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Sota Volume 45 Issue No. 37

Anpetu Iyamni, September 17, 2014

Inside this Edition –

Highlights from second “Grassroots Solutions for a Better Community” forum held last week

SWO landowners among others receiving offers from Cobell Land Buy-Back Program

Office of Trustee announces Cobell checks will be in the mail Monday, Sept. 15th

20th anniversary of VAWA is observed

Two-day SWO Wellness workshop planned at SWC

National Day of Remembrance for Murdered Victims: Sept. 25th

View photos of Machine Ballot process inside this Sota; New way to cast your ballot in Tribal elections

Free business training for Native American artists at SWC this week

SWC to host traditional pottery workshop

Photos of Wambdi football team in action

Deadline for receipt of copy for consideration is 12:00 noon Fridays

Invitation to Oyate, community –

Come observe National Day of Remembrance for Murdered Victims

Submitted by Wac’ang’a

September 25, 2014 is National Day of Remembrance for murdered victims.

It is important to honor the memory of victims lost to homicide and acknowledge the resulting long-term trauma for families, communities, and the Nation. It has been the practice of Wac'ang'a (Sweetgrass) to observe this day and give the Survivors of Homicide Victims the opportunity to honor those murdered. Survivors of Homicide Victims are the families and friends who had special ties of kinship and are thus left behind in the aftermath of the violent crime of homicide. It is our desire and hope that all "Survivors of Homicide Victims" join us in honoring the lives of those who were taken too soon. Our National Day of Remembrance for Homicide Victims ceremony is being observed at Wac'ang'a (Sweetgrass) administrative office through the theme: "Love you forever." Today I light a candle for you, To shatter all the darkness and bless the times we knew….

Please join us Thursday, September 25th at 6:00 p.m.at 417 Veterans Ave. Sisseton. for an "Empty Chair Display" along with a Candle light vigil, Offering of prayers, and a releasing of balloons. A light supper will be served.

"There is a sacredness in tears. They are not the mark of weakness, but of power. They speak more eloquently than ten thousand tongues. They are messengers of overwhelming grief and unspeakable love." Washington Irving

Second “Grassroots Solutions for a Better Community” forum held last week

By CD Floro

Sota Editor

SWO Meth Prevention Coordinator Crystal Owen has organized a series of public forums “Grassroots Solutions for a Better Community.” The second forum took place last Wednesday morning, September 10th, at TiWakan Tio Tipi in the Tribal Council chambers.

Everyone who was invited to participate in the first forum has been re-invited, but the turnout was light – with some Tribal programs critical to the issue missing.

SWO Tribal Chairman Robert Shepherd attended and offered his “take” on what his office can do, and what it cannot do alone.

US Attorney Brendan Johnson was unable to make this second meeting but plans to attend others in the future.

Crystal was upbeat, saying “those of you who are here are supposed to be here . . . (the ones) making a difference.”

Tribal elder Norbert Jones opened with a traditional prayer.

Everett Blackthunder Jr. and Darren Crawford sang to the hand drum, and each gave personal comments about how Dakota traditions can help families cope with addiction and abuse.

Jesse Larsen began a discussion of how the Sisseton-Wahpeton Housing Authority handles testing of housing units for drugs.

He told of a house testing positive that morning, with details of how high different toxic substance levels were in the rooms – including bedrooms where little children had been sleeping.

Cocaine, heroin, and more.

Most of the positive tests include meth, which is the “scourge” these days.

The Housing Authority is responsible for maintain 476 housing units across the Lake Traverse Reservation.

We nearly fell out of our chair, and even had to ask Jesse to confirm what he had said . . . that so far 70 percent of these homes where families and precious little children live . . . test positive.

And the cost for cleanup?

Jesse told us, and Patrick Deutsch later confirmed, is between about $4,000 all the way up to $8,000. Per unit.

The $8,000 cleanup was caused, were informed, by an evicted family re-entering home and vandalizing it – retribution for being forced out.

Most cost between $4,000 and $6,000. Still a lot of money.

And, of course, until a unit is cleaned, it cannot be rented to another family.

Corporal Bill Owens was one of those who spoke, and a point he made is that we need individuals willing “to stand up” and point the finger at “those we know are (doing the drug dealing, selling).”

Then, he added, “We need to stand behind and alongside that person, those people” to support them.

Otherwise, fear of embarrassing family members or fear of reprisals from the dealers, will mean the epidemic continues unchecked.

Whose responsibility is it to deal with the meth epidemic that is causing babies to be born addicted to the drug, making our children sick, and destroying the fabric of family life?

Blaming others won’t help. That’s a statement shared in different ways by different people at last week’s meeting.

No one program or office can go it alone.

That was the consensus after some long discussions that won’t be printed here.

What we will share is a list.

These are priorities developed by the consensus:

1. Nine Month Treatment Center (for adult and youth)

2. Update tribal and housing codes and ordinances to reflect no dealers or users allowed in the housing sites (Drug Free Zones)

3. Adolescent/Children’s home and a home for babies

4. Neighborhood Watch in all the housing sites and communities to help report crimes

5. Mandatory reporting of child neglect and abuse including to the unborn be followed according to tribal codes and to include follow up by the programs that need to

6. Turn Rehab Center and area into “Rehab Village” as it was intended

7. Increase Support services for addicts and families (ala non, etc.) in the different communities

8. Identification of all existing resources so we know what we have to work with and will know what we need

9. Allocate a percentage of gaming revenue to fund these solutions.

10. Quit pointing fingers and work together because as long as we do that nothing gets accomplished and the crimes and abuse continue.

Watch for upcoming meetings, and hopefully join in helping put an end to this horribly destructive cycle happening on the Lake Traverse Reservation.

Land Buy-Back Program payments offered to American Indian landowners

SWO landowners among those receiving offers

Washington, DC – September 8, 2014 – Following Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell’s recent visit with the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation, Deputy Secretary of the Interior Mike Connor today announced that more than $8.3 million in purchase offers have been mailed to nearly 2,100 individual landowners with fractional interests on that reservation. This mailing will kick off several weeks of additional purchase offers to landowners who own fractional land interests on the Umatilla, Coeur d’Alene, Lake Traverse (homeland of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate) and Crow Indian Reservations.

As part of President Obama’s commitment to help restore tribal homelands, the Department’s Land Buy-Back Program for Tribal Nations (Buy-Back Program) has successfully concluded transactions worth almost $103 million, restoring the equivalent of nearly 265,000 acres of land to tribal governments.

“The success of the Buy-Back Program is reflected in our ongoing collaborations with tribal governments and active outreach to individual owners,” said Deputy Secretary Connor. “We know that tribal leaders can best explain the value of reducing fractionated lands and the significant benefit to Indian Country, and we are committed to making sure that individuals are aware of this historic opportunity to strengthen tribal sovereignty by supporting the consolidation of Indian lands.”

The Buy-Back Program implements the land consolidation component of the Cobell Settlement, which provided $1.9 billion to purchase fractional interests in trust or restricted land from willing sellers at fair market value within a 10-year period. Individuals who choose to sell their interests receive payments directly into their Individual Indian Money (IIM) accounts. Consolidated interests are immediately restored to tribal trust ownership for uses benefiting the reservation community and tribal members.

There are almost 245,000 owners of nearly three million fractional interests, spanning 150 Indian reservations, who are eligible to participate in the Buy-Back Program. Many see little or no economic benefit from what are often very small undivided interests in lands that cannot be utilized due to their highly fractionated state.

In addition to receiving fair market value for their land based on objective appraisals, sellers also receive a base payment of $75 per offer, regardless of the value of the land.

Flathead Reservation landowners will have until October 24, 2014 to return accepted offers.

Sales of land interests will also result in up to $60 million in contributions to the Cobell Education Scholarship Fund. This contribution is in addition to the amounts paid to individual sellers, so it will not reduce the amount landowners receive for their interests.

Landowners can contact the Trust Beneficiary Call Center at (888) 678-6836 with questions about their purchase offers. Individuals can also visit their local Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians (OST), or Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) office or find more information at www.doi.gov/buybackprogram/landowners in order to make informed decisions about their land.

Individual participation is voluntary. A decision to sell land for restoration to tribes does not impact a landowner’s eligibility to receive individual settlement payments from the Cobell Settlement, which are being handled by the Garden City Group. Inquiries regarding Settlement payments should be directed to (800) 961-6109.

"From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer"

GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov

Phone 605-698-3388

Veterans Day Pow Wow Nov. 7-9, 2014 at TZTS gym

*The Governor encourages all South Dakotans to set aside time on Sept. 19 to honor the POW/MIAs who fought to protect our freedoms and lost theirs, as well as remember those engaged in today's struggle to guard our way of life for future generations. "In their service to our country, former prisoners of war and those missing in action, have sacrificed mightily to maintain the promise of liberty that we hold dear," added Larry Zimmerman, Secretary of the South Dakota Department of Veterans Affairs. "Sept. 19 affords us a great opportunity to reaffirm our vow to never forget the courage of our nation's staunchest de-fenders - our former POWs and MIAs." Please see this week's flyer for the honoring we will have for National POW Day. We encourage families of the POW's to please attend. The Thompson family will be providing soup again in honor of their father "Winfield Thompson-US Army" who was a POW for 3 years 5 months during WWII. We will have fry bread to go along with the soup and also cake served at the Tribal Elderly building following the honoring.

*VETERANS DAY POW WOW: Will be held at Tiospa Zina Tribal Gym on November 7-8-9, 2014. For information contact: Danielle DeCoteau @ 268-1765. The planning committee will consist with a couple of members from each honor guard and also 3 at-large (not a member of any Honor Guard) Veterans. See notice in this week's Sota if you are a Veteran and want to be on the planning committee.

*Annual Women Veterans Conference: October 17, 2014 Sioux Falls, SD. The Keynote Speaker is our very own Donna Williams, USN Veteran. I will have a copy of the flyer in this week's edition for ALL women Veterans who are interested in attending. Please call our office (698-3388) if you want to go. Our Desert Era Honor Guard has been asked to bring a Women's Honor Guard along for this day as well. So our SWO Women Veterans will be representing the Oyate in a big and proud way this day. So please check out the flyer in this week's Sota!

*Dedication: for our Monuments is being planned for October 24, 2014. Please watch the Sota for further developments. We will be inviting all family members of the Congressional Medal of Honor, Code Talker and P.O.W's who are acknowledged on the monument.

*Veterans: For those of you that are in the Honor Guards please make sure that your copy of the DD214 is secured here at the TVSO office. At our last UVA meeting it was asked if they were all in per previous UVA Motion. We have a locked fireproof safe and it will be guarded with the utmost confidence.

*Thank you to those of you that stop in on a regular basis. Thanks goes to Gilbert Robertson who dropped off more books for our mini library that he has created with his donations. Thank you!! Remember Veterans stop by our Office which is located in the Post Office building next to job service Office. The address is 205 East Oak Street Suite # 121. Our telephone is 698-3388.

*The best way for find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others. (Ghandi)

*WOMEN VETERANS CALL CENTER: 1-855-VA-WOMEN. Crisis Help Line: 1-800-273-8255, available 24/7, and tell them you are a veteran. All calls are confidential.

-WOMEN. Crisis Help Line: 1-800-273-8255, available 24/7, and tell them you are a veteran. All calls are confidential.

Have a good week.

Geri Opsal, Tribal VSO.

Drivers: Please continue to use BIA 700 detour routes

Submitted by David Spider

SWO Construction Manager

Once again just a reminder to have all travelers to PLEASE USE the BIA 700 Detour Routes of Roberts Co. 34 (old 81), Roberts Co. 5 and South BIA 700 for detour access to and from Sisseton and Agency Village.

I periodically check the routes for condition and traffic use and we continue to have many people still using the gravel routes as cut across routes. PLEASE DO NOT as this excessive traffic is already beginning to put some serious wear and tear on the gravel roads and are becoming increasingly filled with washboards, a large amount of dust and we continue to still have motorists speeding by the housing site along BIA 706 and many heavy vehicles and busses using these routes. These should only be allowed if needed for usual routine access for routes to homes.

Just a reminder to please do you part and take alternate access and to spread the word.

Construction should last on the road surface until middle/end of October so please bear with us during construction.

Art Crawl is coming

Circle October 3, 4 and 5, 2014 on your calendar for the Northeast South Dakota Art Crawl.

Three Days, Six Locations: Rendezvous Point (Wilmot), the Farm Bed and Breakfast, Thollehaug Commons, Nicollet Tower (all in Sisseton), With the Wind Winery (Rosholt) and Moeller Bronze (north of Rosholt).

Visit the locations, enjoy original/one of a kind artwork, talk with the artists, watch as they work and more.

Check out facebook - Art Crawl or call 605-200-2252 for more information or to participate in the Art Crawl.

Remarks by President Obama –

Observance of 20th anniversary of VAWA

Washington, DC – South Lawn of the White House – September 12, 2014:

THE PRESIDENT: Thank you so much. Thank you. Everybody, have a seat. Have a seat. Welcome to the White House. Give Ivan a big round of applause for the introduction. Dayna, thank you for sharing your story. And I want to thank all of you for joining President Clinton and me in celebrating this 20th anniversary of AmeriCorps.

I want to thank some strong supporters of national service who are here today. We’ve got Treasury Secretary Jack Lew, who as a young aide to President Clinton -- I mean, they both still look good -- (laughter) -- but 20 years ago helped to write the legislation creating AmeriCorps’ 20-year legacy. So thank you, Jack, for the great job.

You already heard from Wendy Spencer, who is -- she never runs out of energy and is reflective of the spirit of AmeriCorps -- the CEO of the Corporation for National and Community Service. Great job, Wendy.

My dear friend, former Senator Harris Wofford, who not only used to run CNCS, but also helped to create VISTA and the Peace Corps. I don’t know anybody who’s got a greater legacy of creating community and helping people to channel their civic virtues than Harris Wofford. We’re so proud of him.

Carrie Hessler-Radelet, the new director of the Peace Corps. Where’s Carrie? There she is right there. We’ve got Congressman John Lewis -- (applause) -- who didn’t have an AmeriCorps program; just went out and got a whole lot done -- which is why I’m standing here. David Price. Senator Martin Heinrich, the first AmeriCorps alum to be elected to the Senate. And everybody who’s here who played a part in creating and sustaining AmeriCorps, both in the Clinton Administration and the Bush Administration and in Congress, and all the service leaders who mobilized and rallied over the years to keep AmeriCorps going. I thank all of you for living a life of active and energetic and engaged citizenship, because it has made America stronger. You have made America stronger because of what you’ve done.

Now, as President Clinton mentioned, not everybody who played an enormous role in this could be here today -- two people in particular who aren’t, but who are in our hearts: Eli Segal, who did so much to get the Corporation for National and Community Service up and running two decades ago. And a man whose extraordinary achievements live on because he never stopped asking what he could do for his country -- our dear friend, Senator Ted Kennedy. His name is on the law that I signed five years ago expanding AmeriCorps -- it was one of the last big public events that Teddy did -- a law that’s going to give a new generation of Americans more opportunities to give back to their communities and their country. And Teddy’s wife, Vicki, as well as Eli’s wife, Phyllis, are here today as well. We thank you so much for everything that you’ve done and for your support. (Applause.)

Now, as Wendy mentioned, all of you who are here are part of a national event. Since yesterday, the 9/11 Day of Service, hundreds of thousands of Americans have taken part in service projects in all 50 states. Michelle and I spent a few hours helping out a school here in D.C. Joe Biden volunteered down the street at George Washington University. And today, thousands of Americans are taking the pledge as new AmeriCorps members. President George H.W. Bush is swearing in volunteers in Maine. President George W. Bush and Laura Bush have filmed a video that’s being shown across the country.

So it echoes back to that day in 1994, when President Clinton swore in that first class of AmeriCorps members right here at the White House. And some of the people who are here were in that class -- and if you were, you might remember him saying that you were starting a journey that would change your lives forever; that AmeriCorps would change the life of the nation; that it would give new life to the values that bind us together as Americans.

And that was a bold claim. But Bill Clinton is an optimist. (Laughter.) And he knew from his own life, as I know from mine, what service can do: the sense of common purpose that it cultivates; the opportunity to join our fellow Americans to work together for something other than just ourselves -- for something bigger, for the common good. And so he had high hopes on that bright September day. And he was not the only one.

