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Volume 50 Issue No. 47

Anpetu Iyamni, Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019

Inside this Edition –

Winter 2019 General Council Thursday and Friday, Dec. 19-20

Tribal Council designates BIA 7 "Cpl. Louis E. Williams Memorial Highway"

Good turnout for Nis'to Inc. "Art Walk"; Offers youth art classes every Saturday

October 2019 Tribal Council proceedings inside this edition

Next week: Report to Akicita on 2019 Veterans Wacipi, with photos from John Heminger Photography

Next week" Report on Trauma Informed Care workshop

Reminder: Deadline for receiving copy is Friday noon

Planting the Seeds of Change at SWO: Growing a Healthier SWO from the Inside Out

By Tribal Chairman Donovan White

Last week, notwithstanding the cowardly social media attacks on my minor children, we experienced a productive week of Tribal Council roundtables. I knew in May, at our Tribal Council's inauguration ceremony, when I swore to protect and uphold our Oyate's Constitution, that my days ahead would be challenging but I did not imagine how rewarding my job would also be. Suffice to say, there is new feeling in the air, on our reservation, that positively embraces a collective yearning to stop the in-fighting and take new steps to reach our potential as the great Sioux Nation that we are. Together, as a united Tribal Council, with your guidance and support, we can, and we will exceed all expectations.

With the honoring of Bataan Death March/POW survivor Corporal Louis E. Williams last week, through the future renaming of Highway BIA 700 in his name, I am reminded that the heaviest weight of military sacrifice is borne by the families left behind. Indeed, it is military families, such as the Williams family, that suffer the most. We must not forget Louis' parents, brothers, sisters and on down the line of current and future relatives who honor us with their holy sacrifice. The next time you see a member of the Williams family and others, I encourage you to take a moment to honor them with a gesture of gratitude, for through them Louis' legacy lives on as does his sacrifice for this country and our tribe.

Much discussion on our reservation has encircled the issue of our for-profit enterprises including how they are or not structured for growth and success. Many of you may be aware of my proposal to restructure our for-profits under a new tribal corporation called a "Section 17." I'm glad to inform you that one of our Planning and Economic Development Director's and newly contracted Sandven Law's top priorities is to make it happen. In short, a Section 17 corporation is a tribal business corporation organized under a federal charter called Section 17 of the Indian Reorganization Act (IRA). Its major advantages include preservation of our SWO for-profit assets, exemption from federal taxes and the ability to issue tax-exempt bonds. This is a necessary undertaking that will have lasting positive impact on our for-profits for current and future generations. Please stay posted as more information will be made available through your Tribal Council Representatives.

Planning is underway for our new Industrial Hemp farming operation. This is an additional vital initiative that I feel you should be kept well informed of. As a first step, we will start making the appropriate preparations to develop SWO's own seed variety and begin developing our internal infrastructure to store our hemp as well as creating an internal capability to manufacture our own products. Our Hemp feral seed research partner is the University of Minnesota and we continue to collaborate with them on developing our own variety. Hemp manufacturing is a multifaceted process and it begins with the providing the right physical structural environment. In the next few months we will using internal resources to purchase and refurbish a building for this purpose.

A key item for future discussion will be managing the abandoned SWO Elderly Village complex. This is yet another example of an old wrong that must be corrected. This poorly planned and executed initiative cost us over 2 million dollars. We must do better by our elders who paved the way so that we can enjoy what we have today on our reservation. I've made it a priority to ensure that future projects like this one are properly vetted and planned for well before they are moved into implementation.

On a personal note, I'd like to share the disappointment and disgust that I feel towards certain members of our tribe who last week dishonorably targeted my minor children in their dirty campaign against me. My children, as are your children, are off-limits in our tribal politics. Last week, my daughters were sent, via Facebook, pornographic images depicting me in a defamed manner. I will take the higher ground when I am personally attacked but when my children are attacked, I will not stand idly by.

I want to inform those who used minors to distribute pornography to my kids that I have initiated an investigation. State and federal law, which directs Facebook and other social media anti-pornographic policies to protect kids, backs my pursuit in seeking justice for my children. I will use all my resources to find and bring those minors and adults behind this travesty to justice. It is time that we revisit how our tribe handles the privacy and protection of our children from obscene individuals and sexual predators in our midst. More to come on this issue.

BIA Highway designated "Corporal Louis E. Williams Memorial Highway"

SWO Tribal Council passed the following resolution last Wednesday to honor the memory of Corporal Louis E. Williams, one of the Tribe's Bataan Death March survivors.

In discussing the resolution, Chairman White commented that Corporal Williams was one of "our akicita" who underwent "one of the most brutal experiences of (World War II)."

He also encouraged "getting back to honoring one another."

And he said that being akicita does not necessary mean someone has served in the military.

He said he wanted politics kept out of these decisions.

TRIBAL COUNCIL RESOLUTION NO. SWO-19-112

Designation of BIA Highway Route 7 as the Corporal Louis E. Williams Memorial Highway.

WHEREAS, The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate is organized under a Constitution and By-laws adopted by the members of the Tribe on August 1-2, 1966, and approved by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs on August 25, 1966, and last amended effective November 15, 2006; and

WHEREAS, The Constitution ARTICLE III, Section 1, states that, the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate shall be governed by a Council, and ARTICLE VII, Section 1, states that, the Council shall have the following powers: (a) to represent the Tribe in all negotiations with Federal, State and local governments; (b) to acquire, own, use, manage, lease and otherwise encumber and to dispose of Tribal property, both real and personal, wherever situated; (d) to make rules governing the relationship of the members of the Tribe, to Tribal property, and to one another as members of the Tribe; (g) to take any action by ordinance, resolution, or otherwise which are reasonably necessary through committees, boards, agents or otherwise, to carry into effect the for-going purposes; (h) to promote public health, education, charity, and such other services as may contribute to the social advancement of the members of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate; (i) adopt resolutions regulating the procedures of the Tribal Council, its officials and committees in the conduct of Tribal Affairs; and

WHEREAS, Louis E. Williams, Cpl. US Army WWII, Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Member, is recognized for his courage and valor and decorated with the American Defense Service Medal with one Bronze Star, Good Conduct Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Theater Service Medal, Philippine Defense Service Medal and Distinguished Unit Badge with Two Oak Leaf Clusters; and

WHEREAS, Corporal Louis E. Williams, US Army WWII Veteran, was captured April 10, 1942 and imprisoned for 3 years 6 months and 9 days at prisoner of war camps Luzon, Philippine Islands and Osaka, Japan with his release date of September 19, 1945; and

WHEREAS, Corporal Louis E. Williams had survived during WWII the Bataan Death March and was posthumously awarded the Prisoner of War Medal which was proudly received by his sons Stuart and Frank Williams; and

WHEREAS, BIA Highway 7 is one of the most traveled highways on the Lake Traverse Reservation, with over 2,400 cars traveling the highway per day creating access to Agency Village, South Dakota; and

WHEREAS, BIA Highway 7 creates access to the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Administration building and the many programs which are designed for the betterment and assistance of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Membership, and economic development of the Lake Traverse Reservation; and

WHEREAS, The Tribal Council of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation does request to the authority of the BIA Area Office Transportation Maintenance department with the assistance of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Department of Transportation for the design, manufacturing and installation of the signage to designate the BIA Highway Route 7 as the Corporal Louis E. Williams Memorial Highway.

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, That the Tribal Council of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation, with of honor and respect for the family of Corporal Louis E. Williams, recognizes the resolve of all our veterans and hold them in very high esteem for their bravery and sacrifices given in the name of our country and flag; and

FURTHER, BE IT RESOLVED, That the Tribal Council of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation hereby designates BIA Highway Route 7 in honor and memory of Corporal Louis Edward Williams for his bravery and valor during WWII; and

FINALLY, BE IT RESOLVED, That the Tribal Council of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation hereby declares the BIA Highway Route 7 as the Corporal Louis E. Williams Memorial Highway.

CERTIFICATION

We, the Undersigned duly elected Tribal Chairman and Tribal Secretary of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Council, do hereby certify that the above resolution was duly adopted by the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Council, which is composed of 10 members (representing a total of 15 Tribal Council weighted votes and two Executive Committee votes for a total of 17 votes) of whom 10 constituting a quorum, were present at a Tribal Council meeting, duly noticed, called, convened and held at the TiWakan Tio Tipi, Agency Village, South Dakota, November 13, 2019, by a vote of 14 for, 3 opposed, 0 abstained, 0 absent from vote, 1 not voting, and that said Resolution has not been rescinded or amended in any way.

Dated this 13th day of November 2019.

Signed by SWO Tribal Chairman Donovan White and SWO Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson.

Council holds roundtable on SWO for-profit businesses

By Shannon White

Sota Assistant Editor

Tribal Council members met last Tuesday, November 12, for a roundtable on the Tribe's for-profit businesses.

Planning Director Michael Roberts invited Kimberly Lowe to join them.

Kimberly is an attorney with Avisen Legal of Minneapolis, a firm specializing in business law.

The Tribe currently has five non-gaming for-profits: Dakota Western Corp., Dakota Crossing, SWO Fuels Inc., Agency Village C-Store and the I-29 Motel.

The Tribe's gaming facilities – Dakota Magic, Dakota Sioux and Dakota Connection – were included in the discussion, which centered on plans to apply for a Section 17 charter.

Chairman Donovan White remarked that Section 17 is ideal because "it separates the politics from business."

The Avisen attorney posed questions to Council, including whether or not they had considered hiring a business manager.

She also asked what their overall goal is for their businesses.

The Tribe is supplementing Dakota Crossing for $100,000-plus every month to keep the doors open.

Ms. Lowe said that grocery stores are not moneymakers, and that the most successful businesses in rural areas are engaged in manufacturing.

She suggested one possibility for Dakota Crossing would be to repurpose the building for a manufacturing business.

Discussion turned to farming; the Chairman has set hemp as one of his key priorities.

The Tribe owns 5,500 acres of crop land.

Kimberly suggested coming up with a sound farm plan to utilize that acreage.

Equipment is often the most expensive part of farming operations, and she estimated a cost of $2-3 million for equipment and storage buildings for farming that amount of land.

Bill LaRoque, Sisseton Wahpeton College Board Chairman, asked how the College might help.

Suggestions were to offer classes in accounting, and business, to support employees.

Ms. Lowe said the bottom line is this:

"What are your goals?"

"Is what you are doing now fulfilling those goals?"

Council talked about what the for-profits provide membership, including "jobs and food."

Kimberly said the Tribe should decide … "do you want jobs, food, or profit?"

Discussion will continue far beyond a roundtable in the council suite.

Tribal Council has set profit-making businesses, ones that do not need ongoing infusions of money to stop bleeding, a top priority.

Tribal Council holds special meeting

By CD Floro

Sota Editor

SWO Tribal Council called a special meeting on Wednesday morning, November 13th.

Stated purpose was to approve contracts for the vacant Tribal Court prosecutor and DNGE management positions.

Council, however, also approved a resolution designating BIA Highway 7 as the "Corporal Louis E. Williams Memorial Highway." See the separate news article.

After discussing the vacant prosecutor post and applicants, Tribal Council in a split vote approved a motion to select June Yankton, of the Spirit Lake Tribe of North Dakota, as SWO Tribal Court prosecutor.

Her start date is December 2nd.

Steven Drewes was selected as Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise (DNGE) CEO pending his obtaining a PMO license and legal review.

Steven has two decades of experience in gaming industry management, most recently as general manager of Grand Casino Mille Lacs & Hinkley in Detroit Lakes, Minnesota.

In a separate motion, Council tasked the new CEO with reviewing the DNGE Career Path Training Program and providing revisions to Tribal Council within the next year.

Purpose is to ensure Tribal member trainees are selected and properly trained before the general manager contracts expire.

The motion came after a discussion of how the management training program has so far been ineffectual in getting Tribal members into top DNGE management positions.

In other motions, Council approved contracts with Robert Mudd as Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel general manager and Michael Starr as Dakota Magic Casino & Resort general manager.

Robert Mudd, with 20 years experience in gaming and tribal business development most recently as Ho-Chunk Nation Executive Business Director, is actually returning to the Lake Traverse Reservation.

He served as DNGE CEO from 2001-2002.

Michael Starr has over 25 years experience in senior level gaming and resort management, including Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino, and the past nine years in Indian gaming.

Most recently, he served as general manager of Soboba Casino, San Jacinto, California.

In other business, Council modified the fiscal year 2020 budget matrix putting travel funds back into the tribal program and/or program budgets.

Those funds had been placed into a separate, consolidated account managed by the budget office.

Levels were, however, set at half of their FY 2019 levels due to the shortfall in funding.

There was discussion about the SWO Café, which is being operated as a Tribal program.

Council discussed the possibility of advertising a request for bids "to farm it out and maybe make a profit."

If that were to happen, Council would like to help the employees find other work.

A motion was made and approved to subsidize the café for $20,000.

There was also a discussion on the need for the Tribe to maintain a contingency fund. According to Chairman White, there is not enough money available to cover a disaster.

Before adjourning, Tribal Council heard from Dr. Sheri Breen, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Minnesota-Morris.

Dr. Breen has been working with the UM researchers on the Tribe's hemp project.

Her specialty is seed sovereignty, and she talked with Council about ways to "gain power … how you control hemp seeds."

The researchers have collected feral seeds on the Lake Traverse Reservation and are cataloging them.

Their study is expected to take two growing seasons to complete.

Results will be useful, explained Dr. Breen, in the Tribe getting a patent on its own variety.

That variety could come from the feral seed or more likely a hybrid.

But its genetics will be owned by the Tribe, allowing SWO to replant from harvested seeds – which cannot be done when growers purchase commercial seed from other sources – reducing costs.

The Tribe can also create an additional revenue stream, the professor said, by selling its variety to other growers.

Patenting its own hemp seed is one part of the Tribe's drive to grow hemp, process it, and use it in its own manufacturing facilities.

There was also a discussion with Dr. Breen about preserving Medicine plant seeds as part of an overall seed sovereignty program.

Roundtable on abandoned SWO elderly village project, hemp

By CD Floro

Sota Editor

Tribal Council met in its suite last Thursday, November 14th, to determine what to do about the abandoned SWO elderly village project.

Originally a housing tax credit project to fund low-rent federally subsidized apartments for Tribal elders, the project went through an unclear transformation into a for-profit apartment building requiring higher rent than most elderly Tribal members could afford.

As reported in last week's Soto, the project has been abandoned and although there was an agreement in June for the Aberdeen general contractor Huff Construction to "button up" the site, that did not happen.

Instead, the footings have been underwater throughout the summer and now the Tribe must have them cut and removed, the site filled in and compacted.

Greg Paulson and Phil Brodeen, Minneaplis attorneys on contract to provide the Tribe with legal services, were present as well as SWO Tax Director Brenda Bellonger and Consultant Bruce Jones.

There was a long discussion about why the agreement with Huff, for the "button up," was never carried out.

It had to do with Huff Construction invoices not being paid due to non-payment of Tribal taxes.

Bruce Jones said "There are two issues."

The first is "following tax laws."

The second is "following policies."

Brenda Bellonger told Council about "problems with the (Huff) invoices."

Tribal tax had been paid on earlier invoices, she told Council, but then were not.

It was said that "Somebody told Huff they didn't have to pay (the Tribe's) taxes."

That led to Chairman White complaining that Tribal taxes have been waived for some contractors and on some projects and not for others.

There was consensus that the Tribe's tax codes need to be fairly and consistently applied across the board.

Another topic was why, although Huff had worked on Tribal projects before and should have understood TERO law, did the general contractor ignore that law.

