents on the dangers of second hand smoke. d. Participated in 3 program events/fairs reaching 105 people educating on stop smoking resources and the effects of second hand smoke. e. Participant on the SD Priority Population Coalition attending 4 teleconference calls. f. Harvested cansasa for use in the community and to educate the community on the traditional use of tobacco. g. Made a presentation on "Cansasa" at the State Tobacco Institute Annual Meeting. h. Participated in Partnership In Community Health meetings to create tobacco policy for our schools & community.

4. Health Career Promotion. This initiative is funded with year-end, non-recurring funds contracted from the Sisseton Indian Health Service to enhance the level of effort in the IHS Master Contract Scope of Work and to implement Priority 7: Health Career Promotion (Externships for College Students and K-12 Activities) of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Health Plan 2016 - 2020. Results: a. Summer Student Extern Program - Post-secondary health career student's work up to 400 hours over the summer months to build their skill and competency in the health care field. Student placement sites are the Sisseton IHS or one of our Tribal Health Programs. For the current year, five students completed the summer program. Placement sites included the Sisseton IHS Behavioral Health Department, Sisseton IHS Lab, Sisseton IHS Physical Therapy, Sisseton IHS Out-Patient Nursing and SWO Diabetes Prevention Program. This raises the number of students completing the program, for the years 2004 - 2017, to 62 students. Some students participated in the program for more than one summer. 37 students completed 1 year; 20 students completed 2 years; 4 students completed 3 years; and 1 student completed 4 years. This resulted in 93 total placements. b. K-12 Activities - Collaborated with the Northeast SD Area Health Education Center (NESD AHEC) to carry out the HOTT Program (Health Occupations for Today and Tomorrow) at the Enemy Swim Day School. 65 students and 7 teachers from grades 5 - 8 participated. This program covers a variety health careers using fun activities specific to each grade level. c. Assisted two high school students through the process to job shadow at the Sisseton IHS, as a part of a senior project. One student job shadowed in the IHS Lab Department. It did not work out for the second student. d. Worked with TZTS students to attend a Scrubs Camp at Aberdeen, SD. This camp is the closest to our area and is held only once a year in October. Several students made application to attend but it did not work out for them to go.

5. Prevention Initiative: This initiative is funded through year-end, non-recurring funds contracted from the Sisseton Indian Health Service to enhance the level of effort in the IHS Master Contract Scope of Work and to implement Priority 9: Prevention (Healthy Choices - includes Injury Prevention) of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Health Plan 2016 - 2020. Results: a. Three (3) CHE staff are child passenger safety technicians, certified to educate on the proper installation and use of child passenger safety seats. 1. 275 individuals received car seat safety education on the proper car seat for the size and weight of their child. 2. 144 caregivers were given car seat safety education and instruction on how to properly install a car seat and adjust the seat for their child. 3. 176 children received a child passenger safety seat. b.  Provided supplies and information to five local sundance groups for the prevention of HIV/HepC. This initiative was previously funded by the Great Plains Area Office but has since been de-funded.

6. Blood Drives. Results: Most Native Americans are Type O, which is the most needed blood. Since May of 2014, 70 tribal members/employees donated a total of 190 units. Donated blood is used for surgeries, treatment for people with cancer, as well as other health emergencies.

Goals and objectives for FY 2018:

1. Complete training provided by the Sisseton IHS to use the Electronic Health Record for tobacco cessation referrals from health care providers. The plan is to start with tobacco cessation and eventually include all of CHE. Results: Number of referrals received and number of individuals provided services.

2. Continue to provide health education to the tribal membership based on community input and survey. Results: Community Survey.

ET Demo Program

Annual report

Elias Mendoza, Program Director, presented the annual report, which was distributed in a handout on day two. An earlier Sota article published a summary of the program's education component.

Staff: Elias Mendoza, Program Director; Bessy Janisch, Caseworker/Employment Assistance; Chrissy Heminger, Data 477 Specialist; Mary Barse, Child Care Coordinator; Amy Wright, TANF Specialist; Denise Kranhold, Adult Education Coordinator; Beverly Rosso, GED Tutor.

Program Summary and Responsibilities:

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe consolidates 8 programs as authorized by the Indian Employment Training and Related Services Demonstration Act of 1992, Public Law 102-477. The responsibilities of the program are to improve the effectiveness through integration by serving tribally determined socio-economic goals consistent with the policy of self-determination and promote self-sufficiency by identifying barriers to employment through case management and lastly to reduce administrative cost by consolidating administrative functions of the various Federal Employment Training Programs.

FY 2017 accomplishments:

1. Economic Develop Project - Dakota Crossing. Results: Provided Dakota Crossing with Point of Sale equipment and fund classes taken at SWC.

2. Mazaska Woha Project - Financial literacy grant transferred from the Planning Department to the ET DEMO program. The project is designed to assist participants in understanding of their finances with the end result leading to job security, personal confidence with their finances and overall improvement of everyday life. Results: First meeting kick-off September 28, 2017, followed by training at House of Hope (open invitation to hold scheduled classes with residents). Several other workshops have occurred and/or scheduled. Project is too new to report any measurable results but the response from programs and entities of the Tribe have been steady.

3. MOU - Browns Valley Health Center. Results: Professional agreement with BVHC to assist them with retention of Tribal member employees. This project is too new to report any measurable results.

Goals and objectives for FY 2018:

1. Expand Mazaska Woha Project. Results: Continue to work with programs and entities of the Tribe by providing their clients/employees with skills that will assist them in understanding financial responsibility.

2. Summer Youth Program. Results: Expand the program beyond Tribal government work experience and ensure more effective mentoring and accountability to deepen the program's impact by combining hands-on work experience, life skills and leadership development.

3. Staff Professional Development. Results: Seek out specialized training to improve professional knowledge and effectiveness, this will help build and improve competence, skill and effectiveness for the clients we serve

Program statistics:

TANF:

     *Total Single Parent Families Served - 247

     *Total Family Caretaker Served - 1,148

Summer youth program:

Enrolled - 25

Completed - 13

Perfect Attendance - 2

Child Care Assistance:

Families Served - 41

Children Served - 68                                              

Adult Education / GED:

Total GED Clients - 57

Total GED Client Assessments Completed - 54

Total GED Certificates - 8

Career Pillar Certificates - 5

MindSet Certificates - 5

NCRC Certificates - 2                               

Employment Assistance:

Total Clients Served - 141

Little Steps Day Care

Annual report

Staff: Sylvanus Flute Jr., Director; Jazmin Barse, Assistant-Director; Pamela Keoke, Cook; Jaime Crawford, Day care provider; Burandy Schrader, Day care provider; Alexis St. John, Day care provider; Antonette GreyBull, Day care provider; Denise Fuentes, Day care provider; Caril Amos, Day care provider; Nikki Crawford , Day care provider.

Program Summary and Responsibilities:

*Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe Program as of April 3, 2017

*Daycare facility can handle up to 59 Children

*Actual count is 44

*Infant room - 10 infants

*Toddler - 10 toddlers

*Pre-school ages 3-5 - 19 children

*ET Demo - 5 slots available

Unmet Needs:

*Security System, no maintenance available for illness' that are contracted and no money for part time maintenance.

Ongoing Issues:

*Higher wages for Daycare workers, one of the lowest wages for the Tribe. Recommendations: Lower rent?

Accomplishments for FY 2017:

*Changed entities from DNGE to SWST April 3, 2017.

*Five (5) slots for ET Demo parents. Results: Parents can receive GED, or go to college.

Goal for FY 2018:

*Open room for more children. Results: 59 day care.

Program statistics:

*Self-pay parents total 15 for 2017

*Subsidy total 28 for 2017.

Procurement Department

Annual report

Staff: Fran Tease, Procurement Contracting Officer; Collette Haase, Procurement Clerk I; Kristen Backman, Procurement Clerk II.

Program Summary and Responsibilities:

*Procure supplies/equipment for all Tribal programs

*Get all quotes for programs

*Generate Purchase Orders

*RFP's for Contracts/Consultants

Unmet Needs:

*Support. Recommendations: Stress importance of Internal Controls.

Ongoing Issues:

*Procurement Policy. Recommendations: Programs need to follow policy.

Accomplishments in FY 2017:

Procurement Department hired another clerk. Results: Solicit quotes/purchase orders in a timely manner.

Goals and objectives for FY 2018:

Distribution Center/Storage Building. Results: Purchase bulk items at a lower cost.

Homebuyers program

Annual report

The Tribe's Homebuyers program is under authority of the office of Tribal Chairman.

Staff: Dustin Kirk, Director; Terri Larsen, Housing Counselor.

Program Summary and Responsibilities:

*To provide financial assistance to enrolled Sisseton Wahpeton tribal members with the purchase of a primary home. There are eligibility requirements on the home being purchased and requirements that must be met by the potential homebuyer to qualify for down payment/closing cost assistance.

Unmet Needs:

*Limited affordable quality homes available for purchase. Recommendations: Continue to refer clients to outside entities e.g. Governors Homes, Cashway, etc.

Ongoing Issues or Struggles:

*Clients becoming "home buyer ready." Recommendations: Continue referring clients to homebuyer education classes.

FY 2017 accomplishments:

*Down payment/closing cost assistance provided for the purchase of 11 homes. Results: Did not meet our goal of assisting 30 tribal members due to tribal members not purchasing homes.

Looking ahead – goals and objectives for FY 2018:

Goal is to assist 14 homebuyers per our approved budget with down payment/closing cost assistance. Results: Number of homebuyers assisted for the fiscal year.

Program Statistics:

*35 household members were put into homes

*$70,000.00 in down payment/closing cost assistance was distributed

*The 11 homes purchased were valued at a total of $906,100.00

Additional Information:

*Program has assisted a total of 432 tribal members with their home purchase since 1999.

*Total value of homes purchased since 1999 is $14,082,106.14

*Total down payment/closing cost assistance distributed since 1999 is $1,082,830.65

Districts present "Elder of the Year"

Awards, Star Quilts

In keeping with tradition, each of the seven Districts honored their choices as "Elders of the Year" for 2017.

District reps to the SWST Elderly Affairs Board presented their lists on day two of general council, presenting awards and star quilts.

Here are those Tribal elders honored this year:

*Big Coulee District: Inez Owen and Floyd Hayes.

*Buffalo Lake District: Wanda Johnson and Sharon Marks.

*Enemy Swim District: Kurt BlueDog, Andrew J. Grey, and Delano Renville.

*Heipa District: Dorothy Freemont and Sampson Hill.

*Long Hollow District: Gloria Nelson and Duane Brown.

*Old Agency District: Franklin Keeble Sr., Donita Goodsell, Arlene Miller, Lillian Lawrence, Orson Bernard, and Norbert Bellonger.

Lake Traverse District: Charles James, Darlyn Kitto.

*****

Watch for the fifth and final article in this series of reports from the winter 2017 general council in next week's Sota.

(Editor's note: Bound report booklets are available through the Office of the Tribal Chairman.)

KXSW-TZTS now on cable TV!

By Crystal Owen

KXSW-Radio

Today is a pretty exciting day!

History is being made here at the Tribal Radio station!

Tiospa Zina Tribal School and KXSW have a channel on Venture cable television!

Be on the look out for Channel 390 for all the boys and girls basketball games and other fun exciting events, news and information coming your way.