William Consuegra took the AmeriCorps pledge that day. Then he went to work for Youth Harvest in Texas, helping high school students improve their literacy skills. Twenty years later, he’s still a public servant, helping communities in New Mexico with community development.

Matthew Little took the pledge that day. He went to work for City Year in Boston. There, he says he discovered a new source of inspiration: “Students who came to me with Fs and left my homework club with As.” And he’s been an educator ever since.

Sondra Samuels took that pledge that day. She headed to Philadelphia to join the Weed and Seed Initiative, helping communities reduce violent crime and gang activity. And she says that AmeriCorps taught her, “that I can look at my country and [I can] actually make it different, not just wish it were different.”

In Chicago, a bright, eager young woman shared in the hope of that day, too. She had recently left her job at a law firm, became the founding executive director of Public Allies in Chicago, a non-profit that trains young people for careers in public service. And soon after, Public Allies received one of the very first grants that AmeriCorps ever awarded. And that young woman happens to live with me. Her name is Michelle Obama. So the Obama household was on board with AmeriCorps from the start.

And for those of you who know my story starting off as a community organizer, I would not be standing here if it were not for service to others, and the purpose that service gave my own life. I moved to Chicago to become a community organizer in part -- in parts of that town where steel plants had closed down and hope had dried up. And I wasn’t sure what I was doing. I wasn’t sure that I’d be successful. I was working with a group of churches out there and we didn’t have a lot of funding. I think my starting salary was $13,000 a year, and gas expenses.

But what I found was that with patience and dedicated effort, I could make a difference. It wasn’t always 100 percent of what I wanted; sometimes it was just 20 percent, sometimes it was just 50 percent. But it turned out that you could nudge history forward. You could shape it. You could see the lives of people that you cared about improving because of the blood and sweat and tears you were putting into it.

And then I found a community for myself, and I began to understand what citizenship meant -- not just some abstraction, not just words on a page, not just rights and privileges, but duties and responsibilities. And it gave me a sense of direction about how I wanted to live my life.

So, as it turned out, the idea of making a difference in other people’s lives made a difference in mine. It made me whole. It gave me center. It gave me a compass. And that, when I look out on all these young people, Bill, is what’s going to happen to them. Most of them are probably already a lot more sophisticated than I was at that time. And probably more gifted and more talented. But that’s why when I look out I can’t describe how inspired I am, because in each of you I see unfurling all the incredible, wonderful things that you’re going to be doing in your lives.

Twenty years after President Clinton signed and swore in that first AmeriCorps class, more than 900,000 Americans have learned the same lesson that I learned by serving through AmeriCorps. And they come from all walks of life -- small towns, big cities, all backgrounds, all age groups. They’ve done everything from deliver emergency relief in the aftermath of disasters, to staffing health clinics in underserved communities, to helping veterans find jobs. They’ve touched millions of lives. They’ve helped America become stronger, and more resilient and more united.

So, Bill, you were right. AmeriCorps has changed the life of our nation. And now it’s up to us to make sure it continues. Because we’re not just here today to celebrate what’s already been achieved. We’re here to rededicate ourselves to the work that lies ahead. We’re here to get things done. We are here to get things done.

My administration has been determined to build on the foundation that President Bush and both -- President Clinton and both Presidents Bush laid. We are determined to help AmeriCorps succeed. We’ve seen the outcomes that AmeriCorps members produce -- improved literacy in the schools where they work. So if we’re smart, Congress will fund this calling that’s meant so much to so many, and keep AmeriCorps strong.

And we’ll keep doing our part. That’s why I created a task force on national service last year -- to find new ways to expand and improve national service. We’ve tested innovations. We’re creating new models of partnership. We’ve reached out to the public -- to the private sector. So AmeriCorps is as effective today as it’s ever been.

We’ve created new AmeriCorps programs to address specific needs. For example, FEMA Corps trains -- (applause) -- trains and deploys national servicemembers to help communities recover from disasters like hurricanes and tornadoes. School Turnaround AmeriCorps sends talented individuals into underachieving schools. The new Justice AmeriCorps will pair AmeriCorps members who are lawyers and paralegals with unaccompanied immigrant children to get them legal help. STEM AmeriCorps is mobilizing scientists and engineers to inspire young people to discover and tinker and innovate and make things.

And we’ve brought businesses and non-profits on board. So we’ve seen again and again how national service helps people -- young people gain valuable skills and training, and employers have noticed. So we want to do more to help talented national service members find good jobs after they wrap up their service. And that’s the idea behind an initiative we’re announcing today called Employers of National Service. If you are an employer -- (applause) -- if you’re an employer who wants to hire talented, dedicated, patriotic, skilled, tireless, energetic workers, look to AmeriCorps, look to the Peace Corps.

And organizations like the Disney Company and American Red Cross and City of Nashville, the United Way, others are already signing up. They know what we know: Citizens who perform national service are special. You want them on your team.

As of a few minutes ago, that includes our newest members -- the AmeriCorps class of 2014.

So you’ve got Catherine Stodola who just took the pledge. She’s helping homeless veterans find housing through Habitat for Humanity here in Washington.

You’ve got Jay Savoy who took the pledge. And through City Year, she’s going to be – she’s leading a team of tutors for kids like herself in her old neighborhood in Southeast D.C.

Ivan, who you just heard from, took the pledge and is mentoring young people through Public Allies in Maryland.

Seventy-five thousand members of this year’s AmeriCorps class will spread out across the country, and they are doing their part to help make America safer and healthier, and more fair and more just -- because like all those who serve their country through AmeriCorps, they don’t just believe in, but live out a fundamental truth, and that is that people who love their country can change it.

That is the genius of America. That is the promise of AmeriCorps. It’s one of the reasons I am so committed to this program, and why I’m so hopeful about the future. We are proud of you. That goes for all the AmeriCorps members over the years. And I’ll always be proud to serve a country where there are such striving, dreaming citizens like all of you. Congratulations.

God bless you, and God bless America. Thank you, President Clinton.

Statement by U.S. Senator Heitkamp

Fargo, ND – September 13, 2014 – On the 20th Anniversary of the enactment of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today released the following statement:

“The passage of the Violence Against Women Act in 1994 was a long overdue acknowledgement of a problem that existed in the shadows for far too long. When I served as North Dakota’s Attorney General in the 1990s, I implemented this law at a state level. Reducing domestic violence was, and remains, one of my top priorities. This law’s passage told women who were victims of domestic and sexual abuse that they were no longer alone, and let abusers know that we were coming after them. Domestic violence was no longer going to be treated as if it was just a public health issue. These cowardly acts were now to be treated and viewed as what they are -- criminal acts. VAWA, and the state law reforms in North Dakota that followed, offered protections and services for victims of domestic and sexual abuse that were desperately needed.

“When I came to the Senate, one of the first bills I cosponsored and helped pass, was the reauthorization of this law because I know the direct impact it has had on women across North Dakota. And I pushed to include crucial protections for Native American women, a population that I have been calling for extra protections for since my time as North Dakota’s Attorney General.

“But we can’t sit on the sidelines and think that our work is done. This change won’t be achieved by just new laws and programs, but instead it requires a renewed commitment to stop domestic violence everywhere. It takes a culture change to really transform the way we address domestic violence. This law has made a huge difference, and if we continue to work together to bring the problems of domestic violence to light and hold the entire system accountable, we will find more progress and protections in the years to come, and make sure that every woman is safe.”

When Heitkamp was elected as North Dakota’s Attorney General in 1992, she was joined by a large wave of female elected officials from across the country. Together, they changed the conversation from domestic violence being an issue of public health and elevated the concern for violence. After VAWA was enacted in 1994, Heitkamp worked closely with North Dakota law enforcement and advocates to implement the new policies and programs. She saw firsthand the dramatic changes in the number of incidents that followed after the act was criminalized. According to the Justice Department, the annual incidences of domestic violence have fallen more than 70 percent since 1993.

Since joining the Senate, Heitkamp has built on her work as Attorney General to combat domestic violence and stop those who seek to harm adults and children. The first bill she co-sponsored was the reauthorization of VAWA which she then played a key role in pushing through Congress. Heitkamp authored a key provision in VAWA to address the continuing crisis of violence against women in tribal communities. The provision strengthens the existing programs and provides tribal governments the force they need to prosecute non-Indian perpetrators who commit these crimes on tribal land.

Heitkamp has built on her work to combat domestic violence by expanding her efforts to also reducing human trafficking. Human trafficking is a growing problem in North Dakota, especially in the western part of the state. Since the fall of 2013, Heitkamp has been a leader in Congress working to combat human trafficking by holding Senate hearings, introducing legislation to crack down on human trafficking and support victims, setting up training sessions for North Dakotans on identifying human trafficking, and coordinating with lead advocacy organizations to raise awareness about this problem.

Funding for transportation improvements on MHA Nation

Washington, DC – September 9, 2014 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced $1 million in federal funding to support initiatives and studies to accommodate energy-related transportation challenges on MHA Nation.

“The energy development in North Dakota has fostered unprecedented economic and population growth that provides endless opportunities for folks in our state. In addition to opportunities and the best economy in the nation, we have also experienced unforeseen challenges in housing, education and infrastructure,” said Heitkamp. “These funds will help MHA Nation make necessary improvements to its roads, bridges, and railways and help make sure the communities are safe and efficient in a time of constant change and development.”

These funds are authorized by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) Grant program. Through the TIGER program, DOT is able to invest in road, rail, transit and port projects that will contribute to national infrastructure objectives and deliver the five long-term outcomes of safety, economic competitiveness, state of good repair, livability and environmental sustainability.

2013- 2014 Grassroots Communities Mining Mini-Grant Program

Deadline: October 1, 2014

The goal of the Mining Mini-grants Program is to support and enhance the capacity building efforts of mining-impacted communities in the U.S. and Canada to assure that mining projects do not adversely affect human, cultural, and the ecological health of communities.

Applications accepted are accepted three times a year: February 1, June 1, and October 1. Applicants will be notified of the funding decision within one month of the application deadline.

There will be an “emergency” fund for extremely time-sensitive projects that fall between grant cycles (i.e., needs that could not have been anticipated at the time of the last cycle and cannot wait to be addressed until the next cycle). These grants will be very limited and awarded on a case-by-case basis at the discretion of the Mini-Grant Review Committee.

WMAN/IEN Grassroots Communities Mining Mini-grants program criteria: Grassroots community-based organizations, and Tribes or Tribal programs in the U.S. and Canada with any budget level may apply. However, if there are more applicants than funds available, priority will be given to organizations with an organizational or mining-specific project budget under $75,000 U.S.. Priority will also be given to community-based grassrootsgroups affected by mining. We prefer to make grants to organizations with a nonprofit 501(c)3 tax designation, or those working with a fiscal sponsor that has a 501(c)3, however this is not a requirement. We do not, however, write grant checks to individuals. For all US-based groups to whom we write a check we need an EIN number. Requests must be project-specific for an immediate need such as legal assistance, organizing and outreach, development of campaign materials, media development, reports, travel, mailings, interns and consultants, etc. to be fulfilled within the next six months on a specific mining campaign. Funds cannot be used for an organization’s usual gene six months after receiving the grant, recipients must submit a 1-2 page report to Western Organization of Resource Councils (WORC) Education Project, emailing it to: kerri@worc.org, aboulanger@whidbey.com and simone@ienearth.org (note by sending to all three of us we assure that your report isn’t missed). In that report, please answer the following two questions:

1) Please describe how the grant funds were used and outcomes of this investment (how did these funds benefit your issue or programs?), and

2) how specific dollar amounts were used (for example: $1000 printing, $800 plane ticket, $150 hotel, $1050 public meeting expenses = total $3000).

If your organization needs an extension for using the funds and/or sending the report, that is fine, but please contact Aimee and Simone to let us know. Please be aware that a group will not be considered for future grants until such a report is submitted. Any questions? We are happy to help. Please contact either Aimee Boulanger, WMAN Network Coordinator at (360) 969-2028 ~ aboulanger@whidbey.com or Simone Senogles, Indigenous Environmental Network, (218) 751-4967 ~ simone@ienearth.org.

RC Family of Companies changes way it assesses FUSC

Effective October 1, 2014, RC Family of Companies (Roberts County Telephone Cooperative Association and RC Communications), New Effington, SD, will change the way it assesses its Federal Universal Service Charge (FUSC). RC Family of Companies is making this change because of a recent Federal Communications Commission (FCC) order.

For the fourth quarter of 2014, the Federal Universal Service Charge (FUSC) contribution factor will increase from 15.7% to 16.1%. This will result in an increase in the charge that appears on your monthly telephone bill. The factor is applied to services designated as interstate by the FCC and changes from time-to-time based on the needs of the federal universal service fund.

The federal universal service fund was established and is maintained to ensure that all consumers, regardless of location, have access to essentially the same telecommunications services at affordable prices. The fund also provides schools, libraries, low-income consumers and rural health care providers with assistance in obtaining telecommunications services.

Please call RC Family of Companies at 888-668-0877 with any questions you may have on these changes.

Task Force to help keep ND strong, families safe

Fargo, ND – September 12, 2014 – US. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today launched her new Strong & Safe Communities Initiative to help address some of the emerging challenges facing the state by bringing a greater focus to keeping North Dakota’s communities strong and families safe in their homes.

Heitkamp specifically announced her new Strong & Safe Communities Task Force – which she will lead – that is comprised of North Dakotans from across the state who have strong understandings of many of the new safety challenges the state faces – such as increases in drug-related crimes, human trafficking, infrastructure stress, and the movement of crude by rail through North Dakota towns, as well as other issues. The group will work together to offer recommendations for a five-year plan to help make sure North Dakota’s communities remain strong and safe for decades to come by addressing these issues head on.

North Dakota has reaped major rewards from the state’s energy boom. The state has the lowest unemployment rate in the country, about 27,000 open jobs, and innovation, research, and development taking place across North Dakota. With the state’s unprecedented population and economic growth, especially in the Bakken, it also faces some new law enforcement, border security, infrastructure, and safety challenges. Heitkamp has already been working to address these issues, and through her Strong & Safe Communities Initiative she aims to raise more awareness about them and provide a tangible plan to address them moving forward so North Dakotans are safe in their homes and the state’s communities remain strong.

“North Dakota’s energy boom has made our state the envy of the country – we have more jobs, economic and population growth, and innovative research happening every day,” said Heitkamp. “Like any growing pains, it has also caused some new challenges that our state is still working through. Much of that came to a head last December when a crude oil train derailed in Casselton. Through my new Strong and Safe Communities Initiative, I’m working to reinforce a goal that I have long talked about and that the incident in Casselton reminded many of us: North Dakota’s top priority must be to keep our families safe and protected in their homes and communities. Everything else comes second.”

Even before the derailment of a train carrying crude oil in Casselton, Heitkamp has been fighting to increase safety for North Dakota families. She has been a leader in working to combat human trafficking, improve rail safety, reduce drug crime, support challenges in Indian Country, boost economic development in rural communities, and expand the state’s infrastructure to support the population growth. Through her Strong & Safe Communities Initiative, she aims to draw a stronger focus to each of these areas and offer reforms to better serve North Dakotans. Click here for more details about the extensive work Heitkamp has already done to address each of these challenges (also below).

Heitkamp’s new Strong and Safe Communities Task Force will be comprised of the below list of North Dakotans who have strong understandings of the following challenges facing the state:

Transportation of crude oil by rail

· Steve Dirksen, City of Fargo Fire Chief

· Bill Fahlsing, Stark County Director of Emergency Services

Human trafficking and domestic violence

· Christina Sambor, Coordinator at FUSE (Force to end hUman Sexual Exploitation)

· Anna Frissell, Executive Director of the Red River Valley Children’s Advocacy Center

· Darianne Johnson, Executive Director of the Domestic Violence & Rape Crisis Center in Dickinson

· Erin Prochnow, Executive Director of the YWCA Cass Clay

· Janelle Moos, Executive Director of the North Dakota Council on Abused Women Services

Crime and drug crime

· Michael Kirby, Grand Forks Acting Police Chief

· Art Walgren, Watford City Police Chief

Indian Country challenges

· Diane Johnson, Chief Judge at MHA Nation

· Cynthia Lindquist, President of Cankdeska Cikana Community College

Economic development and community impact

· Gene Veeder, McKenzie County’s Economic Development Director

· Dawn Keeley, Executive Director of the Red River Regional Council

· Brad Gibbens, Deputy Director and Assistant Professor, Center for Rural Health, UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences

· Sherry Adams, Executive Officer of Southwestern District Health Unit

“We can make sure North Dakota’s communities remain safe and strong while still enabling our state and the U.S. to continue to develop our vast array of energy resources,” added Heitkamp. “By working together on my new task force, we can build a plan to help prepare North Dakota towns to handle and address these challenges well into the future, and make sure every North Dakotan is protected.”