Comments made:

Not to "make the same mistake again."

"We dropped the ball, didn't have a point system."

But "We are following the guidelines now and in the future."

There was strong opposition to waiving taxes … (it's) not good business."

Afterwards, Council turned its attention to the governance side of developing an industrial hemp business on the Lake Traverse Reservation.

Presenting information on USDA licensing and other legal matters was attorney Phil Brodeen.

Phil works out of Minneapolis with long-time SWO legal consultant Greg Paulson.

He said the Tribe needs to update its judicial code to follow existing federal regulations to get started.

Participating in the roundtable was Charlene Miller, Natural Resources Manager and North Dakota licensed hemp grower.

It was Charlene's name on the license allowing the Tribe to successfully grow industrial hemp crops on its ND test fields the past two seasons, with assistance from the University of Minnesota research team.

Tribal Court restores Chad Ward to District office

By Shannon White

Sota Assistant Editor

At the Lake Traverse District October 24th meeting, a motion was made and passed to remove District Treasurer Chad Ward from office.

Chad, who was not present at the meeting, later filed in SWO Tribal Court against the removal.

A hearing was held last Tuesday, November 12, with petitioner Ward and defendants District executive officers Darwin James, Jacky White and Teresa Thompson present.

The issue for the court was procedural.

The district constitution contains a process for removing a district executive:

The executive must be presented with charges, the charges must be delivered a minimum of five days before a public hearing, and the executive must be able to respond to the charges at a public hearing.

Chad Ward did not receive charges, nor was he provided an opportunity to respond.

The Chief Judge ruled that his right to due process had been violated and that he was still the Lake Traverse Treasurer until the process is completed.

Chad was informed that he did not have to surrender his keys or password until the issue is resolved.

The removal will be addressed at a future meeting of Lake Traverse District.

After the ruling was handed down, Chad Ward came into the rotunda and spoke to district members who had come to show their support.

Sisseton community hosts 45th annual snow queen pageant

By Shannon White

Sota Assistant Editor

The Friends and Neighbors Club presented the 45th Annual Sisseton Area Snow Queen Pageant at the Performing Arts Center on Saturday, November 9.

This year's theme was "Moonlight Over Paris."

Dean Lehrke served as MC, introducing the 2019 title-holders Snow Queen Elise Heesch, Junior Snow Queen Hailey Rae Nelson, and Little Miss Sisseton Semiah LaFromboise.

The 2019 Junior and Senior Courts were also present.

Contestants had a busy day of interviewing for the judges and getting ready for the pageant.

They were introduced to the audience while MC Lehrke recited their interests, hobbies and accomplishments.

After all of the contestants were introduced, the reigning Queens made speeches giving up their crowns and wishing the new Queens good luck.

Little Miss Sisseton drew the name of the 2020 Little Miss Sisseton, Heaven-Lee Bissonette.

The 2020 Junior Snow Queen is Annika Estwick.

The 2020 Snow Queen is Sheridan Swanson.

The 2020 Sisseton Area Junior Snow Queen and Snow Queen will compete in the South Dakota statewide Snow Queen pageant in 2020.

Community Art Walk held last week in downtown Sisseton

The local non-profit Ni'sto Inc., with support from the East River Care Coalition and Floating Foundation of Photography (FFP), hosted a community art walk at its location in downtown Sisseton last week.

Works of local youth and adult artists were on display, and Bryan Akipa provided flute music for the event.

Here are some comments about the celebration from organizers and participants:

"What a wonderful, wonderful evening."

"So many people came to see the artwork and to see the smiles on the faces of the artists."

"And it's a wrap!"

"Art workshop complete."

"We had a great turnout for the art show."

Another art workshop is being scheduled with the FFP for March 2020.

Also, Nis'to is continuing art workshops every Saturday from 12:00 noon until 5:00 p.m.

The Nis'to building is located at 506 Veterans Ave. in Sisseton.

Contact Dustina Gill for more information.

KXL oil spill in North Dakota

By Talli Nauman

Pierre, SD – Native Sun News Today – Nov. 12, 2019 – As tribal representatives and members took part in South Dakota's Keystone XL Pipeline hearings October 29-31, a large oil spill into a wetland in neighboring North Dakota underscored testimony here against permitting the use of public water for construction of the private infrastructure.

"Water that is contaminated by an oil leak or spill is damaging at best – and deadly at worst – to the health of people, livestock, wildlife, and fisheries," said Dakota Rural Action in response to the 383,000-gallon (9,000-barrel) spill of tar-sands crude oil, or diluted bitumen.

The leaking dilbit, a toxic material, caused a shutdown of the Keystone I Pipeline after discovery of the damage October 30, which affected wetlands near Edinburg, 75 miles northwest of Grand Forks, according to the North Dakota Department of Environmental Quality.

Dakota Rural Action objects to permitting Keystone I's sister KXL Pipeline, as do Mniwakan Nakicijinpi (Lone Eagle family youth pipeline fighters), the Yankton (Ihanktonwan), Rosebud, and Cheyenne River Sioux tribal governments, the Great Plains Tribal Water Alliance, and individuals from Montana, South Dakota and Nebraska.

TC Energy Corp., formerly named TransCanada Corp., seeks nearly 167 million gallons of water over a two-year period from the Cheyenne, White, and Bad rivers for use in building and testing the tar-sands crude oil line.

In addition, separate individual well owners are seeking two permits to divert flow from Inyan Kara and Hell's Creek underground water tables in order to assure supply for six man-camps -- squatter settlements for the transient workers from elsewhere who would be hired to install the line.

The South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources, DENR, has recommended the state Water Management Board approve all the water rights applications for surface and underground water requested for the hazardous materials pipeline.

TC Energy Corp. operates the Keystone I Pipeline from Canada to the Texas Gulf. It spilled dilbit more than a dozen times in 2011, the first year of operations.

"This most recent spill brings stark clarity to the fact that, despite lack of consideration by DENR staff in their recommended approval of these permits, the quantity of water available to downstream users is highly dependent on the quality of that water," Dakota Rural Action said in a written statement.

Ihanktonwan Tribal Historic Preservation Officer Kip Spotted Eagle testified against surface water permits for KXL construction, because "the river is a traditional cultural property."

In Billings, Montana, on October 29, pipeline fighters rallied in freezing 10-degree weather outside the venue of a U.S. State Department meeting about the latest Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (DSEIS) for the project.

The rally, filled with participants carrying "Protect Our Water" and "No KXL" signs, afforded speakers public exposure denied by the meeting format. Rally goers traveled on icy roads from across Lakota Territory.

The DSEIS is crucial to the future of the Keystone XL Pipeline, since its finalization will influence permitting decisions from the Bureau of Land Management and the Army Corps of Engineers on a proposed Missouri River crossing of the pipeline.

The proposed site of the pipeline crossing is below the spillway of the Ft. Peck Dam, which releases water at up to 65,000 cubic feet per second, creating potential for "scour erosion" of the riverbed that could lead in turn to exposure of the buried infrastructure, making it "highly susceptible to leaks," the Western Organization of Resource Councils said in a media advisory.

"I can tell you without a doubt that the Keystone XL Pipeline poses a direct threat to our water system," said Bill Whitehead, chair of the Assiniboine and Sioux Rural Water Supply System on the Ft. Peck Indian Reservation.

"The site where the KXL Pipeline would cross the Missouri River is directly upstream from the intake for our drinking water. This provides water not only to all of Fort Peck, but also to communities further east of us. As many as 30,000 people could have their drinking water affected by a pipeline spill," Whitehead said.

"We also have water intakes downstream from the proposed pipeline crossing that serve our irrigation system," he said. "This irrigation system is part of a 100-year agreement with the U.S. government. We depend on this water to grow our food and take care of livestock. Our very existence is dependent on this water."

Adding his opinion was Sen. Frank Smith of Poplar, Montana on the Ft. Peck Indian Reservation. "We know from history that the question is not if a pipeline spills but when," he said. "This tar sands oil is dangerous stuff that is impossible to clean up when it leaks," he added.

"Our water system will be destroyed by a KXL spill," he predicted. "We refuse to sacrifice our water for the sake of a Canadian oil company."

The South Dakota Water Management Board set another permit hearing for December 17-19.

The State Department is accepting public comments until November 18 on the new Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (DSEIS) for TC's proposed Keystone XL pipeline project.

'We're under attack': Tribes defend Indian Child Welfare Act in critical case

By Acee Agoyo

Indianz.com – Nov. 12, 2019 – The battle over the Indian Child Welfare Act is far from over as tribes continue to defend the landmark law against an attack from hostile state governments and non-Indians.

After initially deciding the closely-watched case in favor of Indian Country, the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals announced that it will hear the dispute all over again. A larger set of judges will now scrutinize the landmark law but tribal nations remain confident that their sovereign rights and their most precious resource -- their children -- will win out in the end.

"For centuries, the United States Congress, Executive Branch, and Supreme Court have affirmed the unique political status of tribal nations and Native people," the National Indian Child Welfare Association, the National Congress of American Indians, the Association on American Indian Affairs and the Native American Rights Fund said in a joint statement after learning of the development last Thursday. "ICWA was enacted with that unique political status in mind and applies only to tribal nations that share a government-to-government relationship with the United States and to Indian children and families who share in that relationship."

"We are confident the Fifth Circuit will affirm ICWA's strong constitutional grounding," the organizations, who are collectively running the Protect ICWA Campaign, added.

In August, the appeals court did just that in the case known as Brackeen v. Bernhardt. After hearing the case in March, a panel of three judges issued a 46-page decision that largely upheld the constitutionality of ICWA, which Congress enacted in 1978 to stop Indian children from being taken from their communities at alarming rates.

"We never want to go back to the days when Indian children were ripped away from their families and stripped of their heritage," the leaders of the Cherokee Nation the Morongo Band of Mission Indians, the Oneida Nation and the Quinault Nation said in a joint statement. "We continue to believe that the Fifth Circuit decision affirming the constitutionality of ICWA was the right decision."

"While it is unfortunate that the attacks on this critical law continue, we are confident that the court will once again uphold the constitutionality of ICWA, as courts have repeatedly done over the past 40 years," the tribal leaders, who have set up the Protect Indian Kids website to explain why the law is considered the "gold standard" in child welfare policy and why it's still needed across the nation.

Not everyone, though, agrees with ICWA's goals. After losing the initial ruling, the states of Texas, Ohio and Indiana, along with non-Indians who want to adopt or have already adopted Indian children, asked the 5th Circuit to rehear the case, a request that was granted in an order issued by a panel of 15 judges from the court.

"We're under attack," Bryce In the Woods, a council member from the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, said at e NCAI's 76th annual convention last month, stressing the importance of Indian children, as the generation that carries on traditions, cultures and languages, to sovereign nations.

"ICWA is under attack," he said. "We need to conquer it now."

Tribal advocates don't think the assault is anywhere near complete. Further appeals to the U.S. Supreme Court, where Indian Country decisions are often bad ones, are all but guaranteed.

"No matter who wins at the 5th Circuit, we are certain that the losing side is going to try and bring this case to the Supreme Court," Dan Lewerenz, a citizen of the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska and a staff attorney at NARF, said at NCAI's meeting on October 24.

The Supreme Court's last ICWA case in fact went against tribal interests. By a vote of 5-4, the justices in 2013 ruled that a girl from the Cherokee Nation could be separated from her Cherokee father against his wishes. The court held that ICWA didn't protect the father's rights at all due to the unique circumstances of the situation with is daughter.

With the predicted appeal further down the line, the 5th Circuit appears to be moving quickly with the rehearing in Brackeen. According to a letter sent to attorneys on Thursday and an entry in the docket that was posted on Friday, the court tentatively set oral arguments in New Orleans, Louisiana, for the week of January 20, giving tribes just two months to prepare for the high-stakes affair.

In addition to the Cherokee Nation the Morongo Band of Mission Indians, the Oneida Nation and the Quinault Nation, the Navajo Nation has been allowed to participate directly in the lawsuit. Separately, hundreds and hundreds of tribes, representing every corner of Indian Country, have submitted or signed onto briefs in defense of ICWA.

Gil Vigil, a citizen of the Pueblo of Tesuque who serves as president of the National Indian Child Welfare Association, credited tribal unity with the prior victory in Brackeen. When the case came up at NCAI's meeting last month, he urged more of the same.

"This is what we need to do when sovereignty is threatened: to come together," Vigil said.

Tribal Reaction

The full statement from the Protect ICWA Campaign, consisting of the National Indian Child Welfare Association, the National Congress of American Indians, the Association on American Indian Affairs, and the Native American Rights Fund, follows:

"This summer, a three-judge panel of the Fifth Circuit upheld the constitutionality of the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA), and we remain confident that upon rehearing en banc the full court will do the same.

For centuries, the United States Congress, Executive Branch, and Supreme Court have affirmed the unique political status of tribal nations and Native people. ICWA was enacted with that unique political status in mind and applies only to tribal nations that share a government-to-government relationship with the United States and to Indian children and families who share in that relationship. We are confident the Fifth Circuit will affirm ICWA's strong constitutional grounding.

In addition, for more than 150 years, the U.S. Supreme Court has recognized that this federal authority to legislate with regard to tribal nations and native people is not limited by reservation borders but extends to wherever Indians may live. When Congress enacted ICWA, it carefully balanced the respective powers of tribes, states, and the federal government to create process that protects Indian children nationwide.

ICWA has long been recognized as best practice in child welfare and it includes broad support in this case from, among others, 21 states, 325 tribal nations, 57 Native organizations, 31 leading child welfare organizations, Indian and constitutional law scholars, and members of Congress.

ICWA is vital for protecting the well-being of Indian children across the United States today and tomorrow. The Protect ICWA Campaign will continue to work with tribal nations, tribal leaders, and allies to ensure a strong Indian Child Welfare Act for future generations of Indian families."

The full statement from Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin, Jr., Morongo Band of Mission Indians Chairman Robert Martin, Oneida Nation Chairman Tehassi Hill and Quinault Nation President Fawn Sharp follows:

"We never want to go back to the days when Indian children were ripped away from their families and stripped of their heritage. We continue to believe that the Fifth Circuit decision affirming the constitutionality of ICWA was the right decision. While it is unfortunate that the attacks on this critical law continue, we are confident that the court will once again uphold the constitutionality of ICWA, as courts have repeatedly done over the past 40 years. ICWA provides a process for determining the best interests of Indian children in the adoption and foster care systems, which is why it is overwhelmingly supported across the political spectrum. We remain devoted in our efforts to defend ICWA because our number one priority remains fighting for the wellbeing, health and safety of children and families."

ICWA and Congress

In passing the Indian Child Welfare Act in 1978, Congress reacted to a crisis of Indian children being taken from their communities at high rates, often without input from their families or their tribal governments. Key findings from the law:

*"[T]here is no resource that is more vital to the continued existence and integrity of Indian tribes than their children and that the United States has a direct interest, as trustee, in protecting Indian children who are members of or are eligible for membership in an Indian tribe"

*"[A]n alarmingly high percentage of Indian families are broken up by the removal, often unwarranted, of their children from them by nontribal public and private agencies and that an alarmingly high percentage of such children are placed in non-Indian foster and adoptive homes and institutions"

*"The Congress hereby declares that it is the policy of this Nation to protect the best interests of Indian children and to promote the stability and security of Indian tribes and families by the establishment of minimum Federal standards for the removal of Indian children from their families and the placement of such children in foster or adoptive homes which will reflect the unique values of Indian culture, and by providing for assistance to Indian tribes in the operation of child and family service programs."