This has been a long time coming and Station Manager Tom Wilson reports that this effort began under the administration of former Chairman Robert Shepherd and has finally come to be almost 5 years later.

It is a great reminder that if you stay persistent and focused anything is possible!

Native American tribes sue opioid manufacturers, distributors

SWST joins lawsuit

Sioux Falls, SD – CBS News/AP – January 9, 2018 – Three Native American tribes in the Dakotas are suing opioid manufacturers and distributors, alleging they concealed and minimized the addiction risk of prescription drugs.

The Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe and the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate sued 24 opioid industry groups in federal court on Monday.

Defendants include drug manufacturers Purdue Pharma, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries and Allergan, and distributors McKesson Corp., Cardinal Health Inc. and AmerisourceBergen Corp.

The lawsuit follows more than 70 cases filed across the country, including in Mississippi, Washington, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania and Ohio. It is one of the first to tie claims to the drugs' impact on Native Americans.

The Cherokee Nation launched a similar suit in April.

The tribes are being represented by former North Dakota U.S. Attorney Tim Purdon and former South Dakota U.S. Attorney Brendan Johnson.

"The prescription opioid crisis has hit Indian Country hard," said Purdon.

He added he is "hopeful" that other North Dakota tribes will also file suit.

The complaint noted that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that one in 10 Native Americans used prescription opioids for non-medical purposes in 2012, which is double the rate of whites.

In October, the CDC said 64,070 people died from drug overdoses in 2016 -- a 21 percent increase over the year before. Approximately three-fourths of all drug overdose deaths are now caused by opioids.

Between 2015 and 2016, Native Americans represented almost 18 percent of opioid-related deaths and 28 percent of patients treated for opioid use in South Dakota. At the time, Native Americans made up 9 percent of the state's population.

"This epidemic has overwhelmed our public-health and law-enforcement services, drained resources for addiction therapy, and sent the cost of caring for children of opioid-addicted parents skyrocketing," said Johnson.

Allegations against the defendants include deceptive marketing, fraudulent and negligent conduct and violations of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organization Act.

The complaint seeks a jury trial to determine monetary damages as well as an "abatement fund" to pay for treatment programs.

The companies hadn't responded to the suit as of Monday.

In October, an explosive joint investigation by "60 Minutes" and The Washington Post reported on moves by Congress to help disarm the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) from going after high-volume distributors. Joe Rannazzisi, who used to run the DEA's diversion control unit, told "60 Minutes" that the opioid crisis was aided in part by Congress, lobbyists and the drug distribution industry.

The DEA said it has taken action against far fewer opioid distributors under a new law. A Justice Department memo shows 65 doctors, pharmacies and drug companies received suspension orders in 2011. Only six of them received them in 2017.

CBS News' Paula Reid reported the Justice Department, which oversees the DEA, does not dispute any of the "60 Minutes" reporting but said the drug crisis is a top priority for the Trump administration.

House passes provisions to protect tribal sovereignty on Labor issues

Washington, DC – Jan. 10, 2018 – Rep. Kristi Noem today led the U.S. House of Representatives in passing provisions to protect tribal sovereignty on labor issues. The legislation, which many South Dakota tribes have long supported, would clarify that the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) does not have jurisdiction over tribally owned and operated businesses.

"In 2004, the National Labor Relations Board unilaterally decided that it needed to meddle in the affairs of tribally-owned businesses on tribal lands, threatening the foundation of Indian law, the principle of tribal sovereignty, and the limits that ought to be placed on the federal government," said Noem. "Subjecting Native American tribes to National Labor Relations Board rules is yet another sign that some still want the federal government to interfere in tribal decision making. I'm proud to see provisions pass the House that withdraw the government's heavy hand and again reinforce our commitment to tribal sovereignty."

In 2004, NLRB unilaterally determined that the National Labor Relations Act applied to tribally owned businesses on tribal lands. Tribes have expressed great concerns over the impact of this ruling. In 2011, Noem introduced the Tribal Labor Sovereignty Act, which would clarify in law that tribally owned businesses on tribal lands are not subject to the jurisdiction of the National Labor Relations Act. As a result, NLRB would not have administration and enforcement powers on reservation land for tribally owned businesses.

The Tribal Labor Sovereignty Act was included in S.140, which passed the House of Representatives today. The provision was endorsed by Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, the Oglala Sioux Tribe, and the Great Plains Tribal Chairman's Association.

Legislative reports

2018 Week 1 Legislative Report

Senator Jason Frerichs

We are back in session in Pierre, and I am proud of my duty to represent northeast South Dakota as the District 1 State Senator. I am pleased to announce that on October 29th, my wife Ashley and I were blessed with our first child Elizabeth Grace.

The Governor delivered his final State of the State address to start the session this year, and he highlighted his passion for workforce education training programs. I agree with the Governor and am pleased to see his excitement for preparing our young people to be equipped for good paying jobs after technical school or college. School-to-work along with career and technical education programs in high school are extremely important to student success. The Governor mentioned an exciting soybean processing plant being built on the edge of Aberdeen and how it will utilize 20% of the soybeans produced in our state. Opioid abuse continues to be one of the biggest issues in rural South Dakota. In 2016, there were so many opioids prescribed in our state that it would equate to enough for every South Dakotan for 19 days. Fortunately, the medical community has joined with state government to curb the amount of opioids prescribed as a first option rather than one alternative.

On Wednesday, Chief Justice Gilbertson delivered his seventeenth State of the Judiciary address emphasizing the importance of drug and alcohol courts and the savings realized in social services by keeping these people who need help in their communities. At one point this past year, a historic event happened when a majority of the Supreme Court justices were women. Unfortunately, this was only on one case due to one of the sitting justices stepping away from a case. Currently, we have just one female out of the five justices. Hopefully as we go forward, we can have more women serve on the South Dakota Supreme Court and more accurately reflect our population.

On Thursday, Chairman Boyd Gourneau from the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe delivered the annual State of the Tribes address and stressed that we are all South Dakotans. Access to quality health care and tackling the meth and opioid crisis are the main issues facing our tribal brothers and sisters. Lower Brule Sioux Tribe has a rich history of being successful in agriculture production, especially with raising popcorn.

I serve as a member of the Senate Transportation Committee, and we received the annual report from the Department of Transportation (DOT) on the status of our roads, bridges, airports, and railroads. I want to assure all of you that our DOT has adequate resources to take care of our state roads and bridges. When we as a legislature passed Senate Bill (SB) 1 a few years ago, it authorized the increase in motor fuel taxes along with an increase to the vehicle excise tax that provided increased funding to the state highway fund. There is an extra $11.5 million of new funds available over and above the projections when we passed SB 1. I will be offering legislation to capture half of that additional money to be used in the local government bridge fund. This fund allows counties to request funding for their bridge projects, and the current fund is not meeting the needs of local governments.

Throughout this session, we will have robust discussion on the various issues impacting our state. I am supportive of the plan to extend the sunset on the open waters compromise law dealing with the public access to non-meandered bodies of water located on private land. I welcome your input on other ways that we can strike a balance to meet the interests of outdoors enthusiasts and landowners.

Please keep in touch on the issues that are important to you. If your schedule allows, come visit the session in Pierre. You can also follow along on South Dakota Public Broadcasting. My email is Jason.Frerichs@sdlegislature.gov or you can call me at 949-2204.

Jason Frerichs, District 1 State Senator, Wilmot, SD.

SD Legislative leaders report

The 2018 Legislative Session began this week, and Democrats are happy to be back in Pierre working for the people of South Dakota. Every member in our caucus has hit the ground running, preparing drafts of legislation and attending committee meetings. While we are the minority party, no one will work harder than the members of our caucus to make life better for each person in our state.

Every Session is unique, with its own challenges and opportunities. Whatever this session brings, Democrats will be guided by our core values. We are fighting to expand the freedom, opportunity, and security of every South Dakotan, so that our state government and state economy works for all South Dakotans, not just the wealthy and powerful. We think your voice should matter in Pierre, not just the voice of those big-money special interests which often control the political establishment.

We believe that state government should reflect the honesty and integrity of the people of our state, and that it should work as hard as the people of this state do. We believe that if you work hard and play by the rules, you should be able to go as far as your talents and abilities can take you; you should be able to make a good life for yourself and your family in our great state.

Unfortunately, our state government is not always the most transparent or accountable, and our state's economy does not work well for everyone. While we all believe South Dakota is a great place to live, we know that a lot of families are struggling to get by and more transparency, accountability, and efficiency are needed in our state government. Numerous independent studies show this to be true:

*South Dakota has the highest rate of people working multiple jobs and second-highest percentage of families where both spouses are in the workforce, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

*South Dakota is 42nd in the nation for median earnings for men and 41st for women, according to the Census Bureau.

*We have the 7th highest percentage of our elderly population living at or below the poverty line.

*South Dakota is the 3rd-worst state in the nation in corruption and one of the 10 least innovative states.

Democrats will introduce a wide range of bills this session that will focus on remedying these problems by making South Dakota's economy work for all South Dakotans and making state government work for all people, not just the powerful and well-connected.

Senator Billie Sutton, Senate Minority Leader.

Representative Spence Hawley, House Minority Leader.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

Nature is Our Superior!

"There is no 'heaven' or 'happy hunting ground' to go to when we pass on; we don't 'die' - we go back to where we came from - GrandMother Earth; NATURE; where we've always been" Red Horse

By Scott Barta

Don't "Pray" but Honor Nature Instead, Just As All Our great, wise, and Beautiful Ancestors did 10,000 years ago!

The Beings of Nature are our superiors. The Seven Hierarchies are the Minerals, Rocks, and Water who are the wisest and longest witness to the billions of years of weather, Moon and Sun.

Next come the Beings in the Ocean and in the Rivers and Lakes, followed by the Plant Nations, the Insect People, the Reptiles, Snakes, Lizards, Scorpions, the Bird Nations, and the Animal People. These are our teachers, our mentors, that must be revered and welcomed to return back undisturbed.

The Seven Hierarchies are the Ones we honor by naming ourselves after in order to learn their guidance for our short 112 years of being a human being before going back unto them.

How did we, the Indian, the Irish, the Korean, the African, the English, the Egyptian, get so far from this understanding?

Ten thousand years ago, the Pyramid Hierarchy System was concocted by bad people who wanted the masses of people to somehow feed and support them. They designed a scheme to get the people in line "under" them. The exploitation of labor and workers began.

The "Five G's" were implemented to remove the people from their Fires, from their Winter Family Stories, and ultimately from their land; they made "cities" and forced the people to come in to them.

Then they invented the word "god" to streamline this transition - from living with and honoring the Earth and Nature, to viewing the Earth as an object - a "globe." It made people think that they were "under" an authority, under something.

Large obnoxious statues, structures, pyramids, and buildings were constructed using slave labor so that "governments" could start controlling.

Once this miserable way was working, alcohol (gin) was thrown into the mix so that the masses would fight among themselves and not revolt against the king.

Gold and Greed consciousness was implemented to give the people false hope that they might, too, join the king's team and become rich and "looked-up to" by the slaves at the bottom of the Pyramid Hierarchy.

What is the Remedy to this "Problem?"

