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Volume 49 Issue No. 39

Anpetu Iyamni, Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018

Inside this Edition –

SWO Primary Election is next Tuesday, October 2nd, 2018

Tribal Chairman's column: Updating the Oyate

Executive Candidates Forum this Wednesday, Sept. 26

Tribal Council presents $1.5 million check to SWHA

Dakota Crossing celebrating its 1st anniversary

Heart Health topic for Meaningful Conversation

Next week: Highlights from SWO POW/MIA Day observance

Reminder: Deadline for receiving copy is noon on Friday

SWO 2018 Primary election is next Tuesday, October 2nd

REB official 2018 candidates list

The Reservation Election has released its official of candidates for the 2018 SWO elections. Please see the entire notice elsewhere in this Sota. Here are candidates listed on the ballot for the primary election next Tuesday, October 2, 2018:

BIG COULEE:

 Alvah Quinn Sr.

 Alexandria "Lexie" Fancher

 Bruce Robertson Jr.

 

ENEMY SWIM:

 Lois Owens

 Cheryl Owen

 Jan Red Wing

 Kevin Roberts

 

LAKE TRAVERSE:

 Francis Crawford

 Dawn Thompson

 Chad Ward

 

OLD AGENCY:

 Milton "Nippy" Owen

 Ethan Dumarce

 Jesse Larsen

 

TRIBAL SECRETARY:

 Edmund Johnson Jr.

 Lisa Jackson

 Myrna Thompson

 

TRIBAL CHAIRPERSON:

 David Flute

 Ella Robertson

 Michael Selvage Sr.

 

There will be NO primary election for the following candidates. Voting for these positions will be held during the Tribe's general election Tuesday, November 6, 2018.

 

BUFFALO LAKE:

 Arnold White Jr.

 Louis Johnson

 

HEIPA:

 Winfield Rondell III

 Marc Beaudreau

 

LONG HOLLOW:

 Justin Chanku Sr.

 Curtis Bissonette

 

TRIBAL VICE-CHAIR:

 Floyd Kirk Jr.

 Danielle DeCoteau

Chairman's Corner –

Updating the Oyate

My friends and relatives:

On behalf of the Tribe, our sincerest condolences to those that have lost loved ones; our thoughts and prayers are with you.

I'd like to share just a couple of brief updates of activities of the Tribe.

As many of you have noticed, request for proposals were due for the continuation of site development and infrastructure at Barkers Hill Phase II. Three weeks ago, we were able to get Rural Development to finalize the construction documents and continue construction at the housing site. We look forward to completing site development and preparing for new housing units next year.

The hemp was harvested, and we anticipate excellent results from the crop and will share all results with the Planning Commission. I'd like to remind everyone that the ultimate goal is to establish ourselves as having the ability to produce hemp products and apply for and assert ourselves as an 8A and get into government contracting and/or private contracting. Ultimately, this will create more jobs and another revenue stream for the Tribe. This will not happen overnight, but if we remain patient and consistent this will become a reality. There is hard work that has taken us this far, and it will take hard work to make this become a reality. I cannot stress enough, the Tribe's enrollment is growing at a fast rate and we need more jobs and more housing.

Finally, we anticipate hearing from the BIA and DOJ regarding how much we will be receiving in federal funding for our new detention facility. Currently, our Tribal Roads Department submitted site development estimates to the architects and once a comparison analysis has been conducted we will continue moving forward with the next step in site development. We are also working with BDM Rural Water to solve our water storage needs for the facility.

Things are moving slower than anticipated, but we are moving forward with Barkers Hill and the detention facility. Rather than trying to "hurry up" and build something, like previous administrations, we are taking these projects very seriously and making sure we do things right and that we consider all aspects of the projects.

Dave Flute, Chairman.

Tribal Council presents $1.5 million check to SWHA

SWO share in financing 20 new homes for Tribal homebuyers; one piece of Housing's five-year plan

SWO Tribal Vice-Chairman Floyd Kirk Jr. presented a check for $1.5 million to the Tribal Housing Authority, on behalf of Tribal Council, last Monday, September 17. Accepting the check was Eric Shepherd, SWHA Executive Director. Also present were Council members: Francis Crawford, Lake Traverse; Alvah Quinn Sr., Big Coulee; Justin Chanku, Long Hollow; JR Rondell, Heipa; and Arnold White Jr., Buffalo Lake.

The check represents the Tribe's commitment to a $2.8 million dollar project to make 20 new homes available for purchase by qualifying Tribal member families. Partners are: 1st Tribal Lending, which will provide homebuyers with HUD 184 home construction loans; and Cashway Redi-built Homes, a Watertown, SD home builder.

Cashway builds houses on blocks in its lumber yard, then transports the completed homes to their sites.

Its contract with SWHA calls for construction of twenty 1,200 square foot 3-bedroom homes to be placed upon crawlspace foundations.

The homesites are located at Long Hollow District and at Barker Hill II.

What are HUD 184 home loans?

The Office of Loan Guarantee within HUD's Office of Native American Programs, guarantees the Section 184 home mortgage loans made to Native borrowers. The loan guarantee assures the lender that its investment will be repaid in full in the event of foreclosure.

The borrower applies for the Section 184 loan with a participating lender, and works with the tribe and Bureau of Indian Affairs if leasing tribal land. The lender then evaluates the necessary loan documentation and submits the loan for approval to HUD's Office of Loan Guarantee.

The loan in limited to single-family housing (1-4 units), and fixed-rate loans for 30 years of less. Neither adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs) nor commercial buildings are eligible for Section 184 loans.

Who is 1st Tribal Lending?

It is a subsidiary of Mid-America Mortgage, Inc., of Texas, which has branches across the country.

1st Tribal Lending has had experience providing 184 individual home loans in Indian country since the program began.

SWHA Director Shepherd said that this homebuyers project is expected to be completed within the next two years.

He also said that it is just piece of the Housing Authority's five-year plan to help meet the Tribe's need for 500 homes.

Another piece is Barker Hill phase II.

Altogether, there will be 62 homes at Barker Hill II, he said.

There will be 30 Governor's Homes, 20 redi-built homes, and 12 homeownership homes.

What are Governor's Homes?

The Governor's House Program, created in 1996, provides reasonably sized, affordable homes to elderly, persons with disabilities, and income-qualified families.

The timetable Eric gives for both of these "pieces" of the Housing Authority's five-year plan is for their completion within two years.

Barker Hill II and Long Hollow's homebuyers houses, he said, are to be completed in the summer of 2019.

Then, what's next after these new 82 (total) homes?

Watch for projects to be undertaken between 2019 and 2021 to provide new units at the following sites:

Rehab Village.

Red Iron.

Enemy Swim District.

Peever Flats.

Brooks housing site.

Eric expressed thanks for Tribal Council's support to help meet the Housing Authority's goals.

SWC selected by Bush Foundation as member of Second Community Creativity Cohort

Sisseton, SD – Sept. 18, 2018 – Sisseton Wahpeton College has been selected as a member of the Bush Foundation's second Community Creativity Cohort.

"We are excited to support the amazing work of Sisseton Wahpeton College to help make our region better for everyone" said Bush Foundation Community Creativity Portfolio Director Erik Takeshita.

Sisseton Wahpeton College is one of 40 organizations from North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota and the 23 Native nations that share the geography selected by the Foundation for its commitment to making art and culture central to problem solving. All participating organizations are either led by and serving people of color or Indigenous people, and/or are led by and serving people from rural communities or non-metropolitan cities or towns with populations of less than 50,000 people.

"Sisseton Whapeton College greatly appreciates the work of the Bush Foundation. Their partnership with our college and community will have a much needed impact on our language and culture programs. I am thrilled we were selected to work with them on this critical project" said SWC President Dr. Randy Smith.

Cohort members were selected from a pool of over 100 applicants from across the region. The program will officially kick off in November 2018 in the Twin Cities at the first annual convening of the Cohort. More information on Community Creativity Cohort 2 and its members can be found at https://www.bushfoundation.org/community-creativity-initiative/community-creativity-cohort-2

*****

Sisseton Wahpeton College was established in 1979 through a charter granted by the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate (SWO). Sisseton Wahpeton College's mission is to provide higher education, research, vocational and technical education and continuing education to the members of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation and others within the historical lands of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate. As a 1994 land grant institution, SWC will preserve and extend Dakota culture, language, and history while contributing to economic development through the provision of human capital and other resources.

The Bush Foundation was established in 1953 by 3M Executive Archibald Bush and his wife Edyth. Today, the Foundation invests in great ideas and the people who power them in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and the 23 Native nations that share the geography. The Foundation works to inspire and support creative problem solving - within and across sectors - to make the region better for everyone.

DOJ awarding up to $246 million in public safety grants to tribes

SWO Tribe awarded $339,925 for victim assistance program

Washington, DC – Sept. 19, 2018 – The Department of Justice today announced more than $113 million in grant awards to improve public safety, serve victims of crime, combat violence against women, and support youth programs in American Indian and Alaska Native communities. Grants were awarded to 133 American Indian tribes, Alaska Native villages, and other tribal designees through the Coordinated Tribal Assistance Solicitation, a streamlined application for tribal-specific grant programs. Of the $113 million, just over $53 million comes from the Office of Justice Programs, more than $35 million from the Office on Violence Against Women, and more than $24.7 million from the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services.

In addition, the Department is in the process of allocating up to $133 million in a first-ever set aside program to serve victims of crime in American Indian and Alaska Native communities. The awards are intended to help tribes develop, expand and improve services to victims of crime by providing funding, programming and technical assistance. Recipients will be announced in the near future.

"With these awards, we are doubling the amount of grant funding devoted to public safety programs and serving victims of crime in Native American communities," said Principal Deputy Associate Attorney General Jesse Panuccio, who made the announcement during his remarks at the 26th Annual Four Corners Indian Country Conference in Santa Fe, New Mexico. "There is an unacceptable level of violent crime and domestic abuse in American Indian and Alaska Native communities. This increase in resources, together with our aggressive investigation and prosecution of crimes, shows how seriously Attorney General Sessions and the entire Department of Justice take these issues. We are committed to reducing violent crime and improving public safety."

The Four Corners Conference is facilitated annually by U.S. Attorneys from Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah to provide a forum for discussion of justice-related topics with a large number of populous and diverse tribal nations located in the region.

CTAS awards cover nine purpose areas: public safety and community policing; justice systems planning; alcohol and substance abuse; corrections and correctional alternatives; children's justice act partnerships; services for victims of crime; violence against women; juvenile justice; and tribal youth programs. CTAS funding helps tribes develop and strengthen their justice systems' response to crime, while expanding services to meet their communities' public safety needs.

Today's announcement is part of the Justice Department's ongoing initiative to increase engagement, coordination and action on public safety in American Indian and Alaska Native communities.

Included in the CTAS list is the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribe, with a grant of $339,925 for a comprehensive tribal victim assistance program (OVC).

Lonna Stevens Hunter named TLPI Victim Resource Specialist

Lonna Stevens Hunter, Tlingit and Sisseton-Wahpeton Dakota, has been appointed to serve as Tribal Victim Resource Specialist with the Tribal Law & Policy Institute (TPLI), working out of the Minneapolis, Minn. office.

Most recently Lonna was Project Coordinator providing Training & Technical Assistance to 40 tribal Children's Justice Act Partnership and Comprehensive Tribal Victim Assistance Program Office of Victims of Crime, Coordinated Tribal Assistance Solicitation grantees with the National Criminal Justice Training Center at Fox Valley Technical College.

Previously, Lonna was the Minnesota Department of Public Safety Tribal Liaison, working closely with tribal law enforcement in developing a tribal taskforce on sex trafficking. In addition, she conducted statewide listening session for the Office on Violence Against Women, developing policy for Native victims of crime with the Office of Victims of Crime, homeland security, FirstNet-emergency communications, including working closely with the Governor's office on the opiate/heroin epidemic.

She also worked with the Minnesota Department of Health on the Adverse Childhood Experiences building community health plans to address healing and resilience with tribal communities.

Lonna has worked with state and tribal coalitions- Alaska Network on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, Minnesota Coalition for Battered Women, the Minnesota Indian Women's Sexual Assault Coalition, and served as Director for the national Sheila Wellstone Institute.

She brings over twenty years extensive experience in tribal, state and federal policy creation and lobbying to end violence against Native women and children, building diverse coalitions of community and government leaders, and direct service with survivors.

TLPI Executive Director Jerry Gardner, Cherokee, welcomed Lonna in a press release last week, stating, "We are very pleased to welcome Lonna Hunter as a TLPI Tribal Victim Resource Specialist. Lonna will be working out of the TLPI MN office – focusing initially on TLPI's Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) Projects especially the OVW Tribal Outreach T/TA for Non-Grantees."