Thune-supported bills head to full Senate

Washington, DC – Nov. 13, 2019 – U.S. Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.), a member of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, today applauded the committee's passage of the Learning Excellence and Good Examples from New Developers (LEGEND) Act, Harvesting American Cybersecurity Knowledge through Education (HACKED) Act, and the Reliable Emergency Alert Distribution Improvement (READI) Act, all bills he's either sponsored or cosponsored. These bipartisan bills now head to the Senate floor for consideration.

 "Today's executive session proves that my colleagues in the Senate can continue to get work done for the American people in a bipartisan manner," said Thune. "My LEGEND Act will improve forecasting capabilities and will benefit farmers and producers, not only in my home state, but across the country, and the READI Act will make necessary improvements to the nation's emergency alert system. I'm thankful for Sen. Schatz's partnership on these important bills, both of which unanimously passed the committee today.

"I'd also like to thank both Sens. Wicker and Klobuchar for their help in strengthening the HACKED Act, legislation that would ensure we have the necessary cybersecurity workforce to combat any potential threats in today's internet and digital economy."

Thune introduced the LEGEND Act last month with Sen. Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii). This legislation would require the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to make certain operational models publicly available and utilize any innovations to improve the models that are developed as a result of public collaboration.

The READI Act, which Thune cosponsored with Schatz last month, would ensure more people receive relevant emergency alerts on their mobile phones, televisions, and radios, explore new ways of alerting the public through online video and audio streaming services, track and study false alerts when they occur, and improve the way states plan for emergency alerts.

Thune joined Sens. Roger Wicker (R-Miss.), Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.), and Jacky Rosen (D-Nevada) in introducing the HACKED Act last week. This legislation would build on the important work being done by South Dakota universities to strengthen America's cybersecurity workforce by bolstering existing science education and cybersecurity programs within the National Institute of Standards and Technology, National Science Foundation, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the Department of Transportation. The HACKED Act includes Thune's amendment to establish a cybersecurity exchange program at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, incorporating one aspect of Thune's and Sen. Amy Klobuchar's (D-Minn.) Cyber Security Exchange Act.

2019 Bush Prize for Community Innovation Winners

November 12, 2019

The Bush Foundation has announced its 2019 Bush Prize for Community Innovation winners: five organizations with a track record of successful problem solving in their communities.

The Bush Prize celebrates organizations that are extraordinary not only in what they do but in how they do it. This year's winners demonstrate a pattern of working inclusively, in partnership with others, to make the region better for all.

The Bush Prize, now in its seventh year, is awarded annually in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and the 23 Native nations that share the same geography.

The 2019 Bush prize winners are:

HMONG AMERICAN PARTNERSHIP - SAINT PAUL, MN

MINNESOTA INDIAN WOMEN'S RESOURCE CENTER - MINNEAPOLIS, MN

RURAL RENEWABLE ENERGY ALLIANCE - BACKUS, MN

VALLEY CITY-BARNES COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION - VALLEY CITY, ND

WOKINI INITIATIVE OF SOUTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY - BROOKINGS, SD

"The 2019 Bush Prize winners exhibit remarkable creativity and tenacity in addressing issues that are most important to their communities," said Bush Foundation President Jennifer Ford Reedy. "Their problem solving builds strength not only in their local community but also in the entire region."

Bush Prize winners receive a package that includes promotional support and materials, and an unrestricted grant equal to 25 percent of the organization's prior fiscal year budget, up to $500,000. The Foundation received 81 applications for the 2019 Bush Prize. Three panels of community members chose the winners from their respective states. Learn more about the selection process.

"This year's winners are defined by their courage," said Mandy Ellerton, Community Innovation Director. "They shake loose solutions to seemingly intractable problems by opening themselves up to surprising partnerships, sharing ownership and bringing together people who don't always agree. This method of working takes guts, and our region is better because of their courage."

*Wokini

Grant for 2019

Grantee: South Dakota State University

Wokini Initiative SDSU logo

Amount: $500,000

Term: 24 months

Program: Bush Prize for Community Innovation

Brookings, SD—In recognition of winning a 2019 Bush Prize for Community Innovation, this grant will advance South Dakota State University's transition to create a welcoming environment for Native Americans through the Wokini Initiative

THE BIG IDEA:

South Dakota State University (SDSU) is on a mission to transform its campus into a welcoming environment for American Indian students. It is the first university in the country to dedicate a portion of its land grant funds to elevate American Indian student success, a decision that explicitly acknowledges that SDSU and the state have benefited from lands taken from the Lakota and Dakota people by the U.S. government.

SDSU's new Wokini ("new beginning" in Lakota) Initiative seeks to eliminate the significant barriers that American Indian students face in achieving a college degree. The program combines transformational change in campus culture with holistic support for Native students, including dedicated scholarships, extensive outreach, academic mentoring and emergency funds. To ensure that the community is prepared to welcome American Indian students, SDSU has developed a state-of-the-art training for staff and faculty to build understanding of Native cultures. In spring 2020, the Initiative will move into a new American Indian student center, located symbolically in the heart of the campus.

An advisory board of tribal leaders and educators throughout South Dakota helps guide the Wokini Initiative and provides a tribal perspective to move the Initiative forward. The University's decision to dedicate land grant funds to American Indian students has inspired numerous other universities throughout the country to consider a similar commitment.

*Minnesota Indian Women's Resource Center

Amount: $500,000

Term: 12 months

Program: Bush Prize for Community Innovation

Minneapolis, MN—In recognition of winning a 2019 Bush Prize for Community Innovation, this grant will advance the organization's charitable mission of empowering American Indian women and families while advocating for justice and equity

THE BIG IDEA:

Minnesota Indian Women's Resource Center (MIWRC) builds hope, health and cultural prosperity for Native women and their families. MIWRC delivers lifesaving programs and leads vital systems change at the local and national levels. It was one of the first agencies in the country to provide gender-based, culturally specific programming developed by and for American Indian women.

MIWRC roots its work in traditional Indigenous values and a deep understanding of the historical trauma of settler colonization and urban relocation. A powerful advocate for its community, MIWRC works responsively, understanding that rapid intervention can mean the difference between life and death for women experiencing family violence, substance addiction, mental health issues, homelessness and commercial sexual exploitation.

In 2018, MIWRC partnered with several Native organizations to respond swiftly and effectively to the grave conditions in a Minneapolis encampment of nearly 200 predominantly Native people experiencing homelessness. MIWRC built public understanding of the situation and partnered with government agencies to effectively address the crisis. As a result of MIWRC's leadership, the City of Minneapolis adjusted its housing budget to better address the needs of the Native community.

On the national level, MIWRC has influenced the federal government's definition of domestic violence and improved services by helping remove silos between federal domestic violence and sexual violence agencies.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

From warrior to soldier: A 200 year journey

The late Master Sgt. Woodrow W. Keeble, SWO, included among U.S. Medal of Honor recipients

By James Giago Davies

Rapid City, SD – Native Sun News Today – Nov. 13, 2019 – Before Europeans ever arrived in North America, wars were fought between tribes, and although some were very bloody, none matched the protracted standards set by European conflict.

In many notable cases, conflict resolutions were devised to avoid the carnage of actual war. These were generally contests of skill, stickball and lacrosse, and although extremely violent by today's standards of sport, the casualties were mild compared to what would have happened had tribes taken up the war club against each other.

Stickball was called "the Little Brother of War" by the Choctaw, because the big brother, actual war, wasn't something any tribe wanted to engage in unless absolutely unavoidable. The concept of war, and the role of the warrior, are to this day, fundamentally misunderstood, not only by European mentalities, but by modern tribal perspectives.

Make no mistake, tribes were not pacifists. If actual conflict occurred, the outcome was horrifyingly brutal. But the warriors who fought in those conflicts arrived there by a different route than the soldiers of any modern army or historical European army.

Sitting Bull described the Lakota perspective: "For us, warriors are not what you think of as warriors. The warrior is not someone who fights, because no one has the right to take another life. The warrior, for us, is one who sacrifices himself for the good of others. His task is to take care of the elderly, the defenseless, those who cannot provide for themselves, and above all, the children, the future of humanity."

From the very beginning, the biggest conflict was not between the tribes and the European invaders, it was between competing factions of Europeans. The conflict in North America, more often than not, was a spillover of a deeper, more desperate conflict back in Europe. In the first notable case of this, the Dutch and the French battled for fur trading hegemony in the Atlantic northeast at the start of the 17th Century.

The Dutch armed their Iroquois allies with muskets, and asked nothing in return but friendship. The French would not thus arm their allies, among them the Iroquoian tribe, the Wyandot, or Huron as they are more popularly known, unless they first swore fealty to the Church. As a result, the musket laden Iroquois, at that time a very organized and sophisticated society, attacked their hated enemy, the Huron, and in March of 1649 burned 15 of their villages and dispersed the survivors into unforgiving wilderness. Over the course of that decade, about 70 percent of the Huron died from disease, harsh conditions or war.

This was a type of war the tribes had not visited upon one another before the coming of the Europeans. But with such low risk and high reward, the Iroquois could not resist attacking their musket bereft enemies Although this conflict began a change in how tribes conducted warfare, it did not as yet alter the perception of the warrior as head of household, as protector and servant of the vulnerable.

This fundamental rewiring of how tribes viewed the warrior would take a drastic turn a century later, during the French and Indian War. In 1755, British General Braddock suffered a convincing defeat, which cost him his life, and the road to the conquest of Ohio and Pennsylvania lay open. But the French could not get their tribal allies to continue the pursuit. The tribes reasoned they had kept their word and helped their French allies, and now they took the spoils promised and headed back home.

For tribes, this decade long European conflict was just a gigantic war party, where they risked what they would, where and when they felt it worth risking, and the agenda and objectives of European strategists and statesmen meant nothing to them. But in these alliances, in this style of conflict, the concept of warrior was fundamentally and inexorably altered in the minds of the participating tribes.

The day would soon arrive when the warrior became the soldier. Twenty years later, in 1778, George Washington said, "I think they [Indians] can be made of excellent use, as scouts and light troops."

Over the centuries the idea of who a warrior is and who a soldier is has conflicted and converged until today those that serve are a combination of the noblest aspects of both realities. One award signifies service above and beyond the call of duty over any other, the Medal of Honor, awarded by the President on behalf of the Congress.

Almost 3,500 people have won this award. Twenty-nine Indians have officially been awarded the Medal of Honor by the US Military, although the list has thirty:

1-Co-Rux-Te-Chod (Pani) 1869; 2-Chiquito (White Mountain Apache) 1871; 3-Jim (white Mountain Apache 1871; 4-Machol (Apache) 1872; 5-Nannasaddi (White Mountain Apache) 1872; 6-Nantaje (White Mountain Apache) 1872; 7-William Alchesay (White Mountain Apache) 1872; 8-Blanquet (Apache) 1872; 9-Elsatsoosu (Apache) 1872; 10-Kelsay (White Mountain Apache) 1872; 11-Kosoba (White Mountain Apache) 1872; 12-Adam Paine (Seminole) 1874; 13-Pompey Factor (Seminole) 1875; 14-Isaac Payne (Seminole) 1875; 15-John Ward (Seminole) 1875; 16-Rowdy (Apache) 1890; 17-Pappy Boyington (Sioux) 1943; 18-Ernest Childers (Muscogee) 1943; 19-Jack C. Montgomery (Cherokee) 1944; 20-Van T. Barfoot (Choctaw) 1944; 21-Roy W. Harmon (?) 1944; 22-Ernest E. Evans (Cherokee/Muscogee) 1944; 23-John N. Reese, Jr. (?) 1945; 24-Mitchell Red Cloud, Jr. (Ho-Chunk) 1950; 25-Raymond Harvey (Chickasaw) 1951; 26-Tony K. Burris (Choctaw) 1951; 27-Woodrow W. Keeble (Sioux) 1951; 28-Charles George (Cherokee) 1952; 29-James E. Williams (Cherokee) 1966; 30-Michael E. Thornton (Cherokee) 1972.

Three gave their lives, Ernest Evans, Tony Burris, and Charles George, and received the Medal of Honor posthumously.

Sota guest editorial –

Understanding meth addiction

A lot of people don't understand meth addiction.

They say, and I do agree for the most part, that all addictions are the same.

I do believe that all substances take you to the same hell, no matter what you use.

But there's something different about meth.

It's different than any other drug I've done.

In my addiction, I did almost everything and anything I could get my hands on.

I've shot up anything that could go in a needle, no matter what I put in my body or how … coke, methadone, shrooms, alcohol, ecstasy, weed, fentanyl, (just to name a few) whatever….

There's something different about meth.

It's hard to explain what meth does to you, to your mind, to your body, to your spirit.

There are almost no words.

People can have all the trainings, summits, awareness events, and college degrees they want.

But you will never understand it unless you've done it.

I know people feel helpless, they want to learn all they can about meth to help.

Especially the ones in recovery themselves.

But meth … it can't be taught.

You'll never understand what you haven't been through.

That's not saying you're useless if you don't understand it.

So please don't be close-minded.

I don't want anyone to think that someone who hasn't experienced meth can't help someone get clean off of it.

Shii, pure alcoholics and some normies helped me get clean off meth.

All you need is to understand addiction and recovery … and keep an open heart and an open mind.

If you're a recovering meth addict, in the recovery world, you know exactly what I'm saying.

Meth changes you.

You'll never be the same.

There are no words to describe it.

But … there is life after meth.

And ANYONE can help you if you let them.

 

– Brandi DeCoteau

Brief editorial comments from the editor's desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

The 2019 winter general council is scheduled for Thursday and Friday, December 19-20.

Make plans, if possible, to attend.

Participation is needed to make your Tribal government work.

Watch for the agenda to be published in your Sota.

*****

Please read the Tribal Council resolution renaming BIA Highway 700 as the Corporal Louis E. Willams Memorial Highway.

In their discussion of the resolution, Council brought up the need to extend recognition to others who have served as akicita for their people.

There is a possibility of developing a policy to bring forward names to be considered for recognition in naming streets and roads, and buildings.

*****

Our thanks to Brandi DeCoteau for sharing from the heart about meth addiction.

Powerful statement about what she explains cannot be described in words.

But … anyone can help … and

There is life after meth.

Please list to what Brandi has to say.

*****

We sat in on some of the morning session of the Trauma Informed Training workshop last Friday.

It was exciting to listen to, and really hear, what presenter Dr. Tonemah had to say.

Watch for a report in next week's Sota.

Thank you to the Casey Family Organization, SWO Child Protection Program, and office of the Tribal Secretary, for making the workshop possible.

And thank you to so many who showed up and participated.

All of you should have a better understanding of trauma and hope for taking "trauma work from dealing to healing."

Look on next week's Sota pages for more information.

*****

Tribal Emergency Management held its second consecutive Saturday Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) training this past weekend.

Pidamiya to all the volunteers who stepped up to join our CERT team.

They will be available in the event of any kind of disaster to help our Oyate.

Watch for photo highlights and information about the training in next week's Sota.

*****

We need to correct our error in last week's guest editorial from Delight LaMere.

The art work she shared was created by her sister, the very talented graphic artist Jessica Heminger.

Our thanks to both for sharing with our readers.

*****

John and his father Clyde Kampeska came before Tribal Council recently, sharing documentation of their ancestry and vision for a return to traditional ways, including to a traditional form of governance.

Chairman White thanked them for coming.

"Our wasicu government," said the Chairman, "has failed us."

He welcomed their ideas and mentioned kunsi Darlene Pipeboy, who frequently calls for the Tribe to return to a traditional form of government.

The Chairman said he wants to see voting expand to include off-reservation members, the quorum lowered to allow the people to make motions at general council, and to hold more general council meetings throughout the year.

