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TZTS Summer 2017 Film Camp videos online on YouTube

 

Search YouTube for:

TiospaZinaTribalSchool@gmail.com

 

Film Camp behind the scenes:

https://youtu.be/pEc83D_s2Hk

 

Ivy:

https://youtu.be/7lH27IOsRNo

 

Dylan:

https://youtu.be/nJYfMAlYee4

 

 

Mystic Fight Scene:

https://youtu.be/CxZQo2FOf3U

 

 

Anhother behind the scenes look at camp:

https://youtu.be/y7_0YiFFhTE

 

 

Redwing:

https://youtu.be/N-uKyMAiDhM

 

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate: Want to re-read the Self-Governance articles from past issues of your Sota Iya Ye Yapi?

Whether or not the Tribe assumes administrative authority over your health services is a BIG DEAL. What do you know about it?

Here they are:

Self-Governance Articles from past Sotas

  Obituaries Editorials Editor's column Education
Legals
Trading post

 

 

Vol. 48 Issue No. 38

Anpetu Iyamni, Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017

Inside this Edition –

Dakota Crossing grocery store opens last week; first look at Tribe's newest business venture

SWST honors its POW/MIAs in rainy ceremony: See the VSO's report to akicita

TZTS Wambdi Homecoming activities are this week!

Senator Rounds' staff to visit Sisseton this Tuesday, Sept. 19

Grow SD to host public community planning meeting

Sierra Wolcott reports on ND Tribal Leaders Summit, President Trump's visit to ND; shares UTTC pow wow highlights

SWC Rodeo team competes in first collegiate event

Reminder: Deadline to submit copy for consideration in the Sota is Friday noon

Dakota Crossing grocery store opens last week!

"from a Dream … to a Reality"

Grocery store, bakery, deli, off-sale beer & wine, open 6-10 daily

Fuel pumps open 24 hours a day!

By CD Floro

Sota Editor

Here are photos of last week's opening day for Dakota Crossing, the Tribe's complete grocery market, with off-sale beer and wine, deli/convenience store, and 24-hour fuel pumps. These photographs continue the Sota series updating Tribal members on their new grocery store, but now the preparations are complete and doors are open! Dakota Crossing provides 26,000 square feet of space, 11 food aisles for dry goods and frozen food, wall-mounted coolers for perishable food, a bakery, wine and beer off-sale, a deli with a seating area and large screen TV, and automotive/hardware section. There are ten checkouts throughout the store. There are 80 employees who have been training and preparing for the opening last Thursday, September 14th. See the full-page advertisement on the back page, and watch for more information in advance of a grand opening planned for Monday, October 9!

This week's front page news is the same as last week's: The Tribe's much-anticipated grocery store, Dakota Crossing, is now open for business along SD Highway 10 east of Sisseton!

Dreamed of, talked about, and hoped for decades – since the 1970s – this grocery is here now, a for-profit business owned by the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe.

We recall some of those early discussions.

Would it be a wholesale grocery, as Prairie Market operated back then in Watertown?

Or would it be a full retail store?

Dakota Crossing is a retail store, and yes, it is "full."

The Tribe's store offers a wide variety of products – many not available in some area grocery stores.

Here's a list, but come in and see for yourself:

*C-Store.

*CENEX fuel.

*Complete Grocery.

*High quality Meats.

*Fresh Produce.

*Deli and C-store.

*Health & Beauty.

*Beer and Wine.

*Bakery (by Rosalie's).

*Flowers (by Sisseton Flower Shop).

Senator Rounds staff to visit Sisseton

Washington, DC – Staff from the office of U.S. Senator Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) will visit Sisseton this Tuesday, September 19, 2017, to assist residents with any issues they may have dealing with federal agencies.

The Senator's staff will be at the SWST's Dakota Crossing Grocery Store, east SD Highway 10, to meet constituents.

Hours are from 11:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m.

Questions or concerns regarding this visit can be directed to Senator Rounds' Sioux Falls office at (605) 336-0486, or by visiting www.rounds.senate.gov.

From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer"

GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov

605-268-0502

Veteran in crisis? Call 1-800-273-8255, press 1

*Thank you to Chairman Dave Flute, who always steps up and was the master of ceremonies for our National POW/MIA Day of Honoring. It truly was a honor to the families and others in attendance. Delmer Bernard drum group (Dakota Nation) sang the flag song and honor songs, Danny Seaboy came and sang, and that was a big honor for the families and they all want to say "Pidamaya!" I like what Chairman Flute said as it was raining, that we were not going to rush the ceremonies because what the POWs went through was nothing compared to us having a little rain come down on us; it was so true. I believe everyone had the same sentiment. Larry Goette spoke of UK Ulyssus Abraham, US Army & US Navy POW of the Korean War. He gifted his cap to the TVSO to keep in a place of honor. Larry is retiring as VSO of Roberts County. Larry also said as it was thundering and raining that the thunder was like the sound of gun shots and the rain were the tears coming down on us. Del had some technical difficulties playing "Taps" so the Chairman stepped up and used the trumpet/bugle to play "Taps"… as it down-poured. It was a very heartfelt day of remembrance of our POWs . Thanks to the Honor Guards, Desert Era Veterans, Kit Fox Society and American Legion Post #314.

*HELPFUL FOREVER GI BILL LINKS: The VA has posted some helpful links for the new Forever GI BILL. The President signed into law the Harry W. Colmery Veterans Educational Assistance Act also known as the "Forever GI Bill®," which will bring significant changes to Veterans education benefits. The law will allow more veterans to use the GI Bill® and more time to use it. Some of the changes will go into effect immediately, and some are written to go into effect shortly after. These links provide the latest information that the VA has released:

https://benefits.va.gov/GIBILL/ForeverGIBill.asp

https://benefits.va.gov/GIBILL/FGIBSummaries.asp

*SEPTEMBER 24, 2017: Gold Star Mother's Day: Please see the accompanying list of Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe Gold Star Mothers. We honor each and every one of you!