About TLPI

The staff has an array of legal, policy, training, and technical assistance experience that has enabled TLPI to administer quality programming in Indian country since 1996.

Because we are a Native American operated non-profit, our work is personal. We proudly pursue our mission to enhance and strengthen tribal sovereignty and justice while honoring community values, protecting rights, and promoting well-being.

Tribal energy loan program starts, more than a decade after its OK

By Sarabeth Henne

Washington, DC – Cronkite News – Aug. 15, 2018 – More than 10 years after it was first approved, a federal loan program for tribal energy development projects will accept its first applications next month.

The Department of Energy in July said it was accepting applications for projects under the $2 billion Tribal Energy Loan Guarantee Program, which will provide "partial loan guarantees to leverage private sector lending" for a range of energy projects by tribes.

"It's a good start," said Pilar Thomas, a professor specializing in Indian energy and policy at Arizona State University's Sandra Day O'Connor School of Law. "There's a real opportunity for them (tribes) to do something around energy."

It's an opportunity that's been a long time coming: The tribal loan program was first approved in 2005 but not fully funded until Congress passed the omnibus budget bill in May 2017.

The program aims to stimulate economic growth in Indian Country by allowing the Energy Department to guarantee up to 90 percent of the unpaid interest on these loans. The first applications are due Sept. 19, with deadlines every other month thereafter.

The program will let the government "work in partnership with private-sector lenders to help them better understand the unique characteristics of tribal energy opportunities and catalyze future private-sector investment," said Energy Secretary Rick Perry in a statement announcing the start of the program this summer.

The National Congress of American Indians cites Interior Department estimates that undeveloped energy reserves on tribal lands, including coal, natural gas, and oil, could "generate nearly $1 trillion in revenues for tribes and surrounding communities." But the loan program will be available for renewable energy projects, like wind and solar power, in addition to transmission lines and energy storage projects, as well as mining and drilling operations.

While the opportunity has always been there, Derrick Beetso said tribes have had trouble getting the funding to make them reality.

"A lot of times, tribes are limited with access to capital for projects in general," said Beetso, the general counsel for the National Congress of American Indians. "Tribes are kind of left out of the process."

Dante Desiderio, the executive director of the Native American Finance Officers Association, said the benefits of the loan-guarantee program are two-pronged.

"It makes it much easier for larger projects to get funded because it gives the guarantees to the banks that are willing to take a risk to underwrite these things for Indian Country," Desiderio said. "The $2 billion is really significant for funding all sorts of energy projects and getting the banks comfortable with dealing with Indian Country for energy development."

Beetso calls the start of the program "generally good news for tribes that are looking to develop their energy resources."

"There are a lot of different needs in the tribal context that this loan guarantee program will help to address," he said.

But Thomas said the program will not be a cure-all when it comes to energy development on tribal lands.

"There is plenty of money sloshing around in the system," said Thomas, a Pascua Yaqui who served as the Interior Department's deputy solicitor of Indian affairs. "The federal government has, by last count, close to 40 programs that can be used for financing energy projects on tribal lands.

"My experience has not been that it's an access to capital problem," she said. "My experience has been that it's generally that the tribe has to recognize and have a commitment to go do a project."

Desiderio disagreed, saying money has been one of the primary impediments to developing Indian energy.

"If it's not one of the main barriers, it's always in the conversation," he said. Funding has "always been really helpful for Indian Country, but it's not been enough. Just the size of this should have a major impact on Indian Country development."

While Thomas does not expect immediate success, she is optimistic about the future of the tribal energy opportunities.

"For me the jury is out on where this is going to end up. The first year, you kind of have to wait and see," Thomas said. "I'm hopeful. It's always better to have more resources than less."

(Note: This article is published via a Creative Commons license. Cronkite News is produced by the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University. cronkitenews.azpbs.org)

Honor the Earth allocates $82,500 in to 23 Indigenous communities

Callaway, MN – September 18, 2018 – This summer, 23 Indigenous grassroots and community organizations across 12 U.S. states and one Canadian province will be the beneficiaries of $82,500 in new grants made late this season by Honor the Earth, a Minnesota-based, non-profit environmental justice organization located on the White Earth reservation. It is led by indigenous women, dedicated to protecting indigenous homelands and resources, and empowering communities with energy independence through renewables.

According to Honor the Earth's Executive Director and co-founder, Winona LaDuke, the organizations receiving grants this year focus on important projects including: food systems and farming; youth and education; sacred lands; renewable energy; anti-fossil fuel projects; and arts and media programming. The grantees are aligned to the same sustainable principles as the grant-making entity, and many recipients share the same needs across locations.

"These dedicated grassroots groups work on the frontlines in our Native communities across Turtle Island," LaDuke notes. "For example, the Village of Solomon in Nome, Alaska, is drafting the tribe's first renewable energy plan (REP). One component of the REP is to provide education and outreach focused on renewable energy and energy efficiency for tribal members."

"Sustainable Nations in Tucson, Arizona, is working to rebuild the resilience of Native nations through culturally and spiritually-based professional training programs and project development in renewable energy," she explains. "They are engaged in traditional and natural building, and ecological wastewater treatment and rainwater harvesting. Their grant will help fund construction and training designed to revitalize traditional Tohono O'odham architecture and includes climate adaptation using a spiritually meaningful building technique."

Another grantee, Yellowbird in Lame Deer, Montana, has implemented a Food Sovereignty Gardening Program: "This program connects youth deeply to the land to help nurture the breath of life and to promote healthy lifestyles through a holistic wellness model," LaDuke adds.

In Minnesota, KKWE Niijii Radio located in Callaway, works to promote justice in the community through its programming including Native America Calling, Minnesota Native News, National Native News, and its Ojibwe Language programs, which are the foundation of their forward movement towards equity. KKWE has committed to being the voice for those less heard and whose voices have been stifled through public policy and systemic racism.

Dream of Wild Health, based in Minneapolis, Minnesota, has established The Reclaiming Our Indigenous Seeds program, which provides a culturally-specific solution to a growing demand for indigenous foods and provides increased leadership opportunities for Native youth. Its program incorporates youth education and leadership training with the goal of supporting the decolonization process of current food systems.

For more information - or to interview Winona LaDuke about these latest grants to Native communities - please contact Martin Keller, Media Savant Communications, 612-729-8585, mkeller@mediasavantcom.com

Summer 2018 Grantees

*Black Mesa Trust- Kykotsmovi, Arizona

*Carrizo Comecrudo Tribe of Texas- Floresville, Texas

*Costanoan Indian Research, Inc.- Hollister, California

*Covenant Pathways- Vanderwagen, New Mexico

*Dream of Wild Health- Minneapolis, Minnesota

*Eyak Preservation Council- Cordova, Alaska

*First Nations Kitchen- South Minneapolis, Minnesota

*Indian Cultural Organization- Redding, California

*Indigenous Community Circle- Moorhead, Minnesota

*Kanatsiohareke Mohawk Community- Fonda, New York

*Wolakota Waldorf Society- Kyle, South Dakota

*Mauna Kea Education and Awareness- Kamuela, Hawaii

*The Moenkopi Developers Corporation- Tuba City, Arizona

*Ogema Organics- Callaway, Minnesota

*Sustainable Nations- Tucson, Arizona

*T'Sou-ke First Nation- British Columbia, Canada

*The Village of Solomon- Nome, Alaska

*Wakemup Productions- St. Paul, Minnesota

*Yellowbird- Lame Deer, Montana

*KKWE Niijii Radio- Callaway, Minnesota

*Hawaiian Language Worldwide Inc.- East Orange, New Jersey

*Four Bridges Traveling Permaculture- Pueblo, New Mexico

*Western Mining Action Network- Billings, Montana

More About Honor the Earth

Honor the Earth's mission is to create awareness and support for Native environmental issues and to develop needed financial and political resources for the survival of sustainable Native communities. Honor the Earth develops these resources by using music, the arts, the media, and Indigenous wisdom to ask people to recognize our joint dependency on the Earth and be a voice for those not heard.

Website: www.honorearth.org

Senate passes temporary extension of VAWA

Long-term renewal needed

Washington, DC – Sept. 18, 2018 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today voted with a bipartisan majority in the Senate to extend the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) for two months to prevent it from expiring at the end of September. But she also called on Congress to quickly pass a long-term reauthorization to give certainty to victims of domestic violence and law enforcement agencies that depend on VAWA programs to crack down on abuse.

"Since serving as Attorney General for North Dakota in the 1990's, I've committed to never stop fighting to end domestic violence and protect victims of these horrible crimes," Heitkamp said. "That's why VAWA was the first bill I cosponsored in the U.S. Senate in 2013 – and ensured that provisions for landmark protections of Native women and tribal authority were included. For too long, crimes of domestic violence hid in the shadows – and VAWA helped make major changes so abusers could no longer get away with such terrible actions. But there is still much work to do. Now, Congress must quickly pass a long-term extension of VAWA to give victims of abuse the resources they need to seek justice and recover from the trauma they've endured. Law enforcement agencies and victim service providers rely on VAWA to bring justice to criminals. It is also critical that we continue to increase the protections for Native women and look at expanding tribal authority where appropriate so that abusers can no longer escape punishment in Indian Country."

VAWA was the first bill Heitkamp cosponsored and helped pass as a U.S. Senator in 2013, building on her longstanding work to implement the first VAWA in the 1990s when she served as Attorney General for North Dakota. Since joining the U.S. Senate, one of Heitkamp's top priorities has been combating domestic violence and stopping those who seek to harm adults and children.

Heitkamp authored a key provision in the 2013 VAWA reauthorization to address the continuing crisis of violence against women in tribal communities. The provision strengthens the existing programs and provides tribal governments the force they need to prosecute non-Indian perpetrators who commit these crimes on tribal land.

Last fall, Heitkamp introduced Savanna's Act to help combat the epidemic of murdered and missing Native women and girls. The bill has gained bipartisan support in the Senate, and Savanna's Act is included in the long-term extension of VAWA introduced in the House.

Heitkamp recently announced $875,232 in federal funding made possible by VAWA for the North Dakota Department of Health to help the state provide services to victims of abuse, an example of VAWA working to help end domestic violence and make sure services are in place to help victims in North Dakota recover.

Despite thin record on Native law, tribes wary of Kavanaugh nomination

By Daniel Perle

Washington, DC – Cronkite News – Sept. 20, 2018 – Add Native Americans to the list of groups concerned about Judge Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court.

Tribal and legal officials could not point to a case involving tribal rights that Kavanaugh has handled as a judge, but they said his writings as a lawyer and his rulings in environmental and voting rights cases give them pause.

"He fails to recognize what's been done to put them (Native Americans) at a historical disadvantage," said Laura Berglan, attorney general for Arizona's Pascua Yaqui Tribe. Pascua Yaqui Council Member Herminia Frias said the tribe's opposition to Kavanaugh's nomination stems primarily from his "lack of understanding of tribes as a race and tribal sovereignty."

The Pascua Yaqui sent letters to members of the Senate Judiciary Committee urging them to reject Kavanaugh's confirmation, while other tribes have contacted members of the state's congressional delegation to express their concerns.

It comes as a Judiciary Committee vote on Kavanaugh's nomination has been put on hold after an allegation that he sexual assaulted a girl decades ago while in high school in the Washington area.

Kavanaugh has vehemently denied the "completely false allegation" and could face his accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, at a committee hearing on the issue Monday.

Kavanaugh, a former aide in the Bush White House and a judge on the U.S. Circuit Court for the District of Columbia for the past 12 years, is President Donald Trump's second nomination to the Supreme Court.

His appointment to the circuit court was marked by contentious hearings, and his most recent nomination has been no different, with the Judiciary Committee holding several days of marathon hearings with members split on party lines. He mostly declined to answer Democratic questions about how he might rule on abortion rights, gun rights and executive privilege, among other issues.

Little was made of Kavanaugh's history on tribal affairs, but legal and tribal advocates said they are concerned by past writings on the legal status of Native tribes, his record on environmental regulation and a 2012 ruling on a voter ID law.

But as a Supreme Court justice, Kavanaugh could be expected to be rule on a few cases every year that are related specifically to tribal law – and many more that would be turned away by the high court without a hearing.

From 1989 to 2014, the court heard 49 cases related to Indian law, or about two per term, according to a study by University of Connecticut School of Law Professor Bethany Berger. She found tribes lost at the court 76.5 percent of the time, 82 percent of the time in the first decade of the current Roberts Court.