To view more details about Heitkamp’s Strong & Safe Communities Initiative, visit Heitkamp’s new webpage by clicking here.

Work to keep ND’s communities strong, safe

Over the past year and a half, Heitkamp has already taken a comprehensive approach to address the new challenges North Dakota faces as the state experiences rapid population growth and development. With her Strong & Safe Communities Initiative, she will work to draw a stronger focus to these areas and offer recommendations to help make sure North Dakota’s communities remain safe and can support the growth they are seeing for decades to come. Below are some of the challenges the state faces which Heitkamp has already been working to address:

Transportation of Crude Oil by Rail

Since the train derailment in Casselton, North Dakota in December 2013, Heitkamp has worked tirelessly to push for improvements to rail safety, and make sure North Dakotans and their communities are safe from potential rail incidents. Because of the energy boom in North Dakota and the heavy reliance on rail as a mode of transportation, small communities are seeing up to nine trains come through per day with more than 100 linked crude oil cars per train. In June, Heitkamp introduced her RESPONSE Act to better prepare emergency personnel in North Dakota and across the country tasked with responding to potential incidents, such as derailments of trains carrying materials like crude oil. Since the derailment, Heitkamp also consistently pressured the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration to release updated rules to help prevent future derailments and to provide regulatory certainty to producers, shippers, and the railroads. Many of these rules were finally released in July.

Human Trafficking and Domestic Violence

Since the fall of 2013, Heitkamp has been a leader in Congress working to combat human trafficking by holding Senate hearings, introducing legislation to crack down on human trafficking and support victims, setting up training sessions for North Dakotans on identifying human trafficking, and coordinating with lead advocacy organizations to raise awareness about this problem. Human trafficking is a growing problem in North Dakota, especially in the western part of the state. Around the world, it is estimated that more than 20 million individuals are trafficked for sex or labor – including an estimated 100,000 children in the sex trade alone in the United States. Heitkamp’s efforts to combat human trafficking builds on her work as North Dakota’s Attorney General to combat domestic violence as she implemented the initial Violence Against Women Act at a state level, and helped pass the reauthorization of the law right when she joined the Senate.

Crime and Drug Crime

Heitkamp has pushed for strong action to help reduce the rise of crime and drug crime in North Dakota, particularly in the oil patch. She brought the previous White House Drug Czar to the state in July 2013 during which he pledged to dedicate federal resources to address crime and drug crime in western North Dakota. He followed up with more support for the area – including making Williams County eligible for more federal funds to help rein in drug abuse and crime. In August, Heitkamp brought the current Drug Czar to North Dakota where he committed to continuing to address the growing drug problems in the state. Heitkamp also sought to expand access to drug take-back sites to accommodate the growing problem of prescription drug abuse in North Dakota.

Indian Country Challenges

With the tremendous growth throughout North Dakota, many of the state’s Indian reservations -- particularly MHA Nation which sits over part of the oil patch – have faced unique issues and Heitkamp has been working to improve safety on reservations, particularly for Native American children. Heitkamp has worked to bring together law enforcement from the Bureau of Indian Affairs and local police forces, including at Turtle Mountain in March, to discuss jurisdictional issues as drugs and crime have increased in the state and on reservations. She has brought a needed focus to the problem of Native American women and children getting caught in human trafficking rings and has sought more resources to help them get out of these terrible situations. In September 2013, Heitkamp brought witnesses to a Senate hearing she called for to testify specifically about these problems, and she continues to meet with Native American advocacy groups about how to stop human trafficking in Indian Country.

Economic Development and Community Impact

As North Dakota’s population rapidly grows, the state has experienced serious strains on much of its housing, transportation, and water infrastructure. Heitkamp is working to help the state’s communities handle many of these new challenges so they remain strong. She has advocated for the expansion of roads to handle the massive increase in traffic – particularly in the western part of the state on US-85. Heitkamp has fought to expand water systems to keep up with the state’s population increase so they continue to provide clean water. She has also sought more access to mental health services across the state. And Heitkamp has pushed for more affordable housing in North Dakota to help alleviate the state’s housing crisis. Additionally, through her leadership on the Senate Agriculture Committee, Heitkamp has pushed for initiatives to strengthen rural economies in communities across North Dakota.

Border Security

In her role as a member of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, Heitkamp is working to improve border conditions and security, particularly at the northern border. North Dakota has 17 border crossings, many of which are small. The state is experiencing many challenges with border crossings, including for human trafficking, illegal trade, illegal immigration, and national security threats. In June, Heitkamp held a meeting with Border Patrol agents, local sheriffs, police chiefs, Bureau of Indian Affairs Law Enforcement, and Federal Bureau of Investigation Agents to talk about these border challenges. Heitkamp also helped the White House Drug Czar announce his new national drug control strategy, which aims to provide stronger coordination between the U.S. and Canada to prevent the flow of drugs and criminals between our borders.

Funding to support Economic Growth in Rural ND

Fargo, ND – September 12, 2014 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp, Chair of the Senate Agriculture Committee’s Subcommittee on Jobs, Rural Economic Growth and Energy Innovation and member of the Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship, today announced more than $560,000 in federal funding to help spur economic growth in rural and tribal communities throughout North Dakota.

Specifically, the funds will be used to support rural businesses and development organizations across the state in designated Rural Economic Area Partnership (REAP) zones – economically-distressed areas that have faced considerable poverty, geographic isolation, declining populations, or economic upheaval.

“North Dakota’s success is due in large part to the strength of its rural communities, as small businesses and new entrepreneurs work hard every day to bolster the state’s economy,” said Heitkamp. “Smart and targeted investments like these funds are what help North Dakota have the lowest unemployment rate in the country. I will keep pushing to make sure our state’s rural and tribal communities get the support they need as they continue to help our economy grow and thrive.”

Among the projects is one for the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa – $99,970. The funds will be used to provide training for rural entrepreneurs and to create a business incubator.

The funds are provided through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Rural Business Enterprise Grant and Rural Business Opportunity Grant programs. The 2014 Farm Bill, which Heitkamp helped draft and pass into law, extends current REAP Zones through 2018.

In North Dakota, small businesses make up 96 percent of all employers and employ almost 62 percent of the private-sector labor force. As a result, small businesses support a booming economy across the state, in addition to helping drive the national recovery from the Great Recession.

Investments in economic activity in Rural Areas and on Native Lands

Burlington, Vt. – September 12, 2014 – Agriculture Deputy Secretary Krysta Harden today announced that USDA is investing in rural businesses and development organizations to spur economic growth in rural areas and in Tribal communities.

"These investments are part of the Obama Administration's ongoing efforts to help rural and Tribal communities that have the greatest need for assistance," Harden said. "USDA is targeting capital and technical assistance to small businesses and development organizations to help stimulate more business activity in areas that are struggling economically. This will help revitalize these small, remote rural communities and create much-needed jobs for local residents."

Harden announced details of the investments following a tour of Intervale Community Farm in Burlington, Vt. Intervale Community Farm is a 135-acre farm incubator on Burlington's Intervale. The Intervale Community Farm contributes 60 full-time, part-time and seasonal jobs to the Burlington economy and is part of the Intervale Food Hub, a thriving local food aggregator and distributor contributing to Burlington's regional economy. Local food hubs provide organizations, businesses and institutions orders for local food products that are sourced from a variety of local farms.

The funding is being provided through USDA's Rural Business Enterprise Grant (RBEG) and Rural Business Opportunity Grant (RBOG) programs. Rural Business Enterprise Grants help small and emerging rural businesses. Rural Business Opportunity Grants promote sustainable economic development in rural communities with exceptional needs.

The grants are being awarded in areas designated as Rural Economic Area Partnership (REAP) zones. REAP zones are areas that are considered economically distressed due to factors such as poverty, geographic isolation, declining populations or economic upheaval (such as the closing of a major job provider). The 2014 Farm Bill extends all current REAP zones through 2018.

Grants are also being targeted, predominantly through the Rural Business Opportunity Grant program, to Federally recognized Native American Tribes.

Since the start of the Obama Administration, USDA Rural Development has invested nearly $6 million in REAP zones through the RBEG program. These grants have supported businesses and community projects across the country, creating or retaining 2,200 jobs (nearly 1,000 created and 1,200 retained). Since 2009, the agency has also invested $7.8 million in RBOG assistance for REAP zones and Native American Tribes. These Rural Business Opportunity Grants have helped approximately 400 businesses, and have created or retained about 2,100 jobs.

Harden emphasized that the USDA funding includes more than $2.2 million for organizations in Vermont, New York and North Dakota. Nine organizations in Vermont are receiving RBEG and RBOG grants totaling nearly $1.2 million. They will use the money to develop businesses, help revitalize a downtown district, and create jobs across the state. Seven organizations in North Dakota are receiving more than $566,000 in RBEG and RBOG grants to provide technical assistance to rural businesses and explore ways to increase commerce in Tribal areas. In New York, two organizations are receiving more than $445,000 to support rural businesses and determine the feasibility of establishing an open-access fiber optic network.

Through today's announcement, USDA is providing nearly $3 million in grants to 28 organizations in 12 states to strengthen rural business and promote economic development. Funding is contingent upon the recipient meeting the terms of the grant agreement.

Today's announcement was made possible by the 2014 Farm Bill. The legislation builds on historic economic gains in rural America during the past five years while achieving meaningful reform and billions of dollars in savings for taxpayers. Since its enactment, USDA has made significant progress to implement each provision of this critical legislation, including providing disaster relief to farmers and ranchers; strengthening risk management tools; expanding access to rural credit; funding critical research; establishing innovative public-private conservation partnerships; developing new markets for rural-made products; and investing in infrastructure, housing and community facilities to help improve the quality of life in rural America. For more information, visit www.usda.gov/farmbill.

President Obama's historic investments in rural America have made our rural communities stronger. Under his leadership, these investments in housing, community facilities, businesses and infrastructure have empowered rural America to continue leading the way – strengthening America's economy, small towns and rural communities.

 

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

Death of 'Irrepressible' Forest Defender prompts investigation

Illegal loggers suspected in killing of Edwin Chota, other leaders

By Nadia Prupis, staff writer

(Published on Thursday, September 11, 2014 by Common Dreams.)

(Editor’s note: What happens to Indigenous brothers and sisters across the world does make a difference, or should make a difference, to all of us. The struggles are all related. Look on our own sister reservations in North Dakota; we have no solid news reports but tribal leaders and their business partners are being executed and threatened with death by the same unscrupulous “natural resource rapists” destroying the land and people of the Bakken region and the forests in Peru. What is so damn frustrating is that these monsters have our Congressional people in their pockets.)

Authorities in Peru are investigating the murder of environmental activist Edwin Chota, a leader of the Ashaninka Indian village of Saweto, who was killed along with three other men in a remote area of the Amazon jungle that they were attempting to protect from illegal logging.

Chota was murdered on September 1 after he left his home in Saweto to meet with other indigenous leaders and anti-logging activists who lived deeper within the jungle, a few days' walk away, near the Brazilian border. His body, and that of the other three men who were killed with him, was discovered by villagers several days later. The distance from the village to the regional capital, Pucallpa, delayed news of Chota’s death for over a week.

Illegal loggers are suspected in the killings, according to Ashaninka regional leader Reyder Sebastián. Chota often spoke of receiving death threats due to his activism and told the New York Times in 2010 that “the law does not reach where we live.”

“They could kill us at any time,” Chota said.

Chota had long fought for the rights of indigenous people to reclaim their land and ban loggers who illegally cut trees and raided the region’s rainforests.

Reports of how the men were killed have differed. Some have said they were bound and shot in front of other villagers, while others have said they were dismembered. Chota’s widow, Julia Perez, who is pregnant with the couple’s third baby, told the Times, “We will see when they bring out his body if he was killed with gunshots or by machete.”

The Associated Press said the other slain men were identified by police as Jorge Rios, who was Chota’s deputy, Leoncio Quincicima, and Francisco Pinedo.

“The illegal loggers are on record for wanting Edwin dead,” University of Richmond environmental professor David Salisbury told Al Jazeera.

Salisbury, who had known Chota for 10 years, told NPR that the activist was often able to accomplish a seemingly impossible task — “to motivate the authorities to fulfill their functions and also to confront these well-armed, extremely powerful individuals.”

“This is not an easy thing to do… But he was unafraid,” Salisbury said.

While the U.S. and other countries have banned the trafficking of mahogany, which loggers raided the forests for, Salisbury said, products made of the valuable wood still find their way into the world market.

The Guardian reports:

A 2012 World Bank report estimated that as much as 80% of Peru’s logging exports are harvested illegally [PDF] and investigations have revealed that the wood is typically laundered using doctored papers to make it appear legal and ship it out of the country; while a 2012 report by the Environmental Investigation Agency indicated at least 40% of official cedar exports to the US included illegally logged timber.

Peru’s largest indigenous federation, Aidesep, excoriated the police and the courts for "doing absolutely nothing despite repeated complaints" to protect the men.

"Our village has always defended our resources and it has confronted illegal loggers who see our reserves as a place to exploit," Peru's El Comercio quotes Sebastián as saying.

Chota’s activism was borne of passion and strength of character, rather than training, Salisbury told NPR.

“Edwin was irrepressible,” Salisbury said. “He always had incredible energy, incredible charisma and a real sense of right and wrong.”

(Photo caption: Edwin Chota attending a meeting on land titles and illegal logging in the Chambira community. Credit: Emory Richey)

Brief editorial comments from the editor’s desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

The meth epidemic, resurgence of cocaine use, and alcohol – the perpetual number one problem drug on our reservations – and horrible impact upon our babies and children, are cause for pessimism. It’s hard to be optimistic in light of revelations coming from our grassroots meetings.

But when we see a younger generations of our Oyate – men and women – stand up and talk about defeating addiction and abuse in their families, we are encouraged.

When we see this new generation take a stand, saying we will point out the criminals and tell them they can no longer deal their death drugs on the Lake Traverse Reservation, we are encouraged.

And when, as one koda who spoke at last Wednesday’s solutions meeting said, when one person stands up we will all rally around them so they will not be intimidated, we are encouraged.

“We know who is doing this,” is something that was said several times by different people in the Council chambers during the meeting.

By overcoming the fear of reprisals people can make a difference by signing complaints and agreeing to go to court.

It is the only way.

Pidamiya Crystal Owen for organizing these “solutions” meetings.

Watch in coming issues for date of the next meeting.

*****

We are also encouraged by the positive things happening because of the dedicated youth and adults in SWO 7GOV, Aliive Roberts County and other organizations and volunteers.

Last Friday night’s Glo-in-the-dark concert was a great example of what this “partnership” is doing for our young people.

Here is what she says about the event and DJ Tom Wilson:

“The youth glo-in the dark dance was beyond awesome! Watching everyone get down and interact whether they knew each other or not strengthened the resolve that the youth are everything and we must continue to support and push them so they reach their fullest potential. Nina Wopida Tom. You are awesome!”

*****

September is Recovery Month.

Dakotah Pride Center and MSPI are hosting a two-day wellness event Sept. 23-24, from 9:00-4:00 each day.

Here is an invitation shared by Kateri Bird and Crystal Owen (also see the news article on PSA notice):

The SWO Dakotah Pride Treatment Center and MSPI program will be hosting a two day wellness event September 23rd and 24th from 9 to 4 each day.

There will be food, door prizes but more importantly a time to come together to learn about addiction, healing, recovery, family support.

If you or someone you know is battling addiction please join us to find out about all the opportunities that we have as Dakota, Lakota, Nakota peoples.

Our ways are sacred and special. We are still here!