UPCOMING VETERAN EVENTS:

*Sept 22-Veterans Stand Down-VFW Post 628-Sioux Falls (3601 S. Minnesota Ave)-9:00 am (CST)

*Sept 28-Annual Womens Veterans Conference - Sioux Falls, SD

*Sept 24-Gold Star Mothers Day Sept 25-Women Veterans Art Exhibit Open House-VA Sioux Falls (2nd Floor Primary Care Addition-4:00 pm (CST)

*VETERANS: PLEASE CALL OUR OFFICE IF YOU NEED ASSITANCE? WE ARE HERE TO SERVE! We are asking that you get your appointment slips turned in as soon as you get your slip - do not wait the day before or 2 days before. We have other avenues that we can utilize and if we have at least 4-5 days in advance that will give us plenty of time. Thank you.

*WOMEN VETERANS CALL CENTER: 1-855-VA-WOMEN. Crisis Help Line: 1-800-273-8255, available 24/7, and tell them you are a veteran. All calls are confidential.

Contacts: Woodrow W. Keeble Memorial American Legion Post 314 – Delano Renville, Commander Cell # 268-0354 & Clayton Ellingson 1-605-924-1266; Vietnam Veterans Kit Fox Society - Doc Wanna, Commander Phone # 698-3299; Desert Era Veterans - Jesse Chanku, Commander 1-605-956-0197; and Geri Opsal, TVSO 698-3388 or 268-0502.

Have a great and safe week.

Geri Opsal, TVSO.

UTTC hosts Tribal Leaders Summit

By Sierra Wolcott

Sota Assistant Editor

Tribal leaders from across the region attended a Tribal Leaders Summit in Bismarck from Tuesday, September 5 through Thursday, September 7. UTTC hosted the event.

Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribal Chairman Dave Flute and members of Tribal Council participated. Skyman Redday attended representing the Tribal Secretary's office.

Below are highlights from the summit sessions.

Youth presentations during lunch; five youth speak

There was a youth track at the summit on Thursday.

Some of these young people spoke during the day's luncheon. They spoke of concerns they had for their communities.

These presenters echoed concerns of our local Oyate youth, with focus on drugs and alcohol, suicide, and other issues that plague our Reservation.

One young man talked about law enforcement, sharing his observation that officers do not always treat everyone equally.

He said he would like to see law enforcement officers treat people with more understanding.

This young man attributed this behavior, in part, to the officers being under a lot of stress, he suggested that governments create programs to support the mental health of law enforcement so they do not turn to drugs and alcohol.

Three Affiliated Tribes Chairman Mark Fox introduced basketball standout Bronson Koenig.

Chairman Fox said, "Basketball was very important to me (growing up)."

The Chairman talked about his brother, who was part of the first Native team to win the state championship in North Dakota.

"We lived sports," he said, "but the reality for us to be a superstar was unattainable. We are taught that we cannot get to a certain level that is beyond us. We have examples like Jim Thorpe and Billy mills and yet as young people it's hard to dream. You are trying to survive."

Fox also sees light at the end of the tunnel.

"Our young people are excelling, it's like a revival of athleticism in Indian country. We have an opportunity to believe in ourselves, in our children."

"Throughout our history there have been hundreds if not thousands like Jim Thorpe and Billy Mills ... and now is a time we can see ourselves playing in the NBA."

Chairman Fox shared an example of Bronson Koenig speaking after an NCAA game where he scored 20 points and his team won.

Koenig had said, "I like to have the ball in my hands in those situations because I believe in myself."

It is the hope of Chairman Fox that young people believe in themselves.

Bronson Koenig, and enrolled Ho-Chunk Tribal member who has been signed to the NBA team the Milwaukee Bucks, provided insights into his own struggles and accomplishments and also answered questions from the audience.

Koenig spoke about the importance of believing in yourself, and not allowing anyone's negativity to stop you. And he uses other negativity to push him forward, in fact.

When asked how being Native plays a role in being an elite basketball player, Koenig responded that "(being Native) plays a huge role, not only in basketball but in life in general."

"My mom taught to me shake hands and show respect and pushed me speak in public."

"(I'm) doing what I was put on the earth to do, not just basketball."

Before each game, he says a prayer to the ancestors and to loved ones that have passed; he says that helps him stay calm and focused.

He explained that being in the NBA is huge and he is proud of this accomplishment, but speaking to youth and giving them encouragement is much more important to him.

Koenig left the crowd with an important message about education.

"That's what my tribe and my people are most proud of. I'm happy to be in the NBA but my degree is more important. No one can take that that away."

Culture & Language

SWST Enemy Swim District Councilwoman Lois Owens served as moderator on this panel. Other panelists were: Ed Hall III, JT Shining One Side, and Cecelia Fire Thunder.

It was encouraging to see that this was the largest breakout session so far. There were at least 130 people gathered in the room set aside for Culture & Language discussion.

It suggests that all tribes understand the importance of preserving our language and traditional ways.

JT Shining One Side spoke of the ceremonies that we carry and how important it is to participate and keep these ceremonies going.

Some of these ceremonies she mentioned, are the big drum ceremony, thirsty dance, and the Buffalo dance.

Cecelia Fire Thunder said that Ojibwe language, culture, and history are taught in middle school, high school, and college. Fire Thunder expressed the importance of learning what you can and sharing it every day.

"I was fortunate" she said, "to be born in a time when our ways were still intact. I was born in a tent. I didn't learn English till I was five, I was completely immersed in Lakota."

"My helpers are the unci's that went before me."

"Your language connects you to the past, it connects you to now, and it connects you to the future."

"You and I have a responsibility to feed the hunger of our kids. To know who they are."

"I encourage each of us to this day forward to do everything you can for our language."

She spoke of a recent survey of Head Start parents at Pine Ridge: "Ninety-six percent said they want their children to learn the language."

Housing panel

SWST Chairman Dave Flute served as moderator.

Other panelists included: Anthony Walters, Linda Lee Retka (both representing the National American Indian Housing Council).

Chairman Flute spoke in Dakota for his introduction, welcoming everyone.

"Wherever our people choose to construct their lodge they would make sure it was in a place that was going to be healthy," he said.

Chairman Flute went on to explain that when a place was chosen to camp the people would make sure there were no rocks, that is was not in the line of the buffalo, and would camp in different areas in the winter and in the summer.

"They didn't have the materials we have today," he continued.

"We are all focused on the same goal."

There's a difference, he said, in the quality of material we have to build.

"We don't have the best of material."

"We don't use the best materials to build our homes. We are cutting our tribal members short.

"A long time ago they wanted the best hides, poles and stakes."