We are not qualified to speak on behalf of the Kampeska family but we respect their vision and advise readers to watch for more to come from them and from others who share that vision.

*****

We began a series of editorial cartoons written by "Sinjin" Sartwell last week. See the second in the series this week.

He writes, "I see poems (in the Sota) sometimes … but I am an artist. I am 36 years old from SWO and I am currently on ISO locked down solitary confinement for contempt of court."

"The only thing keeping me sane is drawing and writing."

"I draw little cartoons through the day. I write and read a lot."

He shares these with "my brothers in here … just to give them a little laugh or cheer them up, or to share a lil knowledge with the younger brothers."

Sinjin requests that they be published in the Sota and says these cartoons "should be appropriate for all ages who read."

Of course, we are glad to get your cartoons and writing and to share them on these pages for all our Oyate to read.

Thank you, keep up your spirits, and your drawing and writing.

*****

Our Veterans Service Office is once again coordinating the annual kids coat drive.

Coats, mittens, gloves, caps, scarves, snow pants and snow boots are all welcome!

For information, please see the notice elsewhere in the Sota or contact Geri or Gabe.

This sixth annual community drive will run through November.

*****

Elder's meditation:

"We do not want riches, but we want to train our children right. Riches would do us no good. We could not take them with us to the other world. We do not want riches, we want peace and love."

–Red Cloud, OGLALA LAKOTA

The Elders say that what is important is peace and love. To have material things is okay, but if not, that's okay too. To have peace and love is more important than anything material. Our children will see the value of peace and love only if adults show they are a priority. Too often we think we can offer material things and they will replace the time spent with our children. But the most important way to give our children peace and love is to spend time with them.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

If only we'd stop trying to be happy we could have a pretty good time. - Edith Wharton (1862 - 1937) 

When someone tells you something defies description, you can be pretty sure he's going to have a go at it anyway. - Clyde B. Aster

A compromise is the art of dividing a cake in such a way that everyone believes he has the biggest piece. - Ludwig Erhard (1897 - 1977)

The pursuit of happiness is a most ridiculous phrase; if you pursue happiness you'll never find it. - C. P. Snow (1905 - 1980)

The illegal we do immediately. The unconstitutional takes a little longer. - Henry Kissinger (1923 - ), New York Times, Oct. 28, 1973 

Give a man a fish, and you'll feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he'll buy a funny hat. Talk to a hungry man about fish, and you're a consultant. - Scott Adams (1957 - ), Dogbert; Dilbert cartoons

Give me the luxuries of life and I will willingly do without the necessities. - Frank Lloyd Wright (1869 - 1959)

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

CDF

Obituaries –

Services held for Bruce Robertson

Funeral service for Bruce Luverne Robertson Sr., 67, of Peever, SD were held on Friday afternoon, November 15, 2019, at the SWO community center in Agency Village, SD, with John Cloud III, Senior Catechist and Jr. Heminger CLP officiating.

Pianists were Billy Kohl and Mary Beth Kirk.

Pallbearers were Micah Kohl, Robert Laughter III, Bruce Godfrey, Terrance Robertson, Rex Godfrey, and Brandon Kohl.

Honorary pallbearers were John Cloud III, Vine Marks Jr., Wayne German, Harold Amos Sr., Cory Budak, John TwoStars, Ronald Kirk, Owen Dean German, and all friends and relatives.

Wake services were held Wednesday and Thursday at the community center.

Interment is at the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Veterans Cemetery, Sisseton, SD.

Military rites were performed by the Kit Fox Society.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD was in charge of funeral arrangements.

Bruce LuVerne Robertson was born to Dormalie and George Robertson on March 31, 1952.

Bruce attended school at Wilmot Public School. He dropped out after the 11th grade and later obtained his GED.

Bruce worked for Dakotah Pride as night security for 10 years. He then worked as a security guard and in the Bingo department at Agency Bingo.

Bruce also worked construction at Dakota Sioux Casino in the late 80's.

His last job was working for Tribal Roads and LTUC at the Tribe.

In his retirement he loved to play the slots, bingo and Yahtzee with Goldie. He called everyone everyday just to check on them. He loved to joke and tell stories to no end.

Bruce entered the US Army National Guard from 1981 until 2002 retiring after 20 years, 8 months, and 20 days. He served the SD 147th Field Artillery Unit until 1981 then was assigned with Company B 142nd Engineer Combat Battalion until his retirement as an E-5. He received the Army Service Ribbon, NCO Dev. Ribbon, Armed Services Reserve Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Army Achievement Medal, and the Good Conduct Medal.

Bruce was an avid horseman. He broke horses for people and loved to ride them with his friends and nephews. He went to rodeos and would participate in the wild horse races.

He retired from riding in 1994 and started a wood cutting business to keep busy. This continued for many years and he had numerous customers.

He was united in marriage to Delight Varnes on May 12th, 1978. To this union 4 children were born. Bruce L Robertson Jr., Jessica R. (Ivor) Carrington, Dustin W. (Brittney) Robertson and Courtney R. (Lee) Simon.

He had a special friend Goldie P. Jackson and from this relationship they had one daughter, Racheal P. Jackson.

He then married Elaine Koll in 1990 to this union he had one son, Blaine O. Robertson of Peever, SD.

He is survived by his children Bruce L. Robertson, Jessica R. (Ivor) Carrington, Dustin W. (Brittney) Robertson, Courtney R. (Lee) Simon, Racheal P. Jackson, Blaine O. Robertson; his special friend/companion Goldie P. Jackson; two sisters, Norma Perko of Big Coulee and (Ruth) Ellen Robertson of Peever, SD; and numerous nieces, nephews and grandchildren.

He was proceeded in death by his maternal and paternal grandparents, his mother and father Dormalie and George Robertson; three sisters Cleone Provost, Helen Godfrey and Georgia Robertson; and his wife Elaine Robertson; and one nephew Tyler Troy Amos aka Wildman.

For Bruce's obituary and on-line registry, please visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com

Services for Sylvester Baker

Sylvester R. Baker, age 49 of Fargo, ND journeyed to the Spirit World on November 11, 2019.

He was born on February 26, 1970 in Fargo, ND the son of Sylvester Peltier and Carol Baker.

Sylvester loved fishing and spending time outdoors.  He enjoyed playing video games and spending time with his grandchildren.  He was a great cook!

Preceded in death by his parents and son Stephan Peltier.

He is survived by his wife, Rita (Wilson) Baker; sons Angelo Peltier and Dakota Peltier; two grandchildren;  brothers Tyrone Peltier, Tydise Peltier, Tyman DeMorey, Tylando LaRoque, LeeAndrew LaRoque and Jovete LaRoque; sisters Tyann Davis, Tyrina Demerey, Evonna LaRoque, Keyann LaRoque, Lisa Enno, Velma Wanze, Khyle Norquay and Karla Norquay; many other relatives and friends.

Funeral services for Sylvester Baker were held on Saturday morning, November 16, 2019 at St. Kateri Tekakwitha Parish, Sisseton, SD, with Fr. Jerry Ranek officiating.

Visitation was held at St. Kateri Thursday and Friday evening.

Interment was at the traditional burial grounds in rural Sisseton.

Honorary casket bearers were Labor Master employees, Blaze Johnson, Ive Norris and Chris Laducer.

Casket bearers were Mike Wilson, Stetson McKee, Jouite LaRoque, Tim Baker Jr., Derrick Enno and Tyvone Lawrence.

Chilson Funeral Home, Winsted, MN served the family.  On-line condolences can be made at www.chilsonfuneralhome.com

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and should be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Open letter to the Oyate

I enjoyed and agree with Marsha Renville's open letter to Sota dated October 31, 2019 "freedom of speech without retaliation."

 When one writes to the Sota with their opinion, it is just that "their opinion" and there should be no need for a response to be vicious, petty or personal by bring in family members names of the opinion giver.

I feel it is okay for a response to anything I say or when I give an opinion, no one has to agree with me.

When one writes to newspapers, one leaves themselves open to dialogue from others with their opinion(s).

I feel it is important to respectfully disagree and keep to the statements of the opinion giver.

Respectfully submitted.

Karen Ramirez, Savage, MN.

"Watch over me"

If my head begins to hang too low…

this prison life has exposed me to the

struggles and pains

of a dying nation,

what you don't see and don't understand

is being used against you,

my sacrifices are small in the

name of retribution…

yet unshakable we stand,

these scars and tattoos tell the stories

so it's clear we possess the strength

to overcome adversity,

but try to imagine a life

reduced to such pain and loneliness

it's crippling … with the chances of

survival less than fifty percent

I acknowledge the depth

and unorthodox life that has

desecrated our existence…

so protect the fond memories

and the future you see,

I pray … Tunkasina watch over me.

 

By Trinity L. Thompson

Nov. 9, 2019

Only Through Christ

 "For there is one God and one Mediator between God and men, the Man Christ Jesus, who gave himself a ransom for all, to be testified in due time ..." (I Timothy 2:5-6).

By Harry Renville

John 3:16-18; Acts 17:30-31; Romans 6; 1 Corinthians 15:1-4; Colossians 1:27; I John 1:7-10; Jesus said to him, "I am the way, the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me." John 14:6

Only God knows how many sunsets we will see, and just how many times the sun will rise over humanity; how many breaths we each have and who will be with Him when this evil age is done, God also knows who truly does love His only begotten Son. (Psalm 139:13-16; John 14:21-24; Colossians 1:16) Nevertheless the solid foundation of God stands, having this seal, "The Lord knows those who are His," and, "Let everyone who names the name of Christ depart from inequity." II Timothy 2:19

I don't know it all, but what I know I must proclaim you see, for I believe I am called to teach truth, even if some won't hear me; And I choose to obey His Word whatever others may say, so through God's gifts, I'll seek to teach His truth till I am called away. (John 17:17; Colossians 3:16; James 1:17) For this is good and acceptable in the sight of God our savior, who desires all men to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth. I Timothy 2:3-4

I've such a deep concern for two dear friends who don't seem to know, for I've sought to teach them the truth which they're not willing to accept though; I've lived for Christ today, but His truth they won't receive, not from me, only God can draw them and open their eyes that they will truly see. (Proverbs 24:11-12; Ephesians 1:18-21; I Thessalonians 5:14) No one comes to me unless the Father who sent me draws him; and I will raise him up at the last day. John 6:44

When one receives a new heart and has died to the lust of the world, he is then a saint strengthened by Christ, for Satan's darts will still be hurled; But saints can still stumble for a while here, perfection will never be, perfection will come when Christ takes him home eternally. (Isaiah 64:6; Ezekiel 19:20; Ephesians 8:9; 6:10-17; I Thessalonians 4:13-18; I John 2:15-17) Do you not know that the saints will judge the world? And if the world be judged by you, are you unworthy to judge the smallest matters? Do you not know that we shall judge angels? How much more, things that pertain to this life? I Corinthians 6:2-3

Should those who never have, start studying the Scriptures today, they would know that it's not through dead saints through whom God hears us when we pray; But many were taught that it's just too hard, so they won't even try, so due to the lack of knowledge sadly, many may eternally die. (Acts 4:12; Romans 8:26-34; Philippians 2:5-11) "And whatever you ask in my name, that I will do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son. If you ask anything in my name, I will do it." John 14:13-14

When I struggled with guilty thoughts from the past now and then, a good friend reminded me of Christ's sacrifice again; Christ paid for those sins when He gave His life for me and you, much more than that, He rose again so we can live eternally, too. (John 14:19; Acts 10:43; I Corinthians 6:19-20) If YOU, Lord, should mark inequity, Oh Lord, who could stand? But there is forgiven with you, that you may be feared. Psalm 130:3-4

If God was not dwelling in my heart, I'd still be lost with no hope, through loneliness and heartaches I wouldn't have been able to cope; But now with Christ in my heart, I am never alone now you see, and what could I do if God's Holy Spirit was not guiding me. (John 16:5-15; Romans 8:8-11; II Corinthians 3:17-18) "I am the vine, you are the branches. He who abides in me, and I in him, bears much fruit; for without me you can do nothing." John 15:5

I know how set you are in your ways, my friends, still I had to try, for truly God is not willing that you eternally die; I've sought so hard to teach you truth just as you once taught me, but again only God can open your eyes that you will truly see.

You, therefore, beloved, since you know this beforehand, beware lest you also fall from your own steadfastness, being led away with the error of the wicked, but grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and savior Jesus Christ. To Him be the glory both now and forever. Amen. II Peter 3:17-18

Prairie Doc® Perspectives –

Language, Literature, Ethics, Music and Spirit

By Richard P. Holm, MD

A muddle and mixture of family and friends surrounded the dying elderly woman like she was a campfire. They came to honor and pay their respects; many generations, from all over the country. This group seemed well educated, well-read, and the intellectual discussions were tossed around in that room like a basketball. She had said, to all, that it was time. "Please stop the dialysis," she insisted, and, it was stopped. At first, she was almost holding court, but over the days, as she was slipping across to the other side, the hymns started filling the room, spilling out into the hospital halls, helping to carry her home. Tears of sadness, appreciation, joy and family love flowed freely the night she died.

Hers was a story about language, literature, ethics, music and spirit. Take away language and literature, and the appreciation she deserved for years of pushing for education and learning for her family and friends would have passed without notice. Take away ethics, and the patient wouldn't have known she could stop dialysis. Take away music and spiritual energy, and the family wouldn't have grasped the true depth and value of the woman or the connection and love they shared with her and each other. The humanities give us meaning, but, from where and why did they begin?

There is no record or hard evidence as to how or when Homo sapiens began speaking, but there are plenty of theories. The one I like the most asserts that, at first, we sang and drummed descriptive sounds while pantomiming hunting stories around the campfire until, over hundreds and thousands of years, words and lyrics evolved. Much later, words became literature when written down in a retrievable way, first on clay tablets, then, on papyrus, parchment, paper and, now, computers.

More than one linguistic expert has theorized that it was language which facilitated the Homo sapiens species to grow and dominate. When ethical words about a common virtue, or rule, convinced, inspired and unified large collections of tribes, these ancient groups became empowered. Words from The Golden Rule, "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you," or the Code of Hammurabi, "A bag of barley is worth two shekels of silver," and even song lyrics like, "Kyrie eleison (Lord, have mercy)," have pushed civilization forward.

The history of humanity has been made bright by language, literature, ethics, music and spirit. Also bright was that room with the elderly dying patient and her loving and singing family and friends.

*****

Richard P. Holm, MD is founder of The Prairie Doc® and author of "Life's Final Season, A Guide for Aging and Dying with Grace" available on Amazon. For free and easy access to the entire Prairie Doc® library, visit www.prairiedoc.org and follow Prairie Doc® on Facebook featuring On Call with the Prairie Doc® a medical Q&A show streaming on Facebook and broadcast on SDPB most Thursdays at 7 p.m. central.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

Sisseton Middle School takes part in National Christmas Tree display

At 56 schools across the country, students are creating one-of-a-kind ornaments for the 2019 National Christmas Tree display on the Ellipse in President's Park. These handcrafted ornaments will adorn 56 smaller trees that surround the National Christmas Tree. The 56 trees represent each U.S. state, territory and the District of Columbia as part of the America Celebrates display.

Through a partnership with the National Park Service, the U.S. Department of Education worked with state art and education agencies to identify elementary, middle and high schools whose students would create the ornaments for the America Celebrates display. Over 1,500 students will participate in this year's project. The project is funded by the National Park Foundation.