Please come join us for some empowerment and healing words that I believe will renew your spirit! Feel free to share this with others. All are welcome. It's free and it's good!

*****

Some important dates to consider involving the honoring of our akicita.

This Friday, September 19, there will be a POW honoring ceremony. Details are in Geri Opsal’s column on page one and also on the POW Honoring notice elsewhere in this week’s Sota.

Also, make sure you know the annual Veterans Day Wacipi will be held at the Tiospa Zina Tribal School gym on November 7-9. We hope to see a good turnout for this annual honoring.

And the annual women veterans honoring will be held on October 17.

Finally, the date has been set for the honoring ceremony and dedication of the akicita monuments placed in front of TiWakan Tio Tipi this past summer: October 24th.

*****

This week we are running an article from SDSU-Brookings on preparations for our loved ones with disabilities in the event of an emergency.

Whether it is a winter storm or other disaster that causes a power outage, we need to make sure everyone who needs electric-powered medical devices has service available.

Please read the article and help prepare for power outages.

*****

The official word from Tim Lake, Sisseton BIA Special Trustee officer, is that the Cobell checks were to be mailed on Monday, September 15th.

So … maybe this is it. Check your mailbox!

We’ve had questions from readers concerning a new filing concerning the Cobell distribution.

Just last week, on September 11th, 2014, there was a new settlement announced.

We’re not sure what it means without getting a legal opinion, but we’re told it states the payment would be lowered to $896.

Questions are:

*Are the Cobell checks going to be smaller?

*Are greater legal fees going to attorneys than originally expected?

*Is the BIA once again failing to protect interests of Native American people?

We don’t have any answers.

But if the checks do come as promised, we will find out….

*****

Just what every school district needs!

It’s very own $700,000 mine-resistant ambush protected vehicle (MRAP), which is designed to withstand blasts from improvised explosive devices and mines.

This gift was given to the San Diego Unified School District in April.

The vehicle was transferred through the Department of Defense's 1033 program, which authorizes the military to donate what it considers surplus military equipment to police and sheriff departments in the United States, including tanks and weapons used in the occupation of Iraq and Afghanistan.

Wonder … have many should we order for our local school districts?

And what about our county sheriffs’ offices and local police department?

Tribal Law Enforcement?

Hey, maybe each of the seven Districts should have one to protect the District Centers.

Madness. Our world is madness!

*****

Our 147th annual SWO Wacipi photo gallery is online.

Check it out on our website:

http://www.earthskyweb.com/news.htm

*****

Please read our Legal notices section.

The Reservation Election Board has posted important information about the process for the primary and general elections.

You will also find information about how to make proposed amendment changes.

This week there is a link to election forms available online on the Tribe’s website:

http://www.swo-nsn.gov

Please note that for the first time, there will be automated balloting for the Tribe’s elections.

Watch for more information in coming weeks!

*****

Candidates:

Also note that the Sota is returning to a former policy of ONLY PUBLISHING PAID IN ADVANCE POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENTS.

This policy must be followed because of not being able to collect on outstanding invoices.

Because we do not accept credit cards, checks must be made at the time of ordering a political ad.

Our political ad rate is discounted at $2.50 per column inch in order to make it less painful on candidates’ pocketbooks.

Please specify size desired when ordering:

Examples –

2 columns x 5 inches, for 10 col. inches @ 2.50 = 25.00

3 columns x 11 inches [quarter page] 33 col. inches @ 2.50 = 82.50

6 columns x 11 inches [half page] 66 col. inches @ 2.50 = 165

6 columns x 22 inches [full page] 132 col. inches @ 2.50 = 330

Submit payment to the Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279

Copy may be submitted electronically to earthskyweb@cs.com

We urge you to plan accordingly so that you are not telephoning or messaging at the last minute to have an ad placed without pre-payment.

Pidamiya!

*****

These lines are attributed to Pope Francis. Whether he is the source, or not, they are worth sharing:

Weep not for what you have lost, fight for what you have.

Weep not for what is dead, fight for what was born in you.

Weep not for the one who abandoned you, fight for who is with you.

Weep not for those who hate you, fight for those who want you.

Weep not for your past, fight for your present struggle.

Weep not for your suffering, fight for your happiness. With things that are happening to us, we begin to learn that nothing is impossible to solve, just move forward.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"The most important thing you can do during the course of the day is to pray." -- Joe Coyhis, STOCKBRIDGE-MUNSEE

There are many things we do during the day that are important. There are many places we have to go and there are many things to accomplish. The old ones say, the most important thing we can do is remember to take the time to pray. We should pray every morning and every evening. In this way we can be sure that the Great Spirit is running our lives. With the Great Spirit we are everything but without Him we are nothing. All Warriors know their greatest weapon is prayer. To spend time talking to the Creator is a great honor. Great Spirit, thank You for listening to my prayers.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

Fervor is the weapon of choice for the impotent. Frantz Fanon

I generally avoid temptation unless I can't resist it. Mae West (1892 - 1980)

Art is making something out of nothing and selling it. Frank Zappa (1940 - 1993)

It is not necessary to understand things in order to argue about them. Pierre Beaumarchais (1732 - 1799)

Everything you can imagine is real. Pablo Picasso (1881 - 1973)

A person is always startled when he hears himself seriously called an old man for the first time. Oliver Wendell Holmes (1809 - 1894)

I have discovered that all human evil comes from this, man's being unable to sit still in a room. Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

To err is human; to forgive, infrequent. Franklin P. Adams (1881 - 1960)

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Services for Richard Nerison

Memorial service for Richard Allen Nerison, 59, Sioux City, Iowa formerly of Sisseton, SD was planned for 10:00 a.m. Monday, September 15, 2014 at the Lake Traverse District Center, Browns Valley, South Dakota, with the Rev. Charles Chan officiating.

Burial will be in St. John’s Episcopal Cemetery, Browns Valley, SD.

A wake service was held at the District Center Sunday.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD is in charge of arrangements.

Richard Allen Nerison was born on May 24, 1955 in Sisseton, SD to Arthur and Verle (Derby) Nerison. He attended school in Webster, SD. He lived in Omaha most of his life. The last ten years he lived in Sioux City, Iowa. He worked as a laborer. He loved driving motorcycles. He was very artistic and creative. He loved drawing, bead work and native crafts. Richard passed away at his home on August 26, 2014.

Richard is survived by one daughter, Teres of Alaska; five brothers, John Derby of Sioux Falls, SD, Larry Nerison of Sisseton, SD, John Nerison of New Effington, SD, Dennis Nerison of Fargo, ND, Martin Nerison of Yankton, SD; and four sisters, Peggy Munk of Flandreau, SD, Sherri Munk of Omaha, NE, Cheryl Zielke of Detroit, MI and Elaine Anderson of Corona, SD, and numerous nieces and nephews. Richard was preceded in death by his parents, one sister, Shirley Zielke and one brother, Patrick Nerison.

Funeral services held for Dallas Farmer

Funeral service for Dallas Lee Farmer, Ciyo meaning Cowboy, 21, of Agency Village, SD was held on Friday noon, September 12, 2014 at the Tribal Community Center, Agency Village, SD with the Rev. Enright BigHorn, Rev. Danelle McKinney, Rev. Vern Donnell, and JC Crawford officiating.

Pianist was Billy Kohl with special music by the Old Agency Drum.

Pallbearers were Steven Sharpfish, Anthony Patterson, Ray Harwood Jr., Ronnie Harwood, Aaron Farmer, Sam Farmer Jr., Mongecha Farmer, and Austin Shepherd.

Honorary pallbearers were "All of Dallas's Relatives and Friends, and Hunka Sisters."

Interment is in the Goodwill Presbyterian Cemetery, Agency Village, SD. All night wake services will be held on Wednesday, September 10, and Thursday, September 11, 2014 both starting at 7:00 P.M. at the Tribal Community Center, Agency Village, SD. The Cahill Funeral Chapel is in charge of arrangements.

Dallas Lee Farmer was born on May 13, 1993, at Sioux City, IA to Tracey G. Harwood and Karen L. Farmer. He attended Head Start in Sisseton, SD, grade school in Lincoln, NE, and graduated from Tiospa Zina High School in Agency Village, SD.

He made his home in Agency Village, SD. Dallas worked at Dakota Magic Casino as a prep cook, he also worked for the Dakota Sioux Casino in the hotel, and worked at the Agency Village C-Store as a cashier, and also worked at the Day Care at Agency Village.

Dallas loved horses and was known as a horse whisperer, he was also a traditional and a grass dancer.

Dallas loved to visit and was always happy. He loved computers and facebook, and was always posing for selfies.

He loved music, walking, and was a very active member of Goodwill Presbyterian Church.

Dallas loved his son very much Michael Julian Joseph Roden-Farmer born January 13, 2011.

Dallas passed away on September 8, 2014 at his home in Agency Village, SD.

Dallas is survived by his parents, Tracey Harwood of Veblen, SD, and Karen (Farmer) Hill of Agency Village, SD; one son Michael "JJ" Farmer of Agency Village, SD; one sister, Brittany Sharpfish of Sisseton, SD; three brothers, Jesse James Harwood of Agency Village, SD, Anthony Patterson of Marty, SD, and Steven Sharpfish of Sisseton, SD; grandmothers Kay Bursheim of Agency Village, SD and Carole Iron Moccasin of Sisseton, SD, and grandfather Rev. Steven Farmer Sr. of Halliday, ND.

Dallas was preceded in death by one brother, David Anthony Farmer, and his grandfathers William Iron Moccasin and Kenneth Bursheim Sr.

For Dallas's obituary and on-line registry please visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com/.

Services planned Monday for Bonnie Marie Johnson

Funeral service for Bonnie “Bon Bon” Johnson, 67, of Sisseton, SD was planned for Monday, September 15, 2014 at 2:00 PM at the Buffalo Lake District Center, Eden, SD with the Rev. Enright BigHorn and JC Crawford officiating.

Pianist will be Billy Kohl with special music by Elena Wilson and Butch Felix.

Pallbearers will be Darin Yammerino, Kingsmill Johnson, Mel Huff, Luke Johnson, Nate Johnson, Billy Canku Jr., John Lincoln and Jody Weidenbach.

Honorary Pallbearers will be Nikki Kirk, Kaye Renville, Lisa Lawrence, Jeff Block, Troy Goodsell, Windy Harwood, Kevin and Tammy Wegehaupt, Julie Pond, Dolly Adams, Bill Vellenga, Stan and Yvonne Hippen, Connie and Dean Abraham, Jackie and Karen White, all of Bonnie’s Family, Friends and Co-Workers. Interment will be in the Buffalo Lake Presbyterian Cemetery, Eden, SD.

Wake services were held Friday and Saturday, and all night Sunday at the Buffalo Lake District Center.

Bonnie Marie Weidenbach was born on March 22, 1947 at Britton, SD to Howard and Lorraine (Stavick) Weidenbach.

She attended school at Red Iron Township and high school in Sioux Falls, SD and she got her GED at Sisseton Wahpeton Community College. Bonnie married Alan Johnson on May 10, 1975 at Big Coulee. They made their home in the Sisseton area.

She worked at Lakeland Lounge; owned and operated the Peever Liquor Store for many years; ran Red Iron Resort; worked Road Construction, worked at the Pool Hall; owned Bonnie and Clyde Bar, manager of the I-29 Motel; and then Dakota Magic in the Box Office, Restaurant Manager, Hotel Manager, and Event Center Coordinator.

Bonnie loved horses, playing Bingo and spending time with her family.

Bonnie passed away on September 10, 2014 at Coteau des Prairies Hospital in Sisseton, SD.

Bonnie is survived by her children, Jeremiah (Marie) Johnson of New Effington, SD, Maurice Johnson of Sisseton, SD, William Johnson of Sisseton, SD, Christian Johnson of Sisseton, SD; she also raised Chance Weidenbach of Watertown, SD and Darin Weidenbach of Watertown, SD; two sisters, Becky (Weidenbach) Adams of Sisseton, SD, Rhonda (Ernie) Karst of Castlewood, SD; two brothers, Terry (Doreen) Weidenbach of Sisseton, SD, Bryan (Deb) Weidenbach of Lake City, SD; sixteen grandchildren; sisters and brother in-laws Louie and Sherry Johnson of Sisseton, SD, Annie and Butch Felix of Sisseton, SD, Dicky and Heidi Johnson of Sisseton, SD, Felix Johnson of Sisseton, SD, Norman Johnson of Sisseton, SD, Cookie Johnson of Sisseton, SD, Angie Johnson of Sisseton, SD, Debbie and Gene Heminger of Sisseton, SD, Jeff Block of Sisseton, SD, Troy Goodsell of Texas, Elena Wilson of Sisseton, SD, and Linda Kriz of Sisseton, SD.

Bonnie was preceded in death by her husband, Alan; parents; brother Monte Dale Weidenbach; sister Dee Sandve; maternal grandparents Mary and Melvin Stavick; paternal grandparents Leona and Burt Gray; and in-laws Chris and Shirley Johnson.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor’s note: The following comes from the editor’s column and the Sota “deadlines and policies” statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Open letter to the Oyate

2014 SWO Elections

Members of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate: I write in regards to this election year. We have many candidates running for all positions executives and councilperson.

I write in regards to one candidate and that is the current Tribal Secretary, my wife Robin Quinn.

Robin as many of you know has a very caring heart and is a very open minded person to which she will go that extra mile when needed.

During her years of employment she has worked in many positions to help or assist tribal members during their time of need. Sometimes, maybe was just to be there and listen, or someone looking for another opinion or something as directing them to the right place to get what they needed help with.

I was hesitant of her running for this position, but knowing her personally and what she had to offer, I was more than happy that she threw her hat in and won last election.

According to many Tribal members and Tribal employees, Robin has been true to her word has kept an open door policy and has worked diligently with the programs to address and solve problems that needed to be addressed.

All elected officials go through a transition period where they need to quickly learn their full responsibility while at the same time having to address current issues that affect the Tribe as a whole and yet at the same time the take on the huge responsibility to address current issues affecting programs under their immediate supervision.

To my surprise, when Robin got in, she immediately took on the responsibility of addressing issues and met with most if not all Tribal Programs that many candidates in the past have taken until their second term to even start to do if at all. (As any good boss, we need to give credit to our employees/assistants; in this case, she has praised Sierra Wolcott for being a big asset while she took on the responsibility of Secretary)

Robin has shown throughout her first term that she is there for the Tribal Members on all issues that affect the Tribe as a whole or individual. As any position an individual holds throughout their life, it is impossible to address all issues to 100% satisfaction. Sometimes you are damned if you do and damned if you don't, but I have been told throughout her term that I had a great wife, that she has helped them or at times that although she wasn't able to help them herself, she was able to refer them to who could.

Yeah, I know she's my wife and you are probably thinking of course he would say that. But truth, I would prefer to stay out of politics, but there were times I too have questioned her (my wife) on issues or concerns that I heard.

If you don't understand an issue, it is always good to question them. In this case, I had her cornered to ask her what/when/where and why.

If re-elected as Tribal Secretary, I strongly believe that you will continue to receive the professionalism you so deserve from the SWO Secretary's Office, "not just words out of a candidates mouth during election to get your vote".

She doesn't just go around and talk about issues that are affecting the Tribe, she actually works toward addressing them whether it is through contacts or programs, she is continually searching and trying to address issues, not just talk about them.

So please for our future, get out there and Vote.

Vote and Re-Elect Robin Quinn for SWO Tribal Secretary

Sincerely,Darrell Quinn, Sr.

Open letter to the Oyate

It is with interest that I have read the candidates who are running for tribal office and their reasons to be voted for as well as their statements and their comments are all impressive on paper however; I am interested in what was accomplished by these candidates while in the positions they held. When one left their prior places of employment, was it to obtain a better position or were they asked to leave. One candidate mentioned the 7 sacred virtues another stating their respect for tribal members. I wish to address their comments.

The time is long past for tribal members to live the seven virtues which one hopes was taught to all tribal members by example as my mother and her generation taught me. If these virtues had been an ongoing practice our tribe would not have the domestic violence, poor education, lack of adequate housing and unemployment.