"We've lost that."

And "If there's a poor quality of life in the home there is a psychological effect."

"Children learn that it's okay to have broken windows, no screen door."

"Most importantly, one major issue is meth in the homes."

"In the housing units … it costs hundreds of thousands to repair."

"It gets into the walls, the studs."

"Kids have respiratory problems."

Our Chairman was adamant about finding ways to take better care of our homes and finding support from the federal government to clean homes of meth, and prevent this from happening in the first place.

The panelists, Tony Walters, OK Cherokee Nation, and Linda Lee Retka, represented the National Indian Housing Council.

The Council is an advocacy and technical assistance group.

Much of their time is spent reaching out to Congressional delegations to support housing needs of Native populations.

"With this administration it's a lot of work," Tony reflected, "with congress it's not as much work."

Reauthorization of NHSDA (1996), Build Act s1275 in the Senate right now.

Sometime this month it will most likely go to floor, there is still time to make changes, and Walters suggests tribes take advantage of that time.

Retka spent her allotted time presenting information on HUD-VASH program that provides chosen tribes housing and support to Native veterans experiencing homelessness or at risk for homelessness.

While SWST does not receive this grant, there is the possibility in the future.

Post-Secondary Education/Secondary Education

Turtle Mountain Chairman Wayne Keplin served as moderator, with panelists Lucy Fredericks, Jim Davis, Cheryl Crazy Bull.

Cheryl Crazy Bull started with statistics.

She mentioned that13.8% of Natives have a college degree. That's less than half of the national average.

Large educational research organizations and work force organizations have published statistics that indicate 60% of jobs by 2020 will require post-secondary education.

At the American Indian College Fund, established in 1989, twenty thousand scholarships totaling over 100 million dollars have been given out.

College increases likelihood of someone's first job paying 20,000-50,000 more than if they did not have a degree.

Educated people also have increased health, home ownership, improved citizen participation, and will make a million dollars more over their lifetime.

When you have an educated population you have workers and entrepreneurship and non-profits.

We do have three or four generations now of families graduating from college.

We need to value tribal colleges; they did not exist 30-40 years ago, and chartering a college is an act of sovereignty. (Sisseton-Wahpeton Community College was chartered in 1978.)

Cheryl has recommendations for tribes: provide scholarships for students, but also advocate for the institutions to provide scholarships.

Partner with colleges in language restoration; they have access to linguists, and other resources.

The University of Washington anual report was shared during, outlining ways that they have included natives.

Looking at higher education at the federal level, 80-90 percent of Native students access Pell grants. (See below.)

Student loans can become a tremendous burden for students that are going into predominantly white colleges.

Tribes are told, we need to be paying attention to what is happening on the federal level, as policy decisions are not necessarily being made by persons clear on Native students and their needs.

We are being told to pay attention.

Civil rights are at stake.

Losing Affirmative Action would mean much fewer opportunities.

Charter schools are an opportunity for affirming sovereignty.

Federal Impact Act: we should be paying attention!

We need to continue supporting students and families to complete degree programs.

Dr. James Davis Turtle Mountain Chippewa, Tribal College Dean, said that tribal colleges creating a world of opportunities for Indian students, however, "the challenges we have had over the years that have been tremendous but also rewarding."

"Young people, middle aged people, and older people have graduated from tribal colleges and even gone on to get higher degrees."

"Tribal colleges serve an underserved population. Probably 60% of tribal students may not have attended college at all if it weren't for tribal colleges."

Approximately 90% of tribal college students are assisted with Federal Pell Grants. This is a Federal grant program that lower income students may use for up to 12 semesters or two years in a lifetime.

As of right now, many students come to college unprepared academically; tribes have the opportunity to plan their own plan for k-12 education.

"How do we change the school systems to give students hope?"

Dr. Davis continued, "For every problem there is a solution."

Currently there are 37 tribal colleges in 17 states, five of which are in North Dakota.

Tribal colleges are slimly funded by the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE).

Tribal colleges receive $7,500 per student, state colleges receive about $14,000 per student.

Tribal colleges in North Dakota pursued state funding in 2007 from North Dakota for non-Indian students, the result was $700,000 divided between the 5 tribal colleges in the state.

It is important to understand our place in the states.

In 2016 Natives paid approximately $142 million in state taxes, and tribal colleges paid approximately $109 million in state taxes. These numbers are important, if we are to request funding from the states in which tribal colleges reside.

Federal and Tribal Relations Update

Presenter was Lawrence S. Roberts, Native American Affairs Team, Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton, LLP

Roberts began by introducing and then playing videos in which President Donald Trump expressed opinions about DAPL and KXL pipelines, as well as energy (coal, etc.) on Native lands.

"I haven't had one call that it's been a bad thing. 32,000 jobs on KXL almost right away," Trump boasted.

"Pleased to announce that the Dakota Access Pipeline is fully operational … I took no heat, everybody's happy …the sun is still shining."

One of the first national movements that was driven by tribes, specifically, Navajo, Pueblo, and Zuni Tribes, was the Dec 28, 2016 1.35 million acres designated at Bears Ears with tribal management.

This legislation included access to and protection of sacred sites, as well as protecting the rights of indigenous peoples to still pick medicines, etc.

When coming into office, Trump signed an executive order ending "egregious act" and put states back in charge, including Bears Ears in Utah.

Trump was, "Concerned about the massive Federal land grab. I am Directing Secretary Zinke to return control to the people Utah and the people of the United States. Now tremendously positive things will happen on that land."

Secretary Zinke did meet with tribes and said, "we will see how the president reacts to that information."

The next clip showed tribal leaders at the table with Trump.

"It's important for Tribal leaders to be at the table," explained Roberts, he went on to say that tribes need to remain part of the conversation and ensure this administration hears tribal input.

Trump addressed tribal leaders, "Your lands have untapped resources that can help you build schools, fix roads …Vast amounts of coal and other resources have been out of reach, but not under the Trump administration. States are also not able to utilize resources on their lands."

Under this administration, Roberts continued, "the Indian affairs political team is still taking shape. The political team that is there that does not need Congressional approval, we need to engage with them. We've got to think about the priorities of this administration and how do the tribes' priorities sync up. Whatever this administration is putting forward budget wise tribes need to be a part of."

As of now, the proposed budget calls for half a billion dollar loss for tribes."