Berger said then that while the court "remains a very dangerous place for tribes," there was a glimmer of hope based on some rulings in 2016. Justice Neil Gorsuch, appointed since then, seems to be well-acquainted with tribal law, she said Tuesday, but with Kavanaugh it will be wait and see.

Matthew Fletcher, a law professor and director of Michigan State University's Indigenous Law and Policy Center, said tribes across the country are worried about a friend-of-the-court brief Kavanaugh filed in Rice v. Cayetano, a 1999 Supreme Court case regarding Native Hawaiians.

It involved a challenge to the Hawaiian Constitution, which prohibited anyone but descendants of native Hawaiians from voting for the trustees of an agency that administered benefits to them.

In his brief, Kavanaugh agreed with Rice that the law was unconstitutional because it allowed a government benefit to be given based on a racial preference. The Supreme Court ultimately agreed, with Justice Anthony Kennedy – whom Kavanaugh has been nominated to replace – writing for the majority that the law was wrongly based on race, not ancestry as the state claimed.

Fletcher said the brief causes concern among tribes that Kavanaugh regards American Indians as simply a racial minority, not as sovereign nations with separate legal rules enshrined in the Constitution.

Fletcher called Kennedy a major influence on Kavanaugh's thinking regarding Native Americans. Although no one can be sure what Kavanaugh's policy toward Native Americans will be until he's on the bench, Fletcher said it's a "fair bet" that he will not be supportive of tribal rights.

Fletcher added that what he called an anti-environmental regulation record like Kavanaugh's usually goes "hand-in-hand" with opposition to tribal legal rights.

That was echoed last week by Rep. Raul Grijalva, D-Tucson, who told a meeting of the National Congress of American Indians that it is "clear to me that the future of federal Indian law is at stake with Kavanaugh's nomination," according to a statement from his office.

NCAI did not respond to requests for comment last week on the nomination. But in statements shortly after his nomination this summer, officials there urged the Senate to proceed carefully, citing issues from environmental rights to voting rights to freedom of religion that affect tribes.

Berglan and Frias said Friday that Kavanaugh's record on environmental issues is worrisome, as is his record on voting laws.

Rep. Ruben Gallego, D-Phoenix, said he did not discuss the nomination with NCAI leaders last week when he met with them in Washington, but he was aware of tribal worries about Kavanaugh.

"I've heard some constituent concerns … that Kavanaugh would not be beneficial to tribes and does not look fondly upon tribal sovereignty," Gallego said.

Sen. Tom Udall, D-New Mexico, was more direct.

Udall, who represents a large number of tribes, criticized Kavanaugh's views of Native legal status, saying in a statement that his "confirmation poses a real threat to bedrock federal Indian law and policy principles that have guided the high court for decades."

Men Of Color In Communications launches business summit

New York, NY – Sept. 18, 2018 – PRNewswire/ -- ColorComm, Inc., the nation's premier platform addressing diversity and inclusion from across the communications, marketing, media, and advertising industries, will launch the Men of Color in Communications (MCC) Business Summit at Bloomberg Headquarters in New York on November 15- November 16, 2018.

The Men of Color in Communications Business Summit will convene over 300 men of color in communications, marketing, advertising, and digital for a two-day summit focused on industry best practices, business development, creating an inclusion strategy, trends for 2019, and more.

Speakers include: Jeffrey Litvack, CEO, Adweek; Rodney Williams, CEO, Belvedere Vodka; Errol Cockfield, SVP of Communications, MSNBC/NBC; Manny Gonzalez, Senior Director-Multicultural at Moet Hennessy USA; Rob King, SVP of Newsgathering, ESPN; Jana Fleishman, EVP Strategic Marketing and Head of Communications, Roc Nation; Terri Hines, EVP of Communications, Fox Sports; and many more.

"It is imperative to have diverse voices, diverse opinions, and diverse leadership in places where important decisions are made on behalf of corporations and clients. The Men of Color in Communications Business Summit will highlight the impact men of color contribute to the communications industry and will provide a forum for learning, advancement, and collaboration." said Lauren Wesley Wilson, Founder & CEO of ColorComm, Inc.

MCC sponsors include: Bloomberg, CBS Corporation, Digitas, Viacom, and many more.

For more information visit: www.mccsummit.com

Rounds statement on Senate passage of Committee Report on Appropriations

Includes a Number of South Dakota Priorities

Washington, DC – Sept. 12, 2018 – U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) today issued the following statement after the Senate voted to pass the conference committee report on H.R. 5895, a package of three appropriation bills to fund Military Construction and Veterans Affairs, Energy and Water Development and Legislative Branch for Fiscal Year 2019. This bill now goes to the president to be signed into law.

"Today's vote is a step in the right direction toward getting back to 'regular order,' where we debate and vote on individual appropriation bills in a timely manner," said Rounds. "This year, the Senate Appropriations Committee passed all 12 appropriation bills with bipartisan support and the Senate has passed nine of those 12 bills so far. While not perfect, this is the fastest pace we've passed funding bills since 1999. We're making a real effort to return to regular order, which is a good way for Congress to keep its spending in check and be transparent and accountable to the American taxpayers."

The Military Construction and Veterans Affairs section provides $97.1 billion to support veterans' health care and benefits, medical and prosthetic research, the National Cemetery Administration, information technology and the VA Inspector General.

· $10.3 billion was provided for construction of national defense facilities, family housing, military hospitals and schools. That includes $15 million for the Rapid City National Guard Readiness Center.

The Energy and Water Development section provides $44.6 billion to support Department of Energy programs and critical infrastructure projects administrated by the Army Corps of Engineers and Bureau of Reclamation.

· This includes $130 million for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility/Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (LBNF/DUNE), a partnership between Fermilab in Illinois and the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD.

· The Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program includes $2.5 million for the Tribal Partnership Program, which could be used to help with the Lower Brule Shoreline Erosion project. $36.87 million was included for Army Corps Operation and Maintenance in South Dakota, which could fund the implementation of the snowpack and soil moisture monitoring program that Rounds requested. This system would help to mitigate major flooding along the Missouri River.

The Legislative Branch division of the bill continues the pay freeze for Members of Congress and provides $4.8 billion to maintain essential operations and security of the U.S. Capitol, Congress and supporting agencies.

Heitkamp: Funding bill includes wins for ND

Washington, DC – Sept. 12, 2018 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today voted with a bipartisan majority of the U.S. Senate to pass a funding bill that includes big wins for North Dakota water projects, energy jobs, military installations, and veterans. The legislation is a compromise bill reached between the Senate and House.

"Since arriving in the U.S. Senate, I've fought to support hardworking families in rural America by making sure their communities remain strong and safe—and this bill includes important funding that helps our towns receive the clean water they need, improves access to affordable health care for our rural veterans, and gives much-needed security to our state's energy workers," said Heitkamp. "This bipartisan bill would improve support for our state's servicemembers by strengthening protection for the B-52s and ICBMs at Minot Air Force Base and providing funding to start a new National Guard training center in Fargo. And increased support in this bill for commonsense energy projects like carbon capture technology means that we're one step closer to securing a long-term, viable future for good-paying North Dakota energy jobs. In this bill, we also pushed back against proposed cuts to the Army Corps' budget, so that we can protect more homes and businesses in communities like Fargo-Moorhead from severe flooding events."

The bipartisan bill to support energy, water, and military construction projects includes key provisions Heitkamp fought for to advance permanent flood protection, build new facilities on North Dakota's military installations, and promote an all-of-the-above energy strategy across the state, including:

Flood Control and Water Infrastructure

· Supporting construction of flood protection projects in North Dakota through increased support for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The legislation rejects the President's proposed cut to the Corps' construction budget and would provide an additional $98 million above current funding levels. Heitkamp has consistently fought for projects that reduce the impacts of floods in North Dakota communities, and this funding will help the Corps prioritize projects like permanent flood protection in the Fargo-Moorhead area. In June, Heitkamp announced that she successfully secured $35 million for the Fargo-Moorhead (FM) Area Diversion Project in the Corps' fiscal year (FY) 2018 work plan.

· Funding vital water infrastructure projects in rural America. The legislation would provide $77 million for critical water infrastructure projects, which Heitkamp has advocated for in North Dakota communities like Medina and Petersburg. The bipartisan bill also includes an additional $98.74 million for rural water projects through the Bureau of Reclamation.

· Encouraging the Army Corps to improve maintenance efforts at North Dakota recreation sites. The bill includes language pushing the Corps to prioritize its recreation sites in the Upper Missouri River Basin— including at Lake Sakakawea and Lake Oahe— for repairs and facility upgrades. Heitkamp has stressed the Army Corps' responsibility to maintain its facilities along the Missouri River in North Dakota and to address the backlog of repairs.

North Dakota's Defense Communities

· Funding new construction to protect Minot Air Force Base's airmen and nuclear arsenal. The funding bill would provide $66 million for the construction of new security facilities to defend against threats to Minot's intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) field, including a new maintenance unit, maintenance shelter, aircraft alert hangar, and operations center. During her extensive tour of the base's facilities in May, Heitkamp pushed for additional funding to address current shortfalls in security and to improve personnel responsiveness.

· Supporting a new National Guard Readiness Center in Fargo. The bipartisan bill includes $32 million for a new facility in Fargo to help train three North Dakota Army National Guard sections.

· Making sure veterans receive the benefits and health care they have earned through their selfless service, including in rural areas. The bipartisan funding package includes $270 million in funding to promote primary health care delivery in rural America, including through strong mental health support. Heitkamp has continued to push the administration to adequately fund the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Office of Rural Health.

Energy Technology

· Supporting the development of carbon capture power and other energy projects. The bill includes a new $30 million competitive grant that would support Project Tundra through its next phase of development – this funding is critical to moving this joint project between Minnkota Electric Power Cooperative and ALLETE|Minnesota Power further towards realization. The grant would assist commercial-scale carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS) power projects in procuring feasibility studies and other items such as detailed designs, scopes of work, material purchasing, and environmental permitting requirements. Additionally, the bill would continue a program that allows the University of North Dakota's Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to collaborate with the U.S. Department of Energy on energy technology research.

· Securing funding to develop advanced energy technologies for coal and natural gas plants. $25 million would be used to advance projects important to North Dakota, including advanced gasification systems, Allam cycle technology, energy and water sustainability, coal-to-liquid fuels, economical CO2 separation and capture, and domestic alternative transportation fuels.

· Increasing funding for carbon capture and carbon storage (CCS) research programs. Under this bill, the CCS and Power Systems program would see increased funding— which Heitkamp pushed for earlier this year. This follows her effort to pass and get signed into law her bipartisan bill to encourage technological innovation in CCUS through the extension and expansion of the 45Q tax credit— securing a long-term position in the U.S. energy mix for existing homegrown resources like North Dakota coal and natural gas.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorials –

A meeting in the Mind: Contemporary and ancient view of the Great Mystery

John 14:2 says "In my Father's House are many rooms. If this were not so, would I have told you that I am going to prepare a place for you?"

And in the Elders Meditations/My Heart Speaks, Joy Harjo writes "In my mind are many dwellings. Each dwelling we create ourselves." She tells of emotions, feelings, actions etc., and we choose to live in whatever room we want.

Now, I am far from being a "wahkan" woman, or Christian, as I travel in two worlds (with the living and with the dead) but being a former counselor and college professor I am always learning and analyzing new things. My beliefs are eclectic, but one belief that I hold dear is in a Great Mystery or God.

If we analyze what is now contemporary thinking, and compare it to biblical teachings, we see there is no difference. There is only, basically, a re-wording.

The house/dwelling of many rooms and mansion prepared for us … consider … could it mean that we are born with clear space, as a clean apartment waiting to be decorated, inside our brain? As a newborn, do we begin learning to fill the room with things "human?"

If we look at the brain we even find a room to sleep in – the hypothalamus.

We even have our own clock, called the circadian, working to help us, sleep homeostasis … and to wake up and to dream.

We are a sacred, masterfully created being of the Creator/God.

Our heart has four chambers, each spiritually situated in the four directions, within a sacred medicine wheel of blue and red.

We may continue on to the words we use for recovery and for good ways of life – the Red Road.

In our body red blood flows fast through our arteries and is spiritually cleansed through the blue travelers within the veins.

All goes back into the heart.

The roadway of veins and arteries are traversed by millions of cells each second.

The most sacred is a future child's new home within the womb. A dwelling place for life that the Creator/God blesses within a woman.

The man in his body is the home of millions of tiny travelers looking for a home to place his seed.

Then life begins.

We are frail in nature but so, so very sacred.