I read with interest candidate Wynde's statement "Our employment industry needs to be innovative to keep people employed." It is important to remember to treat employees with respect (that means deep admiration for someone or something elicited by their abilities, qualities, or achievements) to prevent them from seeking employment elsewhere, only then can one say "I respect tribal members."

I am interested in how many of the candidates worked on the Housing Board and how many tribal members were able to obtain adequate housing during their tenure on this very important board. Was housing available to all tribal members or to only their family? How many times did the council members vote to spend thousands of dollars to attend workshops in Las Vegas and other vacation spots when there are many offices available in and around Sisseton. What was accomplished at these workshops, how did they apply what they learned at their place of employment and was it beneficial to all tribal members?

As a tribal elder I would like to be able to call our tribal office. BIA and all tribal entities and speak with an employee as well as get a return call when I leave a message. This would fall under Mr. Selvage's virtue of patience.

Karen Ramirez, Bloomington, MN.

From the SD Democrat Party –

Governor Daugaard's Enron style accounting of EB5 scandal liability

Sioux Falls, SD – September 11, 2014 – What if your business had the ability to make its liabilities or litigation miraculously disappear from the books? One day, your business faces "millions of dollars of potential liability" and the next day it's gone!

That's exactly what Governor Dennis Daugaard admitted to doing yesterday.

South Dakota's own attorneys said in federal & state court filings that South Dakota may pay "millions of dollars of potential liability" as a result of Joop Bollen's fraudulent EB5 scheme. This legal matter continues today.

The ongoing contingent liability was tucked into a small paragraph of a 300 page report in 2010 & 2011 and then - poof! - the ongoing liability was gone in 2012 and 2013 reports.

Why? Because the Governor's office simply decided they didn't want to report it anymore, says Zach Crago, executive director for the South Dakota Democratic Party:

"I'm simply stunned by Governor Dennis Daugaard's Enron style accounting that magically waives away inconvenient arbitration. Since when does the Governor decide what ongoing liabilities should or should not be reported on the state's books? It makes me wonder: What other ongoing liabilities have been magically waived away by Governor Daugaard?"

Here are the undisputed facts from the press conference ysterday:

1) South Dakota may be on the hook for "millions of dollars of potential liability" from Joop Bollen's fraudulent EB5 scheme.

2) Rounds employee Joop Bollen dragged South Dakota into a legal morass and violated state law in the process, according to South Dakota's own attorneys.

3) Governor Mike Rounds among many state leaders knew about Joop Bollen's actions, and Mike Rounds didn't fire him. Instead Mike Rounds rewarded Bollen's illegal actions with a sweetened no-bid contract to administer the EB5 program.

Thune statement on 13th Anniversary of 9/11 Attacks

Washington, DC – September 11, 2014 – U.S. Senator John Thune (R-South Dakota) today issued the following statement on the 13th anniversary of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks:

“While it’s been 13 years since the deadly terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and Flight 93, the memories of 9/11 remain strong today. Attacks designed to shake the American spirit were met by an unmatched sense of pride, courage, and hope. Selfless first responders ran toward the chaos to protect innocent Americans from harm, and in the face of danger, citizen heroes rushed to aid those in need. Today America remembers the sacrifices made on 9/11, the lives lost, and the challenges that were overcome. America will never forget.”

Noem statement on Anniversary of September 11

Washington, DC – September 11, 2014 – Congresswoman Kristi Noem today released the following statement on the anniversary of September 11:

“Thirteen years ago, terrorists tore a hole in the New York City skyline and put our Pentagon under attack while heroes died in a Pennsylvania field. On the same day eleven years later, militants claimed the lives of four more Americans in a terrorist attack in Benghazi, Libya. My heart breaks for the mothers, fathers, siblings, and children who lost a loved one in those attacks and I pray for them to feel the nation’s comfort on this solemn anniversary. I pray for the women and men in uniform who have defended our nation, protected our shared values, and brought justice to hate-filled terrorists. America will never forget what happened on September 11 nor will we forget the sacrifices of those who responded to the call of duty. The American spirit cannot and will not be broken.”

Brazilian musicians coming to Sisseton

A world music ensemble from Brazil will be in Sisseton September 28-October 4 as part of a multi-city Midwest performance tour through the Arts Midwest World Fest program. The five-member ensemble is part of a series of international music groups coming to Sisseton from Brazil, Israel, Quebec, and China. Sisseton is one of only nine Midwestern cities to host the 2013-15 World Fest and is the only partner community in South Dakota.

"Paulo Padilha and Group" from Brazil will perform a free public concert Saturday, October 4, at 7:00 p.m. at the Sisseton Performing Arts Center. Paulo is known for his clever lyrics that tell the story of daily life as an artist in urban Brazil. The lighthearted melodies and upbeat rhythms of Brazilian samba music captivate audiences everywhere.

In addition to the public concert, ten shorter assemblies throughout the week introduce students and the general public to the music and culture of Brazil. Of special interest to the public will be the opening mini-concert at the Sisseton Wahpeton College Auditorium at 11:00 a.m. on Monday, September 29, a mini-concert at the Abbey of the Hills (formerly Blue Cloud Abbey) on Thursday, October 2, at 11:00 a.m. and another at Tekakwitha Living Center at 2:30 p.m. on the same day. All are free and open to the public.

Last year's residencies with "Le Vent du Nord" from Quebec and "Baladino" from Israel were well received in Sisseton. Jane Rasmussen, Director of the Sisseton Arts Council, reported that each group performed for over 3,000 students and adults during their week of residency in Sisseton including a full house at each of the concerts.

Arts Midwest, based in Minneapolis, partners with program sponsors like The National Endowment for the Arts and 3M and BNSF Railway and the South Dakota Arts Council to cover a substantial portion of the cost so that communities like Sisseton can enjoy this rich arts experience.

Local sponsors in Sisseton provide additional funds to make the concert free to the public and provide hospitality to the musicians throughout the week. These include the Sisseton Arts Council, the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Tourism Office, the Sisseton Promotion Board, Sisseton Wahpeton College, Tiospa Zina Tribal School, the Sisseton School District, and Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise.

For more information contact the Sisseton Arts Council at sissetonarts@gmail.com and watch for upcoming articles in local and area newspapers.

Document Transfer on loan from NARA arrives at NMAI

The Treaty of Canandaigua signed by George Washington

These photographers were taken during a historical document transfer at the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) on September 8th. The Treaty of Canandaigua between the Haudenosaunee (the Six Nations, or Iroquois Confederacy) and the United States, signed by George Washington in 1794 was delivered to NMAI from the National Archives and Records Administration. This treaty on-loan has never been displayed at this magnitude and was greeted and accepted by Chief Oren Lyons, Ph.D., the Faithkeeper of the Turtle Clan of the Seneca Nations of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy along with NMAI Museum Director, Kevin Gover.

The receiving of the document is the kick-off for a series of events that coincide with NMAI’s 10th Anniversary – and the opening of Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations on September 21, 2014.

ABOUT NATION TO NATION:

The exhibition focuses on eight treaties representing the approximately 374 ratified between the United States and the Native Nations, on loan from the National Archives. Each document details and solidifies the diplomatic agreements between the United States and the neighboring Native Nations. Told from the point of view of the Indian Nations and accompanied by US testimonials, curated by Suzan Shown Harjo (Cheyenne/Hodulgee Muscogee) the story is woven through five sections: Introduction to Treaties, Serious Diplomacy, Bad Acts, Bad Paper, Great Nations Keep Their Word and Reflections.

Featuring more than 125 objects from the museum’s collection and private lenders – including art and artifact - the Navajo blanket owned by General William Sherman, a collection of Plains Nations pipes and beaded pipe bags, peace medals given to Thomas Jefferson, George Washington and the sword and scabbard of Andrew Jackson (on loan from the National Museum of American History) - tell the story of our early ancestors and our efforts to live side-by-side at the birth of the United States. Video installation, Archival photographs, wampum belts, textiles, baskets and peace medals highlight each historical moment in time.

UMass Amherst Geographer’s book calls for expanded role of Indigenous Peoples in Worldwide Conservation

Amherst, Mass. – A just-published book edited by University of Massachusetts Amherst human geographer Stan Stevens presents the latest original research and surveys transformative new approaches now being considered to enhance the rights of indigenous peoples worldwide to have a stronger voice in shaping conservation and park management policies that affect their traditional lands.

The book, “Indigenous Peoples, National Parks and Protected Areas,” released this month by the University of Arizona Press, documents past practices, presents case studies from North and South America, Asia and Australia, and outlines new directions for an expanded future role for indigenous communities in the management of national parks and other conservation lands and cultural heritage sites.

As Stevens explains, “In the past, national parks were created and land set aside for wildlife and other conservation needs without the consent of indigenous peoples and without regard to the fact that it often destroyed their traditional ways and means of livelihood. Indigenous peoples came to see parks as a threat to their culture, and the dispossession of their lands and loss of sacred sites as a new colonialism.”

He adds, “In recent years, there has been a dawning international awareness that conservation efforts need to be acceptable to indigenous peoples. They have made some very powerful statements about being dispossessed in the name of conservation, they are more aware of rights issues than ever before, and there is much greater appreciation of the contributions they make to conservation through their knowledge, institutions and practices.”

The new 380-page paperback volume presents 12 chapters, four of them plus the introduction by Stevens and eight by other authors who discuss issues around establishing and managing parks and protected areas in Alaska, Canada, Australia, Peru, Honduras, Nicaragua, South Africa, Guatemala and Nepal.

It was as a graduate student in the 1980s in Nepal studying land use and management by the indigenous Sherpa people in the Mount Everest area when Stevens’ eyes were opened to the politics of land use, governance and conservation management. Sherpa elders showed him how socially and culturally complicated was their relationship with Sagarmatha National Park, created in 1976, and its Nepali government-appointed managers.

“They alerted me to the marginalization of indigenous peoples and to the frontier dynamics going on,” he recalls. “I began reading about the situation globally. My advisor at the University of California, Berkeley, Bernard Nietschmann, was one of the first researchers in the world to suggest that we need a new kind of protected area, one that not only preserves spectacular scenery and wildlife, but also protects cultural and biological diversity and is managed by the indigenous people for whom it is home. This all led me to re-think my career,” Stevens says.

He points out that recent research suggests the assumption that people are incompatible with nature and need to be removed from the landscape is wrong. Scientists are now recognizing that the stewardship of indigenous peoples has contributed substantially to biodiversity. It’s been estimated that more than 80 percent of high priority sites for global biodiversity conservation are found on the customary lands and territories of indigenous people, he adds.

“We used to take it for granted that the government should relocate the people, who seemed to be a threat, but now we realize this not only violated their rights, it also shortchanged conservation because their presence and activities had supported and fostered biodiversity,” Stevens notes. “Now we see that we should be working together with indigenous peoples, respecting their place-based knowledge and cultures and learning from their sustainable practices.”

In recent years, conservationists are taking a more global view and grounding practice more in science, with greater sensitivity to indigenous peoples’ rights and more appreciation for indigenous knowledge and practices. For example, Australia has recognized more than 50 “Indigenous Protected Areas,” a new kind of park that Aboriginal people own and manage. They have already had some success in eradicating invasive species and restoring ecological systems to health.

In the book’s final chapter, Stevens asserts that, “The new protected area paradigm embraces indigenous peoples’ conservation achievements and capacity and considers them vital to creating, sustaining and restoring global biocultural diversity. It envisions global conservation as being strengthened, legitimated and made more sustainable by validating indigenous peoples’ control over their territories and supporting their self-governance, cultures, livelihoods and rights.”

A formal book launch event is planned at the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s World Parks Congress in Sydney, Australia, in November, where Stevens has helped to organize a session on the governance of protected areas established in indigenous peoples’ territories.

More: http://www.uapress.arizona.edu/Books/bid2493.htm

Social “helper” column dedicated to young generation Oyate –

Wawokiyape

By Sherielle “Shay” DuMarce

Hello Shay:

I enjoy reading your weekly column, you seem to be a very caring person and ready to give advice. I wanted to write and tell you a story about one of our tribal members.

This man worked at his job for 15 years, it took him a long time to work his way up to manager. This man recently resigned because his boss was going to demote him, mistreated him and blamed him for decisions that were made.

Later, it was found out that the job was given to another person shortly after, who was related to someone in a seat of power so to speak.

My question is, was this a ploy to get rid of this man because this other man wanted the job and he was related to a boss/council person/exec? Did they care he had a family to support?

We elect council persons/ executives to serve the people not throw around their weight and get their relatives jobs they didn’t work hard for. My heart and prayers go out to this person and his children.

From, a concerned tribal elder.

Dear concerned elder:

Thank you for your letter and concern.

It doesn’t seem like this needs advice but rather to point out how corrupt, cruel, unfair and self-serving some people are. They get elected into these positions by the people yet when in office they stop thinking of the people and start doing "favors" for friends and relatives. I completely understand and it is sickening!

People deny this ever happens but it does and this behavior is alive and thriving on our reservation. We need honest, trustworthy people in these positions who genuinely care for the betterment of the people instead of their own personal gain or doing family favors.

All I can do is just shake my head because I’m just one voice. If change is to happen you will need more than one but I’m glad you sent this letter in cause it shows that I am not the only one who sees this and is willing to speak on it publicly. My advice would be to this gentleman would be, file a complaint against his ex-boss, explain in detail what happened or has happened and speak up!

Don’t be silent about this regardless of who doesn't agree. I pray this man finds another job and is not struggling. God bless.

Respectfully, Shay.

Are your loved ones with Disability prepared?

Brookings, SD – September is National Preparedness Month. This month serves as a reminder to families and their communities to ensure they are prepared for a wide variety of events, including weather events such as blizzards and tornados or manmade events, such as a terrorist attack.

"Our loved ones with disabilities may require unique considerations as you work to ensure they are prepared for a potential emergency," said Leacey E. Brown, SDSU Extension Gerontology Field Specialist.

A resource Brown suggests community members go to is the www.ready.gov Website. "It has several great preparedness lists folks can use as helpful guides," she said.

"If Winter Storm Atlas taught us anything, it was to be prepared for everything," she said. "Many people were stuck in the homes for days without electricity. While inconvenient, going without electricity isn't life threatening for most folks. It can be if you depend upon an assistive device."

Brown shares some examples of assistive devices which are electricity and battery dependent, that a person with a disability might use: oxygen, respirators, power wheel chairs or home dialysis equipment.

"Losing power for these devices for an extended period of time may be life threatening," Brown said. "Planning for the needs of people who use power dependent assistive devices is essential as your family prepares for emergencies."

She added that planning ahead is especially import for people with disabilities who are living alone. "During Winter Storm Atlas, many people were not able to leave their home for several days. This means that they may not have been able to look in on loved ones with disabilities living alone," she said. "Couple this with the absence of electricity and you have a potentially life threatening situation on your hands."

Unfortunately, an available electricity source is not as simple as having a generator available during power outages. Brown said it is essential that the person with the disability has the capacity to turn it on and keep it running (e.g. add fuel).

"If a person does not have the ability to operate the generator themselves, identifying a trusted neighbor who can get to your loved one, even when roads are impassible, is essential," she said. "Identifying this person before an emergency allows you to familiarize them with your emergency plan and the needs of your loved one."

This responsible individual should know the location of your loved one's emergency supplies, including medications, financial paperwork and advanced care plan (these items are in addition to the food and water your loved one will need to survive).

"It is also important for them to know how to operate the generator and any assistive devices your loved one might need (e.g. home dialysis equipment," Brown said.

Emergencies can strike when we least expect it. Planning ahead is the key to ensuring you and your loved one are equipped to survive it.

Two Spirit/LGBTQ Presenter

Lenny Hayes, MA, Co-Occurring Disorders Counselor is an enrolled member of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the northeast corner of South Dakota and is currently a Mental Health and Chemical Health Therapist. In 2010 Lenny graduated from the Adler Graduate School, Richfield, MN completing a Master's degree in Adlerian Psychology with an emphasis in Marriage Family Therapy, Clinical Counseling, and Management Consulting and Organizational Leadership. Lenny returned to Adler Graduate School in 2013 and received a certificate in their Co-Occurring Disorders Program in which leads to a Master Level Licensed Alcohol Drug Counselor. Lenny is also owner and operator of Tate Topa Consulting, LLC. He has extensive training in mental/chemical health issues that impact the Two-Spirit/LGBTQ community. Lenny has extensive experience in working with victims of crime in the Two-Spirit/LBTQ community in regards to the area of child abuse, sexual abuse, bullying, and domestic violence.