Roberts suggested Tribes should form policies now and bring them to the administration and leverage state and local relationships.

Taxation

Presented by Mark Van Norman, Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, Atcitty & Van Norman Law.

"In order to have sovereign nations we have to have taxation," Van Norman began.

"We should have self-governance to be able to build schools, fix roads …when we have funds we invest in culture and language."

Van Norman and colleagues are working with legislatures to advocate for tribes to receive the same funding that states receive through new market tax credits and low income tax credits.

The tribes can be allocated the tax credits and work with developers.

Right now the developer owns the project.

Other tax issues needing attention, and/or are up for renewal, include Indian employment credit, depreciation credit, and coal credit.

Trump visits Mandan oil refinery

By Sierra Wolcott

Sota Assistant Editor

President Donald Trump made a quick trip to Bismarck, North Dakota on Wednesday afternoon, September 6th.

Trump spoke about tax reform at the Tesoro Oil Refinery.

While I did receive a press pass to cover the speech, I decided to stay outside the rally, with the other Natives.

In total maybe 300 people lined the street in hopes of catching Trump's eye; about half and half supporters and those protesting.

Unfortunately, Trump's motorcade took an alternate (back) route.

When this became apparent, supporters and those protesting walked up the road to the refinery, which had previously been blocked by police.

There, for the most part, supporters were on one side of the street, and demonstrators on the other.

Law enforcement kept everyone off the road and in the ditch, while they did have to be reminded of that a few times (possibly by me). Trump supporters, however, were freely walking on the road.

When a demonstrator would step onto the road they were quickly and briskly reminded of where they ought to be; one man was reminded by being pushed back into the ditch when he was simply walking around people to get to his friends.

A woman who was there to demonstrate (protest) went over to the Trump side at one point and stood in front of the Trump supporters. They tried to cover her sign with theirs and pushed against her. When she asked law enforcement for assistance, the officer told her to go back across the road.

Some agitators on the Trump side initiated yelling matches with opposition, handing out insults as well as the usual "Get a job."

One demonstrator hollered back with "Jesus was black."

After an hour or so, Trump supporters began to leave.

Everyone else slowly followed.

Overall, the demonstration was tame, and law enforcement officers treated everyone with respect.

Grow SD to kick off Sisseton Master Plan community meeting

GROW South Dakota invites the public a community meeting to be held at the Sisseton City Hall community room, from 5:15-7 pm this Thursday, September 21, 2017.

A light dinner will be served.

The meeting will review data as well as provide a platform for discussion and implementation of topics for a master plan for the Sisseton community. This plan will provide a guide for communication, revitalization as well as community and economic development. The meeting will be facilitated by Sumption & Wyland consultants.

Lori Moen, GROW SD Chief Operating Officer, said that "The master plan will be a guide as they develop a community wide vision. This tool will combine the visions and existing goals into one platform."

The process will involve large and small group meetings that will identify the challenges and solutions for the priorities of Sisseton. These objectives will be incorporated into the plan.

A Core Group will guide the process and keep the focus groups on task.

The final product will be a written Master Plan that will provide a direction and communication strategy for the community at large. This tool will provide current and future leaders a community-based guide for policies, activities, and planning.

Moen anticipates another outcome besides the completion of a Master Plan.

"I anticipate throughout this process a communication strategy will evolve where access to reliable information about the community regarding event planning, economic development, housing, downtown revitalization efforts, arts and culture, recreation, civic updates or education will be streamlined."

For more information about GROW South Dakota's housing and business development programs and services, please visit our website at www.growsd.org or call (605) 698-7654.

Health, business consultant hours

Carla Burns, Certified Marketplace Navigator with the Affordable Care Act and Business Consultant with the Aberdeen Small Business Development Center, will be in Webster on Tuesday, September 19, 2017 beginning at 9:00AM.

She will be working at the GROW South Dakota new Webster Regional office, 14 West 7th Avenue (immediately behind Cornwell Drug) in Webster from 9:00 AM until noon. Please note this permanent change of address.

At 1:00 pm Carla will be in Sisseton working in office space provided by GROW South Dakota also known as NESDCAP, located at 104 Ash St. E. in Sisseton.

Interested persons are encouraged to call Carla at (605) 626-2565 to make an appointment for Tuesday, September 19, 2017 for either the health insurance or the business assistance.

Carla can meet with individuals, employers and employees to discuss and apply for health insurance through the Affordable Care Act Marketplace.

Also, Carla is available to work with individuals interested in starting a new business or improving the operations of their existing business. Her management consulting services cover start-up issues, business planning, marketing and financial projections to mention a few areas. This is a free and confidential service.

It is best for clients to call ahead and make an appointment. Carla can be reached at (605) 626-2565 in Aberdeen.

If clients are unable to meet with Carla on this day, they are still encouraged to call her to arrange another time. SBDC is hosted by GROW South Dakota and SBDC and GROW South Dakota are Equal Opportunity Organizations.

As a Certified Navigator, Carla offers confidential services free of charge to individual consumers, and families in South Dakota. Navigators provide fair, impartial, and accurate information about the full range of healthcare coverage options that are available through the Exchange which will help consumers to make informed decisions during the health plan selection process.

Federal funding to help support Native small business owners

Washington, DC – Sept. 14, 2017 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp, a member of the U.S. Senate Small Business and Entrepreneurship Committee, today announced $255,000 in federal funding for United Tribes Technical College to provide entrepreneur support to minority business enterprises.

"We need to make sure that we help support new start-ups across North Dakota, including in Indian Country, so that we grow our economy, support jobs, and make sure North Dakota remains a great place to start businesses," said Heitkamp. "As we look for ways to help promote economic development in Indian Country, this federal funding will support efforts at United Tribes Technical College to enable minority business owners to obtain the skills needed to get their start-up off the ground and growing."

These federal funds are made available through the U.S. Department of Commerce Minority Business Development Agency Business Center Program to provide support to help minority businesses access financing opportunities, develop management and negotiating skills, and find global market opportunities, among other assistance that will help small minority businesses grow.

In 2015, Heitkamp brought then U.S. Small Business (SBA) Administrator Maria Contreras-Sweet to the Standing Rock Sioux Indian Reservation where they held a roundtable discussion with tribal and business leaders about supporting and expanding Native small businesses. During this meeting, the SBA announced it would make federal investments in Indian Country as well as provide training and technical assistance to bolster economic development on reservations. Native American reservations face high rates of unemployment and poverty so to help combat these challenges it is important that federal investments are made so that those living in Indian Country have access to jobs and economic mobility.