A masterpiece, we are, with many mansions to dwell in, to walk in and out of, and so sacred that the Creator/God nurtures our soul and spirit in a mysterious home or room of our own.

Untouchable, but fed what we think, do, and understand.

Why would we destroy such a beautiful home?

We have everything within our bodies that is hidden yet full of wealth.

We have the composition of the great oceans, seas and water in us … and streets of gold, called the nervous system, and we have the Great Mystery's breath of life in us and around us called oxygen, air and breath.

We need to respect the Great Mystery/Creator/God for He respected our parents and us through this thing we call life.

"Where soul and spirit live, Satan is near too."

In the bible, found in Job: "Satan went with the angels of God to a meeting. God asked Satan where he was and Satan replied, 'Roaming in and out of the world/earth.'"

Could this world/earth be a spiritual land in the brain also?

A secret room where the Creator/God and Satan meet? To analyze and explore each room within us?

The old ones of our Tribe spoke of this mysterious thinking, that either made people do good or bad. Is this what they were referring to? The unseen world of conscience?

Betty Anne Owen, Sioux Falls, SD.

Facing the bad spirit: A Lakota way

A Facebook post shared by Cante Skuya LaFromboise

Drugs have a bad spirit, they are evil.

I remember a medicine man saying that there is a little man at the end of the bottle. When he goes into your body he makes you crave more and more, taking your soul to the place of despair.

Meth is an evil spirit that has come to destroy and to kill.

The spirit of meth is darker and more evil than any seen before.

There was a medicine man who was tired of seeing his daughter suffer from meth addiction, so he wrapped her in a white sheet and took her out to a hill where he prayed for her life.

When he took off the white sheet he said he saw the biggest ugliest human-looking thing with a crooked face come out of her. It screamed an awful scream and took off into the hills.

That night in his yuwipi ceremony the spirits asked her to be cleansed in the sweat for four nights so that evil spirit would not come back to her.

They told him that those drugs carry a spirit that will take their life; it makes them lose their mind.

The connection between the heart and mind is broken, so they become emotionless and full of hate and sadness.

This is the kind of sickness we face.

I went through this with my sister. I had to pray and pray for her.

One night when she was depressed she was thinking of ending her life, a little man who had spiders crawling all over his body sat with her and she was so scared she changed her mind.

We had to do a similar ceremony for her using a black cloth to pull that evil spirit away from her so that it no longer lived within her body.

We are Lakota. We have the power and ability to beat this.

We just have to keep praying for them, we have to keep fighting this evil enemy, there is no other way.

A day is coming when this enemy will be killed for good, because this enemy only has the power we give it.

We will win!

(Author not known.)

My Lakota explanation on Meth

The evil drug you know of as Meth, when inside a person, or when someone is on it, at this time the spirit leaves the person's body, because it is so evil … then the person you see is just a body without the spirit … they look like ghosts in our world and their bodies are actually in the evil world.

By Phillimon D. Two Eagle

Native News Online – Dec. 5, 2015 – I think the spirits are telling me this information in the Lakota teachings of what is happening to us: Never in our people's history have we ever been subjected to so much evil in our lifetime.

That is why when you look at the person on this drug they look pale, dark around the eyes, lose weight, they no longer look like the person you once knew.

When on this drug since their spirit has left they are just a body that doesn't care about anything, no respect to no one, invincible feelings all it wants is more of the drug. The person on this drug does not eat and stays awake for four days they are in sleep deprivation, starving and after prolong use are hallucinating and fear that evil spirits are after them which there are evil spirits are trying to claim his spirit.

So my relatives, we are in a state of emergency I urge you to urge your council representatives to do something immediately.

We must load our chanunpa and continue praying together if nothing is done then it could get worst.

Kohan chekiyapo Otehikelo.

*****

Philimon D. Two Eagle is a member of the Sicangu Lakota on the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Mr. Two Eagle is a veteran of the US Army and has served in various capacities for the Rosebud Sioux Tribe In law enforcement, and lifelong work in tribal economic development and Lakota language, history and culture. Mr.Two Eagle has been on Lakota vision quest, is a Lakota speaker, sun dancer, and pipe carrier.

Please read Tribal Chairman Flute's update to the Oyate submitted for this edition.

*****

We were pleasantly surprised to get the updated timetable for current Housing projects on the Lake Traverse Reservation.

We hope you read the article on Tribal Council's $1.5 million contribution to build 20 new homebuyer houses. SWHA Director Eric Shepherd announced that this project and Barker Hill II (with 62 homes) are expected to be completed in the next two years.

Beyond that, he said, Housing has new home projects at other housing sites in its 5-year plan.

*****

The Tribal Elderly Board is hosting a Tribal Executives forum this Wednesday, September 26th, from 5:00-8:00 p.m. at the community center. (Tribal Elderly Center is alternate location if the community center is used for a wake service.)

Make sure to come, if possible, or check out KXSW live and archived video.

Learn as much as possible about the candidates for Executive office you will have on the primary ballot on Tuesday, October 2nd.

See the notice elsewhere in this Sota.

We are very disappointed that the date was changed from Sept. 19. The earlier date would have meant the Sota could provide readers with coverage of statements made at the forum prior to the election.

*****

We invite all candidates for SWO office in this year's elections, to submit an open letter.

Please write down, up to 500 words, your reasons for running and reasons why the Oyate should vote for you.

We also offer discounted rates for political advertising. This discount is to encourage you to use the Sota to advertise your campaign.

These discounted ads, however, must be paid for in advance.

Please read the notice in our legal section.

*****

The SWO Tribal Veterans Office organized a ceremony held last Friday to honor our Tribal POWs: Ulysses K. Abraham, USN Korean War; Myrton Dickerson, US Amry WWII; Robert "Bud" Owen, US Army WWII; Winfield J. Thompson, US Army WWII; and Louis E. Williams, US Army WWII.

Photographer John Heminger was on hand to document the event, and we will share more of his photo highlights with VSO Geri Opsal's report, in next week's edition.

Watch for it.

*****

Congratulations to the Sisseton Wahpeton College!

The Bush Foundation has selected SWC for membership in its 2nd Community Creativity Cohort.

Read about the selection elsewhere in this issue of the Sota.

Here is what Erin Griffin has to say, "This really is momentous; we've got our foot in the door."

"I'm hoping this will open us to many more opportunities."

From the Bush Foundation:

The Community Creativity Cohort 2 is a participant-led, capacity building program to support organizations that make art and culture central to problem solving—the guiding goal of our Community Creativity strategic initiative.

This cohort will focus on:

Organizations led by and serving people of color or Indigenous people (POCI) and/or …

Organizations led by and serving people from rural communities, non-metropolitan cities or towns with populations of less than 50,000 people.

We want to support both art and culture organizations and non-art organizations.

We want to support organizations that have been integrating art into problem solving for years, as well as those that are just starting to experiment with using art and culture in problem solving.

We will support the creation of a participant-led learning cohort to help organizations improve their work and strengthen their organizations.

*****

Dakota Crossing is celebrating its first anniversary.

It has been one year, this September, since the Tribal grocery store opened its doors.

The store is giving away a carload of groceries – and a car to cart it away! (A 2012 Silver Chrysler Convertible.)

See the full-page advertisement on the back page for the car giveaway and loads of specials!

*****

We apologize to Jacob LaBlanc for the glaring error in identifying him in our coverage of the Wambdi coronation ceremony!

Jacob is very much this year's Wicasta!

Congratulations, Jacob, and also Winyan Kylee Deutsch, for being chosen to reign over this year's Wambdi Homecoming.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"everything is laid out for you. Your path is straight ahead of you. Sometimes it's invisible but it's there. You may not know where it's going, but still you have to follow that path. It's the path to the Creator. That's the only path there is."

–Leon Shenandoah, ONONDAGA

Everything on the earth has a purpose and a reason for its existence. Every human being is a warrior and every warrior has a song written in his/her heart and that song must be sung or the soul forever remains restless. This song is always about serving the Great Spirit and helping the people. This song is always sung for the people. Many times I need to learn much about the difficulties of life. I need to know this, so I must experience it. Then I can be of use to the people. Because I am experiencing difficulty does not mean I have left the path or that I have done something wrong. It means I'm doing the will of the Great Spirit during these times of testing. I need to pray constantly to keep a good attitude.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

Hello seeker! Now don't feel alone here in the New Age, because there's a seeker born every minute. - Firesign Theatre

The man of knowledge must be able not only to love his enemies but also to hate his friends. - Friedrich Nietzsche (1844 - 1900), Ecce Homo, Foreword

Everyone rises to their level of incompetence. - Laurence J. Peter (1919 - 1988), "The Peter Principle"

The most dangerous strategy is to jump a chasm in two leaps. - Benjamin Disraeli (1804 - 1881)

It is possible to be below flattery as well as above it. - Thomas Babington Macaulay (1800 - 1859)

He felt that his whole life was some kind of dream and he sometimes wondered whose it was and whether they were enjoying it. - Douglas Adams (1952 - 2001), "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy"

A specification that will not fit on one page of 8.5x11 inch paper cannot be understood. - Mark Ardis

In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice; In practice, there is. - Chuck Reid

If time flies when you're having fun, it hits the afterburners when you don't think you're having enough. - Jef Mallett, Frazz, 08-01-05

Listening, not imitation, may be the sincerest form of flattery. - Dr. Joyce Brothers (1928 - )

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

CDF

Obituaries –

Services held for Phyllis Sherod

Funeral service for Phyllis D. Sherod (Keoke), 55, of Browns Valley, MN was held on Wednesday afternoon, September 19, 2018 at the SWO community center, Agency Village, South Dakota with Rev. Father Charles Chan officiating.

Active pallbearers were Waylon Maestos, Chris Sherod, Josh Keoke, Matt Keoke, Isaac Delgrosso, Jordan Kurrasch, Jacob Kurrasch, and Jared Kurrasch

Honorary pallbearers were Martin Orman, Deanne White, Brenda Solberg, Linette Beaudereau, Edna Max, Charlotte Keoke, Lori Keeble, Leila Redday, Shelia Barse, Veronica Ojeda, Arlene Miller, Donna Thompson, and all of Phyllis's friends and family.

All-night wake services were held Monday and Tuesday at the community center.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD was in charge of funeral arrangements.

Phyllis Darlene Sherod passed away on September 14, 2018 in her home surrounded by her loving family.

She was born on December 18, 1962 in Sisseton, South Dakota to Robert Keoke Sr. and Darlene Keoke (Barse).

She attended grade school in Peever, SD then went to Westside School in Sisseton.

She was in the Tekakwitha orphanage until 7th grade.

After she left the orphanage, she lived in the Sisseton area where she met her first husband. They moved to Watertown, SD where she had her first 3 children Daniel, David, and Dennille Goette.

She was going to school for cutting hair but never finished.

She then got divorced and had her fourth child Derrick Goette and moved to St. Paul, MN where she met her second husband and had her fifth child Dawn Kraemer.

They then moved to Peever, SD where she worked as a bartender for the Peever Liquor Store.

Phyllis then divorced and met her third and final husband Dennis, they then moved to Colorado and then moved to Browns Valley, MN and had her sixth child Dezeray Eagle (Sherod) and then moved to Ortonville, MN where she had her seventh child Dennis Sherod Jr.

Throughout the rest of her years, she and Dennis along with the kids lived in various locations because Dennis did carpentry.

Phyllis's favorite hobbies were wood working, sewing, arts & crafts, making dream catchers, and writing. She loved being outdoors, walking, camping, going for rides, listening to the birds/nature.

She was a very caring, loving person. Everyone that met her loved being around her, all the places she moved to, she always knew how to make it feel like home.

Phyllis is survived by her children Daniel Goette, David Goette, Dennille Goette, Derrick Goette, Dawn Kraemer, Dezeray Eagle, and Dennis Sherod Jr.; siblings Larry, Conrad, Robert, Willis, Arlys, Marvin, Michelle, Dorcy, Quincy, Tracy; grandchildren Jackson Chanku, Diamond Goette, Dominick Goette, Devina Goette, Aubrey Lawrence, Nathen Lawrence, Kira Lawrence, Liam Goette, Jaslynn Goette, Hannah Goette, Derrick Goette Jr., Dontae Kraemer, Melody Bernard, Alice Johnson, Travis Johnson, Anpao Eagle, Molly Eagle, Anthony Eagle.

Phyllis is preceded in death by her parents, her step-dad Dennis Brant; husband Dennis Sherod Sr.; brother Darwin Mireau; sister Debra Silverman; and niece Kim Keoke,

For Phyllis's obituary and on-line registry please visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com

Memorial service for Sean Hopper

Memorial service for Sean Hopper, 45 of Waubay, SD was held on Saturday morning, September 22, 2018 at Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD.