Step one is to develop Oyate Omniciye or "Circle Gatherings of Women and Men" that allows women and men back together in community governing through unanimous consensus. True democracy where all have a true voice deciding the fate of their communities.

Step two is to bring back the ancient and timeless Four Sacred Lusts, Breathing from the Nose, eating totally organic (non-chemicalized) or BioDynamic Foods who's seeds can replant the next growing season, understanding that it's only your selfish "thinking" that causes your suffering, and thanking - from the heart - the Moon, the Sun, the Rock and the Water, and all the Beings of Nature.

Understanding of the Seven Hierarchies, the Pyramid Hierarchy, the Five G's, Oyate Omniciye, and the Four Sacred Lusts is the only Path, today, to Contentment and True Wisdom for tomorrow's grandchildren.

Brief editorial comments from the editor's desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

Please note that while this week's Sota is being printed on Monday, it is not going into the mail until Tuesday due to the federal Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. So expect a delay in receiving your copy by mail.

*****

The Reservation Election Board has not yet certified candidates for the special election January 30th to fill the unexpired term of Crystal Heminger, who resigned.

We are publishing a list of those who have filed, but the official list will not be available until this Wednesday, January 17th, and it will be published in our issue of Wednesday, Jan. 24.

*****

We are publishing a news release concerning a lawsuit filed against opioid manufacturers.

The SWST is one of three tribes who filed the suit.

It is one of many fronts in the battle against an epidemic of addiction, abuse and traumas.

Suicide prevention is another front.

It is disturbing to see that 2017 has set a record for suicides in the state of South Dakota … and knowing that our tribal communities are home to the most casualties.

Thank you to everyone who is contributing to success in this battle.

There are many engaged in positive work in our community – pidamiya!

*****

Plan ahead for cultural events at Dakota Magic February 16-17, honoring the Treaty.

Chairman Flute has announced there will be a kahomni Friday evening, and on Saturday there will be both moccasin and hand game tournaments beginning in the morning, wacipi in the afternoon.

There will be a feed on both days.

Watch for a poster to be published.

*****

Note the page one article on Tiospa Zina Tribal School's accreditation.

There has been, apparently, some confusion about the Tribal school no longer wishing to be accredited by the state of South Dakota.

This is by choice and is no reflection upon academics provided to TZTS students.

Tiospa Zina's founders were proponents of Tribal Sovereignty and Indian Self-Determination.

They fought for the right to determine what education system was best for their children.

In keeping with that mission, the current Sisseton-Wahpeton School Board discontinued state accreditation in July 2017: for the purpose of advancing Tribal Sovereignty and Indian Self-Determination.

Please read Superintendent Dr. Roger Bordeaux's article for more information, including the school's solid accreditation certifications.

*****

This week we begin providing readers with weekly updates from your House and Senate representatives from Pierre, SD.

Watch for these reports to see what's happening weekly on the state legislative front.

*****

Apologies for small print!

We apologize to readers, especially those with aging or impaired eyesight, for the small, hard-to-read print, in last week's Tribal Council proceedings.

We suggest getting out a magnifying glass if you are having trouble with those pages. In the future, we will do better.

Publishing the Council minutes – a task our contract with the Tribe requires – has, for years, been difficult.

Releasing approved minutes has not been high on the priority list, although there have been periods when they were released in a timely manner. Often, months go by before Council actions become available for Sota readers.

But, for decades, the minutes have been provided in text format.

Now, it seems that technology is only available to provide Council proceedings in image format – pictures of the printed page captured in PDF image files.

So last week we were able to "catch up" on three months worth of minutes – by using image files. Not text files, which allow us to "flow" the text into columns on our Sota pages during layout.

As of this writing, Wednesday, Jan. 10th, we are told that the November 2017 Council minutes are ready to be released to the Sota.

It will be provided in PDF image format again, but we will set aside more space in the newspaper to accommodate the images so they are more readable, when we receive them.

Thank you for your understanding.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"When a man does a piece of work which is admired by all we say that it is wonderful; but when we see the changes of day and night, the sun, the moon, and the stars in the sky, and the changing seasons upon the earth, with their ripening fruits, anyone must realize that it is the work of someone more powerful than man."

– Chased-by-Bears, Santee-Yanktonai Sioux

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

In case you're worried about what's going to become of the younger generation, it's going to grow up and start worrying about the younger generation. Roger Allen

The real hero is always a hero by mistake; he dreams of being an honest coward like everybody else. Umberto Eco (1932 - ), Travels in Hyperreality (Harcourt)

Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength. Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

Progress isn't made by early risers. It's made by lazy men trying to find easier ways to do something. Robert Heinlein (1907 - 1988), Time Enough For Love

It is a great ability to be able to conceal one's ability. Francois de La Rochefoucauld (1613 - 1680), Maxims, 1665

If scientific reasoning were limited to the logical processes of arithmetic, we should not get very far in our understanding of the physical world. One might as well attempt to grasp the game of poker entirely by the use of the mathematics of probability. Vannevar Bush (1890 - 1974)

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Funeral Tuesday for Jenny Cole

Jenny Faye (Simon) Cole, age 73, of Sisseton, SD journeyed to the Spirit World on Friday, January 12, 2018 at her residence.

She was born on January 21, 1944 in Long Hollow, SD to the late Paul A. Simon and Amelia (Harris) Simon. She was a descendant of Chief Simon Anawangmani (One who walks Galloping Upon).

Jenny grew up in Long Hollow, a district of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate.

She attended the Long Hollow Day School and later transferred to the Wahpeton Indian School, Wahpeton, ND.

She graduated from the 8th grade and later transferred to Flandreau Indian School.

After her educational years, she returned to live in Sisseton for a short time. She then moved to Minneapolis, MN in 1965 to make her home. She returned to visit with family on occasion.

She enjoyed playing Flinch with relatives while visiting. She also enjoyed fishing, going for rides to sight see and watching Jimmy Swaggert ministries.

She was a MN Vikings fan. She attended God's Royal Church in Minneapolis and attended women's Bible study groups and was quite active in church activities such as making crafts for different groups.

She married John L. Cole on July 2, 1978. John passed away on December 16, 2010 while in Minneapolis.

Jenny was employed in various occupations. Her recent employment was with an assisted living group in New Brighton, MN where she was employed as an attendant. She retired in 2010 and returned to live in Sisseton in March of 2015.

She is survived by a son, Drew Culver of Portland, OR. He returned from Portland in October 2017 and their meeting for the first time was brief. Due to his recent employment scheduling, he was not able to return to be with his mom. She is further survived by a sister, Barbara Mail of Agency Village; brothers Rev. Michael L. Simon and Francis Simon both of Sisseton and Filmore Simon of Agency Village; many cousins, nephews, nieces; other relatives and friends.

In addition to her husband, she was preceded in death by her parents; a sister Ethel (Simon) Max; three sisters in infancy; brothers Clayton J. Simon and Ronald D. Simon; paternal grandparents and maternal grandparents.

Funeral services for Jenny Cole will be held Tuesday, January 16, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. at the Community Center in Agency Village. Rev. Enright Bighorn, Rev. Michael Simon and CRE Filmore Simon will officiate.

Spring interment will be held.

A wake will be held beginning on Sunday, January 14th from 7:00-10 PM at the Community Center in Agency Village. Further all-night wake will be held Monday, January 15th beginning at 7:00 PM at the Community Center in Agency Village.

Honorary casket bearers will be Joann Wilson, Pearl Battles, Brenda Tyler, Joann (Frenier) Gill, Marcella Haug, Ione Renville, Kassey Goodbird, Della Shepherd, Sophrona Shepherd, Gretta LuVerne, Nichollette Simon, Izola Simon, Darlene Ross, Rose (Max) Chase, Tami Redday and Christina Simon.

Casket bearers will be Ray Ramos, John Ross, Robbie Laughter, Josh Laughter, Tim Laughter, Eliphlet Simon Sr., Stephen Simon and Alan Simon.

Chilson Funeral Home, Winsted, MN served the family.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Update on Keystone I oil spill

Submitted by Paula Horne

Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe Water Land Protection

January 10, 2018

Update on the Keystone pipeline adjacent to the Lake Traverse Reservation in South Dakota:

According to a filing with the SD Dept. of Environment & Natural Resources, groundwater has been impacted 6 feet below the surface.

As you may know, one of Sisseton-Wahpeton tribal members' main concerns when the spill occurred is that it would affect our aquifer.

Transcanada maintains that while groundwater has been impacted by the spill, contamination in two drinking water wells that were tested is below EPA safety levels.

Oil contamination in the water supply can cause everything from minor skin irritations to nervous system problems, miscarriages, birth defects, and cancer.

Clean up of the site is still reportedly underway.

Last week a truck driver had an accident and spilled half a ton of contaminated soil on a public roadway because he was 'distracted by an electronic device.'

Canku family holiday gathering in Florida

Retired Rev. Clifford Canku visited his sister Catherine Whitmier, and husband Kenneth, during the Christmas holiday.

He also visited his niece Tammy Whitmier and her husband Bary.

They all live in Lauderhill, Florida.

Clifford warmed up every day by sitting outdoors in the patio area.

Everyone had a fun time!

Open letter to the Oyate

I would like to apologize to former Tribal Chairman Andrew Grey Sr. for making disrespectful comments about his education level. It was disrespectful and I am sorry. I never should have spoken like that out of anger.

I was overwhelmed myself in my own job at the time. I was feeling under educated and instead of asking for more help, I resorted to anger.

I was so wrong to say something like that about anyone and trying to insult a leader who was actually trying to help me get my own job done.

The former Tribal Chairman tried to help me resolve the differences I had with other staff. He did the right thing.

Education is important, but being there for the employees was the best of what he did. I should have listened to Myrna's side too. I should have been more open to the Tribe's side.

I was full of false sense of pride and I wish I could have kept my mouth shut.

Being a Tribal leader and staying up to date on issues doesn't mean that all Tribal leaders need a Phd to do that.

Many of our Tribal leaders in the 1800s knew more about true intentions of the impeding invasion of our lands without any college education.

We choose our leaders based upon the type of person they are.

I understand that. I vote that way too.

We do not have inherited leadership anymore.

I am still learning my own place.

Like I said before, I will not run for office anymore and I want to stay out of Tribal politics.

My past words seem to keep rearing up against me. I must move on from the angry person of the past and become the best person I can be for my children.

I would also like to apologize to Myrna German for all the trouble we went through in the past.

We all need to move forward and in a positive way too. I do not want the FBI to be investigating here.

I hope everyone has a good year.

I really do not want to hear about how some Tribal employees are using their job to take something from the Tribe for their own benefit. It angers me. I won't lie about that.

I hope our leaders address these matters in the best way they can for the best of the Tribe when it does happen.

As a member of the Tribe, I want to hear more positive things than negative.

I am still learning my Dakota language and songs.

I am not General Custer reborn, that guy seemed like an asshole.

I also learned that I should have used an eagle feather because I have not earned the right to speak and asked permission to speak about anything first. I am sorry.

Lisa Ann LaBelle.

Open letter to the Oyate

Our Oceti Sakowin prisoners in Sioux Falls say wopida tanka to Geri Opsal and the United Veterans Association, Barb Ryan, Myrna German Thompson, all of the Sisitunwan Wahetunwan people, the wood cutters, and wood haulers, for making sure we have firewood for our inipi ceremonies.