Reintroduce Taxpayer Bill of Rights Enhancement Act

Washington, DC – Sept. 12, 2017 – U.S. Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.), a member of the tax-writing Senate Finance Committee, today joined Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) in reintroducing the Taxpayer Bill of Rights Enhancement (TBORE) Act of 2017 (S. 1793), comprehensive legislation to improve customer service at the IRS, create new taxpayer protections, and update and strengthen existing taxpayer protections. This legislation updates the senators' prior version of the bill. Parts of the prior measure were enacted into law, but further action is needed to improve the interaction between taxpayers and the IRS.

"Taxpayers have wrongfully suffered under the IRS for too long, and it's time to restore some integrity back into this agency," said Thune. "Our bill addresses these problems by strengthening taxpayer protections, which would allow Americans to rest easy, knowing they will get fair treatment when dealing with the IRS."

"The IRS has never been anyone's favorite agency," said Grassley. "It has a long way to come back from scandals and declining customer service. Taxpayers shouldn't be at a disadvantage with an agency that has tremendous power over their money. The IRS has to answer taxpayers' questions, protect their privacy, and help people meet their tax obligations with fairness and respect."

TBORE is necessary to ensure that appropriate safeguards are in place to protect taxpayer rights by preventing IRS abuses. Among other provisions, the legislation:

· Significantly increases civil damages for the unauthorized disclosure or inspection of tax return information and significantly increases civil damages for improper IRS collection activities.

· Puts the bite back into a provision, called a "toothless tiger" by a Tax Notes article, that permits taxpayers to bring a cause of action against the IRS for unauthorized collections actions.

· Increases the time period in which taxpayers may seek to have proceeds from the sale of wrongfully levied property returned to them.

· Provides relief to taxpayers who voluntarily work toward paying off their tax debts through the use of automated installment payments.

· Protects a taxpayer's retirement nest egg where the IRS improperly levied on a taxpayer's IRA or employer-sponsored retirement plan. · Eliminates red tape that may act as a barrier to taxpayers facing financial hardship to settle their tax debt through an offer-in-compromise. · Provides penalty relief to taxpayers by raising the threshold at which a penalty is imposed for the underpayment of estimated taxes, expanding its application and simplifying related calculations. · Provides former spouses greater access to information about collection activities related to joint returns filed during their marriage. · Ensures that low-income and elderly taxpayers continue to have access to free services to file their annual tax return. · Ensures all taxpayers have convenient access to appeals by requiring the IRS to locate at least one appeals officer and settlement officer in each state. Iowa and South Dakota are among the states lacking in this area. · Requires tax-exempt organizations to file Form 990 electronically and mandates that the IRS make such information available in a timely manner.

Provisions from the prior version of the Grassley-Thune Taxpayer Bill of Rights Enhancement Act that were enacted in December 2015 include:

· Codifying the Taxpayer Bill of Rights, which includes the right to: be informed; quality service; pay no more than the correct amount of tax; challenge the position of the IRS and be heard; appeal a decision of the IRS in an independent forum; finality; privacy; confidentiality; retain representation; and a fair and just tax system. The provision also requires the IRS commissioner to ensure that IRS employees are familiar with and act in accordance with these rights.

· Prohibiting IRS employees from using personal email accounts for official business. This codified an already established agency policy barring use of personal email accounts by IRS employees for official governmental business.

· Declaratory judgments for section 501(c)(4) and other exempt organizations. The provision permits these exempt organizations to seek review in federal court in instances where the IRS fails to act on an application in a timely manner or makes a negative determination as to their tax-exempt status. · Termination of employment of IRS employees for taking official actions for political purposes.

Senate approves Thune Bills to combat Human Trafficking

"The Senate's passage of these bipartisan bills is an important step in the ongoing battle against human trafficking."

Washington, DC – Sept. 15, 2017 – U.S. Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.), chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, today applauded the Senate's passage of his bipartisan legislation to combat human trafficking, the No Human Trafficking on Our Roads Act (S. 1532), and the Combatting Human Trafficking in Commercial Vehicles Act (S. 1536), of which he's a cosponsor. Both bills, which passed the Commerce Committee on August 2, 2017, were approved by unanimous consent in the full Senate last night.

"The Senate's passage of these bipartisan bills is an important step in the ongoing battle against human trafficking," said Thune. "These bills create a common-sense consequence for egregious wrongdoing and serve as a starting point for better recognition and reporting of human trafficking by commercial drivers."

S. 1532 and S. 1536 would (respectively):

· Disqualify individuals from operating a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) for their lifetime if they used a CMV to commit a felony involving human trafficking.

· Designate a human trafficking prevention coordinator at the U.S. Department of Transportation and would increase outreach, education, and reporting efforts at the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.

Bill to strengthen Transparency, Science at EPA

HONEST Act would help make certain EPA regs are based on best available Science

Washington, DC – Sept. 12, 2017 – U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.), chairman of the Senate Environment and Public Works (EPW) Subcommittee on Superfund, Waste Management and Regulatory Oversight, today introduced the Honest and Open New EPA Science Treatment Act of 2017 (HONEST Act) to make certain that Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations are based on the best available science.

The HONEST Act would preserve the integrity of the scientific review process by prohibiting the agency from proposing, finalizing or disseminating regulations or assessments based upon science that is not transparent or not reproducible.

"The EPA has a long history of using questionable and secretive science to justify its actions, often leading to burdensome new regulations that hurt businesses and destroy jobs," said Rounds. "When a regulation is implemented, the agency should be able to justify it publicly so we all have a chance to understand its impact. Sound, reliable science is vital to helping us make important policy decisions that impact the health of American families and their livelihoods. The HONEST Act would hold the EPA accountable for its decisions and bring an additional layer of transparency and accountability to the regulatory process."

Additional cosponsors of the HONEST Act include Senate EPW Chairman John Barrasso (R-Wyo.) and Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.). Similar legislation was introduced in the House of Representatives by Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Tex.), Chairman of the House Science, Space and Technology Committee, earlier this year.