A meal and fellowship followed the service at the Enemy Swim District Center, Enemy Swim, SD.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD was in charge of funeral arrangements.

Sean was born in Sun Valley, CA on December 5, 1972. He was the son of Jim and Henrietta (Gill) Hopper.

Sean grew up in Sun Valley before moving to Waubay, SD in 1980.

There he attended the Waubay School, then later in life he got his GED and certification as a CNA and med-aid.

Sean got married in 1992, having two children, Collin and Bethany, prior to divorcing.

He moved to Valley City in 1997, adding another daughter Misty Fields.

He moved back to Waubay after a few years to live with his parents. There he worked at Roslyn Nursing Home.

Sean had a terrific sense of humor and laugh.

He enjoyed many things in life. He loved reading, fishing, watching the Minnesota Vikings, playing basketball, and his video games. He loved taking care of his residents.

Sean is survived by his children Bethany Haas of Aberdeen, SD, Colin Hopper of Aberdeen, SD, and Misty Fields of Moorhead, MN; two grandchildren Lucy Hopper, and Rose Haas; siblings David Hopper of San Dimas, CA, Mike Hopper of Waubay, SD, Deanna Hopper of Browns Valley, MN, Ian Hopper of Anaheim, CA, Eric Hopper of Browns Valley, MN, and then two adopted siblings Heather Whalen of Montana and Waylon Greeley of Rapid City, SD, and several nieces and nephews.

Sean was preceded in death by his parents and grandparents.

For Sean's obituary and on-line registry please visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com

Services pending for Edith Eldridge

Edith Eldridge, age 94, of Browns Valley, Minnesota passed away Friday, September 21, 2018 at the Browns Valley Health Center in Browns Valley.

Funeral arrangements are pending with Ranney-Bainbridge Funeral Home, Wheaton, Minn.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Invitation to attend Sioux Falls Native American Day Parade

We would like to invite you to participate and/or attend the Native American Day Parade in Sioux Falls on Monday, October 8, 2018 beginning at 10:00 a.m. in downtown Sioux Falls on the traditional parade route used by the City on S. Phillips Ave which begins near 14th Street.

Native American Day became a state holiday on October 12, 1990 during the "Year of Reconciliation." The Native American Day Parade in Sioux Falls will honor the state holiday by highlighting the beautiful and vibrant cultures of our local tribal nations.

The theme is "Honoring Our Elders" as we would like to give thanks to our elders and honor their wisdom and generosity. The Grand Marshall will be Tim Giago of Native Sun News Today.

Here are the contests for the Parade:

* Best School Spirit

* Most Humorous

* Most Traditional

* Best Arts & Entertainment

* Best Kiddie Float (Ages 0-10)

* All-Around Winner

We look forward to having you or your group in the first-ever Native American Day Parade in Sioux Falls on Monday, October 8!

Parade Information:

Fees and Float Registration Forms can be mailed to or dropped off at:

Phade Heat Press & Vinyl

2210 S. Euclid Ave.

Sioux Falls, SD 57105

Phone: 605-366-3234

We have also set up a PayPal for the Parade. This Google Doc has all the necessary information and registration form:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfqSq9H4FXUvZzw2KtHiPhFpV4n7TqB4tz3WWeVoZB3DSW2qA/viewform

Event page on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/events/513412689081255/

If you would like to volunteer, here is some information:

https://www.signupgenius.com/go/70a0c44a9ab28abff2-crowd

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact the organizer:

Richie Richards

Parade Organizer

From Crystal Owen: "On Monday, October 8th, the first ever Native American Day Parade will be held in Sioux Falls, SD. I am sending this information out to everyone and asking if you would please share it with others who might be interested in being a part of the parade. I think it's a great opportunity for the SWO to get involved and showcase some of the good things that we have going on here. We have the three casinos, we have our for profit business, we have our Tribe which is one of the largest employers here in South Dakota. So, if anyone is interested, I hope that you would contact Richie Richards and think about entering a float or at least attend if you can."

(Editor's note: Yankton Sioux Tribal member Lynn "Smokey" Hart addressed the late Gov. George Mickelson and state lawmakers in 1990, and is responsible for getting them to observe Native American Day.)

"Heart Health" is Meaningful Conversation topic

This Saturday, September 29, in support of World Heart Day, Dr. Wilbert Williams of Sisseton will present a talk and lead a meaningful conversation about heart health.

This will be held at the Sisseton City Hall Community Room, 406 2nd Ave W., starting with a meal at 5:30 p.m.

World Heart Day is a part of an international campaign to spread awareness about cardiovascular diseases and stroke prevention.

The World Heart Federation (WHF) organizes the World Heart Day, an international campaign on September 29th every year.

Dr. Wilbert Williams Jr., MD, is a Family Practice specialist in Sisseton, South Dakota.

He attended and graduated from Albany Medical College of Union University in 1978.

He has over 40 years of diverse experience, especially in Family Practice.

Dr. Williams serves the community at the Woodrow Wilson Keeble Memorial Health Care Center. He is also affiliated with Coteau Des Prairies Health Care System.

A meal and refreshments will be provided.

This event is sponsored by the Baha'is in the Sisseton area.

To learn more and get involved in these monthly meaningful conversations, contact Rick and Mehran DeLoughery at 605-419-2169.

Annual Bazaar

St. Kateri Tekakwitha Church in Sisseton will be having its annual Bazaar on Sunday, October 7th.There will be a roast beef dinner served, with mashed potatoes and gravy, veggies, salads and dessert.\

Serving begins at 12:00 noon.

Cost of the dinner is $9.00 for ages 11 and up, $6.00 for ages 4-10 and free for children 3 and under.

There will also be a raffle, games, bingo, cake walk, bake sale, quilts and a country store.

For raffle tickets contact a St. Kateri Tekakwitha parishioner or the Catholic Community Center. Everyone is invited, so come and enjoy the fun – there is something for everyone!"

ND woman charged with make false statements to federal agency

Sioux Falls, SD – Sept. 12, 2018 – U.S. Attorney Ron Parsons announced that a Fort Totten, North Dakota, woman has been indicted by a federal grand jury in North Dakota for Making False Statements to Federal Agency.

LaRon Greywater, age 44, was indicted on September 5, 2018. She appeared before U.S. Magistrate Judge Alice Senechal on September 10, 2018, in Grand Forks, North Dakota, and pled not guilty to the Indictment.

Greywater faces up to 15 years in federal prison and/or a $250,000 fine, and a $100 assessment to the Federal Crime Victims Fund. Restitution may also be ordered.

The Indictment alleges that Greywater, a former Bureau of Indian Affairs police officer, was on duty and driving in a BIA vehicle on September 20, 2017. She failed to stop at a stop sign and yield the right of way to other traffic at an intersection on the Spirit Lake Indian Reservation. A collision occurred and she allegedly made false representations about the brakes on her vehicle malfunctioning which caused the wreck.

The charges are merely accusations and Greywater is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty.

The investigation was conducted by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Office of Justice Services, Internal Affairs Division. Assistant U.S. Attorney Tim Maher is prosecuting the case on behalf of the United States Attorney General and United States Attorney Ron Parsons. Greywater was released on pretrial conditions pending trial. A jury trial date has not been set yet.

RC Technologies changes how it assesses FUSC

Effective October 1, 2018, RC Technologies, New Effington, SD, changed the way it assesses its Federal Universal Service Charge (FUSC). RC Technologies is making this change because of a recent Federal Communications Commission (FCC) order.

For the fourth quarter of 2018, the Federal Universal Service Charge (FUSC) contribution factor will increase from 17.9% to 20.1%. This will result in an increase in the charge that appears on your monthly telephone bill. The factor is applied to services designated as interstate by the FCC and changes from time-to-time based on the needs of the federal universal fund.

The federal universal service fund was established and is maintained to ensure that all consumers, regardless of location, have access to essentially the same telecommunications services at affordable prices. The fund also provides schools, libraries, low-income consumers and rural health care providers with assistance in obtaining telecommunications services.

Please call RC Technologies at 888-668-0877 with any questions you may have on these changes.

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

By Gypsy Wanna

SWO Wellness Coordinator

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

Each year the SWO Community Health Education Program sponsors an education and awareness campaign about breast cancer and screenings.

Although we create many opportunities for people to learn, we can't reach everyone.

There are still women that don't know about age appropriate screenings, such as mammograms to detect breast cancer; generally mammograms begin at age 40 (unless there is a family history of cancer). A mammogram is an x-ray of a woman's breasts to detect changes that aren't normal.

Talk to a doctor about your risk for breast cancer, especially if a close family member of yours has had breast or ovarian cancer. Your doctor can help you decide when and how often to get mammograms.

This year please join us for a week of learning and activities October 15-19, 2018.

Be sure to watch for more information in the next issue of the Sota.

Free Car Seat Safety event on Saturday

Certified Technicians in Sisseton will check car seats and teach car seat safety on National Seat Check Saturday

Agency Village, SD – September 21, 2018 – SWO Community Health Education Program announced today that certified Child Passenger Safety Technicians will be offering free car seat inspections and education to parents and caregivers on Saturday, September 29, 2018 beginning at 11:00 am to 1:00 pm at the 4-H Building, on BIA Hwy 700.

The event is part of National Seat Check Saturday, and will include instruction on how to choose the right car seats for children, with an emphasis on how to install and use them correctly. Technicians will also explain the importance of registering the seats with the manufacturer so parents and caregivers can be notified if there is a recall.

"Car seats, booster seats, and seat belts are often used incorrectly," said Sandi Bernard, CPS Technician.

"Every 33 seconds in 2015, one child under 13 was involved in a crash. No parent wants to ever get it wrong when it comes to a child's safety. That's why we're hosting this car seat check event on National Seat Check Saturday. Parents - don't think you know, know you know that your kids are secure in their car seats and are in the right seats for their ages and sizes."

Car crashes are a leading killer of children, and the latest research from the U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) shows that nearly two out of three of car seats are misused.

Sandi Bernard added that using age- and size-appropriate car seats and installing them correctly are the best ways to reduce these deaths. "More than one-third of children 12 and younger who died in crashes in 2015 while riding in cars, pickups, vans, and SUVs were unbuckled. Many of those kids could have survived if they had been buckled up."

National Seat Check Saturday is part of Child Passenger Safety Week, which runs from September 23-29, 2018.

The week is dedicated to teaching parents and caregivers about the importance of correctly choosing, installing, and using car seats, booster seats, and seat belts. Parents and caregivers will also be reminded of the importance of registering car seats with the manufacturer so they can be notified in the event of a recall.

NHTSA recommends keeping children rear-facing as long as possible, up to the top height or weight allowed by their particular seats.

It's the best way to keep them safe.

Once a child outgrows the rear-facing car seat, he or she is ready to travel in a forward-facing car seat with a harness and tether.

After outgrowing the forward-facing car seat, a child should ride in a booster seat until tall enough to fit in a seat belt properly.

The safest place for all kids under 13 is in the back seat.

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate's National Seat Check Saturday event is being held at the 4-H Building from 11:00 am to 1:00 pm. All parents and caregivers are invited to attend this free event.

For more information on child car seat safety, as well as how to find other car seat check events, go to www.nhtsa.gov/carseat.

US Attorney's office hosts "Addiction and Suicide: Communities in Crisis" conference

Sioux Falls, SD – United States Attorney Ron Parsons announced that the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of South Dakota, together with Avera Health, hosted a conference on "Addiction and Suicide: Communities in Crisis" on September 6, 2018 at the Sioux Falls Convention Center.

One of the highest priorities of the United States Department of Justice, as outlined by Attorney General Jeff Sessions, is to reduce drug overdose deaths. "We are currently facing an addiction crisis of historic proportions: 64,000 Americans lost their lives to drug overdoses in 2016, the highest drug death toll and fastest increase in American history. In 2017, 72,000 American lost their lives to drug overdoses. That's almost half of the population of Sioux Falls – vanishing in a single year. For Americans under the age of 50, drug overdose is now the leading cause of death. That wasn't true even five years ago," said U.S. Attorney Ron Parsons. "These are not just numbers – they are moms, dads, daughters and sons, spouses, friends, and neighbors. Addiction and suicide touch all levels of society, in every part of our state: large cities, small towns, Indian reservations, and rural areas alike."

Suicide is also a growing problem across the nation and in South Dakota. "The state Department of Health reported 192 suicide deaths in South Dakota last year – the highest number ever recorded in the state. Suicide is third highest cause of death for children ages 5-14 in the state, and the second highest cause of death for young adults ages 15-24," said Deb Fischer-Clemens, Senior Vice President for Public Policy at Avera Health. "Addiction and suicide are interrelated problems that are hitting right in the heart of America, right where we live."