The tree for South Dakota will adorn ornaments designed by 22 student representatives from the Sisseton Middle School Art Department and Art Educator Alexis Monroe. Sisseton Middle School accepted the opportunity to design ornaments in September, after being hand-selected by the South Dakota Department of Education through communication with Superintendent Tammy Meyer. Soon after, 24 clear two-piece plastic globe ornaments arrived at the door, ready for a group of 7th and 8th graders. Students were asked to create designs that are emblematic of their state, void of logos, slogans, political statements, or school names and identity, and spent time on planning visual themes that represent South Dakota. In all, each student and Mrs. Monroe came up with 24 entirely different designs for the ornaments that concentrate on SD animals, SD landscape, Native American culture, and farming and ranching. Most students used acrylic paint to create their designs on the inside and outside of the three-dimensional surface while one student created paper sculpture for the interior of the ornament.

The variety of designs that the students made are what makes this project unique to Sisseton. Within the category of animals, spectators will see a painted bison, horse, red fox, ring-necked pheasant, small grouping of grassland creatures and also a baby eagle sculpted out of paper, laying in its paper nest. Rolling hills, lakes country, the Black Hills, East river Prickly Pear Cactus, pasque flowers and a group of snowy white spruce were present in the landscape category. The Native American culture category showcased a snowy scene with a tipi and tree with ribbon for ceremony, an up close painting of the Crazy Horse Monument, the four directions and their meanings, a beadwork flower, Oceti Sakowin symbolism with sage inside, and a sage and echinacea filled ornament with a Dakota poem about Mother Earth. Farming and ranching were represented with a hayed field, barns and cattle scenes, a "red" tractor and a corn chopping operation in action. The ornaments were packaged carefully and placed in the mail at the end of October.

Mrs. Monroe commented, "We are genuinely honored to be chosen for this rare opportunity. The students have showcased their ability to create a visual behind an idea all while learning new Art techniques in a small amount of time. One student worked through the anniversary of her mother's death by creating a design that included healing medicine and using her love for writing and painting to scribe a poem on the outside of her ornament, telling us to 'Honor the Earth, our Mother.' She didn't realize the connection between her idea and what she was going through until the project was done. Art is powerful. Words cannot describe how proud I am of all of them."

"The ornaments created by our students are truly special, and depict many aspects of the various lifestyles, cultures and natural beauty of our state," said Sisseton Middle School Principal Michael Drew. "We are extremely proud of Mrs. Monroe and our students for representing Sisseton Middle School, and the State of South Dakota, at the National Christmas Tree celebration this year!"

The National Christmas Tree Lighting has strong ties to education. In 1923, a letter arrived at the White House from the District of Columbia Public Schools proposing that a decorated Christmas tree be placed on the South Lawn of the White House. On Christmas Eve that year, President Calvin Coolidge walked from the Oval Office to the Ellipse and pushed a button that lit the first National Christmas Tree. It was a 48-foot fir donated by Middlebury College in Vermont.

 Since 1973, the National Christmas Tree has been a living tree which can be viewed year-round in President's Park - one of America's 419 national parks! The National Park Service recently planted a new Colorado blue spruce to serve as the National Christmas Tree.

The National Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony will kick off the holiday season with live musical performances, special guests and the official lighting of the National Christmas Tree. The festivities continue with a daily lighting of the National Christmas Tree, free evening musical performances and a chance to see the 56 state, district and territory trees and their ornaments up close from Dec. 9, 2019 through Jan. 1, 2020.

 For more event information and updates, please visit www.thenationaltree.org or follow President's Park on Facebook or Twitter. Join the conversation online using the hashtag #NCTL2019.

2019 State Volleyball tournament to air on Venture Digital TV

Venture Communications, in cooperation with South Dakota Public TV (SDPB), will partner to bring the 2019 State Volleyball Tournament to Venture communities. For fans who will be unable to travel and attend the games in a live setting, Venture Communications will bring the live action to you.

Coverage for all class AA, A, and B games will begin Thursday November 21st continuing thru Friday November 22nd and Saturday November 23rd.  The games on Thursday & Friday will begin at 12:00 pm CST and Saturday games will begin at 8:00 am CST. 

Tune to the following Venture Digital TV channels to watch your favorite team:

*Class B Venture Digital TV Channel #399

*Class A Venture Digital TV Channel #400

*Class AA Venture Digital TV Channel #401

All games will be broadcast from the Rushmore Plaza Civic Center, Rapid City.

To access additional game times and team standings throughout the day go to sports.sdpb.org. 

New coalition hopes to create public charter schools based on Oceti Sakowin values

By Arielle Zionts

Rapid City, SD – Rapid City Journal – Nov. 17, 2019 – A new coalition hopes to improve Native American educational opportunities and outcomes by creating public charter schools in Rapid City and across the state based on the values of the Oceti Sakowin, the Lakota, Dakota and Nakota people.

"We don't want our culture, spirituality, our language to be viewed as an elective," said Sarah Pierce, one of the leaders of the South Dakota Education Equity Coalition. These schools will let students be "unapologetically Indian," she said. "They don't have to check their indigenous-ness at the door."

The coalition formed in August and is dedicated to improving equity for all students in South Dakota, said Pierce, a member of the Oglala Sioux Tribe and the former director of Indian Education at Rapid City Area Schools (RCAS).

The group introduced its first big project recently at the State-Tribal Relations Committee in Pierre — passing legislation that would allow communities to create public charter schools that are open to students of all backgrounds and rooted in Oceti Sakowin language, culture and knowledge.

South Dakota is one of five states — the others are North Dakota, Montana, Nebraska and Vermont — without legislation for charter schools, schools that are publicly funded but privately operated by a group such as a nonprofit or university.

The state passed a law in 2010 that would have allowed the state to create a charter high school for Native American students if it received funds from President Barack Obama's federal stimulus package. But it was repealed in 2018 after the state didn't receive any of those funds, according to a February 2018 article in the Mitchell Republic.

Although committee member and NDN Collective organizer Cante Heart lives in Rapid City, she said she sends her children to school on the Pine Ridge Reservation so they can learn their language, sing their songs and smudge.

Other members, Pierce said, live on reservations but send their children to city schools because they can be more academically rigorous.

"Our design will hopefully have a great balance that won't lack in rigor or culture," she said.

"I think creating more options is one step to addressing that inequity," Pierce said when asked why the group wants to create charter schools rather than focus on making traditional public schools more equitable and culturally inclusive.

"We're not intending to necessarily discredit the work that's being done within existing districts, only to create an alternative pathway," she said.

Pierce, who worked for Rapid City and Omaha public schools for eight years, said there are "a lot of limitations" within traditional schools. For example, students can only take Lakota at RCAS if they attend one of the three schools that offer it.

She also said that the charter schools could be helpful to students who have already dropped out of traditional schools, and that traditional schools could later end up incorporating some of the charters' practices.

The problem, solution

Native American students, who make up about 11 percent of the public school student population in South Dakota, lag behind their white peers when it comes to academic outcomes, according to the 2018-2019 school report cards.

Sixty-one percent of white students in the state met or exceeded the English language arts test compared to 23 percent of Native American students. When it comes to the science test, 53 percent of white students passed compared to 14 percent of Native American students. In the science test, 47 percent of white students passed compared to 13 percent of Native American students. Ninety-five percent of white students graduate from high school, and 56 percent are college and career ready compared to 66 percent and 13 percent, respectively, of Native Americans students.

The testing disparities between white and Native American students are similar at RCAS. But 91 percent of white students graduate from high school, and 49 percent are career and college ready compared to 54 and nine percent, respectively, of Native American students.

Oglala Lakota County has four state-run pre-K through eighth grade schools, one online high school, and is planning on opening a physical high school in August 2020. Eight percent of its students passed the English language arts test and 31 percent graduate from high school. Too few students passed the math and science tests and are college and career ready to post the data without jeopardizing their privacy.

The Pine Ridge Reservation also has schools funded and/or operated by the Bureau of Indian Education, which does not include graduation and career and college readiness data on its report cards. In spring 2016, four percent of the students at the Pine Ridge School passed the English language arts test while none of them passed the math test.

Native American students in urban schools also may see few teachers that look like them. Twenty to 24 percent of RCAS students are Native American while two percent of instructional staff (teachers, paraprofessionals, counselors, etc.) are Native American, said Robin Gillespie, director of federal grants at the district.

To understand educational disparities, Pierce said, you have to go back to the boarding school era and other education policies that created generational trauma by separating Native American families and stripping them of their culture.

"None of those efforts were truly designed with indigenous input in mind," she said.

Pierce said schools with an intentional focus on indigenous culture can lead to better outcomes for Native American students. She pointed to the Pemayetv Emahakv school in Florida, the NACA-Inspired Schools Network (NISN) in New Mexico, and the Anpo Wicahpi girls school and Lakota language programs at the Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation on the Pine Ridge Reservation. Anpo Wicahpi and Thunder Valley did not return messages asking to speak about their educational outcomes.

Other efforts to create indigenous-focused schools and curriculum have been rejected. Last week the North Carolina Charter Schools Advisory Board voted to reject a school in the Lumbee tribal community, according to the News & Observer. Board members said they were concerned the school would be exclusive towards non-indigenous students and that the school's teaching methods are linked to a professor they said is too critical of the U.S. government.

Next steps

The coalition has 30 members from 10-15 organizations including Teach for America, Thunder Valley, Anpo Wicahpi, NISN, the Rapid City and other school districts, and NDN Collective, a Rapid-City based nonprofit where Pierce and Heart work.

Gillespie said she joined the committee because she cares about Native American education and equity for all students. She said Whitnee Pearce, the director of Indian education who is working on cultural proficiency and implementing the state Oceti Sakowin standards at RCAS, is also in the group.

RCAS is still learning more about the charter school proposal so it has no position on whether it supports it or not, Gillespie said.

In addition to presenting its idea in Pierre, the coalition has met with state elected and appointed officials, tribal leaders and school districts. Heart, a member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, said the group also met with the Sicangu Community Development Corporation, which is working with NISN to open a Lakota immersion school whether or not charter legislation is passed.

Pierce said the coalition wants to open charter schools, rather than private schools, to ensure the schools have a sustainable source of funding. She said the schools may also use some private money.

Pierce said the group will ask for legislation that only allows for charter schools based on Oceti Sakowin values because the state is too small and rural to support a wide network of charter schools like some other states have. If legislation is approved, she thinks most schools will start with a few grades before expanding to a small-sized school of 200-250 students. She imagines students will be selected first-come-first-served or via lottery system if there's a high demand.

The group has met with union stakeholders to discuss whether the charter school staff could be part of the teacher's union or not, Pierce said. She said the schools would have to follow all state and national standards when it comes to education and transparency.

"The only difference would be there would be room for a a lot more creativity and innovation," Pierce said.

Legals

Request for Bids

Dakota Connection Casino

November 14, 2019

1.  Project Description

Dakota Connection Bingo and Casino is soliciting bids for replacement carpet for our main casino floor.

Work to be performed is located at 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, South Dakota 57262

2.  Project Scope

Work performed include tearing up existing glued down carpet and install approximately 1350 sq. ft. of new carpet tiles. Provide labor to tear up and install new carpet tiles, provide equipment to move some furniture fixtures. Supply and install track and insert transitions in doorways as needed. Provide patch compounds as needed to cover areas prep and patch, scrape floor as needed to install new flooring. Any manufacturer's warranty specifications will include a contractor's warranty of work for one-year commencing from completion and acceptance of the project

3.  Disposal of existing carpet

Disposal of old carpeting shall be performed by Dakota Connection.

4.  Bid Schedule Sheet

The Bidder shall be responsible for conducting site review, inspection of project area and recording and taking all measurements associated with the furnishing materials and completing the tasks listed above. All bidders must have a bid schedule sheet completed in full quantities, unit cost per bid item, total cost per bid item and total cost for the proposed project.  Include in the bid timelines on the start and completion of the project. All inquiries shall be directed to Jeremiah Johnson, Facility Manager of Dakota Connection at 605-698-4273 office or 605-419-2294 cell

5.  Compliant with TERO Requirements

All Bids must include, along with bid schedule sheet:

1.  Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Business License

2.  Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate TERO Certification, if applicable

3.  Workman's Compensation Coverage

4.  Liability Insurance

5.  TERO Tax 3.00%

6.  Sisseton-Wahpeton Tribal Tax Requirements

     All bids must be in compliant with Tribal Tax Requirements:

1.  Sisseton-Wahpeton Tribal Use tax 5.50%

2.  Sisseton-Wahpeton Tribal Excise tax 2.00%

Any questions regarding TERO and SWO Tribal Tax please contact the SWO TERO office or the SWO Tax Office at 605-698-3911

7.  Timeline (s)

Bids will be received by Dakota Connection Facility department beginning November 18, 2019 and closing on November 25, 2019 at noon.

47-1tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

IN TRIBAL COURT

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

& NOTICE OF HEARING

Sisseton Wahpeton Office of Child Support

Enforcement Agency,

vs.

VARIOUS DEFENDANTS AS SHOWN BELOW

It has been established that the SWOCSE and the Court cannot locate or serve the following Defendants in the following cases:

SCOTT BRAVEBULL, Multiple cases Scheduled for November 25, 2019 @ 9:00 o'clock a.m.

DERRICK FLUTE, Multiple cases – Scheduled for November 25, 2019 @ 9:00 o'clock a.m. 

LYDIA GODFREY, Multiple cases – Scheduled for November 25, 2019 @ 9:00 o'clock a.m.

TYLER SULLIVAN, Multiple cases – Scheduled for November 25, 2019 @ 9:00 o'clock a.m.

Therefore, it is hereby ORDERED that Notice by Publication is hereby provided herein on the various HEARINGS FOR CHILD SUPPORT and that a hearing will be held on the dates and times as shown, to occur at the Tribal Court, SWO Admin Building, Old Agency, South Dakota.

ALL ABOVE DEFENDANTS ARE HEREBY GIVEN NOTICE AND ARE ORDERED TO ATTEND THE HEARINGS AND THAT FAILURE TO DO SO MAY RESULT IN A WARRANT FOR YOUR ARREST.

Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the pleadings/filings describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of October 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT.

ATTEST:

/S//S/

Gina Ruggieri, Presiding Judge

Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court.

45-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

IN TRIBAL COURT

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

& NOTICE OF HEARING

Sisseton Wahpeton Office of Child Support

Enforcement Agency,

vs.

VARIOUS DEFENDANTS AS SHOWN BELOW

It has been established that the SWOCSE and the Court cannot locate or serve the following Defendants in the following cases:

TRESSA BISSONETTE, Multiple cases Scheduled for November 25, 2019 @ 1:00 o'clock p.m.

DAISY HARE, Multiple cases – Scheduled for November 25, 2019 @ 1:00 o'clock p.m. 

JOSEPH JOHNSON, Multiple cases – Scheduled for November 25, 2019 @ 1:00 o'clock p.m.

Therefore, it is hereby ORDERED that Notice by Publication is hereby provided herein on the various HEARINGS FOR CHILD SUPPORT and that a hearing will be held on the dates and times as shown, to occur at the Tribal Court, SWO Admin Building, Old Agency, South Dakota.

ALL ABOVE DEFENDANTS ARE HEREBY GIVEN NOTICE AND ARE ORDERED TO ATTEND THE HEARINGS AND THAT FAILURE TO DO SO MAY RESULT IN A WARRANT FOR YOUR ARREST.

Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the pleadings/filings describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of October 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT.

ATTEST:

/S//S/

Gina Ruggieri, Presiding Judge

Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court.

45-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

IN TRIBAL COURT

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

& NOTICE OF HEARING

Sisseton Wahpeton Office of Child Support

Enforcement Agency,

vs.