"Because American taxpayers foot the bill for EPA regulations, they have a right to see the data that justifies EPA decisions," said Chairman Smith. "The HONEST Act requires EPA to base new regulations on sound, publicly available science, which will allow EPA's data to be independently reviewed. With the introduction of the HONEST Act in the Senate, we are one step closer to restoring confidence in EPA's rulemaking process. I appreciate Sen. Rounds' partnership on this legislation, and I look forward to its swift implementation."

The HONEST Act requires that: · The EPA administrator shall not propose, finalize or disseminate a covered action unless all scientific and technical information relied on to support the action is 1) specifically identified, and 2) made publicly available.

*There are protections in the legislation for trade secrets, financial or confidential information.

(Editor's note: Does the EPA, which is being gutted by the Trump administration, really have a history of using "… questionable and secretive science … [creating] burdensome new regulations that hurt businesses?")

Allocation to customers

Highmore, S.D. – Venture Communications Cooperative is proud to announce that $3,000,000 will be paid back to the cooperative members from outstanding capital credit patronage balances. A portion of the total amount returned to members comes from the 2016 allocation with the remainder coming from the 2004 allocation. Members who were customers of Venture Communications during those years will be mailed their patronage checks in late September. Patronage checks for amounts less than $20.00 will not be written and the amounts will be applied as a credit to the members Venture bill.

Customers who had service with Venture Communications Cooperative in 2016 recently received an allocation statement. The amount shown on the allocation statement will not be equal to the amount of the check received. The allocation statement shows accumulated earned patronage through the year 2016. The retirement check customers will receive is a portion of the statement amount.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

Important Message from Keeper of Sacred White Buffalo Calf Pipe

To understand the depth of this message you must recognize the importance of Sacred Sites and realize the interconnectedness of what is happening today

Chief Arvol Looking Horse

August 26, 2016

I, Chief Arvol Looking Horse, of the Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota Nations, ask you to understand an Indigenous perspective on what has happened in America, what we call "Turtle Island." My words seek to unite the global community through a message from our sacred ceremonies to unite spiritually, each in our own ways of beliefs in the Creator.

We have been warned from ancient prophecies of these times we live in today, but have also been given a very important message about a solution to turn these terrible times.

To understand the depth of this message you must recognize the importance of Sacred Sites and realize the interconnectedness of what is happening today, in reflection of the continued massacres that are occurring on other lands and our own Americas.

I have been learning about these important issues since the age of 12 when I received the Sacred White Buffalo Calf Pipe Bundle and its teachings. Our people have strived to protect Sacred Sites from the beginning of time. These places have been violated for centuries and have brought us to the predicament that we are in at the global level.

Look around you. Our Mother Earth is very ill from these violations, and we are on the brink of destroying the possibility of a healthy and nurturing survival for generations to come, our children's children.

Our ancestors have been trying to protect our Sacred Site called the Sacred Black Hills in South Dakota, "Heart of Everything That Is," from continued violations. Our ancestors never saw a satellite view of this site, but now that those pictures are available, we see that it is in the shape of a heart and, when fast-forwarded, it looks like a heart pumping.

The Diné have been protecting Big Mountain, calling it the liver of the earth, and we are suffering and going to suffer more from the extraction of the coal there and the poisoning processes used in doing so.

The Aborigines have warned of the contaminating effects of global warming on the Coral Reefs, which they see as Mother Earth's blood purifier.

The indigenous people of the rainforest say that the rainforests are the lungs of the planet and need protection.

The Gwich'in Nation in Alaska has had to face oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge coastal plain, also known to the Gwich'in as "Where life begins."

The coastal plain is the birthplace of many life forms of the animal nations. The death of these animal nations will destroy indigenous nations in this territory.

As these destructive developments continue all over the world, we will witness many more extinct animal, plant, and human nations, because of mankind's misuse of power and their lack of understanding of the "balance of life."

The Indigenous people warn that these destructive developments will cause havoc globally. There are many, many more indigenous teachings and knowledge about Mother Earth's Sacred Sites, her chakras, and connections to our spirit that will surely affect our future generations.

There needs to be a fast move toward other forms of energy that are safe for all nations upon Mother Earth. We need to understand the types of minds that are continuing to destroy the spirit of our whole global community. Unless we do this, the powers of destruction will overwhelm us.

Our Ancestors foretold that water would someday be for sale. Back then this was hard to believe, since the water was so plentiful, so pure, and so full of energy, nutrition and spirit. Today we have to buy pure water, and even then the nutritional minerals have been taken out; it's just empty liquid. Someday water will be like gold, too expensive to afford.

Not everyone will have the right to drink safe water. We fail to appreciate and honor our Sacred Sites, ripping out the minerals and gifts that lay underneath them as if Mother Earth were simply a resource, instead of the source of life itself.

Attacking nations and using more resources to carry out destruction in the name of peace is not the answer! We need to understand how all these decisions affect the global nation; we will not be immune to its repercussions. Allowing continual contamination of our food and land is affecting the way we think.

A "disease of the mind" has set in world leaders and many members of our global community, with their belief that a solution of retaliation and destruction of peoples will bring peace.

In our prophecies it is told that we are now at the crossroads: Either unite spiritually as a global nation, or be faced with chaos, disasters, diseases, and tears from our relatives' eyes.

We are the only species that is destroying the source of life, meaning Mother Earth, in the name of power, mineral resources, and ownership of land. Using chemicals and methods of warfare that are doing irreversible damage, as Mother Earth is becoming tired and cannot sustain any more impacts of war.

I ask you to join me on this endeavor. Our vision is for the peoples of all continents, regardless of their beliefs in the Creator, to come together as one at their Sacred Sites to pray and meditate and commune with one another, thus promoting an energy shift to heal our Mother Earth and achieve a universal consciousness toward attaining Peace.

As each day passes, I ask all nations to begin a global effort, and remember to give thanks for the sacred food that has been gifted to us by our Mother Earth, so the nutritional energy of medicine can be guided to heal our minds and spirits.

This new millennium will usher in an age of harmony or it will bring the end of life as we know it. Starvation, war, and toxic waste have been the hallmark of the great myth of progress and development that ruled the last millennium.

To us, as caretakers of the heart of Mother Earth, falls the responsibility of turning back the powers of destruction. You yourself are the one who must decide.