The keynote speaker for the conference was Ryan Leaf, former NFL player and collegiate football coach, who experienced addiction to prescription opioids and now is a voice for recovery, with a mission to reach anyone in need of hope.

More than 400 conference attendees also heard stories from individuals who had personal or family experience with the tragedies of addiction, depression and suicide. U.S. Attorney Parsons moderated a panel on Drug Crisis Intervention and Prevention with Dr. Benjamin Aaker, Emergency Medicine Specialist with Avera Medical Group, Sioux Falls Police Chief Matt Burns, and Dr. Kenneth Snell, Minnehaha County Coroner and Medical Examiner. In addition, Janet Kittams, President of the Helpline Center, and J.R. LaPlante, Director of Tribal Relations at Avera, moderated panels on the topic of Suicide Crisis Intervention and Prevention in general and from a tribal perspective.

This was the fifth annual conference sponsored by Avera and the U.S. Attorney's Office to explore issues of justice, well-being and safety in our state and region. Past topics have included human trafficking, living with disabilities, child sexual abuse and the opioid epidemic.

The goal of the conference was to reduce overdose and suicide deaths by opening up a larger conversation between people from all walks of life in South Dakota. Attendees represented the legal system, government, health care, education, social work, ministries and more.

"I hope we can all consider ways in which we can reach out and intervene before that accident, before that arrest, before that overdose, before that suicide attempt or other moment of crisis," said U.S. Attorney Parsons at the close of the conference. "And that we remember: there is always hope."

Fighting the Opioid Crisis head on

By Sen. John Thune

Sept. 21, 2018

The opioid crisis that's plagued many areas of the country has reached epidemic levels, and it's on the rise. Last year alone, more than 72,000 Americans lost their lives to drug overdoses. Of those, nearly 50,000 were related to opioids – a highly addictive drug that can be fatal when misused, whether in the form of a prescription drug or illicit substance.

No state is immune to this battle, including South Dakota. And while it might not have affected our state the same way it has others, I can say with certainty that one opioid-related death is one too many.

Sadly, we've lost hundreds of fellow South Dakotans to this epidemic over the last decade, and nationwide, the problem is only getting worse. Today more people are dying from opioid overdoses than in motor vehicle accidents. It's now the leading cause of accidental death in the United States.

Taking on this crisis requires a strong and coordinated response from local communities all the way to the federal government, which has an important role to play in this battle. In a place where politics too often rules the day, I'm glad this fight has garnered the strong bipartisan support it deserves in Washington, D.C. It's too important not to.

In 2016, Congress passed the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act and the 21st Century Cures Act, which devoted substantial resources to states to empower them to tackle this problem in communities around the country. In March and September of this year, we passed appropriations bills that included more than $8 billion to address the opioid crisis. All told, funding to combat this crisis has increased by nearly 1,300 percent over last four years.

Most recently, Congress passed the Opioid Crisis Response Act, which is the result of more than 70 proposals from senators across the ideological spectrum, myself included. Five Senate committees, including the Senate Commerce Committee, which I chair, contributed to this effort that will help reduce use and supply, encourage recovery, and drive innovation and long-term solutions.

The bill includes my Expanding Telehealth Response to Ensure Addiction Treatment Act, which will take meaningful steps toward expanding access to telehealth technology for Medicare patients being treated for substance use disorder. Telehealth is critical for rural states like South Dakota, which is why I'm glad this particular provision was included in the broader legislation.

It also includes my Fighting Opioid Abuse in Transportation Act, which would close a safety gap in railroad drug and alcohol testing regulations and require certain federal agencies to include fentanyl, an opioid drug, in the drug-testing panel.

Angela Kennecke, a journalist who is familiar to many South Dakotans, lost her daughter to the opioid crisis. Angela has bravely shared her family's experience, saying, in part, "I think it's best if I just tell my story and let everyone out there know what happened to my daughter. Because I really believe it could happen to anyone's daughter. It can happen in anyone's family."

She's right. It can happen to anyone's family. That's why Congress has taken this issue head on. When I say one opioid-related death is one too many, it's people like Angela's daughter, Emily, who I'm talking about. We can curb this epidemic, and with the tools that are being deployed nationwide, I'm confident we will.

Legislation to combat Opioid crisis

Washington, DC – Sept. 17, 2018 – U.S. Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.), chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation and a member of the Senate Finance Committee, today issued the following statement after the Senate overwhelmingly approved the bipartisan Opioid Crisis Response Act of 2018, which contains proposals from five Senate committees, including Thune-authored bills that were previously adopted by the Commerce Committee or Finance Committee. The Senate bill must now be reconciled with House-passed legislation before it can be sent to the president for his signature.

"The opioid crisis is a nationwide epidemic that needs to be fought on all fronts, which means Congress has a critical role to play in providing important tools to communities that are facing this issue head-on," said Thune. "I'm proud of the collective effort that senators from both sides of the aisle have dedicated to finding common ground to expand both treatment and prevention activities. Today this bill is one step closer to the president's desk, and we are one step closer to providing much-needed assistance to those who need it the most. I hope my colleagues in the House will consider this important piece of legislation without delay."

Thune-authored Provisions:

· The Expanding Telehealth Response to Ensure Addiction Treatment (e-TREAT) Act (S. 2901), bipartisan legislation that would increase access to substance use disorder treatment through telehealth technology under Medicare. Thune has long advocated for the use of telehealth as a means to increase access to health care services in rural communities, like those throughout South Dakota (approved by the Finance Committee).

· The Fighting Opioid Abuse in Transportation Act (S. 2848), which would close a safety gap in railroad drug and alcohol testing regulations by expanding testing requirements to both rail mechanical employees and yardmasters. It also addresses a major on-going drug abuse issue by requiring that the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Transportation include fentanyl in the drug-testing panel, subject to findings on available testing (approved by the Commerce Committee).

Thune-Supported Provision, Approved by Thune-Led Commerce Committee:

· The Opioid Addiction Recovery Fraud Prevention Act of 2018 (S. 2842), which is sponsored by Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va.), would clarify and reaffirm the power of the Federal Trade Commission to bring enforcement actions against opioid treatment scams, including deceptive treatment claims and bogus products. It would also protect individuals with opioid use disorder and their families from harmful and misleading addiction treatment programs or products.

Rounds statement on legislation to address Opioid epidemic

Washington, DC – Sept. 17, 2018 – U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) today made the following statement after the Senate voted to pass the Opioid Crisis Response Act, a comprehensive bill to address the growing opioid epidemic in the United States:

"The legislation we passed today takes an important step toward ending the heartbreaking issue of opioid addiction," said Rounds. "Opioid addiction does not discriminate—it can affect men and women of all ages and of all races, in any town in the United States, including in South Dakota. Many times, addiction starts with a legal painkiller prescription from a doctor following surgery or to manage chronic pain. Because opioids are highly addictive, they can easily lead to abuse. When the prescription runs out, people attempt to buy them illegally on the street or turn to dangerous substances such as heroin or fentanyl. I'm pleased that we were able to pass the Opioid Crisis Response Act and I urge the president to sign it into law so those suffering from addiction can get the help they need as quickly as possible."

The Opioid Crisis Response Act will:

o Reduce use and supply by helping to stop drugs at the border and providing grants to states to better share monitoring program data;

o It will encourage recovery by providing support to states and tribes, establishing recovery centers and improving access to health professionals, tele-health services and long-distance care, and recovery housing services;

o It includes support for caregivers and families and promotes family-focused treatment and recovery; and

o It seeks to drive innovation and long-term solutions by supporting advancements in cutting-edge research to spur discovery and development of new non-addictive painkillers and address economic and workforce impacts, among other things.

Legislation to address Opioid crisis

From 2013 to 2016, drug-related deaths in ND increased by nearly 400%

Washington, DC – Sept. 27, 2018 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today voted with a bipartisan majority of the U.S Senate to pass comprehensive, bipartisan legislation to combat the ongoing, nationwide substance abuse crisis. The legislation includes provisions Heitkamp successfully fought for to address the ripple effects of North Dakota's overdose epidemic among children, families, and rural communities.

Over the past few years, drug abuse and drug-related deaths have steeply risen across rural America. In North Dakota, drug-related deaths increased by nearly 400 percent from 2013 to 2016. And from 1999 to 2015, opioid deaths in rural America quadrupled among 18-25 year olds.

The bipartisan Opioid Crisis Response Act includes key pieces from a bill Heitkamp introduced to address and mitigate the detrimental impact exposure to trauma, like opioid and methamphetamines abuse, can have on children. Traumatic experiences such as those related to addiction can lead to severe health and behavioral complications that can impact children throughout their lives. Young people who experience four or more traumatic events are three times more at risk of heart disease or lung cancer, while those who experience six or more traumatic events are 30 times more likely to attempt suicide.

"The prevalence of addiction and overdoses in rural America has reached beyond crisis levels," said Heitkamp. "This comprehensive package will provide significant resources to communities that urgently need assistance, including to North Dakotans suffering from addiction in Indian Country. Right now, we're witnessing an entire generation of American children who could be scarred for life due to the substance abuse they've witnessed in their families. That's why it's so important that this bipartisan bill also includes my provisions to mitigate the impacts of childhood exposure to trauma, boost the mental and behavioral health workforce, and commit to evidence-based evaluations and interventions. This legislation is an important and needed step, but we must keep fighting for additional support, so all North Dakota families and communities are strong and safe."

The legislation also includes Heitkamp's provisions to improve the Opioid State Targeted Response (STR) grant program, which she proposed in legislation she introduced earlier this year. It would increase flexibility, enable tribes to apply directly for grants, and create a tribal set-aside. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), American Indians and Alaska Natives had the highest overdose death rates of any group in 2015 and the largest percentage change in the number of opioid-related deaths over time.

The provisions from Heitkamp's Trauma-Informed Care for Children and Families Act she fought to include in the Opioid Crisis Response Act would combat the crisis and boost access to trauma-informed treatment by:

Establishing an interagency task force to identify best practices. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), U.S. Department of Education, U.S. Department of Justice, and relevant tribal agency professionals would work to identify a set of best practices that improve capacity and coordination for the identification, referral, and support of children and families that have experienced or at risk of experiencing trauma.

Understanding the prevalence of trauma. Data collection and reporting by states would be expanded to include Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) in behavioral health surveys.

Increasing funding for the National Child Traumatic Stress Initiative. Funding would provide technical assistance, direct services to communities, and would support evaluations and dissemination of best practices in trauma-informed care for children and families.

Integrating mental health practices in schools. Grants would link educational agencies with mental health systems to increase student access to evidence-based trauma support services to help prevent and mitigate trauma that children and youth experience due to substance abuse.

Addressing workforce shortages. Health professionals in the National Health Service Corps would be able to provide behavioral and mental health services in schools or other community-based settings. Additionally, trauma-informed training would be included as part of graduate education and training programs.

The bipartisan legislation also includes critical provisions that would strengthen prevention and education programs, expand access to medication assisted treatment (MAT), and improve wrap-around services for those in recovery. Additionally, this bill includes a measure that would help prevent fentanyl and other illegally-trafficked synthetic drugs from being shipped through the international mail system by strengthening federal agencies' ability to screen shipments that are coming into the country.

New app and harnesses power of museums to better lives of people living with Dementia

St. Paul, MN – Sept. 20, 2018 – Every 65 seconds someone in the United States develops Alzheimer's disease, and as the U.S. population ages, the rate of diagnosis will grow.

On Sept. 24th, the Minnesota Historical Society (MNHS) launched the U.S. version of the award-winning "House of Memories" dementia awareness program, originally developed in the U.K. by National Museums Liverpool to provide person-centered care for people to live well with dementia.

The program offers training workshops, resources and activities, including the "My House of Memories" app, the first of its kind in the world.

The app features more than 100 interactive pages of MNHS collection items, which can help those living with dementia draw on memories to create personal connections with family, friends and caregivers. The collection items include objects, photographs, music and video that were curated by people living with dementia and their caregivers, including African-Americans who selected items that connect to the black community.

"In working to develop the U.S. version of the app and training workshops, we were able to tap into our extensive collections in exciting new ways," said Kent Whitworth, director and CEO of the Minnesota Historical Society. "The app includes items like a Vikings fan helmet, toys and dolls, and civil rights images and audio. Seeing how these museum resources can create meaningful, person-centered engagement for American audiences, and African-Americans in particular, has been very rewarding."