VARIOUS DEFENDANTS AS SHOWN BELOW

It has been established that the SWOCSE and the Court cannot locate or serve the following Defendants in the following cases:

DAVID CARPER, I-20-007 Scheduled for November 26th, 2019 @ 9:00 o'clock a.m.

CHRISTOPHER PATTEN, I-20-009 Scheduled for November 26th, 2019 @ 9:00 o'clock a.m. 

Therefore, it is hereby ORDERED that Notice by Publication is hereby provided herein on the various HEARINGS FOR CHILD SUPPORT and that a hearing will be held on the dates and times as shown, to occur at the Tribal Court, SWO Admin Building, Old Agency, South Dakota.

ALL ABOVE DEFENDANTS ARE HEREBY GIVEN NOTICE AND ARE ORDERED TO ATTEND THE HEARINGS AND THAT FAILURE TO DO SO MAY RESULT IN A WARRANT FOR YOUR ARREST.

Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the pleadings/filings describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of October 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT.

ATTEST:

/S//S/

Gina Ruggieri, Presiding Judge

Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court.

45-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

IN TRIBAL COURT

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS- 20-008

SWOCSE/ Destinee Eastman, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JESSE ESTES, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

& NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of November 2019 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 31st day of October, 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT.

ATTEST:

/S//S/

Gina Ruggieri, Presiding Judge

Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court.

45-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

IN TRIBAL COURT

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS-19-192

SWOCSE/ Dallis Rencountre, PLAINTIFF

VS.

COREY SHEPHERD JR., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

& NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of November 2019 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 1st day of November 2019

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT.

ATTEST:

/S//S/

Gina Ruggieri, Presiding Judge

Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court.

45-3tc

October 2019 Tribal Council proceedings

REGULAR TRIBAL COUNCIL MEETING

Thursday, October 3, 2019, 9:00 AM

TiWakan Tio Tipi Council Chambers

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT:

BIG COULEE:                      Lisa Jackson

BUFFALO LAKE:                 Louis Johnson

ENEMY SWIM:                     Cheryl Owen

LAKE TRAVERSE:               Francis Crawford

LONG HOLLOW:                 Curtis Bissonette

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT:

HEIPA/VEBLEN:  Winfield Rondell Jr. (suspended pending hearing) 

OLD AGENCY:     Milton Owen (medical)

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES PRESENT: Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr. and Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES ABSENT: Tribal Chairman Donovan White (funeral)

 

CALL TO ORDER: Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr. called the meeting to order at 11:07 AM with two (2) Executives and five (5) Council members from seven (7) Districts answering Roll Call. Opening Prayer for the Long Hollow District said by Long Hollow Tribal Council Member Curtis Bissonette.

 

MOTION NO. 1: made by Myrna Thompson, second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Louis Johnson, to approve the Regular Tribal Council Meeting Minutes of Tuesday, September 10, 2019.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 1: 9 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Curtis Bissonette (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.              0 Abstained.  2 Absent From Vote: Francis Crawford (2).  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 2: made by Cheryl Owen, second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Myrna Thompson, to approve the Regular Tribal Council Meeting Minutes of Wednesday, September 11, 2019.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 2: 9 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Curtis Bissonette (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.              0 Abstained.  2 Absent From Vote: Francis Crawford (2).  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 3: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Louis Johnson, to approve the Special Tribal Council Meeting Minutes of Tuesday, September 17, 2019.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 3: 9 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Curtis Bissonette (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.            2 Abstained: Francis Crawford (2).  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 4: made by Myrna Thompson, second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Cheryl Owen, to amend Tribal Council Motion No. 92, of 9/25/19, to now read; "to hire Joseph F. Halloran of the Jacobson Law Group, as a temporary Special Attorney, to represent the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate in two matters: (1) the Shakopee Loan Agreement; and (2) the Tribal Court lawsuit of Debra Flute, Megan LaFromboise, and Shaun Eastman v. Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation, and the Chairman is authorized to execute a standard attorney contract at the same rate as outside legal, pending legal review."

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 4: 11 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 5: made by Myrna Thompson, second by Francis Crawford, question by Cheryl Owen, to rescind Tribal Council Motion No. 99, of 9/25/19, "to approve the FY 2020 Budget Matrix - Option 1, with revisions, as recommended by the SWO Tribal Executives, and as presented by Budget Supervisor Lexie Fancher, to include: salary adjustments, no COLAs, no work performance, Holiday incentive at $250, Boards & Committees reduced to $100/regular meeting and $50/special meeting, REB at $1,500/election day, DEB at $750/election day, and Animal Control Officer at 24 hours/week."

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 5: 9 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.      2 Abstained: Lisa Jackson (2).  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 6: made by Francis Crawford, second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Myrna Thompson, to approve Executive Resolution No. 19-07, "Extension for P.L. 93-638 Law Enforcement Contract for FY2019".

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 6: 11 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

                Executive Resolution No. 19-07

 

MOTION NO. 7: made by Francis Crawford, second by Myrna Thompson, to approve Executive Resolution No. 19-08, "Reschedule Veblen Tribal Councilman Winfield Rondell Jr. Hearing".

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 7: 11 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

                Executive Resolution No. 19-08

 

MOTION NO. 8: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Louis Johnson, to approve the BIA Route 11 Barse Trail Rehab Project budget, in the amount $4,500.00, with the TTP budget as the funding source, as presented by Department of Transportation Director Cliff Eberhardt.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 8: 11 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 9: made by Francis Crawford, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Lisa Jackson, to approve the Department of Transportation report, as presented by Director Cliff Eberhardt.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 9: 11 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 10: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Louis Johnson, to select Mayou Electric for electrical work at the Behavioral Health and the Dakota Language Institute buildings, in the amount of $6,205.52, with the Facilities Management budget as the funding source, as presented by Interim Facilities Manager Breon Lake.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 10: 11 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 11: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Louis Johnson, to approve request for support for the Drop-In Center, located in Sisseton, SD, in the amount of $5,000.00, for labor and materials, with the Chairman's budget as the funding source, as requested by Tribal Chairman Donovan White, and as presented by Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 11: 9 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Curtis Bissonette (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.              0 Abstained.  2 Absent From Vote: Francis Crawford (2).  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

               MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 12: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Executive Committee Minutes for the meeting held Friday, September 27, 2019.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 12: 11 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

               MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 13: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Tribal Chairman written report, excluding item #4, pending further discussion, as submitted by Tribal Chairman Donovan White.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 13: 11 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 14: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation Grant budget, as presented by Budget Supervisor Lexie Fancher.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 14: 11 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 15: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Myrna Thompson, to approve the Native Language Immersion Initiative Grant budget, as presented by Budget Supervisor Lexie Fancher.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 15: 11 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 16: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the FY 2020 Budget Matrix - Option 2 Re-adjusted, as recommended by the Tribal Executives, and as presented by Budget Supervisor Lexie Fancher.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 16: 11 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 17: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Curtis Bissonette, to advertise a Request for Proposals (RFP) for accounting software for the Tribal Financial Departments, as presented by Budget Supervisor Lexie Fancher.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 17: 11 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 18: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Myrna Thompson, to approve the Budget Office report, as presented by Budget Supervisor Lexie Fancher.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 18: 11 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 19: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Curtis Bissonette, to approve the Tribal Vice-Chairman report, as presented by Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 19: 11 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 20: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Francis Crawford, question by Lisa Jackson, to approve the Tribal Secretary report, as presented by Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 20: 11 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 21: made by Francis Crawford, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Lisa Jackson, to acknowledge the receipt of the Heipa District Minutes for the meeting held September 8, 2019.

Heipa District Minutes for meeting held September 8, 2019:

1.             Terminate Chief of Police, Gary Gaikowski for neglect of duty.

2.             Invite SWO Vice-Chairman, Eddie Johnson to next district meeting.

3.             Leave the 18-20 year old, key and PMO licenses alone for district day because the bill of rights under SWO Constitution, Article 9, Section 1 states that all members of the SWO shall be accorded equal political rights and equal opportunities to participate in the economic resources and activities of the Tribe.

4.             Present Tribal Attorneys start concentrating on EPAC Code, Civil Rights Office Code, Hemp Code, Medical Marijuana Code, Construction Management, 7 member REB Board and hire legal attorney to get our boundaries back.

5.             Any new Economic Development go through RPC.

6.             Start construction on the new detention center immediately. There should be 5 million set aside from settlement account.

7.             Approve Youth-to-Adult Membership: Elonna LaFromboise, Angelia White, and Isaiah Heminger-Rousseau.

8.             Approve Adult Membership: Shawn Nanaeto, Mikaylah Nanaeto, and Liliyah Nanaeto.

9.             Terminate Steve Sandven's contract.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 21: 11 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 22: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Louis Johnson, to acknowledge the receipt of the Big Coulee District Minutes for the meeting held September 26, 2019.

Big Coulee District Minutes for meeting held September 26, 2019:

1.             Approve Adult Membership: Brianna Fuentes, Shayla Kaczmarczyk, Cindy Lamb, Lillian Lawrence, Chelsey Martin, Wacey McClure, Cydney White, Elisa White, and Gayle Vasquez.

2.             Approve Youth Membership: Jasper Brown, Ashley Eastman, Ta Wakanhdi Ota Eastman, Makwa Geshick, Khyler LaCroix, Destiny LaFromboise, Isaiah LaFromboise, Damon Martin, Brooklyn McClure, Jasper McClure, Kellen McClure, Nataleigh Montreal, Nino Montreal ll, Harmony Stands on Top, and Rocky Traversie.

3.             Deny the district relinquishment: Eric Shepherd.

4.             Reaffirm BCD motion to have SWO Council make their own motion to proceed with gravel for district members and direct the BCD Councilwoman to present and bring back to the district a firm date.

5.             All contracts are reviewed and or revised by the tribal legal counsel before it goes to the SWO Council for approval.

6.             Not lower the proposed revision of Lakeshore Taxes and leave them as is.

7.             Approve the revision of Part X of Chapter 67 Tax Code to eliminate the tax on sweetened beverages and keep the tax on energy drinks.

8.             Recommend that every tribal vendor have their taxes taken out of their payments before tribal finance cut their checks and all contract taxes taken out per tax regulations.

9.             The SWO Council and Budget Office cannot touch Program Generated Funding.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 22: 11 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 23: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Lisa Jackson, to acknowledge the receipt of the Long Hollow District Minutes for the meeting held September 19, 2019.

Long Hollow District Minutes for meeting held September 19, 2019:

1.             Direct Councilman to request a free meal at 2019 district days.

2.             Approve Youth Membership: Roger Redday III, Servando Blue, Giselle Bird, Gianna Hernandaz, Aisley Laughter, Letrenton Goodsell, Wakinyan Graves, Tristen White, and Graciela Gacia-Hare.

3.             Approve Youth-to-Adult membership: Teyana Provancial, Shantel Wilson, Boydi Keeble, Sienna Guerue, Sarah LeBeau, Tavis Driver, and Joseph Cloud.

4.             Approve Relinquishment: Gabriel Hare, Bryce Hare, and Phillip Hare.

5.             Approve District Membership: James Genia Jr. and Lisa Cleveland.

6.             Councilman Curtis Bissonette to make motion to reinstate $10,000 from tribal roads budget for each district for private home owners gravel and tribal roads will do the gravel effective immediately.

7.             Accept TEAB results.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 23: 11 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 24: made by Francis Crawford, second by Louis Johnson, question by Curtis Bissonette, to acknowledge the receipt of the Lake Traverse District Minutes for the meeting held September 26, 2019.

Lake Traverse District Minutes for meeting held September 26, 2019:

1.             Seat Shannon White.

2.             Steve Sandven return that jump drive and if he does not then go after his lawyer license.

3.             All job positions under Human Resources that they be advertised.

4.             All the tribal departments budgets be to Council by June and to enforce the accounting manual.

5.             Get rid of Judicial and have them reapply.

6.             Reaffirm Shannon White as our Judicial Representative.

7.             Our Tribal leaders get ahold of our Congressional leaders.

8.             Approve Youth-to-Adult Membership: Greyson His Gun, Primitivo Banuelos Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 24: 11 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 25: made by Cheryl Owen, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Curtis Bissonette, to acknowledge the receipt of the Enemy Swim District Minutes for the meeting held September 26, 2019.

Enemy Swim District Minutes for meeting held September 26, 2019:

1.             Accept the Special District elections September 18, 2019.

2.             Accept Adult and Youth Membership: Adult - Darius Burley, Lorenzo Lufkins, Devon Rencontre, Brayden Roberts, Ramona Roy-Cadotte, Katelyn Tordsen, Lyla Tordsen, Quinton Tordsen, Prestin Brown, and Dalon Gurely. Youth - Kato Bissonette, Kito Bissonette, Haven Thennis, Dakota Milk, Leighthan Rockwood, Lorence Rockwood, Kairah Vermillion, Lea White, and Virgil White.

3.             Support the Cultural Preservation Committee in their request to preserve cultural archives and to also support the language institution, due to SWO budget cuts.

4.             Nominate Juliah Goodsell to the Constitution Revision Committee.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 25: 11 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 26: made by Louis Johnson, second by Francis Crawford, question by Lisa Jackson, to acknowledge the receipt of the Buffalo Lake District Minutes for the meeting held September 26, 2019.

Buffalo Lake District Minutes for meeting held September 26, 2019:

1.             Accept the verbal resignation of Lorraine Rousseau from the SWO Judicial Committee that will be effective Friday, September 27th, 2019 at 4:30pm.

2.             Place the Buffalo Lake District Chairman as the District representative on the SWO Judicial Committee until the election will be held.

3.             Approve Youth Membership: Laila Johnson.

4.             Request DCA's assistance in obtaining school clothes from the tribe for Head Start youth and to reimburse the districts for school clothes from 2018.

5.             Request on behalf of The Buffalo Lanes the $150,000.00 from Section 7 funds and as always to be used solely for The Buffalo Lanes.

6.             Approach Tribal Council and request approval and or permission to submit a grant to Shakopee for financial assistance with The Buffalo Lanes.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 26: 11 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

Note       Old Agency District did not have a District meeting in September 2019.

 

MOTION NO. 27: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the District Chairman's Association (DCA) report, as presented by DCA Members; Kenneth Johnson, Norma Perko, Jessie Chanku, Brenda Bellonger, Jesse Larsen, Darwin James, and Delbert Hopkins Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 27: 11 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Curtis Bissonette (2); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 28: made by Francis Crawford, second by Cheryl Owen, to adjourn.

                MEETING ADJOURNED 3:19PM.   

 

Respectfully Submitted, Lindsey Abraham, Recording Secretary Asst.

 

REGULAR TRIBAL COUNCIL MEETING

Friday, October 4, 2019, 9:00 AM

TiWakan Tio Tipi Council Chambers

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT:

BIG COULEE:                     Lisa Jackson

BUFFALO LAKE:                 Louis Johnson

ENEMY SWIM:                     Cheryl Owen

LAKE TRAVERSE:               Francis Crawford

LONG HOLLOW:                 Curtis Bissonette

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT:

HEIPA/VEBLEN:  Winfield Rondell Jr. (suspended pending hearing) 

OLD AGENCY:     Milton Owen (medical)

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES PRESENT: Tribal Chairman Donovan White (9:20), Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr., and Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson

 

CALL TO ORDER: Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr. called the meeting to order at 9:17 AM with two (2) Executives and five (5) Council members from seven (7) Districts answering Roll Call. Opening Prayer for the Long Hollow District said by Long Hollow Tribal Council Member Curtis Bissonette.