You alone – and only you – can make this crucial choice, to walk in honor or to dishonor your relatives. On your decision depends the fate of the entire World.

Each of us is put here in this time and this place to personally decide the future of humankind.

Did you think the Creator would create unnecessary people in a time of such terrible danger?

Know that you yourself are essential to this world. Understand both the blessing and the burden of that. You yourself are desperately needed to save the soul of this world. Did you think you were put here for something less? In a Sacred Hoop of Life, there is no beginning and no ending.

*****

Chief Arvol Looking Horse is the author of White Buffalo Teachings. A tireless advocate of maintaining traditional spiritual practices, Chief Looking Horse is a member of Big Foot Riders, which memorializes the massacre of Big Foot's band at Wounded Knee.

(This message was shared again on Sept. 7, 2017 on Indian Country Today Media.)

Sota guest editorial –

Native American prayer

A prayer for our Sacred

Star Mother Earth &

All her inhabitants

Oh Loving Creator who has

Given to us the moon the

Stars & the sun

We come to you as your

Children with bowed heads

& hearts filled with uncertainty

Quiet this trembling heart,

And replace the fear with

Faith & belief

Help us to understand what

Is happening in our world is

Not new but has gone on

Throughout the eons of time

Fires purging and floods

Cleansing like the sacred

Smudge bringing the 4

Elements together

The earth the wind water &

Fire

May this prayer rise up high

High into the higher octaves

Forgive us for failing to trust

& believe that all will unfold

As it should

May our voices send out one

Prayer, one vibration

Knowing that this cloud shall

Pass and the Light will once

Again pierce the darkness

Bringing hope to the faint

Hearted , strength to the

Weary, and a new found faith

Only learned through the

Lessons in the class room of

Life

We shall rise as Eagles soaring

Into new dimensions

And humbled by the power of

Nature

We shall Survive !!!

Forgive us for doubting &

Lift us up high high into the

Higher octaves of enlightenment there to join

Our Ancestors

Megwetch Megwetch megwetch

White Eagle

Brief editorial comments from the editor's desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

There's been a lot of excitement with the buildup and then last week's opening of the Tribe's new grocery store. Justifiably so; this is something that has been talked about and dreamed about for decades.

Dakota Crossing grocery store represents a big deal!

This is a major investment in the future of the Oyate, in the future of today's and tomorrow's children.

We encourage everyone to help support this business.

If you are a Tribal member, do business here!

If you are a non-Tribal member, do business here!

Dakota Crossing's success is going to be good for everyone in the community.

Watch coming issues of the Sota, as there will be a Dakota Crossing advertisement in each week, letting you know about in-store specials every week. Read, and save money on your grocery bill.

This week's Sota lists six specials that ought to bring customers!

And remember, there will also be unadvertised in-house specials throughout the store as well!

*****

Please read this week's report to akicita from Tribal VSO Geri Opsal.

Geri reports on how the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe honored its POW/MIAs last Friday, September 15th, in the rain.

The ceremonial reading of the names.

The 21-gun salute by the Kit Fox Society.

Playing of Taps.

And see the remarkable photos by John Heminger, taken at the observance.

Thank you to those who support our veterans and their families.

Their sacrifices are to be shared and remembered.

Something else we must do, as citizens, is to be alert so future sacrifices are not asked for except for the noblest of causes.

Also see the list of our Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe Gold Star Mothers and help us honor them all. September 24 is set aside as Gold Star Mothers Day.

*****

Our thanks to Sota Assistant Editor Sierra Wolcott for her contributions to this week's edition.

Please read Sierra's articles on the regional tribal leaders summit and protest at President Trumps visit to supporters at an oil refinery in North Dakota.

We expect to publish her work regularly, providing coverage for some of the many activities impacting lives of our Oyate that don't get adequately reported.

*****

This is Homecoming 2017 Week for the Tiospa Zina Wambdipi!

Check out the schedule of activities on the Education page, and come out to cheer the Wambdi.

The Homecoming parade gets underway at 1:00 p.m. Friday, September 22nd. The theme is "Movies." Come and participate in the parade and football action in the evening.

Kickoff is 7 p.m., with the Wambdi team hosting the Hitchcock Tulare Patriots.

*****

We encourage everyone to support our Wac'ang'a (Sweetgrass) Walk in Remembrance of Missing and Murdered on Monday, September 25th.

See the notice elsewhere in this edition of the Sota.

*****

Watch next week's Sota for an article and photos on the recent Harvest Fest.

This annual autumn celebration is getting bigger and better, thanks to the SWST Natural Resources and Fish & Wildlife programs!

*****

We do not have a followup report, but by all accounts the South Dakota Symphony concerts held locally were a tremendous success!

Thank you to the Sisseton Arts Council and the SD Symphony Orchestra for providing an extraordinary opportunity for these local, very talented, musicians:

*Students who composed pieces for the Dakota String Quartet: Alannah Lawrence, Derrick Lawrence, Dr. Shira Tamboullian, Samuel Williams, and Chris Wolcott.

*Those composing pieces for Dakota Wind Quintet: Ricky Albright, Bryan Akipa, and Garrett Lawrence.

What a gift is the music. Thank you for supporting the arts.

*****

We encourage all members to be actively involved in Tribal and District business.

And we had been keeping readers informed that Tribal radio station KXSW-FM has been live-streaming Council meetings over the radio station and over the internet.

Tom Wilson informed us last week that he has suspended the live feed because of technical difficulties with the internet server at Tribal headquarters.

Watch for updates, over KXSW and in the Sota, to see when the problems are fixed and live feeds can continue.

Before, Council meetings were broadcast on KXSW 89.9 FM, on the station's Facebook page, and website KXSWRez.net.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

Treat the earth well: it was not given to you by your parents, it was loaned to you by your children. We do not inherit the Earth from our Ancestors, we borrow it from our Children.