"We are proud to be working in partnership with the Minnesota Historical Society, to launch 'House of Memories' in the U.S., to help Americans to live well with dementia," said Carol Rogers, executive director for education and visitors at National Museums Liverpool. "Person-centered care is at the heart of our training and acknowledges that an individual's personal history and memory are of huge importance. Museums can be fantastic resources at helping unlock memories, improve communication and understanding, and enrich the lives of those living with dementia. We're excited to see how the U.S. version of the 'My House of Memories' app will help Americans living with dementia and their caregivers to connect and share memories together."

The "My House of Memories" app is free and can be downloaded to tablets and smartphones from iTunes and Google Play.

Search for "My House of Memories" and look for the pink house.

MNHS will also hold training workshops across the state for professional and family caregivers, aimed at helping participants develop new skills and understanding in caring for those living with dementia. Participants will receive a toolkit and view training videos based on the real-life stories of people living with dementia.

Family caregiver workshops will be held in spring 2019. To find out more about the workshops, visit mnhs.org/houseofmemories.

The Mayo Clinic's Charter House, Rakhma Homes and St. Paul African American Faith ACT Community are community partners on this project.

This initiative will complement other MNHS memory loss programs, including sensory-based tours, memory cafes and a baking lab. MNHS is a member of the SPARK! Alliance, an organization of Minnesota and Wisconsin museums focused on serving the memory loss community.

When it hurts to move, moving might be what helps

By Richard P. Holm, MD

The word "chronic" means persistent and unrelenting; something that doesn't go away quickly. When you preface that word with "pain," you have a potentially crippling condition which affects too many people in too many guises.

Chronic pain can develop in a variety of conditions: headaches, lower back pain, herpetic pain following shingles, neuropathic foot pain resulting from diabetes, and the body-wide muscle pain of fibromyalgia, to name a few. The bad news is that it is often very difficult to get rid of chronic pain, like an unwanted guest who never wants to leave.

Surgery or medicines (especially opioids) are often minimally effective at treating chronic pain and sometimes make things worse. Even injections of steroids, which is an invasive, expensive and overused procedure, is typically useless for chronic pain. In the end, too many people continue to suffer. The pain can eventually take control and cause the person to become helpless, inactive, and shut down completely.

It is important to understand that immobility often makes the situation worse. If a joint or muscle is not used regularly, it barks and bites when called upon to be moved, the pain of which can dissuade further use. This cycle, if unbroken, can result in an increasing level of immobility, severe disability, and more time to dwell on the pain. This is exactly the reason they say "use it or lose it!"

Paradoxically, one of the most effective ways of breaking people out of this cycle is for them to change negative habits and to become more active. Again, the best answer for CHRONIC pain is usually not surgery or more pain medicines. Regular stretching, good posture, adequate sleep, a good diet, and regular exercise can work wonders where modern medicines fail. Of course, each case is different, and sometimes a trapped nerve needs release or severe inflammation needs to be turned down and rested. However, carefully moving through stiffness and discomfort can give us considerable relief. It will be tough in the beginning, and results may not be instantaneous, but the struggle of starting healthier habits in the face of chronic pain can be well worth the long-term benefits.

Studies show that return to function, although not easy, is the key to rehabilitation. Chronic pain doesn't have to mean progressive immobility, disability, and hopelessness. We should remember to accept the pain when we have to, and, when advised by the doctor, to move those muscles.

Use it or lose it.

*****

Watch On Call with the Prairie Doc® most Thursdays at 7 p.m. central on SDPTV and follow the Prairie Doc® on Facebook and YouTube for free and easy access to the entire Prairie Doc® library.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

Introducing: SWO Johnson O'Malley Program staff

Here are current members of the Sisseton JOM Program.

Nikki Crawford

My name is Nikki Crawford, and I just started working for the JOM program in August 2018. I am located at the Sisseton Middle School. I have two wonderful children: my oldest is my son Jorell who is 13 years old; and my youngest is my daughter Deanna who is 8 years old.

I choose to work with JOM students because helping children is the most rewarding job I can think of!

Knowing that my job is to help kids achieve their full potential and to help them feel happier and better about themselves, brings a huge smile to my face.

I also help with the Special Olympics Team here at the Sisseton Middle School. The Special Olympics sports organization is for children with intellectual disabilities, and providing year-round training and competition for athletes.

Favorite Quote is:

"Work hard in silence - let your success be the noise!"

Darlene Jo Roberts

Darlene Jo Roberts is located in the Waubay School JOM program, where she has worked with JOM students for 13 years.

Jo is looking forward to the upcoming school year as the SWOJOM Education Administrator.

Why do you choose to work with JOM students?

I feel very close to our JOM students and look forward to their successes. I strive in getting them to realize their full potential, that is my goal every school day.

What is your favorite quote?

"Keep looking up - that's the secret of Life!"

Alexandria Crawford

Alexandria Crawford is 24 years old. She has a 2-year-old little boy named Blair.

Alex is enrolled with SWO in the Old Agency District.

This school year, she will be located at West Side Elementary School and has been there for going on a year.

Alex says she's very lucky to work with such amazing and talented students throughout the school year there at Westside Elementary. She is excited and ready for this school year.

Why do you choose to work with JOM students?

I truly and whole heartedly believe in all of our tribal youth here. I want them to be proud of who they are and where they come from. Many of our tribal youth just need that extra reminder that many of us are rooting for them. To remind them that many of our people want to see them succeed and go above and beyond their limits to achieve their goals. I chose to be here and help support them in any way that I can.

What's your favorite quote?

"Walk like you have 3000 ancestors behind you" – ndninspired

SWC Mustangs Rodeo Team update

Results from last weekend's rodeo in North Platte, Nebraska:

Darin Peterson - Team Roping place 3rd in the long round and 5th in the average.

Rich Marone and Lane Kvien - Team Roping placed 2nd in the long round and 4th in the average.

Lane Kvien -Steer Wrestling placed 3rd in the long round, tied for 1st in the short round and placed 1st over all.

The men's team placed 1st overall the colleges in our region!

This is SWC's first time WINNING a team title!

SWC Mustangs next rodeo will be September 28th and 29th in Fort Dodge, Iowa.

Don't forget about October 10th and 11th.

The SWC Mustangs are hosting an NIRA College Rodeo held at SWC College Rodeo Arena.

Tell your friends and family. Hope to see everyone there.

See the poster elsewhere in this edition of the Sota.

UTTC receives federal grant for Intertribal Research and Resource Center

Bismarck, ND – United Tribes Technical College (UTTC) is the recipient of a $2.6 million dollar federal grant to establish an Intertribal Research and Resource Center (IRRC).

The grant will be used to address community needs and to improve the sustainability of natural resources and agricultural sustainability in Indian Country.

"United Tribes Technical College (UTTC) has a long history of serving as a resource for tribal nations throughout the Great Plains region. The Intertribal Research and Resource Center (IRRC) builds on a strong network of partnerships to enhance research activities to positively impact land management and the sustainability of natural resources," UTTC President Leander R. McDonald says.

These federal funds will be made available through the National Science Foundation's Tribal Colleges and Universities Program.

"UTTC has a great team and infrastructure to manage and implement the grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to the benefit of the region," McDonald says.

The grant is expected to continue through 2023 with an additional $900,000 in federal funds expected to be made available.

Jeremy Guinn, chair of the Environmental Science and Research Program at UTTC, says this funding is a way to reach beyond academic programs and serve the community directly.

"The research areas are food, energy, and water. It is a broad area but these are interconnected fields and we are looking to provide research, information, and resources to the tribes in those three areas, Guinn says.

The Intertribal Research and Resource Center will be in addition to the work already happening on the college campus through the Land Grant program and the Environmental Science and Research Program that focuses on cultivating sustainable food on campus as well as research into sustaining natural resources.

Rounds accepting Spring 2019 Internship applications

Deadline to apply is Oct. 15

Washington, DC – Sept. 18, 2018 – U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) today announced that he is currently accepting internship applications for spring 2019. The deadline to apply for internships in his Washington, D.C., Pierre, Rapid City and Sioux Falls offices is Monday, Oct. 15, 2018. College credit is available.

Duties in the Washington, D.C., office may include tracking legislation, researching bills, attending committee hearings and briefings, leading tours of the U.S. Capitol, handling constituent phone calls, sorting mail and providing legislative support. Duties in the South Dakota offices include researching constituent inquiries and requests, participation in outreach activities, assisting staff on special projects, handling phone calls and constituent requests and sorting mail. In all offices, students will work closely with constituents and staff, polish their research and writing skills and gain an in-depth understanding of a Senate office.

Interested college students should complete the online internship application and submit a resume no later than Oct. 15, 2018. Resumes should be submitted to intern coordinator Kari Weller at kari_weller@rounds.senate.gov. Information about the internship program, along with the application, can be found online at www.rounds.senate.gov/internships.

Additional questions can be directed to Kari Weller at (605) 336-0486.

Legals

Request for Bids

Requesting sealed proposals for:

The Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi Project is looking for individuals to provide guidance and mentoring sessions to various age groups of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Youth for at least 3 to 5 hours per week. The Individual will also be responsible for providing a final report that entails a detailed overview of the Mentor's performed duties to the Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi Project's Chief Academic Officer. Contracts are for 3, 6, and 9 months - desired length of contract must be submitted with proposal.

All sealed bids must include and be submitted by Ocotber 2nd, 2018:

Applicants must submit the following as a part of their proposal:

1.  Bio-sketch or resume of academic and professional credentials, technical competence, experience, and expertise.

2.  Two signed references that highlight the applicant's ability to perform the scope of work.

3.  Work plan to perform the scope of work delineating deliverables, timelines, costs, roles and functions of how the mentor will spend their required 3-5 hours per week in contact with the youth.

4.  Incremental payment schedule that is based on completion of deliverables delineated in the work plan.

5.  Desired length of contract must be addressed within proposal. Contract lengths can be 3, 6, or 9 months

Required Documentation:

1.  Statement of qualifications, competence, and capacity to perform the scope of work.

2.  Current South Dakota Driver's Licenses, and willing to get a tribal driver's license if proposal is accepted.

3.  Able to pass a background check, if proposal is accepted.

4.  Abide by the laws, policies and courts of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation shall govern proposal, contracts and work.

5.  Copy of SWO Business License, if proposal is approved.

6.  To review the entire list of required documentation and what else must be submitted with the prospal please contact Collette Haase SWO Procurment Officer - her information is provided below.

Contact the Procurement Office for specifications: colletteh@swo-nsn.gov

Please submit sealed proposals to:

SWO Procurement Office

Attn: Collette Haase

PO Box 509

Agency Village, SD 57262

By 4:00 pm on Tuesday, October 2nd, 2018

All interested parties acknowledge that any Agreement executed and performed within the Tribe's exclusive jurisdiction is subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the Tribal Court of Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation. All interested parties acknowledge that they must comply with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Ordinances: TERO Chapter 59 Requirements, Wage Rates & Compliance Plan; Business License Ordinance Chapter 53 and Tax Ordinance Chapter 67; and Chapter 75 Sex Offender Registration.

39-1tc

 

REQUEST FOR

WELLNESS CENTER

PROJECT MANAGER

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate is seeking an expert consultant to develop the proposed Wellness Center on the Lake Traverse Reservation and to update previous drawings. The Planning and Development Phase will begin in September 2018 and is expected to be completed in a 12 month period.

Potential applicants interested in performing the services described below should submit proposals to the attention of Floyd Kirk Jr., Tribal Vice-Chairman Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation, P.O. Box 509, Agency Village, South Dakota 57262. To be considered one original and five copies of the proposal must be received no later than Friday, September 21, 2018 at 4:00 pm.

A. CONSULTANT PROPOSALS

Summary Description of Contract Services:

1. Facilitate multi-disciplinary project development team that will provide the guidance and expertise to make the project a reality through a phased approach.

2. Develop a business plan

3. Identify funding sources

4. Provide/assist and work with architectural and engineering services to update and revise planning documents, including the Master Plan, Pre-architectural Program, Conceptual Design, and Schematic Design.

Scope of Work:

1. Reactivate and reconvene a project development team composed of key stakeholders, and other partners to provide multi-disciplinary guidance, direction, and expertise to the project.

2. Identify and develop construction financing options in consultation with the project development team.

3. Identify and develop revenue streams for operational programming, including the existing budgets of the programs that will occupy the facility, increases to the existing budgets that may be obtained through increases in appropriations from Congress by the Federal agencies, non-recurring grants from federal agencies.