Lenny has always worked within the Native American community which includes the American Indian Family Center, St. Paul, MN, Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe, and the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community. His lived experience and training have made him a sought after workshop presenter on Native American Historical and Intergenerational Trauma and how it impacts the Native American and Two-Spirit Community. As a consultant with the MN Indian Women's Sexual Assault Coalition he assisted with the development of a curriculum and booklet on; how to train advocates to work with sexually assaulted victims as well as Two-Spirit individuals. He also created a focus group of Two-Spirit individuals who discussed unreported sexual assaults that occur within the Two-Spirit community. He has been involved in the development of the Two-Spirit Indian Child Welfare Education Days where the focus has been Historical Trauma of Two-Spirit people particularly in the area of bullying, sexual abuse, child abuse/neglect and domestic violence. Lenny was a consultant and participant in a project with the National Resource Center for Tribes and the National Resource Center for Permanency and Family Connections. This project included in developing digital recordings of Two-Spirit/LGBTQ individuals who were involved in the foster care system and/or adopted. The title of this project is "Healing Footsteps of Two-Spirit/LGBTQ People." This project also included in creating a tip sheet for foster parents of Two-Spirit/LGBTQ children. Lenny is involved with several local LGBTQ organizations and also a Council Member of the MN Two-Spirit Society and Board member to First Nations Repatriation Institute.

Lenny lives in Prior Lake, MN with his partner and their dog Jackson.

CDC report finds sodium consumption high among US children

More than 40 percent of sodium comes from 10 common types of food

By Tracey Cooper, RN, PHN

Woodrow W. Keeble Memorial Health Care Center

More than 90 percent of U.S. children, aged 6-18 years, eat more sodium than recommended, putting them at risk for developing high blood pressure and heart disease later in life, according to a new CDC Vital Signs report.

This report provides the most recent data detailing how much sodium school-age children eat and where it comes from. Using data from CDC’s 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, CDC researchers determined that about 43 percent of sodium eaten by children comes from the 10 foods they eat most often: pizza, bread and rolls, cold cuts/cured meats, savory snacks, sandwiches, cheese, chicken patties/nuggets/tenders, pasta mixed dishes, Mexican mixed dishes, and soups.

“Too many children are consuming way too much sodium, and the result will be risks of high blood pressure and heart disease in the future,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “Most sodium is from processed and restaurant food, not the salt shaker. Reducing sodium intake will help our children avoid tragic and expensive health problems.”

To help reduce the amount of sodium children are consuming daily, parents and caregivers, as well as schools, communities, and places that sell, make or serve food, are all encouraged to take steps to ensure more low-sodium options. For example, parents can establish healthy eating habits in their children by providing a diet high in fruits and vegetables without added sodium.

House passes Bill to preserve rural access to therapy services

Washington, DC – September 9, 2014 – Senator John Thune (R-South Dakota) today praised the House of Representatives’ passage of bipartisan legislation (H.R. 4067) originally authored by Thune, and Senators Jerry Moran (R-Kansas), and Jon Tester (D-Montana), which extends a prohibition on the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) from enforcing a regulation that harms access to therapy services in rural areas for calendar year 2014. Next, the Senate, which previously passed Thune’s companion legislation (S.1954) in February of 2014 by unanimous consent, will likely consider the House-passed version before sending the bill to the president to be signed into law.

The extension provides additional time for Thune, Tester, and Moran to advance their Protecting Access to Rural Therapy Services (PARTS) Act (S. 1143), which would permanently clarify that general supervision of outpatient therapeutic services by a physician or non-physician practitioner is sufficient for payment of therapeutic hospital outpatient services.

“Rural health care providers across South Dakota understand that this regulation crafted by Washington bureaucrats would place an unnecessary strain on the already overextended staff of our health care facilities,” said Thune. “I’m pleased that my bipartisan legislation to extend the prohibition of this burdensome regulation and provide rural health care facilities with the flexibility needed to continue delivering quality outpatient therapy services may soon become law. I will continue to press my colleagues in Congress to pass my long-term solution to ensure our rural providers are not faced with this unnecessary regulation beyond 2014.”

Outpatient therapeutic services include services such as drug infusions, blood transfusions, and cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation services. These health care services have always been administered by licensed, skilled medical professionals in hospitals under the overall direction of a physician. However, in its attempt to clarify existing regulations in 2009, the CMS retroactively interpreted existing policy in place since 2001 to require a supervising physician be physically present in the department at all times when Medicare beneficiaries receive outpatient therapy services, the majority of which are low risk.

In response to perennial concerns raised by hospitals and lawmakers, including Thune, CMS delayed enforcement of its direct supervision policy from 2009 through 2013 for Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs) and other small, rural hospitals. Recognizing that CMS would be enforcing the regulation in 2014, Thune offered the PARTS Act as an amendment to the Senate Finance Committee’s SGR and Medicare Beneficiary Access Improvement Act, which passed by voice vote out of committee on December 13, 2013. The language included in the SGR and Medicare Beneficiary Access Improvement Act would permanently prohibit enforcement of this regulation for CAHs. However, until Congress enacts a permanent SGR fix, the legislation would provide for an additional year of non-enforcement of the regulation.

Skin cancer questions

By Richard P. Holm MD

What kind of skin cancers are there? There are three major kinds. In general, one in five (20%) people in the US have had or will have some kind of skin cancer. In Australia where the sun is intense, two out of three skin cancers are basal cell type, one in four are squamous cell, and one in twelve are malignant melanoma.

Should I go to a dermatologist for screening? Of course the dermatologist is the most experienced with skin cancer, but primary care providers can be good at it too. Realize, however, that the first person to find skin cancer should be you, along with a partner to look over places you cannot see. Screening is especially important for those at high risk for skin cancer.

Who is at high risk for skin cancer? At highest risk would be anyone who has had a bad sunburn or excessive lifetime sun exposure, especially when young, and in those with light complexion, freckles, blue eyes, blond or red-hair. At higher risk for malignant melanoma are those with many moles, with a prior personal history of skin cancer, and with a family history of malignant melanoma.

Does sun screen help prevent skin cancer? This is widely presumed to be true but as yet not scientifically proven. In fact some speculate that people who use sun screen may then expose themselves to more damaging sunlight and also may have more vitamin D deficiency. All that said, it is my opinion there is enough evidence to use sun screen, around here, March through September, and to take 2000 IU of vitamin D daily.

How do I know when to go to the doctor? The ABCDE pneumonic helps in knowing when a skin lesion might be dangerous. A: asymmetry or irregularly shaped; B: border fuzzy not sharp; C: more than one color in it; D: diameter wider than pencil width; and E: lesion evolving or changing.

It is common to mistake a benign and safe look-a-like seborrheic keratosis for a possible malignant melanoma. Seborrheic keratosis is light brown to black, raised, and waxy. If one can partially peel or scratch off waxy material with a fingernail, then it is benign, while malignant melanomas can be flat with nothing to feel or scratch, or nodular... but never waxy.

No question, when you're not sure, see your doctor.

EPA seeks input on proposed label options for safer products

Washington, DC – September 8, 2014 – The Environmental Protection Agency is redesigning its Design for the Environment Safer Product Label to better convey to consumers that products bearing the label meet the program’s rigorous standard to be safer for people and the environment.

“We want consumers to be able to easily find safer products that work well,” said Jim Jones, Assistant Administrator for Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention. “The agency wants to hear from the American people on which designs will help people identify household cleaning and other products that are safer for families and the environment.”

The redesigned label is intended to help consumers, businesses and institutional buyers recognize products that have earned the EPA Safer Product Label. All ingredients in products that earn the logo have undergone a thorough evaluation to ensure they meet high standards for safety and performance. When people use these products, they are protecting their families and the environment by making safer chemical choices.

Over the past 15 years, the voluntary EPA Design for the Environment (DfE) Safer Product Labeling Program has grown significantly. More than 2,500 products have earned the DfE label because they are formulated with the safest possible ingredients for human health and the environment based on the best available science and protective criteria. The program helps partners drive change by providing technical tools, methodologies, and expertise to move toward safer, more sustainable formulations.

The agency is also seeking input from a wide range of stakeholders, including the chemical and product manufacturing industry, retailers, consumers and environmental organizations. This input will help inform the agency’s selection of a new label.

Comment on the proposed designs up until October 31, 2014: http://www.epa.gov/dfe/label

Funds to for victims of Domestic Violence in Grand Forks

Washington, DC – September 9, 2014 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced $300,000 in federal funds through the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) to increase services for victims of sexual assault, law enforcement response and prosecution to the City of Grand Forks.

The City of Grand Forks will use these funds to partner with the Community Violence Intervention Center and strengthen the criminal justice system and community response to sexual assault. It will also increase support for underserved populations, such as tribal communities; enhance the response to sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking by implementing comprehensive data collection and analysis; and improve the coordination of services and the widespread use of best practices to support victims through meaningful collaboration and training.

“When I served as North Dakota’s Attorney General, I helped implement the Violence Against Women Act in our state and saw firsthand the impact of comprehensive services and support to help victims of domestic violence, their families, and their communities,” said Heitkamp. “Making sure some of the most vulnerable North Dakotans have a safe place to turn to and a community to support them is critical to combating and preventing domestic violence. It was only appropriate that one of the first bills I helped pass in the Senate was the reauthorization of a bill that supports these initiatives. These funds will build off of the already great work Grand Forks is doing to support victims of domestic violence, as well as sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking.”

In the Senate, Heitkamp has built on her work as North Dakota’s Attorney General to combat domestic violence and stop those who seek to harm adults and children by helping push the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) through Congress. It was one of the first bills the Senate passed after Heitkamp joined the chamber. As North Dakota’s Attorney General, Heitkamp helped implement the initial VAWA after the bill became law in 1994. Since then, programs supported by VAWA have made drastic changes. According to the Justice Department, the annual incidences of domestic violence have fallen more than 60 percent since 1993.

Ripple Effect –

Defying statistics: Two significant floods in 3 years

It can be hard to stay focused on building flood protection here in the Red River basin. After waters recede, it seems as though they’ve never been there, and most summers as of late have brought spells of drought-like conditions, making flooding seem far away.

Truth is, however, that severe flooding can hit the basin any place- and we never know exactly what the severity or place will be.

Look at the plague of flooding in the northern half of the basin this spring and summer 2014, flooding brought the area flows to very high levels. Such levels of flow by themselves come as a surprise. But given the fact that this was the second such magnitude flood in the same region in only three years appears to defy even the statistics.

It’s not the statistics, however, that are the problem. It’s the simple facts that flooding can occur in wide degrees of magnitude at almost any place in the basin. And that one large flood does not guarantee another won’t follow.

In this instance, the 2014 potential flood months in the northern Red River basin started out in a way similar to much of the rest of the basin: an early partial snow melt saturated the soils, leaving the basin facing eminent flooding from a potential late, too-sudden final thaw. Coming to the rescue for the basin was an unusually cool spring that allowed for a gradual, almost imperceptible final thaw. With the exception of the basin’s northern stretch, which faced ice problems, expected flood fights were turned largely into non-issues.

For the northern basin, however, the fight wasn’t over. In early summer, a six inch rain storm hit southern Manitoba, causing widespread impacts as the additional precipitation atop saturated soils broke flow records. Multiple rivers were pushed high, with 13 reaching floods of record. More than a million acres of farmland in southern Manitoba were left unseeded. Estimates of damaged bridges and other infrastructure run high.

By itself, this record flow makes an unmistakable point about the potential damage of Red River basin flooding. Add to this the fact that similar record flows had occurred in the northern basin just three years previous and the lesson becomes even more poignant.

And this flood has been slow at receding. Even as Topping delivered his report to the RRBC in early September, the flood in Manitoba was still ongoing. Lakes continued to be high, requiring sand bagging, and over 500 homes continued to be affected.

For more information, look at the Long Term Flood Solutions document by visiting www.redriverbasincommission.org.

Until the next Ripple Effect, The Red River Basin Commission (RRBC).

*****

The RRBC is a grassroots organization that is chartered not-for-profit corporation under the provisions of Manitoba, North Dakota, Minnesota, and South Dakota law. Our offices in Fargo, ND and Winnipeg, MB can be reached at 701-356-3183 and 204-982-7250, or you can check out our website at http://redriverbasincommision.org

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

ESDS FACE activities highlights

By Dionne Lake

The FACE Adult Ed Classroom has been busy with learners; families have been enrolling and coming to see what's new for this year in the FACE Program. Many parents and caregivers have joined the classroom while their little ones are in the Early Childhood classroom. Families have been spending valuable learning time together as well as having learning adventures on their own.

One of the fun activities that the Adult Learners have done is making and canning salsa. Many individuals donated tomatoes and vegetables, and Ellen Robertson taught us how to can.

In addition, we went digging south of ESDS for sinkpeta wota or bitter root. The winter months are coming and we will give the medicine to our little ones and those who need it to fend off sickness.

We are looking forward to an awesome year!

NIKE N7 Summit 2014

The N7 Fund, a charitable organization committed to bringing sport and all of its benefits to Native American and Aboriginal communities in the United States and Canada, and the Native Wellness Institute, a 501(c) 3 non-profit organization committed to promoting the well-being of Native people through programs and trainings that embrace the teachings and traditions of Native ancestors ("NWI"), are in the planning stages of organizing the 3rd N7 Sport Summit. With a theme of "7 years of N7: Gathering Speed to Move Future Generations," the 2014 Sport Summit will take place October 2nd through October 4th, 2014, and hope to bring individuals from the United States and Canada together at the Nike World Headquarters in Beaverton, Oregon.

Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate will be providing travel and meal expenses for 3 high schoolers to attend the NIKE N7 Summit in Beaverton, Oregon. Please inform those wishing to apply just to submit resume with following criteria on it.

Qualification criteria (Point system)

*Must be between ages 14-18 to apply, and enrolled member of SWO tribe

*Must have 3.2 GPA or higher (3.2-3.5 1pt) (3.5-4.0 2pt)

*Involved in extracurricular activities, state activities (1pt)

*Completed community service hours, must show proof (5-10hrs 2pt) (10-15hrs 3pt)

*3 recommendation letters from non-family member (4pt)

*Short essay (paragraph) on leadership and why it's needed on our reservation (5pt)

APPLICATION DEADLINE IS FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 19TH, 2014.

Contact Derrick McCauley 605-698-8218 or derrickm@swo-nsn.gov (PARKS AND RECREATION).

Morris praised by Winds of Change

The magazine again named Morris a top-200 institution in support of American Indian students

Morris, MN – September 11, 2014 – Winds of Change has again named the University of Minnesota, Morris one of the top 200 institutions in the nation in support of American Indian students. Published quarterly by the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES), Winds of Change is the leading nationally distributed magazine with a single-minded focus on career and educational advancement for American Indian and Alaska Native peoples, with an emphasis on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

Each September Winds of Change releases a Top 200 Special College Issue, which includes a list of the top 200 colleges for American Indians. The issue, viewed as a crucial resource for students and college recruiters, identifies institutions that graduate a high percentage of American Indian undergraduates as well as those with vibrant, supportive Native American communities.

At Morris, American Indian students comprise 16 percent of the student body and have a six-year graduation rate of 61 percent, compared to the statewide average of 39. The campus also hosts the highest percentage of American Indian students in the University of Minnesota system.

“As a public university whose history is tied to the land and all the peoples who have lived and studied here, it matters that we commit ourselves to supporting Native American students and communities,” says Chancellor Jacqueline R. Johnson. “This national recognition affirms that commitment.”

Schools are identified for inclusion in the Winds of Change Top 200 Special College Issue based on data from the United States Department of Education regarding enrollment and graduation rates from four-year colleges over the past four years. Additional information is available at aises.org.

Funding for Native American Research Center for Health at Cankdeska Cikana Community College

Washington, DC – September 8, 2014 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced more than $675,000 in federal funds to create a new Native American Research Center for Health (NARCH) at Cankdeska Cikana Community College(CCCC) in Fort Totten.