Our prisoners rely on our inipi ceremonies to keep us in balance with all of life.

This act of generosity will never be forgotten.

Rollin Ryan and Madrid "Bam Bam" Robers always made sure we had plenty of traditional support for our sacred areas, meetings, gatherings, and cultural events.

Florence Seaboy was an important woman to the whole spirit of everything that moved inside our prison facilities. This woman stood proudly beside all of our drums and gave us her perfect voice of wicaglata every time. No wicalata has been able to outrank her.

George Blue Bird, Sioux Falls, SD.

Open letter to the Oyate

"Happy New Year"

Yea! … I wish you the very

best in all that your heart desires,

"Me" … I'm just thankful to be alive

and have a special place in your heart,

2017 most definitely left a good

impression, I can admit that …

you just be ready for all the

wonderful things coming your way,

for real … thank you for believing in me

and giving me a reason to smile and

feel important …

that's just me being modest,

your influence has encouraged me

to follow my dreams…

you've opened my eyes and introduced

me to another part of your world

pulling me near …

and for that … I wish you

a successful "Happy New Year."

By Trinity L. Thompson

E-ternal Entertainment

Jan. 1st, 2018.

Prayer for the people

By Barb Kirk

January 12, 2018

Addiction is on my mind. I want to share for encouragement to users who struggle everyday.

We all know that there is no opportunity in abusing legal and illegal drugs.

Even though we know there is no chance for opportunity in a life to be productive. Use still continues.

We know the legal consequences of illegal drugs but don't care.

Is it the drug that affects the brain and influences the user NOT use common sense, instead that selfish need to feel good kicks in.

The brain is now programed to using.

However, deep down in our soul/being we feel and know it's a road to nowhere.

We become depressed and start hating everything that is wrong with other people. If only they change then I could change.

THE BIG LIE.

However, the REALITY is change is hard for the addict, be it meth, pot, alcohol, pills, it's very, very hard.

A person has to decide how hard they want to stop using and recover from nothingness.

To begin feeling self.

I want to stop, I want to work, I want my children to love me again, I want someone to love in my life.

These are normal living behaviors.

Addicts don't have that.

To be able to gather together with family and friends without everyone being wasted on something. Be it a good brew, joint, meth, or pills.

Choose to stop! One Day at a Time.

I send out love and hope to those who are struggling everyday with addiction.

May the God of my ancestors bless you with the strength, power and resilience to walk on this earth in a sacred productive manner.

Amen.

Poem: You are Loved and Not Alone

By Harry O. Renville

Psalm 37:39-40, Acts 17:30-31, Romans 6:1-11, 1Corinthians 15:1-4, Ephesians 2:8-9, Titus 3:4-7, 1John 1:7-10

But the salvation of the righteous is from the Lord; He is their strength in the time of trouble. And the Lord shall help them and deliver them; He shall deliver them from the wicked, and save them, because they trust in Him. ???

My young friends, should a time come when you feel hopeless and just don't know where to turn; turn to HIM who has always, and will always love you, whoever you are and whatever you've done.

If you seek Christ with all of your heart, He will hear your cry, He will hear your prayers; for He sees all, knows all, and loves us all.

Please, just never give up. Psalm 28:6-7

You are Loved and Not Alone

Lord, thank You for all Your blessings, even those we cannot see,

And for the gifts I can't do without; which I have received from Thee;

May Your Spirit comfort all those whose hearts have been filled with doubt,

That they'll now truly see that there is a much better way out.

Exodus 4:11-12, Job 36-41, Ephesians 5:20, James 1:17

If You were my guide, strength and shield, Lord, what good could I do?

And without the hope of salvation, I'd still feel hopeless too;

Now may those who do feel unloved, hear Your still small voice today,

And as always, My Father, through the name of Jesus I pray. Amen.

1Kings 19:11-12, Psalm 16:1-2, John 14:6-14, Colossians 1:27

God knows our past, present and what's in store for you and me,

And even though God truly does love all of humanity;

When bad things happen, He gets blamed, and we may all ask why,

Well we'll have all the answers when Christ reappears in the sky.

Acts 1:9-11, 1Theselonians 4:13-18

Now we have an enemy who's set on leading us astray,

It's because of him that evil is in the world today;

I was once in his clutches, when those addictions still had me,

But today, I live for Christ and from the world He has set me free.

Genesis 4:7, John 17:6-19, 1Corinthians 10:19-20, 2Corinthians 5:15-17, 2 Corinthians 11:12-15, 2Theselonians 2:3-12, 2Timothy 3:13

But evil men and imposters will grow worse and worse, deceiving and being deceived???

You are Loved and Not Alone

With the wicked one roaming the Earth, we must all beware,

But with Christ in believers' hearts, we'll allude the tempter's snare;

He's the one to be blamed when bad things happen in this world,

Until Christ does return, darts of wickedness will be hurled.

Ephesians 6:10-18, 1John 4:4

Some of you may have heard of Jesus when you were still a youth,

And I know some of you eagerly accepted the truth;

Well He still loves you, and there's still time to return, my young friends

But for many, it will be too late when this evil age ends.

Ezekial 18:32, Isaiah 45:22-24

I believe I've been called to teach, warn and comfort the unlearned out there,

So the truth as I've come to know it, with others, I now share;

And there are young souls who just need an encouraging word,

I Love You, may be three words some of them have never heard.

Proverbs 24:11-12, Philippians 2:3-4, 1Theselonians 5:14, James 5:19-20

Should I be called home before you have received Christ too?

Some glorious day, if it's the Lord's will, I'll be seeing you;

Please do make the right choice before Christ returns to take us away,

For most assuredly, it will be too late someday.

Isaiah 11:6-9, John 1:11-12, John 14:1-4, Romans 13:11-12, Hebrews 10:24-25, Revelations 21:1-17

A little while longer and the world will see Me no more, but you will see me. Because I live, you will live also. -John 14:19

Because YOU live, I can face tomorrow; Because YOU live, all fear is gone; Because I know, YOU hold the future, now life is worth living, just because YOU live.

You are Loved and Not Alone.

Reminder: Small business assistance available

Carla Burns, Business Consultant with the Aberdeen Small Business Development Center, and Certified Marketplace Navigator with the Affordable Care Act will be in Webster on Thursday, January 18, 2018 beginning at 9:00 am. She will be working at the GROW South Dakota NEW Webster Regional office, 14 West 7th Avenue (immediately behind Cornwell Drug) in Webster from 9:00 am until noon. Please note this permanent change of address.

At 1:00 pm Carla will be in Sisseton working in office space provided by GROW South Dakota also known as NESDCAP, located at 104 Ash St. E. in Sisseton.

Interested persons are encouraged to call Carla at (605) 626-2565 to make an appointment for Thursday, January 18, 2018 for either the business assistance or the health insurance.

Carla is available to work with individuals interested in starting a new business or improving the operations of their existing business. Her management consulting services cover start-up issues, business planning, marketing and financial projections to mention a few areas. This is a free and confidential service.

Also, Carla can meet with individuals, employers and employees to discuss and apply for health insurance through the Affordable Care Act Marketplace.

It is best for clients to call ahead and make an appointment. Carla can be reached at (605) 626-2565 in Aberdeen.

If clients are unable to meet with Carla on this day, they are still encouraged to call her to arrange another time. SBDC is hosted by GROW South Dakota and SBDC and GROW South Dakota are Equal Opportunity Organizations.

As a Certified Navigator, Carla offers confidential services free of charge to individual consumers, and families in South Dakota. Navigators provide fair, impartial, and accurate information about the full range of healthcare coverage options that are available through the Exchange which will help consumers to make informed decisions during the health plan selection process.

Sisseton 2018 Winter Show

As temperatures take a dip on the thermometer, warm up at the 2018 Sisseton Winter Show. This year's event will be held Jan. 19-20 at the Sisseton High School Practice Facility and will include a variety of vendors, entertainment, educational programs, legislative cracker barrel, children's activities, food and fun for the entire family.

All events are open to the public, and no admission will be charged. The hours are slightly different than years past. Everyone is encouraged to follow the signs when entering the high school parking lot on Friday as to not disrupt school activities. On Friday, Jan. 19 the doors of the Practice Facility will be open from 11:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. Be sure to use the north doors to the facility and not other school entrances. The hours for Saturday, Jan. 20 will be 9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Stage Entertainment

More than 60 exhibitors will be on display around the Practice Facility gymnasium. While browsing through the various booths and displays, Winter Show visitors will be treated to entertainment and educational programs on the stage in the northwest corner of the gym. Entertainment and programs are sponsored by Dacotah Bank and Coteau des Prairies Health Care System.

The stage schedule will be as follows:

Friday, January 19

12:00 noon: Pasture and Grass Land Range Management Presentation by Peter Bauman

1:00 p.m.: Coffee 101 with T.J. Just

1:30 p.m.: Reuse and Refurbish Presentation

2:30 p.m.: Safety Tips for Winter with Brett Hanson

3:30 p.m.: Rodeo Demonstration presented by the Sisseton Wahpeton College Rodeo Team

4:30 p.m. Starr Chief Eagle, hoop dance performer from western South Dakota, sponsored by Sisseton Arts Council

5:30 p.m.: Jeffrey Salveson Magician/Comedian from Fargo, ND

Saturday, January 20

9:30 a.m.: Cooking Demonstration by Tracey Sing, owner of Hickory Street Kitchen and Cocktails

10:00 a.m.: Kids' "Show Us Your Talent" Contest finalists will perform. Winners' prizes provided by Hannasch Seed of Sisseton.

11:00 a.m.: Animal Encounter, up close and personal with animals from the Bramble Park Zoo in Watertown, SD

12:00 p.m.: Pie Auction to raise funds for the new Roberts County 4-H Community Center

1:00 p.m.: Animal Encounter returns to the stage for Part 2

1:45 p.m.: Announcement of Door Prize Winners

(Note: All scheduled entertainment and educational programs may be subject to change.)

Lunch Stand

Roberts County 4-Hers will be serving coffee, beverages, donuts, cookies and bars as well as lunch items during the Winter Show. Proceeds will go to support 4-H activities in the county.

Community Transit Rides

Community Transit will provide rides to and from the Winter Show on Friday (within Sisseton city limits only). Call 698-7511 to reserve a ride that day. Roberts County National Bank is sponsoring the service so there will be no charge for individuals transported to and from the event by Community Transit.

Kids' Play Land

On Friday, Jan. 19 from 3:00-6:00 p.m., children can enjoy a special Kids Play Land sponsored by Fisher Seeds. This year's theme is "Candy Land."

Free 4-H Pancake Feed

The annual 4-H Pancake Feed will once again be provided FREE thanks to the support of Venture Communications Cooperative. Roberts County 4-H leaders and members will be cooking and serving pancakes and sausages in the SHS cafeteria from 5:00 - 7:00 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 19. Freewill donations for 4-H activities in the county will be accepted.

Legislative Crackerbarrel

Legislators from Dist. 1 will be available on Saturday, Jan. 20 at 9:00 a.m. for a "crackerbarrel session" in the concourse area of Ben Reifel Gymnasium.

Pie Auction

There will be a pie auction on Saturday, Jan. 20 at 12:00 noon sponsored by the Roberts County 4-Hers. Proceeds from the auction will go toward the Roberts County 4-H Community Center.