 

MOTION NO. 29: made by Francis Crawford, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Lisa Jackson, to approve the draft resolution, "Authorizing Request for and Approving Withdrawal of ILCA Land Purchase Funds Held in Trust by OST to Purchase On-Reservation Trust or Restricted Interests from Lorraine Rousseau", 13.72 acres, in the amount of $19,038.62, as recommended by the Reservation Planning Commission, and as presented by Realty Manager Jerry Eastman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 29: 12 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

                Resolution No. SWO-19-095

 

MOTION NO. 30: made by Francis Crawford, second by Louis Johnson, question by Lisa Jackson, to approve the Appraisal Services Agreement with DAL Appraisal & Land Services, with the Realty budgets as the funding source, and to authorize Tribal Chairman Donovan White to execute the Agreement, as presented by Realty Manager Jerry Eastman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 30: 12 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 31: made by Francis Crawford, second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Regular Tribal Council Meeting Minutes of Wednesday, September 25, 2019.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 31: 12 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 32: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Tribal Chairman's full report, as presented by Tribal Chairman Donovan White.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 32: 12 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 33: made by Cheryl Owen, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Myrna Thompson, to approve the Realty Office report, as presented by Realty Manager Jerry Eastman.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 33: 12 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 34: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Myrna Thompson, to approve the resolution, "Authorization to Submit the Native Voices Endowment: A Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Legacy Project Grant through the Endangered Language Fund", as presented by Education Director Dr. Sherry Johnson.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 34: 12 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

                Resolution No. SWO-19-096

 

MOTION NO. 35: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Lisa Jackson, to authorize the Tribal Research Office to apply for a Tribal Public Health Project grant from the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's Health Board and the Great Plains Tribal Epidemiology Center, as presented by Education Director Dr. Sherry Johnson.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 35: 12 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 36: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the resolution, "Authorization to Submit the Community Innovation Grant through the Bush Foundation", as presented by Education Director Dr. Sherry Johnson.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 36: 12 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

                Resolution No. SWO-19-097

 

MOTION NO. 37: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Lisa Jackson, to authorize the reimbursement to Enemy Swim Day School, for ten (10) Lightspeed Redcat Access Classroom Audio Systems, in the amount of $11,010.00, with the Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi grant as the funding source, as presented by Education Director Dr. Sherry Johnson.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 37: 12 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 38: made by Cheryl Owen, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Louis Johnson, to approve the Native American Day Hand Game Tournament & Moccasin Tournament budget, in the amount of $6,500.00, with the Executive Committee budget as the funding source, as presented by Education Director Dr. Sherry Johnson. 

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 38: 10 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  2 Opposed: Francis Crawford (2).  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 39: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Francis Crawford, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the September 2019 CACFP Food report for Head Start & Early Head Start, as presented by Director Lynn Halbert.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 39: 12 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 40: made by Francis Crawford, second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Lisa Jackson, to approve the September 2019 Budget/Expense Report for Head Start and Early Head Start, as presented by Director Lynn Halbert.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 40: 12 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 41: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Louis Johnson, to approve the September 2019 Attendance Report for Head Start and Early Head Start, as presented by Director Lynn Halbert.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 41: 12 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 42: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Francis Crawford, question by Louis Johnson, to authorize the payment to Northside Implement, for engine replacement on a school bus, in the amount of $22,659.95, with the Head Start budgets as the funding source, as presented by Head Start Director Lynn Halbert.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 42: 12 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 43: made by Cheryl Owen, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Myrna Thompson, to approve the Head Start & Early Head Start report, as presented by Director Lynn Halbert.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 43: 12 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 44: made by Lynn Halbert, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Myrna Thompson, in resolution form, to enroll into the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate the two (2) applicants as listed in Exhibit A, as presented by Enrollment Officer Zelma Flute.

                Block, Kysa Rae   Garcia-DeCoteau, Genesis Angel

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 44: 10 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  2 Abstained: Curtis Bissonette (2).  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

                Resolution No. SWO-19-098

 

MOTION NO. 45: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Myrna Thompson, in resolution form, to enroll into the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate the ten (10) applicants as listed in Exhibit B, as presented by Enrollment Officer Zelma Flute.

                Coffman, Maeley Joleen    Gerry, Chasten Mikel

                Halvorson, Theresa Mae    Hart, Donna Renee

                Hill, Darien Isaiah                 LaCroix, Anthony James

                One Horn, Layiah Nicole    Poor Bear, Ariah Jacob

                Renville, Loyalty Rykell       Sotomayor, Luis Angel

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 45: 12 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

                Resolution No. SWO-19-099

 

MOTION NO. 46: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Edmund Johnson Jr., in resolution form, to enroll into the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate the ten (10) applicants as listed in Exhibit C, as presented by Enrollment Officer Zelma Flute.

                Biddell, John Clyde Mathias               Bohlmann, Sierra Deohnne

                Drum, Jace Kenneth           Geshick, Makwa Dayton

                Good Bear, Hunter Nikoli   Good Bear, Izaac Malachi

                Renville, Grayson Lee         Renville, Kieran Colt

                Shortman, Basileeah Hope                Simon, Gavin Lee

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 46: 12 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

                Resolution No. SWO-19-100

 

MOTION NO. 47: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Enrollment Office report, as presented by Enrollment Officer Zelma Flute.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 47: 12 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 48: made by Myrna Thompson, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to reduce the stipends of Tribal boards and committees to $100/regular meeting and $50/special meeting, with only one (1) special meeting allowed per month, and Reservation Election Board (REB) stipends reduced to $1,500.00/election day, with allowable mileage for REB.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 48: 12 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 49: made by Edmund Johnson Jr., second by Cheryl Owen, question by Francis Crawford, to go into Executive Session, at 12:07pm.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 49: 10 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  2 Absent From Vote: Curtis Bissonette (2).  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 50: made by Francis Crawford, second by Edmund Johnson Jr., question by Curtis Bissonette, to come out of Executive Session, at 12:19pm.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 50: 12 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 51: made by Francis Crawford, second by Curtis Bissonette, to adjourn.

                MEETING ADJOURNED 12:20PM.

Respectfully Submitted, Lindsey Abraham, Recording Secretary Asst.

 

SPECIAL TRIBAL COUNCIL MEETING

Thursday, October 10, 2019, 4:06 PM

TiWakan Tio Tipi Council Chambers

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT:

BIG COULEE:                     Lisa Jackson

ENEMY SWIM:                     Cheryl Owen

LAKE TRAVERSE:               Francis Crawford

LONG HOLLOW:                 Curtis Bissonette

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT:

BUFFALO LAKE: Louis Johnson

HEIPA/VEBLEN:  Winfield Rondell Jr. (suspended pending hearing)

OLD AGENCY:     Milton Owen (medical)

               

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES PRESENT: Tribal Chairman Donovan White and Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr.

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES ABSENT: Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson (funeral)

 

CALL TO ORDER: Tribal Chairman Donovan White called the meeting to order at 4:06 PM with two (2) Executives and four (4) Council members from seven (7) Districts answering Roll Call.

 

MOTION NO. 52: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the resolution, "Authorizes PL 93-638 Contract for Planning, Design, and Construction of SWO Substance Abuse Treatment Center to Enhance Existing IHS Behavioral Health at SWO Service Unit", as presented by Tribal Chairman Donovan White.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 52: 10 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Lisa Jackson (2); Francis Crawford (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

                Resolution No. SWO-19-101

 

MOTION NO. 53: made by Francis Crawford, second by Curtis Bissonette, question by Edmund Johnson Jr., to have the Tribal Vice-Chairman's Office oversee the disbursement of the funds, and process all bills, invoices, and payments for the upcoming 2019 Veterans Wacipi, and to have an itemized expenditure report for Tribal Council review within thirty (30) days after the event.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 53: 10 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Lisa Jackson (2); Francis Crawford (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 54: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Lisa Jackson, to allocate $100 per child for Head Start students, that are three (3) years of age or older, for school clothes funding, provided that the children have proof of enrollment in Head Start, with the Reserve account as the funding source for FY 2020, and the Youth budget as the funding source for FY 2021.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 54: 10 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Lisa Jackson (2); Francis Crawford (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 55: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Edmund Johnson Jr., to authorize Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise to research the feasibility of sports betting at Dakota Magic Casino, with the authorization for DNGE to tentatively commit with the other North Dakota Tribes on pursuing an agreement with IGT for sports betting, pending review of the fees/costs and contract language, and to also request North Dakota officials to authorize Geo-fencing around the State of North Dakota for the purposes of mobile sports betting.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 55: 10 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Lisa Jackson (2); Francis Crawford (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 56: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to amend the Scope of Work in the contract with the Bureau of Indian Affairs, for the SWO Community Justice Center.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 56: 10 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Lisa Jackson (2); Francis Crawford (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 57: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Francis Crawford, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the resolution, "Calling upon Congress to Enact the Remove the Stain Act, HR 3467".

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 57: 10 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Lisa Jackson (2); Francis Crawford (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

                Resolution No. SWO-19-102

 

MOTION NO. 58: made by Francis Crawford, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Lisa Jackson, in resolution form, to nominate SWO Tribal Member Woodrow Wilson Keeble to be entered into the North Dakota Hall of Fame.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 58: 10 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Lisa Jackson (2); Francis Crawford (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

                Resolution No. SWO-19-103

 

MOTION NO. 59: made by Cheryl Owen, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Francis Crawford, to select Chris Seaboy to serve as Dakota Connection Casino Interim General Manager until the position is filled, pending a PMO license, as presented by Tribal Chairman Donovan White.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 59: 10 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Lisa Jackson (2); Francis Crawford (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1). 0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 60: made by Francis Crawford, second by Edmund Johnson Jr., to adjourn.

                MEETING ADJOURNED 4:50PM.   

Respectfully Submitted, Lindsey Abraham, Recording Secretary Asst.

 

SPECIAL TRIBAL COUNCIL MEETING

Wednesday, October 16, 2019, 10:00 AM

TiWakan Tio Tipi Council Chambers

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT:

BIG COULEE:                     Lisa Jackson

BUFFALO LAKE:                 Louis Johnson

ENEMY SWIM:                     Cheryl Owen

HEIPA/VEBLEN:                  (suspended pending hearing)  

LAKE TRAVERSE:               Francis Crawford

LONG HOLLOW:                 Curtis Bissonette

OLD AGENCY:                     Milton Owen         

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES PRESENT: Tribal Chairman Donovan White, Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr., and Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson

 

CALL TO ORDER: Tribal Chairman Donovan White called the meeting to order at 10:08 AM with three (3) Executives and six (6) Council members from seven (7) Districts answering Roll Call. Opening Prayer for the Long Hollow District said by Old Agency Tribal Council Member Milton Owen.

 

Note:      This Special Tribal Council Meeting was called to conduct a Removal Hearing for Heipa Tribal Council Member Winfield Rondell Jr. for alleged violation(s) of the SWO Constitution & By-Laws as set forth in the written statement of charges memorialized in Tribal Council Resolution No. SWO-19-093.

 

Note:      Heipa Tribal Council Member Winfield Rondell Jr. is present at this meeting/hearing with his legal counsel, Alexander Vian.

 

MOTION NO. 61: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, to deviate from the Hearing Guidelines and allow the Hearing portion of this meeting to be open to the public, as requested by Heipa Tribal Council Member Winfield Rondell Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 61: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairwoman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.       0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 62: made by Lisa Jackson, to have Lake Traverse Tribal Council Member Francis Crawford and Old Agency Tribal Council Member Milton Owen recuse themselves from the hearing, due to alleged conflicts-of-interest, as requested by Heipa Tribal Council Member Winfield Rondell Jr.

                MOTION DIED. Lack of Second.

 

Note:      At the start of the hearing, Mr. Rondell requested that Council Members Francis Crawford and Milton Owen be recused due to an alleged conflict of interest because both have extended family members related to Lennie Bernard. When requested to support the allegation with argument at the hearing, the only information provided to the Council was the statement that an alleged conflict exists, no other information has been provided.

 

MOTION NO. 63: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Francis Crawford, question by Milton Owen, to go into Executive Session, at 1:24pm, to view surveillance tape, which pertains to Mr. Rondell and several Tribal employees.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 63: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairwoman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.       0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 64: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to come out of Executive Session, at 2:38pm.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 64: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairwoman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.       0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 65: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Francis Crawford, to go into Executive Session, at 3:15pm.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 65: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairwoman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.       0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 66: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Milton Owen, question by Francis Crawford, to come out of Executive Session, at 5:30pm.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 66: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairwoman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.       0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 67: made by Francis Crawford, second by Milton Owen, question by Edmund Johnson Jr., the Tribal Council considered three written charges of improper conduct against Heipa Tribal Council Member Winfield Rondell Jr. on Wednesday, October 16, 2019, at the Tribal Council Chambers. Council Member Rondell had previously been served with the written statement of charges.  Council Member Rondell appeared at the October 16th hearing and was represented during the removal hearing by legal counsel, Alexander Vian, and received a full opportunity to be heard on each of the written charges. After considering the written charges, reviewing the evidence and testimony provided, and hearing from Council Member Rondell, Tribal Council finds Council Member Winfield Rondell Jr. to be not guilty of Charge #3:

Charge #3

The family of Maynard Bernard alleges that Councilman Rondell showed gross neglect of duties and oppression by receiving confidential information and then sending this protected, and confidential information to a third party who has no rights to said information. This in itself is a clear breach of Section 4(b)(4).

Councilmember Rondell is charged with violating the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Constitution & Bylaws, Code Of Ethics:

Section 4(b)(4) "malfeasance of office: including gross partiality or oppression."

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 67: 7 For: Francis Crawford (Yes); Curtis Bissonette (Yes); Cheryl Owen (Yes); Milton Owen (Yes); Lisa Jackson (Yes); Louis Johnson (Yes); Tribal Vice-Chairwoman (Yes).  1 Opposed: Tribal Secretary (No). 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 68: made by Francis Crawford, second by Louis Johnson, question by Lisa Jackson, the Tribal Council considered three written charges of improper conduct against Heipa Tribal Council Member Winfield Rondell Jr. on Wednesday, October 16, 2019, at the Tribal Council Chambers. Council Member Rondell had previously been served with the written statement of charges.  Council Member Rondell appeared at the October 16th hearing and was represented during the removal hearing by legal counsel, Alexander Vian, and received a full opportunity to be heard on each of the written charges. After considering the written charges, reviewing the evidence and testimony provided, and hearing from Council Member Rondell, Tribal Council finds Council Member Winfield Rondell Jr. to be not guilty of Charge #2:

Charge #2

The family of Maynard Bernard believes that Councilman Rondell has used his status as an elected official to obtain private and confidential information and see this as a major breach of improper conduct and abuse of his authority as a tribal leader.

Councilmember Rondell is charged with violating the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Constitution & Bylaws, Code Of Ethics:

Section 4(b)(3) Improper Conduct, "Public conduct so as to question the integrity of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate."

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 68: 8 For: Francis Crawford (Yes); Curtis Bissonette (Yes); Cheryl Owen (Yes); Milton Owen (Yes); Lisa Jackson (Yes); Louis Johnson (Yes); Tribal Vice-Chairwoman (Yes); Tribal Secretary (Yes).       0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 69: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Louis Johnson, the Tribal Council considered three written charges of improper conduct against Heipa Tribal Council Member Winfield Rondell Jr. on Wednesday, October 16, 2019, at the Tribal Council Chambers. Council Member Rondell had previously been served with the written statement of charges.  Council Member Rondell appeared at the October 16th hearing and was represented during the removal hearing by legal counsel, Alexander Vian, and received a full opportunity to be heard on each of the written charges. After considering the written charges, reviewing the evidence and testimony provided, and hearing from Council Member Rondell, Tribal Council finds Council Member Winfield Rondell Jr. to be not guilty of Charge #1:

Charge #1

Council Person Rondell knowingly used private and confidential information and sent such information to Grady Renville - fully knowing that Renville was not included on the original mailing of said information and as such, has no rights to the protected information.