4. Provide monthly reports to the Vice-Chairman.

Qualifications and requirements for organizations or individuals responding to this Request for Proposals:

1. Documented experience as a planner with a new construction project.

2. Experience and expertise in architectural and engineering design and construction of wellness centers.

3. Expertise in obtaining financing for a phased funding construction.

4. Professional education includes degrees in recreation

5. Excellent communication, group facilitation, networking and writing skills.

6. Good standing with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate on past project performance.

7. Cannot be debarred from participation in Federal contracts.

Applicants must submit the following as a part of their proposal:

1. Statement of qualifications, competence, and capacity to perform the scope of work.

2. Work plan to perform the scope of work delineating deliverables, timelines, costs, roles and functions.

3. Itemized budget applicant will need to perform this scope of work, including all fees and reimbursable expenses (such as supplies, travel, and overhead).

The laws, policies and courts of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation shall govern proposal, contracts and work.

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation is a sovereign and federally recognized Indian Tribe. All proposals must include recognition that subsequent agreements and work shall be governed by and construed in accordance with the laws and courts of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate. Irrespective of any language to the contrary in the RFP, subsequent agreements or elsewhere, no right to arbitration of any controversy or claim arising out of or related to the Agreement.

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate shall utilize the following selective factors in determining the most responsive proposal.

1. Capacity/Technical Approach - 30 Points

2. Experience/Past Performance - 20 Points

3. Qualifications - 20 Points

4. Cost / Budget - 20 points

5. Indian Preference - 10 points

6. 100 Possible Points

38-2tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 18-164

SWOCSE/ Arlene Argo-White, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MATTHEW DUMARCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of September, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of August, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 03-269

SWOCSE/ Gordon Redday, Sr., PLAINTIFF

VS.

BETHEL GILL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Dismiss Child Support And Establish TANF Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of September, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of August, 2018

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 16-110

SWOCSE/ Michelle Blue, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ANTHONY RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of September, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of August, 2018

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 08-005

SWOCSE/ Daisy Hare, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ANTHONY RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of September, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of August, 2018

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 08-292

SWOCSE/ Kandice Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ANTHONY RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of September, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of August, 2018

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 08-034

SWOCSE/ Gerri Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ANTHONY RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of September, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of August, 2018

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 15-056

SWOCSE/ Mairiel Stone, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ANTHONY RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Re-Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of September, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of August, 2018

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 18-053

SWOCSE/ SD/Sarah Braun, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SHANE JEFFERSON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of September, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of August, 2018

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 18-033

SWOCSE/ SD/Jamie Herrera, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SHANE JEFFERSON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of September, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of August, 2018

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 17-045

SWOCSE/ SD/Ella Robertson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SHANE JEFFERSON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of September, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of August, 2018

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 00-500

SWOCSE/ Jody LaFontaine, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DALE BLOCK, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of September, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of August, 2018

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 18-168

SWOCSE/ Liberty Strutz, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JESSIAH LONEFIGHT, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of September, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of August, 2018

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 15-144

SWOCSE/ Mary Krpan, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CHANDLER SHEPHERD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of September, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of August, 2018

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 18-160

SWOCSE/ Arlene White Argo, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LAKOTA YOUNG, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of September, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of August, 2018

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 18-139

SWOCSE/ Harvey Renville, Jr., PLAINTIFF

VS.

KELEE ADAMS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to EstablishChild Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of September, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of August, 2018

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 13-001

SWOCSE/ Sheena Erickson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SHANE DUMARCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of September, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of August, 2018

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 17-117

SWOCSE/ Charlene LaFontaine, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SOPHIA KLEINHEKSEL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of September, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

 

Dated this 29th day of August, 2018

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-18-831-650

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE

OF NAME OF:

JODI EASTMAN, Petitioner.

ORDER AND NOTICE OF

HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from JODI MARIE EASTMAN to JODI MARIE HIS MANY LIGHTNINGS shall be heard before the Honorable BJ Jones, Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at 2:00 P.M. on the 10th day of OCTOBER, 2018.

Dated this 12th day of September, 2018.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST:

E. Pfeiffer, CLERK OF COURTS

38-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-18-832-651

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE

OF NAME OF:

OHIYESA EASTMAN, Petitioner.

 ORDER AND NOTICE OF

HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from OHIYESA EASTMAN to OHIYESA HIS MANY LIGHTNINGS shall be heard before the Honorable BJ Jones, Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at 2:15 P.M. on the 10th day of OCTOBER, 2018.

Dated this 12th day of September, 2018.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST:

E. Pfeiffer, CLERK OF COURTS

38-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-18-830-649

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE

OF NAME OF:

DONALD EASTMAN, Petitioner.

 ORDER AND NOTICE OF

HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from DONALD ALBERT EASTMAN to DONALD ALBERT HIS MANY LIGHTNINGS shall be heard before the Honorable BJ Jones, Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at 2:00 P.M. on the 10th day of OCTOBER, 2018.

Dated this 12th day of September, 2018.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST:

E. Pfeiffer, CLERK OF COURTS

38-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-18-855-674

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE

OF NAME OF:

Recker The Miracle Harrison Neconish, Minor,

And concerning:

Leslie Neconish, Petitioner.

 ORDER AND NOTICE OF

HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from RECKER THE MIRACLE HARRISON NECONISH to DAZEN KALINO NECONISH shall be heard before the Honorable BJ Jones, Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at 1:30 P.M. on the 10th day of OCTOBER, 2018.

Dated this 12th day of September, 2018

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST:

E. Pfeiffer, CLERK OF COURTS

38-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-18-833-652

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE

OF NAME OF:

ame, Petitioner.

 ORDER AND NOTICE OF

HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from WILLOW REDSTAR EASTMAN to WILLOW REDSTAR HIS MANY LIGHTNINGS shall be heard before the Honorable BJ Jones, Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at 2:15 P.M. on the 10th day of OCTOBER, 2018.

Dated this 12th day of September, 2018.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST:

E. Pfeiffer, CLERK OF COURTS

38-3tc

Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following position(s):

Juvenile Probation/Diversion Officer, Tribal Court

Teacher, Head Start

Teacher Aide, Head Start

Nurse Care Connector, Health & Social Services

Closing Date: September 28, 2018 @ 4:30 pm

Heavy Equipment Operator, Tribal Roads

Court Process Server, Tribal Court

Receptionist, Administration Building

Maintenance Technician II, Facilities/Maintenance

Maintenance Technician V, Facilities/Maintenance

Closing Date: October 5, 2018 @ 4:30 pm

Application and job description information can be seen at SWO Human Resources Office or http://www.swo-nsn.gov/contact/employment. Application can be downloaded from "Apply Now" and emailed to ArnoldW@SWO-NSN.GOV or DeniseH@SWO-NSN.GOV. Contact can also be at Arnold Williams 698-8238 or Denise Hill 698-8251 with questions. (Tribal preference will apply).

 

Notice

Dakota Nation Industries is seeking to fill two positions:

 Dakota Crossing General Manager

 Corporate Accounting Manager

Both positions are open until filled.

For job descriptions and more information, contact Josh Flute, CEO, Dakota Nation Industries, P.O. Box 509, Agency Village, SD 57262; office 605.698-2002; cell 605.419.1787.

 

Enemy Swim Day School

Job openings

Computer Technology Teacher/Instructor

The Enemy Swim Day School is seeking a Computer Technology Teacher/Instructor for the 2018-2019 school year. Preferred qualifications: BA/BS degree in Elementary Education, SD State Teaching License or obtainable or BA/BS in any field and technology proficient. Required AA or commensurate number of hours; will train if necessary. For more information about the position call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 and ask for Dr. Nadine Eastman, or visit our website www.esds.us for an application and position description. Send application, resume 3 letters of recommendation, and other credentials to: Enemy Swim Day School, 13525 446th Avenue, Waubay, SD 57273. Indian Preference policies apply. This position is open until filled.

Dakota Language Teacher/Instructor

Enemy Swim Day School is seeking a Dakota Language Teacher for the 2018-2019 school year. Qualifications: Dakota Language Teacher Licensure preferred or willing to work toward certification. For more information about the position call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 and ask for Dr. Nadine Eastman. Please visit our website at www.esds.us for a position description and application. Please submit application, resume, 3 letters of recommendation and credentials to: Enemy Swim Day School, 13525 446th Avenue, Waubay, SD 57273. Indian Preference policies apply. This position is open until filled.

Cook's Assistant

Enemy Swim Day School has openings for a Cook's Assistant for the remainder of the 2018-2019 school year. Must be physically capable of standing for long periods of time and lifting up to 30 lbs. Hours are 6:30 am – 2:30 pm. This position includes benefits. If interested please pick up an application from the business office or visit our website: www.esds.us. Call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 for more information, ask for Dr. Nadine Eastman. Please submit application, 3 letters of reference and copy of education to: Enemy Swim Day School, 13525 446th Avenue, Waubay, SD 57274. Indian preference policies apply. Open until filled.

39-2tc

 

Browns Valley School

Job Opening

Browns Valley School is seeking a paraprofessional for the 2018-2019 school year.

Application forms may be requested from the district office, 320-695-2103.

Please submit applications to:

Denise Pikarski, Principal

Browns Valley School

Box N 118 Church Street

Browns Valley, MN 56219

39-2tc

 

Sisseton Public Schools

Job Openings

Bus Mechanic

The Sisseton School District 54-2 has an opening for a bus mechanic. Experience in diesel and gasoline vehicles is preferred. Must have or will obtain a CDL license. Position eligible for health insurance and retirement contributions. If interested, contact Joe Anderson for more information at 698-7613 Ext. 5. EOE

It is the policy of the Sisseton Board of Education that no otherwise qualified person will be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any district program or activity on the basis of race, religion, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, natural origin, or disability. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the nondiscrimination policies: Superintendent of Schools, 516 8th Avenue West, Sisseton, SD 57262-1262, (605) 698-7613 Ext. 4.

Regular & Substitute Bus Drivers

The Sisseton School District 54-2 has openings for regular route and substitute bus drivers. $19.50/ hour, includes health insurance and retirement contributions. Employer will fund CDL class B license. If interested, contact Joe Anderson for more information at 698-7613 Ext. 5. EOE

It is the policy of the Sisseton Board of Education that no otherwise qualified person will be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any district program or activity on the basis of race, religion, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, natural origin, or disability. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the nondiscrimination policies: Superintendent of Schools, 516 8th Avenue West, Sisseton, SD 57262-1262, (605) 698-7613 Ext. 4.

Afternoon Substitute Route Bus Drivers

The Sisseton School District 54-2 has openings for afternoon substitute route bus drivers (approx. 3 times/week). $19.50/ hour. Employer will fund CDL class B license. If interested, contact Joe Anderson for more information at 698-7613 Ext. 5. EOE

It is the policy of the Sisseton Board of Education that no otherwise qualified person will be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any district program or activity on the basis of race, religion, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, natural origin, or disability. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the nondiscrimination policies: Superintendent of Schools, 516 8th Avenue West, Sisseton, SD 57262-1262, (605) 698-7613 Ext. 4.

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Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Count Department:

Team Member (5 Full-Time) 3:00 am to finish

Hotel Department:

Front Desk Clerk (Full-Time) Rotating

Security Department:

Administrative Assistant (Full-Time) Day

Female Officer (Full-Time) Rotating

Surveillance Department:

Observer (2 Full-Time) where needed

Closing Date: September 28, 2018 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions

Two identifications documents required upon hire

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department 16849 102nd Street SE Hankinson ND 58041 For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment) Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Opening

Restaurant Department:

Wait staff (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, and swing, includes weekends & holidays. Customer service skills, prior experience with waiting on tables and working with a cash register is preferred. Must be able to multi-task. Appropriate dress code. Have the physical ability to stand for prolonged periods of time. Must have a High school diploma or GED & be at least 18 years old.

Prep cook/cook (2) full-time, rotating shifts, day, and swing, includes weekends & holidays. Previous experience is preferred. Must be able to multi-task; have the ability to work under pressure; the ability to operate necessary equipment; knowledge of food preparation safety requirements and ability obtain a "Food Handlers" certification; physical ability to clean, lift heavy object up to 20 lbs. or more and restock inventory. Have the physical ability to stand for prolonged periods of time. Appropriate dress code. Must be very dependable. Must be at least 18 years old & must have a High School Diploma or GED.

Dishwasher (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, includes weekends & holidays. Experience in Food Service, food handling safety, and sanitation. Mobility throughout the facility. Able to lift 20-50 lbs. occasionally. Good health, able to stand and walk for long periods of time. Frequent bending, stooping and twisting. Appropriate dress code. Ability to obtain a "Food Handlers" certification. Must be at least 18 years old.

Opening date: Thursday, September 20, 2018

Closing date: Wednesday, September 26, 2018 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 
 

 

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