This two-day event, sponsored by the Sisseton Area Chamber of Commerce and the Glacial Lakes 4-H Rodeo Club. For more information on any of these activities, call 605-698-7261 or email sissetonwintershow@gmail.com.

SWST weather closing policy

Sisseton-Wahpeton Tribal members are asked to please contact Tribal Law Enforcement at 698-7661 in the event of an emergency, and to be as specific as possible concerning the nature of the problem.

Tribal officials ask that anyone away from home during a storm, if you find shelter, please notify Tribal Law Enforcement (605-698-7661) that you are safe. That could prevent rescue workers from endangering themselves out looking for you.

The public is asked to plan ahead when the forecast calls for a possible winter storm. This includes checking to make sure there is ample heating fuel, food, and drinking water. For those with serious medical conditions, be certain there is ample medication on hand.

In some cases, dialysis patients and others with acute health problems should contact Sisseton IHS about staying with family or friends close to the health care center. Telephone number is 698-7606.

Tribal office business hours

on winter storm days

Closing of Tiospa Zina Tribal School and Sisseton Public Schools will be taken into consideration when making a final decision to close Tribal offices, but they are no longer the determining factor.

The decision to close Tribal offices due to weather will remain at the discretion of the Tribal Executives. In the event of a closing, the announcement will be made on Tribal radio station KXSW, and and tv stations KELO and KSFY.

Above all, employees are asked to please use their best judgment when traveling in winter weather and avoid traveling during winter storms except in emergencies. (And then, please let others in your family, or friends, and Tribal Law Enforcement, know your plans.)

If possible, everyone is asked to please check on your elderly family members and friends during such times.

SWO Head Start closings policy (updated)

School will be closed when the temperature is -25 degrees or colder, with or without windchill. Please check KELOland regularly or the KELOland closeline online. You will only receive our emergency notifications if your phone number is up-to-date and working.

Hope for raising a kinder generation

By Sonia J. Magat, D.O., Ph.D.

Around the beginning of the New Year, many individuals tend to make resolutions for "bettering themselves."

There is a desire to examine oneself and for some, possibly form stronger social bonds and closer relationships.

Research has shown that individuals with stronger social bonds live longer.

The last year, 2017, showed an increase in public anger among men and women due to problems with racism, violence and abuse or harassment.

Girls and women were encouraged to be strong and fierce, showing "righteous anger" as it was called.

However, boys and men did not receive commensurate encouragement. In the present culture, there seems to be no desire to promote kindness and empathy.

"Too much personal distress will cause individuals to avoid rather than engage," according to author Lydia Denworth (Scientific American, December, 2017), "Overcoming distress is essential to strengthen resilience."

Empathy is an inborn trait, but the expression of empathy is diminishing due to rapid changes in our society.

About 40% of children lose empathy by the time they reach college age as shown by study on 14,000 students over a 30-year period at the University of Michigan.

There is reduction in the quality of human interactions below that which is necessary to develop capacity for compassion. Children are spending more time with computers, cell phones, video games and less time interacting "face to face" with others.

What conditions will allow empathy to grow and not wither?

There is still hope for the children in our era.

Parents should recognize that children, regardless of gender, have the inner trait, empathy, that needs to be promoted and preserved.

All children, girls and boys should be given the permission to express their emotions without shame. Allow them to be sad, afraid, hurt or affectionate.

At the same time help them to sustain a feeling of kindness and compassion for all, without confusion about racial and gender inequalities.

This is one way we can foster empathy at this time when our culture needed it most.

There is still hope for a kinder and compassionate new generation of children.

(Editor's note: We are privileged and glad to continue receiving articles from Dr. Magat, even after her retirement from the Tribe's Early Childhood Intervention Program.)

Lower Brule chairman urges lawmakers to expand

Wise Winter weather tips for your family yard

When Old Man Winter Comes calling, homeowners need to keep everyone in the family—including your pets – safe. Follow these wise winter weather tips from the Outdoor Power Equipment Institute (OPEI) and TurfMutt.

Bring Pets Inside – Dogs and cats should be kept inside during cold weather months. Wipe their paws and bellies after they've been outside, and check for ice accumulation between paw pads. If you're using a de-icing agent, remove that salt and other agents, too.

Pick up Debris – Before it snows, remove debris and household items from your family yard. Doormats, hoses, toys and sticks can hide under a layer of snow that could harm your snowthrower, family or pets.

Clear a Path – Your snowthrower is a convenient way to clear your driveway and sidewalks. It also gives your pet a path to their bathroom area.

Ventilate Portable Generators – If a winter storm knocks out your power, a generator can be a life-saver if used properly. Place the generator outside and away from windows, doors and vents that could allow carbon monoxide to come indoors.

Trim Trees Carefully – When using a chainsaw, stand with your weight on both feet, adjust your stance so you are angled away from the blade and hold the chainsaw with both hands.

Watch Where You Throw—Keep kids and pets away from the equipment, and never put your hand in the chute or auger to clear a blockage. Turn the machine off and always use a clean-out tool.

For more information, go to savelivinglandscapes.com

Bills to combat Human Trafficking signed into law

These bills "will aid in the ongoing battle against human trafficking."

Washington, DC – Jan. 8, 2018 – U.S. Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.), chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, issued the following statement after the president signed his bipartisan legislation to combat human trafficking, the No Human Trafficking on Our Roads Act (S. 1532), and the Combatting Human Trafficking in Commercial Vehicles Act (S. 1536), of which he was a cosponsor.

"Now that the No Human Trafficking on Our Roads Act and the Combating Human Trafficking in Commercial Vehicles Act have been signed into law, they will aid in the ongoing battle against human trafficking," said Thune.

S. 1532 and S. 1536 would (respectively):

· Disqualify individuals from operating a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) for their lifetime if they used a CMV to commit a felony involving human trafficking.

· Designate a human trafficking prevention coordinator at the U.S. Department of Transportation and would increase outreach, education, and reporting efforts at the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.

Bill to hold websites like Backpage.com accountable for Sex Trafficking

Legislation has enough support to pass Senate

Washington, DC – Jan. 11, 2018 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced that her bipartisan bill to crack down on websites like Backpage.com that knowingly facilitate sex trafficking has exceeded 60 cosponsors, all but assuring passage if it is brought up for a vote in the U.S. Senate. She called on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to hold a vote on the bill on the Senate floor without delay so Congress can better prevent trafficking and protect victims.

Today is Human Trafficking Awareness Day, recognized nationally every year to bring awareness that the crime of human trafficking is an urgent problem in need of solutions.

Heitkamp helped write and introduce Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act (SESTA) with U.S. Senators Rob Portman (R-OH), Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), John McCain (R-AZ), Claire McCaskill (D-MO), and John Cornyn (R-TX). The narrowly crafted legislation, which now has 65 cosponsors, would clarify that Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act does not protect websites that knowingly – as Backpage.com did – facilitate online sex trafficking, therefore allowing victims to seek justice.

The bill follows a two year long investigation by the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs' Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, on which Heitkamp serves, into ads placed on Backpage.com of victims of sex trafficking, including in North Dakota. As part of the investigation, the Subcommittee held multiple hearings on Backpage.com which Heitkamp played a key role in. In January 2017, the Subcommittee released its report which found that Backpage.com deliberately crafted loopholes that enabled trafficking on its site – particularly of children. Heitkamp's bill was introduced in response to the investigation.

"Our bipartisan bill now has enough support to pass the U.S. Senate – a huge feat especially during these partisan times -- and I urge Majority Leader McConnell to bring it up for a vote without delay so that we can crack down on sex traffickers and get justice for victims," Heitkamp said. "Our investigation uncovered that a company permitted and facilitated some of the most heinous crimes on its site at the expense of some of the most vulnerable children. Owners of websites like Backpage.com, who make money as their platforms are knowingly exploiting children must be held accountable and stopped. And that's why we took action with this bill to prevent children from being trafficked online – and that should be a goal all of us can get behind. This bill would clarify the law so cowardly criminals are no longer shielded from the consequences of their actions. The stories of women and children, including in North Dakota, being trafficked online are horrific – and our bill would help stop it from happening. The Senate needs to bring it up for a vote now."

The legislation passed unanimously out of the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation last November. In September, Heitkamp joined members of the Committee for a hearing to consider the legislation. At the hearing, Heitkamp sat alongside Cindy McCain, an international leader in the global fight against human trafficking, to underscore to her Senate colleagues that this legislation is necessary to immediately provide victims an avenue to seek justice for their exploitation – and make sure that companies will be held liable to the fullest extent of the law for profiting from this form of modern-day slavery.

"A society that tolerates human trafficking is no society at all," said Cindy McCain, global anti- human trafficking leader. "We must do everything we can to stop this evil crime and protect our most vulnerable citizens. When websites like Backpage.com can facilitate trafficking with impunity, it's clear the law must be changed to hold them accountable. For years, I've been working with Senator Heitkamp to combat human trafficking and bring perpetrators to justice, and the bipartisan Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act now has a real chance of passing the Senate because of all the support behind it. Inaction is not an option on an issue as important as the safety of our children and those who are victimized by these horrible crimes."

"Human trafficking is a form of modern day slavery, and it is a criminal industry that is growing in North Dakota," said Christina Sambor, FUSE Program Manager at Youth Works in Bismarck. "We need a concerted, coordinated effort to stop these heinous crimes, and we need stronger laws to bring criminals to justice. In North Dakota, Backpage.com has been a way for traffickers to sell women and children for sex. Senator Heitkamp's bipartisan bill would help give victims of trafficking on websites like Backpage.com a chance to see justice and prevent these crimes in the first place. We support her long fought efforts to toughen laws and finally end the pain and heartbreak that human trafficking causes in our communities."

Heitkamp helped negotiate with Republican and Democratic members of the Senate, anti-trafficking advocates, and tech companies to make critical clarifications to the bill to gain the support of additional senators and the Internet Association – a trade association that includes Google, Twitter, Facebook, and many of the other major U.S. tech companies. Additionally, many technology companies, like IBM, Oracle, and Hewlett-Packard announced their support for the bill. It's also endorsed by the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children and other anti-trafficking advocates and law enforcement organizations.

The Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act would make sure websites would no longer be able to exploit a loophole in the Communications Decency Act that has allowed them to serve as a platform for sex trafficking crimes. Specifically, the bill would:

· Allow victims of sex trafficking to seek justice against websites that knowingly or recklessly facilitated the crimes against them.

· Eliminate federal liability protections for websites that assist, support, or facilitate a violation of federal sex trafficking laws.

· Enable state law enforcement officials, not just the federal Department of Justice, to take action against individuals or businesses that violate federal sex trafficking laws.

Statement on VA rule change to begin reimbursing Veterans for emergency care

Washington, DC – Jan. 11, 2018 – U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.), a member of the Senate Veterans' Affairs Committee, today made a statement after the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) announced it has revised its regulations related to payment or reimbursement to veterans who have had to seek emergency care at a non-VA facility.

"After seven years of an improper rule being on the books and thousands of veterans being denied reimbursement by the VA, this announcement is a significant step in the right direction," said Rounds. "The majority of the veterans impacted by this rule change are elderly veterans, many of whom live on a fixed income and have limited resources to pay their medical bills. These men and women have made incredible sacrifices for our country, and I'm glad the VA has taken action to fulfill its legal obligation to cover their emergency care costs. We will continue to review the revised rule to make certain the VA is acting in the best interest of our veterans."