These funds will assist CCCC as it develops a new tribal health research hub. This new NARCH will work to address prevalent health disparities in local tribal communities and bring academic research opportunities to local Native organizations and institutions. It will also help expand the number of Native American scientists and health professionals who are engaged in biomedical, clinical, behavioral and health services research.

“Encouraging Native American students to become involved in academic research, addressing the health disparities in Indian Country and expanding medical research opportunities in North Dakota are all important to keep our state on a successful path forward – and these funds do just that,” said Heitkamp. “I look forward to learning about the great research that will inevitably come from Cankdeska Cikana Community College’s new Native American Research Center for Health to improve the lives of families and tribes across the state.”

Champions earn honors at ‘Tribes’ powwow

Bismarck, ND – UTN – Beautiful powwow weather, world-class guests and top-quality competition highlighted the 45th Annual United Tribes International Powwow, “Home of the Champions.” The gathering held September 4-7 at United Tribes Technical College in Bismarck featured contestants from 70 different tribes and 14 states and Canadian provinces.

CONTEST ACTION

 (Team from) New Town, ND; Battle River, Red Lake, MN; Ft. Peck Sioux, Poplar, MT; and Eagle Ridge, New Town, ND.

Twenty-four drums rendered their best songs for 581 dancers during seven grand entries, intertribals, competitions, specials and honorings. Host drum North Bear, Ethete, WY, added their powerful beat and soaring vocals to the proceedings.

Total prize money awarded for all 25 singing and dancing categories was just under $115,000, the highest amount offered in the event’s history.

Thanks to a generous donation from the Three Affiliated Tribes of the Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara Nation, the powwow committed increased the singing contest prize money to $18,000. The winning drum took home $7,000.

A celebration of Native horse culture was featured in a, first ever, intertribal Hat and Boot Dance Special and tribal horse-song drum contest. Iron Boy also took home the top singing honors in that category, followed by Yankton Sioux, Lake Andes, SD; Blue Coats, Box Elder, MT; Eagle Ridge, New Town, ND; and Iron Bull.

POWWOW HIGHLIGHTS

Sunny days with temps reaching into the 80s and overnight lows in the upper 40s made for comfortable camping and powwow conditions. Lone Star Arena offered well-cushioned grass, courtesy of UTTC’s groundskeepers.

The powwow theme, “We Are All Related,” was universally embraced by participants and visitors. Distinguished visitors to the event included Olympic Gold Medalist Billy Mills (Oglala Lakota); former vice presidential candidate on the Green Party ticket, Winona LaDuke (White Earth Anishinaabe); and Women’s NBA All-Star Shoni Schimmel (Umatilla Confederated Tribes) of the WNBA Atlanta Dream.

Miss Indian Nations, Alexandria Alvarez (Shoshone-Bannock), Fort Hall, ID, sponsored a mother and daughter dance special and give-away to mark the end of her one-year reign as a cultural ambassador.

The U. S. National Anthem was rendered sweetly by eight-year-old Amani Netterville of Theodore Jamerson Elementary School. Keith Big Crow (Three Affiliated) made a repeat appearance this year playing the Anthem Jimi Hendrix style on his Fender Stratocaster electric guitar.

The event was attended by a group of international tour operators from the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Italy, France, Germany, Austria, Australia, and Switzerland. The visitors were on a planning tour hosted and coordinated by the Rocky Mountain International Marketing Group and North Dakota Tourism.

Journalists from New Zealand and Canada covered the event, along with tribal press and media, and representatives from local news outlets.

Over the four-days, powwow paid attendance was estimated at 6,000 to 7,000 people.

The evening entertainment was carried live by tribal radio stations around the region from a feed supplied by KMHA Radio, New Town, ND. Video and audio of Saturday night’s program was streamed on the internet on the websites of stations owned by Townsquare Media in Bismarck/Mandan and other media markets in six states: Colorado, Oklahoma, Wyoming, Minnesota and the Dakotas.

Fifty-seven volunteers, including 26 from the local AETNA office, served a free roast buffalo meal on powwow’s closing day for over 2,000 visitors, singers and dancers. The buffalo was donated by the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, one of the college’s five governing tribes, and presented by United Tribes.

COLOR GUARDS

The following color guard units participated in the 2014 United Tribes Powwow: First Nations Women Warriors Julia Kelly and Donise Red Horn; American Legion Post 253, White Shield, ND; Myron B. Johnson/Nathan Good Iron American Legion Post 271, Mandaree, ND, and Auxiliary Post 271; Looking Back/Growler/Jamerson American Legion Post 239 Little Eagle, SD; American Legion Post 9061, Mandaree, ND and Auxiliary Post 9061; VFW Post 10772, Fort Yates, ND; Unit 300 American Legion Auxiliary; American Legion Post 29, Minot, ND; Lilley/Dionne Post 262 Belcourt, ND and Auxiliary Unit 262; and United Tribes Technical College Freedom Defenders.

PARADE OF CHAMPIONS

The “Parade of Champions” enjoyed beautiful weather and many spectators along its route through downtown Bismarck. Grand marshal was Olympic Gold Medalist Billy Mills, accompanied by his wife Pat.

Participating were 221 dancers, five drums, and 25 registered entries from various tribes, local businesses, non-profit groups, and political parties. Veterans groups honored the event, and some floats joined-in as non-registered participants.

Best Overall Entry/Theme went to MHA’s Brian White Tail and Aletha Morsette and the powwow princess riding in a vintage car. Named Best Youth/Cultural Group was Lakho Piyhapi Wahohip (Lakota Language Nest) featuring Lakota-speaking preschoolers. Best Horse Group was the Heart Roping Club with carts pulled by Shetland ponies. The Mandaree Drum claimed the award for Best Drum/Dancer entry.

The Classtiques Car Club and Stan Puklich Chevrolet volunteered their time and beautiful cars. Three horse groups participated. Volunteers and staff did an excellent job of helping present culture and diversity to the town audience as an outreach of the powwow.

POWWOW RUN

Billy Mills inspired a gathering of 90 runners with the memory of his 1964 win in Tokyo as he fired the starting gun for two events in the THUNDERBIRD Powwow Run. The only American to ever win Olympic Gold in the 10,000 meter race was encouraging and approachable, signing autographs and posing with runners for photos before the events.

Kyle Downs of Bismarck ran a personal best of 32:10 to win the 10K race, while Andy Nielsen, also of Bismarck, turned in a 17:01 to claim the 5K honor.

Top female finishers were: Camie Anderson, 41:16, fourth overall in the 10K and Jessilynn Long Feather, 23:25, 11th overall in the 5K.

HEAD STAFF

The strong and animated voice of announcer Vince Byel of Minnesota brought spirit and energy to the event, complementing the cultural commentary and interpretation of co-announcer Butch Felix, (SD). Other powwow head staff: Arena Director Charles Lasley, (WI); Head Singing Judge John “Shorty” Bearstail, ND; Head Men’s Dance Judge Trae Little Sky, (SD); and Head Women’s Dance Judge Tonja Jo Hall, (ND). Ernie Boss Calf Ribs (MT) provided the ground blessing for Lone Star Arena and Blackfeet and Lakota prayers and prayer-songs throughout. Powwow sound was provided by Frank K. Jamerson, REZ JAM Sound, McLaughlin, SD.

All first place dance category and singing contest winners received a jacket adorned with the powwow logo showing the “We Are All Related” artwork of artist Wallace “Butch” Thunder Hawk, Jr., a medal and cash. Second through fourth place winners received cash and medals inscribed with the “Home of the Champions” slogan.

The United Tribes International Powwow Committee thanks all participants, spectators, donors, college staff and volunteers for making the 45th annual event a success. The committee expresses special appreciation to companies and individuals in Bismarck-Mandan for sponsoring competitive categories and supporting the powwow and associated events.

WOMEN FANCY

1 Jocy Bird (Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara/Dakota) Sioux Falls, SD

WOMEN TRADITIONAL

1 Randi Bird (TAT/Dakota) Sioux Falls , SD

SENIOR WOMEN FANCY

3 Sherry Bird (Three Affiliated/Dakota) Sioux Falls, SD

SENIOR WOMEN JINGLE

2 Dianne DesRosiers (Sisseton-Wahpeton Dakota) Browns Valley, MN

SENIOR MEN GRASS/CHICKEN

3 Greg Derosiers (Ojibway) Browns Valley, MN

Diamond Legends Softball

MEN:

Upper NIAA All Indian Nationals

2 Tribesmen (Sisseton)

Lower NIAA All Indian Nationals

2 SWST (Sisseton)

Preparing Vegetables for Frost or Freezing

Brookings, SD – It is mid-September and gardeners raising tomatoes know what that means. "One of these next nights it is going to freeze and kill all the tomato plants," said Mary Roduner, SDSU Extension Consumer Horticulture Field Specialist.

"Unfortunately for the plants, a light frost or freeze is often followed by several days or weeks of lovely warm weather that would have allowed the tomatoes and peppers to finish maturing," Roduner, said. "Providing protection for the plants may get you a slightly longer growing season."

Before we look at ways to protect the plants, Roduner said it is important to understand the difference between a frost and freeze. "Frost occurs when water vapor freezes on a surface when the temperature reaches 32 degrees Fahrenheit or below. It usually occurs on a clear night when heat radiates up from the ground," Roduner said.

She explained that tiny ice crystals form when water vapor condenses. "Similar to dew, the temperature at ground level is the key," she said. "The temperature there is often colder than the air temperature just a few feet higher. This lower ground temperature is why the air temperature can read 35 to 37 degrees Fahrenheit and there is frost on the ground."

To protect small plants from frost, Roduner said they need to be covered.

A freeze, Roduner explained involves a 32 degree Fahrenheit surface temperature that lasts for a significant length of time. "Frost is not necessarily present. Freezing is a function of temperature not humidity. Vegetation damage is usually a result," she said.

The terms "killing freeze" or "frost" depends upon the hardiness of the plant, low temperature reached and length of time at that temperature.

Roduner provides a breakdown of freeze temperatures: Light Freeze: Damage depends upon length of freeze duration. 29 to 32 degrees Fahrenheit - tender plants killed with little destructive effect on other vegetation. Moderate Freeze: 25 to 28 degrees Fahrenheit - wide spread destruction on most vegetation with heavy damage to fruit blossoms and tender semi-hardy plants. This is a killing freeze when temperatures reach this point or lower for three hours or longer. Severe Freeze: 24 degrees Fahrenheit and colder, heavy damage to most plants.

When plants freeze, ice crystals form inside the individual cells. "These crystals are very sharply pointed and poke through cell walls. When the plant warms up, water in the cells leaks out and the cells die," Roduner said. "If there is too much of this type of damage the entire plant will die."

To see this happen, Roduner said to simply place an apple in the freezer. "When it is frozen solid, remove it from the freezer and set it in a bowl at room temperature. In a short while the apple will collapse into a pile of mushy flesh and be sitting in a pool of liquid," she said.

As we get closer to fall, gardeners should make an obsessive habit of watching the weather, said Roduner. "Find your favorite source that seems to be the most accurate and pay special attention to the forecast for nighttime low temperatures," she said. "Temperatures can change quickly at this time of year so it is important to be prepared to cover plants."

Protection techniques:

When covering plants it is best to use cloth like old sheets or blankets. Roduner explained that the blankets provide insulation and hold a few extra degrees of warmth close to the plants. She added that plastic is not a good insulator and loses heat rapidly. If plastic touches leaf or fruit surfaces it acts like a conductor, allowing the cold to still damage any plant material it touches.

"Cardboard and newspaper between the plants and any plastic you may need to use will prevent the leaves and plastic making contact and provide and extra layer of insulation," she said.

Roduner explained that gardeners should cover the plants early in the evening to capture and hold heat. "If the next day is going to be borderline cold, the covering can be left on. It won't hurt plants to be covered for several days if conditions warrant," she said. "Be sure that there are no gaps in the covering because this will allow cold air to get inside and damage the plants."

Wind can cause additional problems with covered plants, blowing the covering material away and potentially breaking off plants in the process.

Most sensitive vegetables & plants: Basil: Does not tolerate temperatures below 37 degrees Fahrenheit. Below 45 degrees it shows stress with leaf bronzing and edge drying. To protect, cut plants down and remove leaves. Basil can be stored in an airtight container in the freezer instead of drying it.

Tomatoes, peppers and eggplant: These vegetables are all tropical plants and do not tolerate cold temperatures. Cover them well with thick blankets. Often a light frost or freeze will damage only the outer leaves and the inside leaves and fruits are fine. This minor damage won't kill the plants or stop the tomatoes from ripening.

Squash: Summer squash will die back and the soft skinned fruits will be damaged with a light to moderate freeze. Winter squash and pumpkins will be damaged depending on how mature they are when it freezes, Roduner explained.

To test the maturity, Roduner said gardeners can use the thumbnail test. "Press your thumbnail into the rind. If the rind is soft and the nail pierces it easily, it is not mature, will have little flavor and will not survive freezing. If the rind is moderately firm and your nail makes a deep dent but does not break the skin, it is almost mature and should be picked and stored in a garage or shed and used quickly," she said. "A mature squash has rind that leaves only a shallow or no dent. While at this stage they can take a light freeze, it is best to harvest them and cure for storing."

Melons and cucumbers: Like summer squash, cucumbers and melons die back with a mild freeze. Cucumbers become translucent and watery. Melons will have soft spots where frost lays on them. Harvest all cucumbers and melons that appear to be ripe. Cover melons that are close to ripe. Water melon does not continue to ripen after it is picked.

Onions: Mature onions that have flesh above the ground will freeze and not store well. Any frozen areas will soften and rot leading to rot in the other onions in the storage container. Pull all onions and put them in a warm dry area to dry down or cure for long term storage. Onions kept in the ground past maturity, when the tops fall over, are prone to insect damage and then rotting.

Beans: Snap beans will freeze and plants will not recover. Pick all beans before it freezes.

Potatoes: Harvest now. Potatoes cannot take even a light freeze without damaging tubers that are close to the soil surface.

These vegetables can tolerate frost and freezing: Lettuce: Loose leaf lettuce will survive down to 20 degrees Fahrenheit. In the morning it will be frozen solid. Do not touch the leaves and by noon they will be as good as new. Harvest before the first prediction of 19 degrees Fahrenheit or colder.

Broccoli, kale, cabbage and cauliflower: These plants will survive very cold temperatures. They will all immediately flower the next spring so they are best removed this fall when you are finished harvesting. Kale is able to over winter if the temperatures don't get too far below zero and can be harvested through the winter.

Spinach: Cover fall planted spinach with a 6-inch layer of straw and allow it to overwinter. Larger leaves can be harvested through the winter and the first early leaves in the spring will be very tender and sweet.

Carrots and beets: These can take a lot of cold. To over winter and harvest before spring, cover with a foot or more of straw or place straw bales over them. This will prevent the soil from freezing too hard and make a February run to the garden for fresh carrots easier.

To learn more, visit iGrow.org.

Garden Corner

By Eric Hanssen

Browns Valley, Minnesota

What will the cold do to apples? You cannot bring a fruit tree into the house and most trees were too large to cover so the fruit had to tolerate the cold snap without any more protection than the surrounding leaves in the canopy. Fortunately most fruits, cherries, plums and peaches, ripen in July and August so the fruit has long been picked. Pear harvest usually starts in late August and many, but not all, pears have also been picked. Apples are the real concern as many cultivars do not fully ripen until late September and even October. There are many trees still loaded with fruit and I have received numerous calls from apple owners wondering what to do. First, apple fruit can withstand at least 4 hours of temperatures in the 28 to 30 F range without serious injury. The sugars and other constituents of the fruit lower the freezing point of the flesh and they can recover just fine. You can tell if the fruit is frozen by a simple test: stick your finger nail through the skin of an apple. If the skin “pops” and juice comes out, it did not freeze. If the skin is hard and it feels like you are poking a Popsicle, then it probably is frozen. If it is frozen, do not pick or handle the fruit. Instead allow the apples to thaw on the tree as temperatures warm up. If the apples did not freeze they will continue to ripen and can be picked at their normal time. There may still be some freeze injury so it might not be a bad idea to pick a few apples early and see if the flesh has turned brown. If oxidation has developed, the fruit received freeze injury and further ripening may not occur. Even if the injured fruit left on the tree continues to ripen, it may not store as well as it normally would.