Councilmember Rondell is charged with violating the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Constitution & Bylaws, Code Of Ethics:

Section 4(b)(1) Converting tribal property or monies without authorization through omission or misrepresentation of facts.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 69: 3 For: Cheryl Owen (Yes); Lisa Jackson (Yes); Louis Johnson (Yes).  5 Opposed: Francis Crawford (No); Curtis Bissonette (No); Milton Owen (No); Tribal Vice-Chairwoman (No); Tribal Secretary (No). 0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote. 1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION DEFEATED.

 

MOTION NO. 70: made by Francis Crawford, second by Milton Owen, question by Louis Johnson, the Tribal Council considered three written charges of improper conduct against Heipa Tribal Council Member Winfield Rondell Jr. on Wednesday, October 16, 2019, at the Tribal Council Chambers. Council Member Rondell had previously been served with the written statement of charges.  Council Member Rondell appeared at the October 16th hearing and was represented during the removal hearing by legal counsel, Alexander Vian, and received a full opportunity to be heard on each of the written charges. After considering the written charges, reviewing the evidence and testimony provided, and hearing from Council Member Rondell, Tribal Council finds Council Member Winfield Rondell Jr. to be guilty of Charge #1 and determines that he shall be removed from the SWO Tribal Council:

Charge #1

Council Person Rondell knowingly used private and confidential information and sent such information to Grady Renville - fully knowing that Renville was not included on the original mailing of said information and as such, has no rights to the protected information.

Councilmember Rondell is charged with violating the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Constitution & Bylaws, Code Of Ethics:

Section 4(b)(1) Converting tribal property or monies without authorization through omission or misrepresentation of facts.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 70: 3 For: Francis Crawford (Yes); Curtis Bissonette (Yes); Milton Owen (Yes).  5 Opposed: Cheryl Owen (No); Louis Johnson (No); Lisa Jackson (No); Tribal Vice-Chairwoman (No); Tribal Secretary (No).  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION DEFEATED.

 

Note:      The weighted votes were not recorded for Motions No. 67-70, since the SWO Constitution Article VI, Section 2 requires "an affirmative vote of five of the Council members…" to remove any Councilman or Officer.

 

MOTION NO. 71: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Francis Crawford, to reinstate Heipa Tribal Council Member Winfield Rondell Jr. to the SWO Tribal Council.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 71: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairwoman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.       0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 72: made by Francis Crawford, second by Myrna Thompson, question by Milton Owen, in resolution form, to appoint Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson as the SWO Voting Delegate and Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr. as the Alternate, to the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), and to authorize payment of the NCAI Membership Fees.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 72: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairwoman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).                0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

                Resolution No. SWO-19-104

 

MOTION NO. 73: made by Francis Crawford, second by Cheryl Owen, to adjourn.

                MEETING ADJOURNED 5:50PM.   

Respectfully Submitted, Verlyn Beaudreau, Recording Secretary

 

REGULAR TRIBAL COUNCIL MEETING

Wednesday, October 30, 2019, 9:00 AM

TiWakan Tio Tipi Council Chambers

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT:

BIG COULEE:                     Lisa Jackson (9:13)

BUFFALO LAKE:                 Louis Johnson

ENEMY SWIM:                     Cheryl Owen

HEIPA/VEBLEN:                  Winfield Rondell Jr. 

LAKE TRAVERSE:               Francis Crawford

LONG HOLLOW:                 Curtis Bissonette

OLD AGENCY:                     Milton Owen         

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES PRESENT: Tribal Chairman Donovan White, Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr., and Tribal Secretary Myrna Thompson

 

CALL TO ORDER: Tribal Chairman Donovan White called the meeting to order at 9:10 AM with three (3) Executives and six (6) Council members from seven (7) Districts answering Roll Call. Opening Prayer for the Long Hollow District said by Old Agency Tribal Council Member Milton Owen.

 

MOTION NO. 74: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Milton Owen, question by Cheryl Owen, to approve the Dakota Western Corporation report, as presented by General Manager Robert Huff.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 74: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 75: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Milton Owen, question by Lisa Jackson, to approve the SWO Fuel Inc. & Agency C-Store report, as presented by General Manager James Bird.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 75: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 76: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Curtis Bissonette, to approve the I-29 Motel report, as presented by Manager Nicole Dumarce.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 76: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 77: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Milton Owen, to approve the Dakota Crossing Grocery Store report, as presented by General Manager Todd O'Riley.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 77: 17 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Winfield Rondell Jr. (3); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

Note: Heipa Tribal Council Member Winfield Rondell Jr. excused from meeting.

 

MOTION NO. 78: made by Cheryl Owen, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Curtis Bissonette, to approve the Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise (DNGE) Operating Needs budget for FY 2020, as presented by DNGE CFO Weston Quinn.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 78: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.            0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 79: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Milton Owen, to approve the Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise report, as presented by DNGE CFO Weston Quinn.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 79: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.            0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 80: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Milton Owen, question by Curtis Bissonette, to authorize the Head Start & Early Head Start to purchase classroom supplies, from Lakeshore Learning Materials, in the amount of $11,621.16, with the Head Start budgets as the funding source, as presented by Director Lynn Halbert.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 80: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.            0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 81: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Curtis Bissonette, to authorize the Head Start & Early Head Start to purchase a refrigerator, microwave oven, and a conveyor toaster, from Culinex, in the amount of $5,362.23, with the Head Start budgets as the funding source, as presented by Director Lynn Halbert.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 81: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.            0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 82: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Milton Owen, question by Myrna Thompson, to authorize the Head Start & Early Head Start to utilize Lakeside Construction, for the installation of gutters, down spouts, and snow guards, in the amount of $8,384.00, with the Head Start budgets as the funding source, as presented by Director Lynn Halbert.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 82: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.            0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 83: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Edmund Johnson Jr., to authorize the Head Start & Early Head Start to utilize Lakeside Construction, for the installation of new fence around the playground area, in the amount of $35,642.50, with the Head Start budgets as the funding source, as presented by Director Lynn Halbert.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 83: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.            0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 84: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Milton Owen, question by Francis Crawford, to authorize the Head Start & Early Head Start to purchase a 2019 Toyota Highlander, from Sharp Automotive, in the amount of $40,000.00, with the Head Start budgets as the funding source, as presented by Director Lynn Halbert.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 84: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.            0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 85: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Edmund Johnson Jr., question by Cheryl Owen, to authorize the Head Start & Early Head Start to purchase eight (8) Hatch Interactive Displays, software, and accessories, from Hatch Early Learning, in the amount of $73,746.80, with the Head Start budgets as the funding source, as presented by Director Lynn Halbert.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 85: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.            0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 86: made by Lisa Jackson, second by Milton Owen, question by Cheryl Owen, to authorize the Head Start & Early Head Start to purchase eight (8) Hatch Multi-Touch Tables, software, and accessories, from Hatch Early Learning, in the amount of $76,516.00, with the Head Start budgets as the funding source, as presented by Director Lynn Halbert.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 86: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.            0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 87: made by Francis Crawford, second by Cheryl Owen, question by Lisa Jackson, to approve the Tribal Homeland Security Grant Program budget for FY 2020, as presented by Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 87: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.            0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 88: made by Francis Crawford, second by Louis Johnson, question by Edmund Johnson Jr., to transfer $100,000.00 to the Dakota Nation Development Corporation (DNDC) accounts, to pay for DNDC bills and invoices, with the Reserve account as the funding source, as recommended by Tribal Vice-Chairman Edmund Johnson Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 88: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.            0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 89: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Milton Owen, to authorize the purchase of gift cards from Dakota Crossing Grocery Store, for General Council door prizes, in the amount of $9,500.00, with the Executive Committee budget as the funding source.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 89: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.            0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 90: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Milton Owen, to go into Executive Session to discuss a personnel issue, at 1:00pm.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 90: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.            0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 91: made by Curtis Bissonette, second by Milton Owen, question by Lisa Jackson, to come out of Executive Session, at 1:31pm.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 91: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.            0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 92: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, question by Cheryl Owen, to change the status of the SWO Tribal Prosecutor from a part-time position to a full-time position, and to begin advertising for a full-time Prosecutor immediately.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 92: 14 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.            0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 93: made by Francis Crawford, second by Milton Owen, question by Myrna Thompson, to authorize attorney Greg Paulson of Brodeen & Paulson Law Office to represent the Tribal Vice-Chairman in the lawsuit filed by the SWO Judicial Committee.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 93: 13 For: Cheryl Owen (3); Louis Johnson (1); Francis Crawford (2); Milton Owen (2); Lisa Jackson (2); Curtis Bissonette (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  1 Abstained: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1).            0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

                MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 94: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lisa Jackson, to adjourn.

                MEETING ADJOURNED 1:34PM.   

Respectfully Submitted, Verlyn Beaudreau, Recording Secretary

Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following position(s):

TVR Outreach Specialist, Education Department

TVR Director, Education Department

477/Case Manager, ET Demo

Tribal Ranger, Fish & Wildlife Department

EDA Planner, Planning

Closing Date: December 2nd, 2019 @04:30PM

Program Manager, Dakotah Language Institute

Dakota Culture & Language Teacher, Head Start

Bus Monitor-Teacher Aide, Head Start

Special Needs - Mental Health Manager, Head Start

Teacher (2 positions), Head Start

Teacher Aide, Head Start

Bus Driver/Custodian, Head Start

Teacher, Early Head Start

Teacher Aide, Early Head Start

Browns Valley After-School Van Driver, JOM

Classroom Aide/After School Tutor, Part Time, JOM   

Parole Agent, Department of Parole

In-House Attorney, Tribal Executive Committee

Sexual Assault Advocate, Behavioral Health

Positions Open Until Filled

 Application and job description information can be seen at SWO Human Resources Office or   http://www.swo-nsn.gov/contact/employment.  Application can be downloaded from "Apply Now" and emailed to ArnoldW@SWO-NSN.GOV or DeniseH@SWO-NSN.GOV.   Contact can also be at Arnold Williams 698-8238 or Denise Hill 698-8251 with questions.  (Tribal preference will apply).

 

Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise

Employee Assistance Provider Office

Position: Office Assistant/Training Assistant

Occupation Summary: Responsible for clerical and administrative duties for the Employee Assistance Provider. Assists in training with current and prospective team members to enhance their skills. Schedules training events, coordinates with department managers, obtains and distributes required instructional materials. Enters data and produces reports on training statistics.

Qualifications:

High school diploma or GED required

Must have clerical experience in a professional setting.

Good organizational skills.

Must possess a positive and motivating attitude.

Must have excellent written and verbal communication skills.

Must be able to articulate and have public speaking skills.

Must have the ability to perform multiple tasks at one time.

Knowledge of customer service principles and practices.

Ability to accurately relay and/or interpret information.

Must be able to maintain strict confidentiality.

Experience:

Experience in facilitating, organizing and creating events, meetings, trainings and presentations.

Extensive knowledge of computers and software applications used for data entry, report writing, training presentations, etc.

Conditions of employment:

Pre-employment drug test

Background investigation to secure a gaming license

This position requires to have dependable transportation available to them.

Must be willing to travel to each of the DNGE properties as needed.

Must also maintain a Valid Driver's License

Must be flexible with work schedule.

Salary: DOE

Closing Date:

November 29th, 2019 at 4:00 p.m.

Submit application and resume to:

Heather Williams, E-mail: heatherw@dakotamagic.com

All other inquiries, contact Heather at 701-634-3000 ext. 2426

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Cage Department

Supervisor (Full-Time) Graveyard

Golf Course Department

Bartender (Full-Time) Day

Hotel Department

Room/Laundry Attendant (4 Full-Time) 8:00 am to finish

Closing Date: November 22, 2019  at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions.

Two identifications documents required upon hire.

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department 16849 102nd Street SE Hankinson ND 58041 For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment) Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

HOTEL:

FRONT DESK CLERK (1 Full-Time)

STARTING WAGE $11.50 plus excellent benefits package!

GENERAL FUNCTION: Staffs the Front Desk to attend to the needs of the guests throughout their stay.

REQUIREMENTS: High School Diploma or GED. Preferred hotel and or accounting experience or equivalent of three to six months related experience and/or training. Excellent interpersonal skills, both in person and on the telephone. Must meet the requirement of a non-gaming license upon hire. (Must be 18 years if age or older)

This position will close on November 21, 2019 at 4pm.

Indian Preference will apply / EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

PORTER:

PORTER (2 Full-Time)

STARTING WAGE $11.50 plus excellent benefits package!

GENERAL FUNCTION: Serves as janitorial/housekeeping staff for guests and casino operations.

REQUIREMENTS: Physical mobility throughout the facility and surrounding grounds. Able to lift 40 to 50 lbs. Must be able to bend, stoop, stand and walk a 8 hour shift. Weekends are mandatory, Must obtain a Non-Gaming License upon hire. Must be 21 years of age.

This position will close on November 21, 2019.

Indian Preference will apply / EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Position: Manager                   

Department: Cage

Qualifications:  Directs and supervises the overall operations of the casino cage area. Oversees hiring, scheduling, and evaluating of cage personnel.  Must be knowledgeable in all Tribal, State and Federal gaming regulations to ensure they are followed.

Education/Experience: Must have high school diploma or GED, at least 3-years previous supervisory, management and/or gaming experience.  A minimum of three years cage experience and previous bookkeeping experience.  Must be able to obtain a Key Gaming License.

Opening Date: Thursday, November 14, 2019

Closing Date: Wednesday, November 27, 2019 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke.

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

 

Restaurant Department:

Shift Supervisor (1) full-time, rotating shifts, week-ends & holidays, will assist the restaurant manager in the operations and administration of the department.  Excellent communication skills - both written and verbal.  Excellent people skills.  Specific training in food products, preparation and cost.  Supervisory experience 1 year, previous cooking experience 1 year, food supervisory experience 1 year, and ServSafe certificate is preferred. Excellent supervisory skills: must show leadership, organizational and motivational skills.  Knowledge of and ability to use the necessary equipment.  Ability to work independently.  Must have physical ability to lift up to 50 lbs.  Appropriate dress code.  Must be at least 18 years old.  High School Diploma or G.E.D. required.

Opening Date: Thursday, November 14, 2019

Closing Date: Wednesday, November 27, 2019 @ 4:00 pm

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke.

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Bingo Department:

Rover (1) part-time, will be required to work any shift assigned during Bingo hours, weekends & holidays.  Will be trained in all positions in the bingo department; such as floor clerk, cashier, pack maker, paymaster and caller.   Previous experience working with money preferred.  Must have good customer service skills, communication skills, ability to get along with other.  Must be 21 years old, must have a High school Diploma or GED.  Must be able to obtain a Key Gaming License.

Restaurant Department:

Dishwasher (1) part-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, includes weekends & holidays.  Experience in Food Service, food handling safety, and sanitation.  Mobility throughout the facility.  Able to lift 20-50 lbs. occasionally.  Good health, able to stand and walk for long periods of time.  Frequent bending, stooping and twisting.  Appropriate dress code.  Ability to obtain a "Food Handlers" certification.  Must be at least 18 years old. 

Opening date: Thursday, November 14, 2019

Closing date: Wednesday, November 20, 2019 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke.

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 

 
 

 

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