This rule change complies with the Emergency Care Fairness Act (ECFA), which was enacted in 2010 and directs the VA to cover veterans with private health insurance when that insurance doesn't cover the full amount of non-VA emergency care. Previously, the VA had not been paying these costs despite its legal obligation to do so, denying hundreds of thousands of veterans' claims. The new rule directs the VA to pay claims submitted on or after April 8, 2016, which is the date that the U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims reversed a Board of Veterans' Appeals decision in Staab v. McDonald.

Rounds has been working to get the VA to comply with its legal obligation to pay for these costs for over a year. During a June 2017 Senate Veterans' Affairs Committee hearing, VA Secretary David Shulkin told Rounds of the VA's decision to withdraw its appeal and begin writing rules to cover these costs. The rules released yesterday are a result of that announcement.

Why are American Indians dying young?

By Jennifer Abbasi

JAMA – Jan. 9, 2018 – A 2017 report funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) painted a grim picture of early deaths among American Indians. The analysis, published in The Lancet, found that while premature mortality rates decreased in blacks, Hispanics, and Asians and Pacific Islanders between 1999 and 2014, the rates increased among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) and whites during the same time period. Between 2011 and 2014, AI/ANs had the highest premature mortality rates in the United States, driven mainly by accidental deaths—primarily drug overdoses—chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, and suicide.

The largest reported mortality increases were in young people. Among 25-year-old AI/ANs, mortality increased 2.7% annually for men and 5% annually for women between 1999 and 2014.

"Increases in premature mortality of this magnitude have rarely been observed in the US," NCI investigator Meredith S. Shiels, PhD, told JAMA.

But experts say the real picture could be even worse for the 5.2 million people in the United States who identify as AI/AN. Their deaths are notoriously underreported due to racial misclassification on death certificates. An astounding 40% of AI/ANs who die are listed as a different race—usually white—on their death certificates by funeral home directors, according to a 2016 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Shiels and her coauthors estimated AI/AN mortality based on death certificates from Indian Health Service (IHS) regions known as Contract Health Services Delivery Areas (CHSDAs), where racial misclassification tends to be lower. But even here, around 20% of AI/ANs are still misclassified as other races on their death certificates. By comparison, only 3% of Hispanics and Asians and Pacific Islanders and almost no whites or blacks are racially misclassified on death certificates, according to the CDC.

"What this basically translates to is an underestimation of mortality for the American Indian population," said Elizabeth Arias, PhD, director of the US Life Table Program at the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

Public health experts say a more accurate reckoning of AI/AN deaths and their causes could help policy makers, health care practitioners, and native communities target drivers of excess mortality.

"[If we] have reliable data, we really can begin to attack these problems from a prevention perspective," said Allison Barlow, PhD, director of the Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health.

Trouble With the Data

There is a way to get a more complete picture of AI/AN deaths. Linking death certificate data to IHS registration records reduces racial misclassification, especially when analyses are also limited to CHSDA counties.

In 2014, in a landmark supplemental issue of the American Journal of Public Health (AJPH) devoted to AI/AN mortality, researchers at the CDC, the IHS, and the New Mexico Department of Health demonstrated that linking these 2 data sources increased the reported all-cause death rate of American Indians in CHSDA counties by 17.3%. The linked data were used to create an AI/AN mortality database (AMD), which currently spans 1990 through 2009 and is maintained by the CDC Division of Cancer Prevention and Control.

The method, though an improvement, has its limitations. American Indians who weren't registered with IHS and were racially misclassified on their death certificates aren't included in the database. And restricting to CHSDA counties limits the data pool, excluding about 35% of the American Indian population. Urban American Indians are likely underrepresented in the AMD.

"It's the price that we pay for trying to get more accurate information," said David Espey, MD, a coauthor of the 2014 report and medical officer for tribal affairs at the CDC's National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. "At least up to this point, it's the most efficient and workable solution to addressing the problem of misclassification."

Espey is working to update the AMD annually starting with 2010 records. Bringing the database into the present day and keeping it current will take money. The Division of Cancer Prevention and Control and the IHS Division of Epidemiology and Disease Prevention must pay the NCHS to link the National Death Index data to the IHS registration records, which cost almost $800?000 last time around.

Espey believes it's well worth the expense. Tribes and tribal organizations frequently cite findings based on AMD data in grant applications, while funders like the CDC have developed grants addressing disparities described using the database. Shortly after the release of the AJPH supplement, for example, the CDC announced Good Health and Wellness in Indian Country, a chronic disease prevention program. The 5-year, $16 million-per-year program is the CDC's largest ever single investment in Indian Country.

"Mortality data are a key tool for us to address health disparities," Espey said. "[T]he longer [the data] recede into the past, the less useful they are for decision making and resource allocation."

A Potent Stew

While the AI/AN data included in The Lancet report may be incomplete, experts say the health and mortality disparities these groups face are unmistakable.

Using the AMD, Arias reported that between 2007-2009, AI/ANs in CHSDA counties had a life expectancy at birth that was almost 10 years lower than Hispanics and about 7 years lower than non-Hispanic whites.

"Based on what we've seen using the best quality data that we've been able to produce, the mortality and health profile for that population is very poor in comparison to other groups in the US," Arias said.

Some of the most startling disparities that emerged from analyses of the AMD data were for alcohol- and diabetes-related deaths, chronic liver disease deaths, infant and pediatric mortality, suicide, and unintentional injuries including drug overdoses.

Suicide strikes particularly early on reservations. "The demographics for suicide are extremely different in American Indian communities compared to other ethnic groups," Barlow said. "The deaths really concentrate in [the] 15- to 25-year-old range and even up to 35-years-old, whereas in the general US population suicide is more often a significant issue in middle age and late age." Between 1999 and 2014 suicides among AI/ANs increased 89% in women and 38% in men, according to the CDC.

Although alarming, these patterns aren't surprising, Barlow said, considering the grinding poverty, poor schools, high rates of teen pregnancy, and almost nonexistent job opportunities that many young people on tribal lands face.

A study published in 2016 by researchers in the Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) found that AI/AN children up to 17 years old have significantly more adverse childhood experiences than their white counterparts, leading to more school problems, grade failures, and greater need for medication and counseling. Another study found that in 2009 to 2012, annual heroin and OxyContin use among American Indian adolescents living on or near reservations was 25% to 229% higher than the national averages.

Social determinants are a key driver of excess mortality in AI/ANs, often leading to behavioral health issues such as depression and substance use disorder, which frequently result in suicides and unintentional drug overdoses. Alcohol use disorder and intravenous drug use–associated hepatitis B and C are the leading causes of cirrhosis and liver cancer in the AI/AN community, contributing to many cases of chronic liver disease.

"When you add on to the traumas that have come to Native people individually and collectively and cumulatively over the years—trauma has its own sequelae for behavioral health, including depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, and other kinds of issues—it's a potent stew," said Ann Bullock, MD, chief clinical consultant for family medicine and director of the division of diabetes treatment and prevention at the IHS.

Yet despite these challenges—and despite treaties between the US government and American Indian tribes that included the provision of health care in exchange for land—the IHS receives substantially fewer funds per capita compared with other federal health care programs, like the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the Veterans Health Administration. Per capita expenditure for IHS users is $3688 compared with $9523 for the total US population, according to a 2016 report.

Lack of access to care is one reason AI/ANs tend to die at younger ages from chronic diseases like diabetes, cancer, and heart disease than do members of other races, according to Donald Warne, MD, chair of the Department of Public Health at North Dakota State University.

Mental health is particularly strained under the IHS system. "We don't have the numbers of providers that we need to address mental health conditions," Warne said, adding that the closest community mental health centers may be located hours away from reservations. The same is true for inpatient behavioral and mental health facilities, such as drug rehab centers, that are contracted by the IHS.

Community Outreach

Late in 2016, the HHS announced the first National Tribal Behavioral Health Agenda, a tribal-federal blueprint of strategies and priorities for improving the behavioral health of AI/ANs that will in part focus on healing from historical and intergenerational trauma.

Yet last summer, the HHS informed grantees of the national Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program that it would end funding after 3 years instead of 5 years. More than 80 grantees around the country—some of them serving AI/AN communities—learned of the cuts last July. Barlow is studying a teen pregnancy prevention intervention in the White Mountain Apache Tribe in Arizona. Calling the funding withdrawal a "gut punch," she said the decision "annihilates our ability to prove outcomes" of a promising program that could help break the cycle of poverty on reservations.

There are bright spots, though. Barlow is also working to help reduce suicides in the White Mountain Apache Tribe. She led a team that trained community members to follow up on every suicide attempt reported to a tribal surveillance system.

"They go out and work with the families, provide education in the homes about mental health, and help connect those families to the care that they want to receive," she said. The intervention led to a 38% reduction in suicides in the tribe during a period when national rates were unchanged. Based on the success of the tribal-academic partnership, the National Institutes of Health has funded 3 research hubs in tribal or urban American Indian communities to reduce suicides in AI/AN youth.

Bullock said the IHS is implementing programs to support young parents, so they don't inadvertently transfer the traumas they've experienced to their children. She also pointed out that diabetes-related end-stage renal disease fell 54% among AI/ANs, from 57% in 1996 to 27% in 2013—a much larger decline than in any other racial group—thanks in part to a decades-long IHS effort to prevent and control diabetes and diagnose and closely monitor kidney disease.

"When we look at… the poverty, the despair, the unemployment, the trauma, the food insecurity, which creates not only health problems but mental health problems, … you see a much different picture of people who are actually being resilient in the face of incredible struggle," she said.

First, do no harm: What it takes to manage the IHS

By Mark Trahant

Trahant Reports – Jan. 6, 2018 – What qualifications are needed to manage (and possibly reform?) the Indian health system? It's Indian Country's largest employer with more than 15,000 on the payroll and many, many more people who work in health care for tribes, non-profits and other related agencies. The IHS budget is $6.1 billion. Yet it's also the least funded national health care delivery system, operating in a political atmosphere where critics ask, why can't it do more?

The Wall Street Journal published a story last week that raised questions about Robert Weaver, the Trump Administration's nominee to head the Indian Health Service. The Journal challenged Weaver's history at St. John's Regional Medical Center in Joplin, Mo., from 1997 to 2006. However it quoted Jennifer Talhelm, an HHS representative, saying "any suggestion Mr. Weaver is unqualified to run IHS is a pure act of character assassination."

Weaver is a member of the Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma.

A few facts: Weaver will be the least educated director of the Indian Health Service ever. If confirmed, Weaver will the tenth permanent director. All but one prior to Weaver have been physicians, most with multiple degrees in public health, science, and health administration. One former director, Robert McSwain, was not a medical doctor, but he was a longtime health manager and holds a Master of Public Administration from the University of Southern California. On his CV, Weaver lists his education at Missouri Southern State University in International Business with an emphasis in Marketing and Accounting; Minor in Spanish; Minor in Vocal Music & Piano. However the Journal reported that he was seeking a degree and did not graduate.