Fall webworm nests are appearing on many trees this year. You can see the nests on trees through the state. If you tear open one of these nests you’ll find fall webworm larvae. The yellow to brown, tufted, larvae are about 1/2-inch long and actively moving within, and beyond, the nest at this time. The webworm differs from tent caterpillars in time of feeding (spring for tent caterpillars and late summer for webworms) and where they form their nests (interior, near branch crotches, for tent caterpillars and exterior, out on the branches for webworms). The fall webworm favorite foods are cottonwoods, chokecherries and walnut, but almost any hardwood tree species will do. It is a myth that since they are feeding on leaves that will soon drop anyway that no damage is caused – the next month or so is a time of high productive for these leaves and the loss of them will leave the tree going into winter with fewer reserves. The larvae have mostly finished their feeding this fall so the best treatment may be to wait until next May or June and apply a soil treatment of a product containing imidacloprid as the active ingredient. This will be absorbed by the tree and kill the young larvae as they begin feeding on the leaves next summer.

This article comes from professor John Ball, SDSU Forestry Specialist in his Pest Update publication available online at http://sdda.sd.gov/legacydocs/Forestry/educational-information/PDF/Pest-alert-2014-Sept-10.pdf

Legals

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

LONG HOLLOW SITE IMPROVEMENTS

BID NOTICE

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Office of Construction Management and Sisseton Wahpeton Housing Authority herein gives notification that sealed bid proposals will be accepted for the LONG HOLLOW SITE IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT, as outlined below:

Project Information:

Long Hollow Housing III Site Development located in Long Hollow, Lake Traverse Reservation, Roberts County, South Dakota. New Housing Development located on Bureau of Indian Affairs Route 8.

Statement of Work:

For this project, the contractor shall be required to supply all labor, materials and equipment to complete final site grading, placement of conserved topsoil, permanent seeding and installation of erosion control devices according to the plans provided by Helms & Associates. Manhole adjustments and raising of manholes WILL NOT be included as part of this project.

Project Completion:

Contractor shall be required to complete the project within 30 days of award.

Applicable Taxes:

Bid package to include:

A. Tribal Employment Rights Office (TERO) Tax in the amount of 3% of the bid submitted

C.  Excise Tax in the amount of 2% of the bid submitted

D. Tribal Use Tax in the amount of 5% on materials included in the bid submitted

E.  State Excise Tax in the amount of 2% of the bid submitted

Tax related questions can be directed towards:

SWO Tax Office Brenda Bellonger

Office: (605) 698?3541

TERO related questions can be directed towards: SWO TERO

DelRay German

Office: (605) 698-3549

Plans/Specs:

Road Construction Contractors & Venders may obtain plans from the Construction Management Office beginning September 12, 2014.

Bid Opening:

Deadline for receiving bids will be September 19, 2014 at 3:00 pm. Bids received after this time and date will not be considered. Preference will be given to Indian owned firms as required by the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate TERO law and regulations. Bid award shall be subject to availability of funds. The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Construction Management Office reserves the right to accept or reject any/all bids.

Please contact our office if you have any questions.

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-14-744-540; D-14-745-541

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE

OF NAME OF:

ISABELL CESAR, ROSELYNN CRAWFORD-CESAR, Minor Children,

And concerning:

HEIDI J. HAYNES, Petitioner.

ORDER AND NOTICE OF  HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from ISABELL JULANE CESAR TO ISABELL JULANE CRAWFORD AND ROSELYNN YAHAIRA JC CRAWFORD CESAR TO ROSELYNN YAHAIRA JC CRAWFORD  shall be heard before the Honorable B.J. Jones, Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at _10:30 A.M. on the  _8th    day of _OCTOBER, 2014.

Dated this 11th day of September, 2014.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST:

E. Pfeiffer. CLERK OF COURTS

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 14-144

SWOCSE/Lyndsey Lacroix, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ARLEN RENVILLE, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.   Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 14-176

SWOCSE/Boyd Keeble, PLAINTIFF

VS.

Shawna Lufkins, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.   Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 07-145

SWOCSE/Sara Farmer, PLAINTIFF

VS.

WAMBLI BRANT, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Paternity & Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.   Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 12-133

SWOCSE/Brittany DuMarce, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FRANCIS KOHL, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Modify Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.   Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 12-075

SWOCSE/Mason Kohl, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FRANCIS KOHL, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Modify Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.   Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 14-168

SWOCSE/Floyd Cloud, Jr., PLAINTIFF

VS.

GAYLA GERMAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.   Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 12-134

SWOCSE/ ND/Jamie Lien, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ANGELO WHITE, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 12-090

SWOCSE/ ND/Lori Bearcub, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ANGELO WHITE, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 13-179

SWOCSE/ Shandel Littlebird, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JOYCE SHEPHERD, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 14-014

SWOCSE/ Iris Keoke, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JOYCE SHEPHERD, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 08-135

SWOCSE/ Charlotte Shepherd, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JOYCE SHEPHERD, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 14-097

SWOCSE/ Summer Ortley, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JAVIER ORTEGA SR., DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 14-169

SWOCSE/Vina Williams, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ALANA REDDAY, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.   Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 14-069

SWOCSE/Emmetto Roberts, PLAINTIFF

VS.

RICHARD WALLENSTEIN, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Modify Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.   Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 14-167

SWOCSE/ Shannon Henman, PLAINTIFF

VS.

WILLOM HENDERSON, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Recognition of a Foreign Order and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 14-155

SWOCSE/Annette Crawford, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TARAE WHISTLING ELK, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.   Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 09-062

SWOCSE/Shelly Holiday, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DAVID REDDAY, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Recognize a Foreign Order has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.   Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 14-205

SWOCSE/Rose Bugg, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BELINDA LOCKE, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.   Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 04-311

SWOCSE/SD, PLAINTIFF

VS.

KEITH CRAWFORD, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Establish Arrears has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.   Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 07-039

SWOCSE/ Robin Johnson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JUANITA DUMARCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 04-374

SWOCSE/ Candace Labelle, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MEQUEL JIMINEZ, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 99-027

SWOCSE/ Brenda King, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CARY EASTMAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 10-001

SWOCSE/ Ivy Shepherd, PLAINTIFF

VS.

KERRY SULLIVAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 14-206

SWOCSE/Angel Rouillard, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ALEX RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.   Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 01-083

SWOCSE/ Devon Brave Bull (Bursheim), PLAINTIFF

VS.

SCOTT BRAVE BULL, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 06-244

SWOCSE/ Jamie Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SCOTT BRAVE BULL, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 09-085

SWOCSE/ MniYata Hill, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SCOTT BRAVE BULL, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 14-222

SWOCSE/Gladys Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SCOTT BRAVE BULL, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of September, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.   Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of August, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST:  Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Job Openings

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Maintenance/Transportation Manager, Head Start

Teacher, Head Start

Teacher Aide/Bus Monitor, Head Start

Teacher Aide, Head Start

Chemical Dependency Counselor Trainee, Dakotah Pride

Closing Date: September 19, 2014 @ 04:30PM

All interested applicants may obtain application and job description information at the Human Resource Department, of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate or contact Arnold Williams at (605) 698-8238 or Denise Hill at (605) 698-8362. (Tribal preference will apply)

 

JOB OPENING

OFFICE MANAGER - TRIBAL EMPLOYMENT RIGHTS OFFICE SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE AGENCY VILLAGE, SD

FUNCTIONS: To provide bookkeeping/technical assistance to the TERO Director. In addition to administrative duties, the Office Manager will also assist the Director in advocating Indian rights under the TERO law.

WAGE: Depending on experience.

Indian preference will apply. Please submit the following: Resume, verification of Tribal enrollment, and three (3) letters of reference to the T.E.R.O. Office between the hours of 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., Monday thru Friday.

All interested applicants may obtain a complete job description from TERO office. Please contact Robert Starr @ the TERO office at: 605-698-8266.

Closing Date: October 3, 2014 at 4:30 p.m.

 

Dakota Western Corporation

Accounting Assistant

Dakota Western Corporation has an immediate opening for an experienced Accounting Assistant. Duties will include but are not limited to payroll, accounts receivable and inventory. Minimum of 3 years of recent experience and college level accounting courses. Must have experience with MS Word, Excel and accounting software. Bring a resume and submit application in person at Dakota Western Corporation, 45679 Veterans Memorial Drive, Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications that do not meet the minimum qualifications will not be considered. Closing date: August 29, 2014.

 

Sisseton Wahpeton College

Sisseton Wahpeton College is seeking applications for the following positions:

Full Time Facilities Manager (Closing date 9/19/2014) Part Time

Library Assistant (Closing date 9/19/2014)

Part Time Prep Cook (Closing date 9/19/2014)

Please contact Human Resources at (605) 742-1105 Or visit our website at www.swc.tc for a complete job listing.

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Sisseton Wahpeton College

Regular full time Nursing Instructor needed for fall semester. Must possess valid SD Nursing License. BSN is required. Position is open until filled.

Visit our website at www.swc.tc for a full job description and application. Contact the HR office at (605) 742-1105.

34-4tc

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Employment Opportunities

Vacancy: Special Education Teacher (High School) Sign-on Bonus Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Special Education Teacher Opening Date: March 7, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Art Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a K-12 Art Teacher Opening Date: July 1, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Alternative Learning Center Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Secondary Teacher Opening Date: July 1, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: School Counselor Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a School Service Specialist School Counselor Opening Date: May 23, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Administrative Assistant (Elementary) Qualifications: High School Diploma/GED and Associate's degree (A. A.) or equivalent from two-year college or technical school; or one year to three years of related experience and/or training; or equivalent combination of education and experience. Opening Date: September 8, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Head of Transportation/Bus Driver Qualifications: High School Diploma/GED, Current Commercial Drivers License with air brakes and passenger endorsements, current commercial drivers license medical examiner's certificate, 1+ years of directly related experience, 1+ years of supervisory experience. Opening Date: August 21, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Parent Liaison Qualifications: Associates of Arts degree in directly related feild; or GED/High School Diploma and 2-4 years directly related experience; or any combination of directly related education and experience. Opening Date: September 10, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled 2014-2015 Extra Curricular Vacancies: Click Here for the Required Coaching Applicant Questionnaire

Vacancy: 7th/8th Grade Girls Basketball Coach Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and coaching applicant questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: April 8, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: 7th/8th Grade Volleyball Coach Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and coaching applicant questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: August 25, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled Click Here for the Required Advisor Applicant Questionnaire

Vacancy: (2) 8th Grade Class Advisor Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: April 11, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: AISES Advisor (American Indian Science and Engineering Society) Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: April 11, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Destination Imagination Advisor Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please

If you would like to apply to be a part of the TZ tiwahe you may pick up an application from the TZTS HR office located at #2 Tiospa Zina Dr. Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications may also be printed off the HR web page by downloading from links under employment forms to the left. Completed applications may be sent to PO Box 719, Agency Village, SD 57262. Faxed to: 605-698-7686. For further information call 605-698-3953 ext. 208. Indian Preference employer. At will employer. All applicants are subject to a Background Check and Pre-Employment Drug Test, pursuant to SWSB policy.

 

Enemy Swim Day School

Bus Driver

Enemy Swim Day School has an opening for a bus driver for the 2014-2015 school year. This is a 6 hour per day position. Applicant must have a valid CDL driver's license with passenger endorsement. ESDS will assist driver in obtaining a CDL if needed. Health and vision insurance is included as well as retirement benefits and paid leave. Wage is dependent upon experience. If interested please pick up an application from the business office or visit our website: www.esds.us. Call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 and ask for Ed Johnson for details. Indian preference policies apply. Open until filled.

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FACE PARENT EDUCATOR

Enemy Swim Day School has an immediate opening for a FACE Parent Educator for the 2014-2015 school year. Parent Educator for FACE Home-Based conducts personal visits with families of prenatal to 5-year old children on a weekly or bi-weekly basis to provide research-based information on how children grow and develop and how parents can foster learning and nurture development. Hours are 8:00 am to 4:00 pm, with some evening hours for scheduled events. Please visit our web site at www.esds.us for a detailed position description and application. This position includes benefits. Indian Preference policies apply. If interested please call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 for more information, ask for Virginia. Open until filled.

 

37-2tc

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Cage Department Cashier (2 Full-Time) Rotating Count Department Team Member (2 Full-Time) 3:00am to finish Foods Department Bus Person (2 Full-Time) Swing Cashier (2 Full-Time) Swing Cook I (2 Full-Time) Swing Hotel Department Room/Laundry Attendant (Full-Time) 8:00am to finish MIS Department System Administrator (Full-Time) Day & on call Human Resources Department Information Specialist (Full-Time) Day Security Department Officer (3 Full-Time) Rotating Surveillance Department Observer (2 Full-Time) Rotating

Closing Date: September 19, 2014 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions

Two identifications documents required upon hire

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE, Hankinson ND 58041.For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO. (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment). Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

M.I.S. (Management Information Systems): COMPUTER SPECIALIST/PROGRAMMER (1 Full-Time) GENERAL FUNCTION: Your level of responsibility will assist end-users with computer issues. You are also responsible for computer maintenance. You will design and write code for programs as needed. You will also write custom reports for end-users when needed. You will be responsible for assisting end-users with computer issues, computer maintenance, and other IT tasks as designated by M.I.S. Manager or Supervisor. REQUIREMENTS: Excellent interpersonal and written communication skills. Flexibility and ability to work in a team environment. Associates degree in computer science, information systems, 2+ years experience in computer science, computer programming, information systems, or a related field or 6+ years experience in a related position; A+ Certification in beneficial. Extensive knowledge of Windows XP, Windows 7, 2000, 2003, 2008, MSSql Databases, Active Directory, VMWare, Crystal Reports, Visual Studio, Java and other programming languages. Ability to lift equipment in excess of 30lbs. Proficiency in Linux, IIS, POS systems, RAID technology, computer hardware, AS/400, networking and anti-virus methods is beneficial. Knowledge of servers if beneficial. Must obtain Key Gaming License upon hire.

This position will be advertised until it is filled.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

C-STORE: CASHIER (1 FULL TIME) GENERAL FUNCTION: Assist in providing quality service to the customers of the Dakota Sioux Casino and efficient operation of the C-Store/Gift Shop. REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or G.E.D. required. Excellent customer service skills. Excellent communication skills, both verbal and written. Strong organizational skills. Must obtain Non Gaming License upon hire.

.GIFT SHOP: GIFT SHOP CLERK (1 FULL TIME) GENERAL FUNCTION: Assist in providing quality service to the customers of the Dakota Sioux Casino and efficient operation of the Gift Shop/C-Store. REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. Neat appearance and good communication skills. Working knowledge of retail and marketing sales. Operate Micros system cash register and make exact change. Must obtain a Non-Gaming License upon hire. Able to move 50lbs; minimal bending and using step ladder.

This position will close on September 17, 2014 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

PORTER: PORTER (3 Full-Time) ROTATING GENERAL FUNCTION: Serves as janitorial/housekeeping staff for guests and casino operations. REQUIREMENTS: Physical mobility throughout the facility and surrounding grounds. Able to lift 40 to 50 lbs. Must obtain Non Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on September 17, 2014 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Facilities/Maintenance Department: Maintenance Worker (1) full-time, available for any & all shifts including graveyard, weekends & holidays; able to follow verbal & written instructions; have organizational & motivational skills; communication skills; customer service skills; have knowledge of safety requirements and knowledge to operate necessary equipment; mechanical & carpentry skills;be physically able to move throughout the facilities & surrounding grounds; have the physical ability to lift heavy objects 100+ pounds; have at least 2 years' experience with all aspects of building maintenance, general maintenance, property maintenance, equipment maintenance with special emphasis on plumbing, air conditioning, electrical, and C-Store fuel pumps. Must have a High School Diploma or GED; be very dependable; have a valid state driver's license; and must be at least 21 years old. Will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke. (Pay DOE)

C-Store Department: Clerk/Cashier (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Excellent customer service skills; math skills essential; ability to operate necessary equipment; physical ability to lift moderate amounts of weight; previous experience working with money preferred; strong organizational skills managing various functions; dependable & available to work any & all shifts. Must be at least 21 years old & have a High School diploma or GED.

Opening Date: Thursday, September 11, 2014

Closing Date: Wednesday, September 17, 2014 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.