Weaver's background is insurance. In a September 2016 profile in Native Oklahoma magazine, Weaver said, "We have Native Americans who are brilliant — geniuses — at gaming, but where are the Native American geniuses at insurance? It's the second-largest cost we pay other than payroll. Yet it just goes to the wayside." He told the magazine that his business saved the Quapaw Tribe more than $5 million a year.

"I try to be a translator for tribal leaders to understand this convoluted, difficult-to-understand, most of the time full of lies and deception industry, into 'this is what it is. This is what your choices are.' I get it," he told Native Oklahoma.

Perhaps the Indian Health Service should be led by someone with an insurance background. It would surely help if the agency could come up with a better funding model, including a mix of insurance funds (third-party billing in IHS-speak.)

But there are three problems that ought to be clearly addressed through the Senate confirmation process.

First there is the problem of scale. Weaver would jump from managing a $10 million a year small business — one where he can hire and fire at will — to running a $6 billion agency where personnel decisions are made by folks higher in the chain of command at the Department of Health and Human Services or even as a favor to a United States Senator. And firing? Just one such action could take up more time than the three years left in this administration. And that's the easy stuff. The agency's operations are complicated by Congress, law, regulation, tribal relations, the Veterans Administration, Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance.

To his credit, Weaver has been outspoken about the underfunding of the Indian health system. (Question: Will he say so again in his confirmation testimony?) In a paper he wrote a year ago, Weaver said: "Healthcare is a treaty right for all Native Americans. The method of delivering healthcare for Native Americans is the Indian Health Service system established through the Federal Government. The Federal Government allocates funds to the IHS system each fiscal year. This allocation has been and continues to be inadequate to meet the healthcare needs of Native Americans. Currently it is underfunded by thirty billion dollars annually."

That figure of $30 billion would eliminate the funding disparity for Indian health. (The National Congress of American Indians has published a plan to make that so over a decade.)

The second problem is how to articulate the Indian health story. This is a problem of "duality," two competing ideas. On one hand you have some significant health and management problems such as those identified in the Great Plains by The Wall Street Journal. On the other hand you have a system that is innovative and includes models of excellence (such as clinics in the Pacific Northwest or the Alaska Native Medical Center.) One story is told. The other less so. I am convinced that a fully-funded system will only happen when we tell both stories. The narrative of failure is not an incentive to invest more money.

The third problem is the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid. Weaver wrote that the law works for Native Americans but overall it was a failure. "We now see that it did not provide health insurance for the forty million uninsured Americans identified as the target market in 2008, it is not affordable for those who were pulled into the ACA system, and the out of pocket maximums associated with the plan effectively make access to healthcare unattainable," he wrote. The first part of that sentence is factually incorrect. The uninsured rate dropped from 20.5 percent in 2013 to 12.2 percent in 2016, a 40 percent decline. You can argue about the cost of that insurance, but it's complicated because the ACA required minimum standards for insurance, covering such things as women's health. All of the Republican plans are designed to save money by getting rid of those standards.

Of course in the Trump era there's probably not a candidate for any public office who champions the ACA.

But I also don't see any Medicaid experience in Weaver's background and that is an expertise area that is critical. Some of the medical, treatment, and ethical issues are extraordinarily complex. They will require a solid team to help consider all of the alternatives that have life and death consequences. (So, if confirmed, he'll need a lot of help.) Oklahoma is not a Medicaid expansion state, so there would not be a lot of experience in squeezing every dollar from Medicaid by making more people eligible or rethinking the coding of costs. The public insurance of Medicaid (and Medicare) now total $1.05 billion of the IHS budget, but it could be a lot more.

Weaver could use his expertise to help tribes improve insurance for tribal members and employees — and that could boost funding for IHS. Private insurance is now only about $110 million of the agency's revenue.

So what are the qualifications necessary to run the Indian health system? I have a bias. I have met some of the great physicians who ran the agency. I remember Emery Johnson's passion and thoughtfulness about what IHS could be. I'd even argue that IHS has had remarkable leadership since its founding. So the standard, for me, at least, is quite high. There are also two Native women who have run state health agencies — an ideal background for managing the IHS. There is a lot of talent out there.

But the Trump administration likes the idea of shaking up government. And, appointing someone to run the IHS with a very different background, does just that. Perhaps Weaver brings a new way of thinking and managing. Then again we would do well to remember the latin phrase that medical doctors learn early in their training, Primum non nocere. It means: First, do no harm.

*****

Mark Trahant is the Charles R. Johnson Endowed Professor of Journalism at the University of North Dakota. He is an independent journalist and a member of The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes. On Twitter @TrahantReports

I have diabetes; I'm NOT a diabetic

By Jill Kruse

When I was in my third year of medical school, I learned one of my most important lessons. It did not come from a textbook or from a teacher, but from a brief conversation with a patient on hospital rounds.

"How long have you had diabetes?" I asked. It was a simple enough question. Diabetes often progressed with time and the longer it was present, the longer the cumulative damage. I wanted to gauge if his foot infection was a new issue or part of a larger battle that had been going on for months to years.

"Thank you," he said.

I was confused. "Thank you for what?" I asked. That was not the expected answer.

"For asking me how long I had diabetes and not calling me a diabetic," he said.

For all intents and purposes, for me as a third-year medical student, the questions were identical. I did not realize there would be any significance to the phrase I chose.

My patient continued, "Diabetes is something that I have, not who I am. It does not define me. I am so much more than this disease." This gentleman's, my patient's, comment made me pause. When I walked into his room I had a lot of data about him, but no knowledge of him.

He went on to tell me about his life, his family, his prior job. He spoke of all the things that changed after his diagnosis and all the things that stayed the same. He no longer was the "diabetic in room 26", a task that I must complete, he was a person who needed my help. He had a name and a rich history that the medical chart did not record. This quick conversation completely changed how I interacted with him for the rest of his stay in the hospital and every patient I have encountered since.

I have a gentle reminder for you and me, like my gentleman gave me all those years ago: you are not a disease or a chronic illness; you are a person who is looking for help to improve your health. It is easy to let a chronic illness become one's identity and become the only subject discussed at a clinic visit. Remind us that there is so much more to your story, because sometimes we get busy and forget; we are human too.

*****

Dr. Rick Holms wrote this Prairie Doc Perspective for "OnCall®," a weekly program where medical professionals discuss health concerns for the general public. "OnCall®*is produced by the Healing Words Foundation in association with the South Dakota State University Journalism Department. "OnCall®*airs Thursdays on South Dakota Public Broadcasting-Television at 7 p.m. Central, 6 p.m. Mountain. Visit www.oncalltelevision.com

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

ESDS Afterschool program student activities

By Rebecca Dargatz

School Community Director

Enemy Swim Day School Afterschool Program students in 5th and 6th grade have the opportunity to participate in the LifeSkills programming with instructors Sandy Bernard, Liz Anderson, and Dakotah Grant.

The LifeSkills class recently invited the Tribal Police Community Resource Officer to talk with the students regarding alcohol use.

Josh talked about how it effects your body along with what organs are affected by using alcohol.

He gave statistics about alcohol, and shared that 80% of deaths on the SWO Reservation are caused by drinking.

Students were able to use impairment goggles to see how alcohol can affect your reactions.

SWC Mustangs basketball update

By Mike Gonzales

Athletic Director

Head Womens Basketball Coach

Women Over All Record -- 10 wins and 2 losses / Conference Record 3 wins and 0 losses.

The women are averaging over 105 points per game.

Leading Scores for the Women:

Samantha Nunez Freshman from El Paso Texas 31 points per game.

Bryanna Phelps Freshman from El Paso, Texas 21 points per game 9 rebounds.

Emily Cuellar Freshman from El Paso Texas 14 points per game.

Cherlee Collins Freshman Hobbs New Mexico 14 points per game 8 assist.

 

Mens Overall Record 6 wins and 6 losses / Conference Record 3 wins and 0 losses.

Leading Scores for the men / Averaging 103 ppg.

Taye Green 18. 3 ppg.

Carion Washington 16.9 ppg.

Anton Wilkerson 12 ppg.

Johnathan Akharoh 11 ppg.

Most recent Mustangs games were on the home court this past weekend.

Watch for more updates, and photo highlights from John Heminger.

Foundation for Rural Service offering scholarships

The Foundation for Rural Services (FRS) will be awarding numerous scholarships in the year 2017, one in each National Telephone Cooperative Association region and one made available to NTCA's Associate membership. The remaining awards will be distributed proportionate to the number of applications received from each NTCA region.

Venture Communications Cooperative, as your local communications service provider, is pleased to participate in this scholarship program. Should a student from the Venture's service area be selected to receive one of the 30 national scholarships ($2000 each) Venture Communications will make a $500 matching contribution to the scholarship. Preference will be given to individuals expressing an interest to return to work in a rural area following graduation.

Students may also be eligible for four FRS Staurulakis Family scholarships valued at $5,000 each. Students who are majoring in math, science, engineering, or medicine are given preference for the FRS Staurulakis Family Scholarships. Also available to students is the TMS Scholarship for $1500, Everett Kneece Scholarship valued at $7000 and three $500 Alan Cox Memorial Scholarships.

The Foundation for Rural Service (FRS), in cooperation with NTCA-The Rural Broadband Association, seeks to sustain and enhance the quality of life in America by advancing an understanding of rural issues. Through its various programs and initiatives, FRS strongly supports the continuing education of rural youth.

Venture Communications is proud of this effort to promote higher education in rural America.

Scholarship applications may be obtained by visiting www.frs.org or by contacting your local high school counselor. Completed applications should be sent to Venture Communications, PO Box 157, Highmore, SD 57345, postmarked no later than February 14, 2018.

Citizenship, community service scholarships

Venture Communications Cooperative, a Highmore based telecommunications provider, announces the availability of 12--$500 Citizenship and Community Service Scholarships to High School Seniors.

The local telecommunications company will be awarding scholarships throughout the telephone exchanges operated by Venture Communications. "We hope that the scholarships will assist the students in achieving their higher education goals", says Venture Communications General Manager Randy Houdek.

Judging of the applications will be based on local community involvement and citizenship with credit also being given for academics and leadership skills. Only student's whose parents or guardians are members' of Venture Cooperative are eligible for the scholarship program. "The scholarship program takes a high priority with the Venture Communications Board of Directors", says Houdek.

This is the twentieth year for the scholarship program. The scholarship application deadline is March 2, 2018. Applications are available online at venture.coop/why-venture/scholarships.. For more information contact the local high school counselor's office or Venture communications at 852-2224.

Legals

Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate

Department of Transportation

GEOTECHNICAL EXPLORATION PROJECT.

Request for Proposal Notice:

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Department of Transportation herein gives notice that bid proposals will be accepted for the Geotechnical Exploration Project.

Project Information: The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Department of Transportation is seeking proposals for a route length Geotechnical Exploration report with design recommendations.

Statement of Work: For this project the contractor shall be required to supply all materials (with exception given to Government or tribal furnished items), and equipment to complete the project in accordance with the approved BIA plans and Standard Specifications for Construction of Roads and Bridges on Federal Highway Projects, FP-14 with amendments.

Additional Information:

For additional information and plan attachments regarding the project, please contact:

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Department of Transportation

Tel. (605) 698-8355

Tel. (605) 698-8230

Cell (605) 268-1775

E-mail: clifforde@swo-nsn.gov or tonih@swo-nsn.gov

Proposals will be accepted until 3 pm central time Friday, January 26, 2018 at the address above or via email to cliffordE@swo-nsn.gov

3-2tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-18-232-003

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE

OF NAME OF:

ERIN DALE KEOKE, Petitioner.

ORDER AND NOTICE OF

HEARING

     NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from ERIN DALE KEOKE to ERIN DALE KIYUKANPI shall be heard before the Honorable B.J. Jones, Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at 1:30 P.M. on the  30th day of JANUARY, 2018.

Dated this 10th day of January, 2018.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST:

E. Pfeiffer, CLERK OF COURTS

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-18-233-004

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE

HARLOW REED KEOKE, Minor Child,

And concerning:

ERIN KEOKE, Petitioner.

Vs.

GABRIELLE WANNA, Respondent

ORDER AND NOTICE OF

HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from HARLOW REED KEOKE to HARLOW REED KIYUKANPI  shall be heard before the Honorable B.J. Jones, Chief Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at 1:30 P.M. on the  30th day of JANUARY, 2018.

Dated this 10th day of January, 2018.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST:

E. Pfeiffer, CLERK

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 16-058

SWOCSE/ Susan Peters, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ELSIE CAMPBELL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of January, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 15-092

SWOCSE/ Tessa Campbell, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ELSIE CAMPBELL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of January, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of January, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 16-105

SWOCSE/ SD/ David Potts, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ELSIE CAMPBELL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of January, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 13-096

SWOCSE/ Susan Peters, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ERIN CAMPBELL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of January, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-052

SWOCSE/ Elsie Campbell, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ERIN CAMPBELL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of January, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 13-182

SWOCSE/ Tessa Campbell, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ERIN CAMPBELL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of January, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 06-121

SWOCSE/ Melissa Country, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FLOYD CRAWFORD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of January, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 07-051

SWOCSE/ Donna Thompson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FLOYD CRAWFORD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of January, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 07-093

SWOCSE/ Lashannon Tiger, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FLOYD CRAWFORD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of January, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 17-063

SWOCSE/ Jennifer Hassebroek, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CASEY O'RILEY, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Recognize a Foreign Order and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of January, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 18-013

SWOCSE/ Jose Rodriquez, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BRANDON ST. JOHN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of January, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 08-011

SWOCSE/ Bernie Rodriquez, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BRANDON ST. JOHN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of January, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 18-040

SWOCSE/ Korey Finley, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TRACY BRANT, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Paternity and/or Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of January, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 13-012

SWOCSE/ Mary Anderson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BECKY COOPER, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of January, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 00-272

SWOCSE/ Kay Bursheim, PLAINTIFF

VS.

KAREN FARMER, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of January, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 18-010

SWOCSE/ Tina Bernard, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MAYCEE CRAWFORD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of January, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 18-014

SWOCSE/ Maria DeCoteau, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CORRI RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of January, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 10-072

SWOCSE/ Charnelle Gill, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JAMES STRUTZ, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of January, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 09-037

SWOCSE/ Jacqueline Franzen, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ALEX WANNA, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of January, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 03-179

SWOCSE/ Jerilyn Spider, PLAINTIFF

VS.

AARON BIRD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of January, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 15-091

SWOCSE/ Brooke LaBelle, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JEREMY LABATTE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of January, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

 

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following position(s):

Office Manager/Café Manager, Administration Building

Prep Cook, Café Administration Building

Behavioral Health Prevention Specialist, Behavioral Health Department

Closing Date: January 19th, 2018 @ 04:30 PM

Application and job description information can be seen at SWO Human Resources Office or http://www.swo-nsn.gov/contact/employment. Application can be downloaded from "Apply Now" and emailed to ArnoldW@SWO-NSN.GOV or DeniseH@SWO-NSN.GOV. Contact can also be at Arnold Williams 698-8238 or Denise Hill 698-8251 with questions. (Tribal preference will apply).

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

TRIBAL EMPOYMENT RIGHTS OFFICE

JOB DESCRIPTION:

POSITION TITLE: TERO Compliance Officer

LOCATION: TRIBAL EMPLOYMENT RIGHTS OFFICE (TERO)

MAJOR DUTIES: The TERO Compliance Officer has the general authority to enforce compliance with the TERO Ordinance of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate, and any and all supplementary ordinances, and any and all rules, regulations, and/or guidelines promulgated by the TERO Commission within the Lake Traverse Indian Reservation, home of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: 1. Monitors hiring of personnel to ensure compliance with TERO. 2. Enforces Indian preference for contractors and/or applicants. 3. Establishes working relationships with outside agencies to enhance the employment and training of tribal employees and tribal members. 4. Assists in maintaining  kills bank and identifies potential individual's skills/experience and general qualifications. Also develop and implement application procedures. 5. Seeks, schedules, and conducts training for TERO-targeted beneficiaries. Monitors training for effectiveness. 6. Perform compliance checks to insure adherence to the TERO Ordinance. 7. Travel to job sites to verify equitable working conditions for all employees. 8. Shall be the impartial investigating agent responsible for investigating, researching, reporting and documenting any information required to ensure compliance. Gathers, and analyzes factual data for investigations. 9. Attend TERO hearings. Bring actions in Tribal court and other jurisdiction as necessary to carry out the intent of TERO ordinance. 10. Monitors the labor/workforce market to provide information to employers and tribal members. 11. Write, develop and type letters, proposals, brochures, reports, and other items as may be required. 12. Travel to attend meetings and/or training workshops. 13. Other duties as assigned.

DESIRABLE QUALIFICATIONS: o Previous experience in investigations/report writing o Knowledge of tribal government and/or tribal operations, as well as tribal culture o Knowledge of public and private employee training programs and trends o Experienced in the Enforcement of the TERO Ordinance - preferred

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: 1. Preferred Associate's degree in Building Trades or a related area and one to three years' experience in similar field or related area. Two Years of General Work Experience within compliance enforcement or similar occupation may be substituted for the educational requirement (two years of full time experience equals to one year of college). 2. Valid state issued driver's license and/or the ability to obtain a South Dakota or Tribal driver's license. Must be insurable on the Tribe's insurance policy. 3. Proficient in computer applications and operations. (Microsoft Word, Excel). 4. Must be able to communicate effectively in both written and verbal forms. Experience in public speaking, experience in presentations on controversial or complex topics to top management, public groups and/or boards of Commissioners and Tribal Council. 5. Must have understanding of TERO Ordinance and the application to situations that may arise. 6. Must be knowledgeable of the Tribal Employment Rights Ordinance, Sisseton Wahpeton Tribe administrative techniques and methodology. 7. All applicants are subject to the Tribe's Drug and Alcohol Free Work Place Policy including pre-employment screening.

WORKING CONDITIONS:

Work is to be performed at the TERO Office and in the Field, Agency Village, SD 57262. Work weeks are Monday to Friday, 8 hours per day, starting at 8:00 AM thru 4:30 PM.

The TERO Office is frequently exposed t o a regular flow of people.

o   Traveling to all segments of the Lake Traverse Reservation.

SUPERVISION RECEIVED:

The TERO Compliance Officer shall report directly to the TERO Director of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate.

Indian Preference: Preference will be; First, Sisseton Wahpeton members, Second, other federally recognized tribes.

Veteran Preference

Letters of Reference: Three

90 Day Probationary Period:

Wage Dependent on Qualifications and Experience.

Deadline to apply: Friday, Feb. 9, 2018.

 

Sisseton Wahpeton College

…has the following vacancies:

Faculty Member/Men's Basketball Coach:

There is an opening for a Men's Basketball Coach. This position is responsible for planning and directing the recruitment, conditioning, training, and performance of student athletes, along with fiscal program management for the SWC men's basketball program. This position will also teach at least two courses. All faculty members perform instruction-related duties and responsibilities in accordance with the mission statement and policies and procedures of SWC. Preferred requirements are: Master's degree, college coaching experience, and college teaching experience. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118. Position closes at 4:30 p.m. on January 5, 2018.

Dakota Language Apprentice:

There are two openings for Dakota Language Apprentices in the Dakota Studies Program at SWC. This position will be responsible for progressively learning the Dakota language under the mentorship of at least one fluent Dakota language speaker and Dakota Studies Advisors. This position is a grant-funded and requires a one-year contract. Upon completion of this project, the Apprentice must commit to two years as an immersion educator for SWC and/or the SWO. Requirements are: High School Diploma or GED. Preference for enrolled members of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate. A Dakota Language Teaching Certificate or will receive certification by August 2018. Proficient with Microsoft Office, office machinery, and social media. Must have excellent verbal and written communication skills. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118. Positions close at 4:30 p.m. on Friday, January 12, 2018.

Dakota Language Archives and Collections Assistant:

There is an opening for a Dakota Language Archives and Collections Assistant in the Dakota Studies Program at SWC. This position will be primarily responsible for gathering/organizing information and adding information to the Dakota Studies Department Past Perfect Museum software. In addition to data management, this position will be required to assist with Dakota language documentation, working with Elders, fluent speakers, linguists, and other applicable professionals and specialists. Requirements are: High School Diploma or GED. Preference for enrolled members of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate. A Dakota Language Teaching Certificate or will receive certification by August 2018. Must have completed Dakota Language I or higher level within last four years. Proficient with Microsoft Office, office machinery, and social media. Must have excellent verbal and written communication skills. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118. Position closes at 4:30 p.m. on Friday, January 19, 2018.

Dakota Language Learners:

There are five openings full-time Dakota Language Learners in our Dakota Studies Program at SWC. Each of these position is a grant funded position. Upon completion of this project, the Dakota Language Learner will be expected to commit to two years as an immersion educator for SWC and/or SWO. Requirements are: High School Diploma or GED. Preference for enrolled members of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate. Has completed Dakota Language I or higher within the last three years. Proficient with Microsoft Office, office machinery, and social media. Must have excellent verbal and written communication skills. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118. Positions close at 4:30 p.m. on Friday, January 26, 2018.

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Count Department:

Team Member (Full-Time) 3:00am to Finish

Lead Supervisor (Full-Time) 3:00am to Finish

Marketing Department:

VIP Host (2 Full-Time) Rotating

Closing Date: January 19, 2018 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions

Two identifications documents required upon hire

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department 16849 102nd Street SE Hankinson ND 58041 For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment) Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

SLOTS: SLOT TECHNICIAN (1 FULL TIME) (ROTATING SHIFTS). GENERAL FUNCTION: To ensure the effective operation of the slot machines. REQUIREMENTS: High school graduate or GED equivalent. Background in mechanics/electronics, or degree preferred. Preferred 6 months experience as a Slot Technician or similar field. Ability to work any and all shifts, including on-call. Must be able to lift up to 100 lbs. and perform moderate amounts of bending and twisting. Good communication skills. Must be able to obtain a Key Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on January 17, 2018 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

HOTEL: FRONT DESK NIGHT AUDITOR (1 Full-Time) Graveyard Shift. GENERAL FUNCTION: Staffs the front desk to attend to the needs of the guests throughout their stay.

REQUIREMENTS: High school graduate or GED equivalent. Preferred hotel and/or accounting experience or equivalent of three to six months related experience and/or training. Excellent interpersonal skills, both in person and on the telephone. Must obtain Non-Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on January 17, 2018 at 4 pm.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

 
 

 

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