- Tribe Unknown

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

There is a coherent plan in the universe, though I don't know what it's a plan for. Fred Hoyle (1915 - 2001)

The grass is always greener once you don't have to mow a lawn anymore. Randy K. Milholland, Something Positive, Young Hope, 04-26-13

Is there life before death? Graffito, in Belfast

A rumor without a leg to stand on will get around some other way. John Tudor

Never try to tell everything you know. It may take too short a time. Norman Ford

There is no nonsense so gross that society will not, at some time, make a doctrine of it and defend it with every weapon of communal stupidity. Robertson Davies

We need not to be let alone. We need to be really bothered once in a while. How long is it since you were really bothered? About something important, about something real? Ray Bradbury (1920 - ), Fahrenheit 451, 1953

One is tempted to define man as a rational animal who always loses his temper when he is called upon to act in accordance with the dictates of reason. Oscar Wilde (1854 - 1900), The Critic as Artist, part 2, 1891

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Note –

There are no obituaries reported in this week's Sota.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Open letter to the Oyate

Banishment? People steal and rip off the tribe, for thousands, most of them are found guilty, and then only a few go to prison. Most get paroled. Then the tribe that they rip off, hires them back, gives these crooks jobs.

When a worker at the casino picks up a ticket off the floor, the tribe bans them from working at the casino.

If you the chairman the tribal council do this. Let's ban these convicted thieves from the tribe.

Also when a casino worker makes a comment about a woman … the tribe bans them from working at a casino.

All members let's vote these elected members out of office.

Remember they will help friends and relatives and their wallet. Will they help you. I doubt it?

my opinion, Indian, Larry Nerison.

Real, genuine accountability

By Rep. Kristi Noem

September 15, 2017

Trust in government is at an all-time low – and who could blame folks? Fraud, mismanagement, and abuse are rampant within government agencies. Taxpayer dollars are too often misspent by bureaucrats. And many people aren't given basic courtesies when they interact with some federal employees. We need accountability in government – and I mean real, genuine accountability.

A few weeks ago, after speaking to the Watertown Rotary, a local radio commentator summarized my remarks like this: "If you don't like the IRS, it probably doesn't compare to Rep. Kristi Noem's disgust with the agency." It's true – and the agency's lack of accountability has a lot to do with that disgust. This should be a "service first" agency, but customer service at the IRS is appalling. During 2015, only 38 percent of callers could reach an IRS representative. Meanwhile, they targeted conservative groups and wasted millions of dollars on conferences and "Star Trek" parody videos.

Through the House, we've passed legislation to prevent the IRS from targeting taxpayers for political gain. We've passed a Taxpayer Bill of Rights. And we've passed legislation I wrote to stop the IRS from rehiring employees who have already been fired for misconduct. Unfortunately, Senate Democrats and President Obama blocked much of this agenda from moving forward.

Thankfully, we turned a new leaf with President Trump's election. Alongside the previously mentioned reforms, one of the best ways to hold the IRS accountable is by drastically reducing its role. By simplifying the tax code, we're hopeful most Americans' tax returns could fit on a postcard once tax reform goes through. That leaves little room for the IRS to take advantage of hardworking South Dakotans.

But I have a problem with federal agencies beyond the IRS too. Today, a wanted felon can evade prosecution for months – even years – and yet somehow still receive a check from the Social Security Administration every 30 days or so. Let's be clear: taxpayers shouldn't be asked to make payments to people who are running from the law. Period.

I've introduced legislation to stop these payments, which is making quick progress in the House. This is not simply a fairness issue either. Staci Ackerman, the Executive Director for the South Dakota Sheriffs' Association points out: "This bill will also limit [wanted felons and parole violators'] ability to avoid justice using taxpayer dollars to evade capture." On top of it all, the legislation is estimated to save more than $2 billion.

I've also introduced legislation to bring greater integrity to the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, which is the country's primary assistance program for low-income individuals and families. Today's program often perpetuates poverty, rather than opportunity. With my legislation, we realign TANF with its core mission: offering upward mobility and the opportunity for greater financial independence to hardworking Americans.

Additionally, I'm fighting to make sure the Indian Health Service (IHS) is held responsible for the care it delivers. Whether it's a drug testing program for employees or strengthening fiscal accountability measures, greater accountability will better keep the IHS focused on serving tribal communities.

I've also voted to expand whistleblower protections within the VA and streamline the process required to fire any VA employee, reforms President Trump signed into law. All of this only scratches the surface of what's being done, which highlights just how broken the federal government is.

As we continue to work toward fixing agencies across the board, I encourage you to reach out to my office if you need assistance with the IRS, VA, Social Security, or any other federal bureaucracy. We can help you navigate the process and, when necessary, hold them directly accountable on your behalf.

Free Car Seat Safety event at Dakota Crossing this Saturday

Certified techs in Sisseton, SD will check car seats and teach car seat safety on National Seat Check Saturday

SWO Community Health Education Program has announced that certified Child Passenger Safety Technicians will be offering free car seat inspections and education to parents and caregivers on Saturday, September 23, 2017 beginning at 10:00 a.m. at Dakota Crossings grocery store parking lot and continuing until 2:00 p.m. The Tribe's newly opened grocery store is located on SD Highway 10 east of Sisseton.

All parents and caregivers are invited to attend this free event.

The event is part of National Seat Check Saturday, and will include instruction on how to choose the right car seats for children, with an emphasis on how to install and use them correctly. Technicians will also explain the importance of registering the seats with the manufacturer so parents and caregivers can be notified if there is a recall.

"Car seats, booster seats, and seat belts are often used incorrectly," said Gypsy Wanna, SWO Wellness Coordinator.

"Every 33 seconds in 2015, one child under 13 was involved in a crash. No parent wants to ever get it wrong when it comes to a child's safety. That's why we're hosting this car seat check event on National Seat Check Saturday. Parents - don't think you know, know you know that your kids are secure in their car seats and are in the right seats for their ages and sizes."

Car crashes are a leading killer of children, and the latest research from the U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) shows that nearly two out of three of car seats are misused. Miss Wanna added that using age- and size-appropriate car seats and installing them correctly are the best ways to reduce these deaths. "More than one-third of children 12 and younger who died in crashes in 2015 while riding in cars, pickups, vans, and SUVs were unbuckled. Many of those kids could have survived if they had been buckled up."

National Seat Check Saturday is part of Child Passenger Safety Week, which runs from September 17-23, 2017. The week is dedicated to teaching parents and caregivers about the importance of correctly choosing, installing, and using car seats, booster seats, and seat belts. Parents and caregivers will also be reminded of the importance of registering car seats with the manufacturer so they can be notified in the event of a recall.

NHTSA recommends keeping children rear-facing as long as possible, up to the top height or weight allowed by their particular seats. It's the best way to keep them safe. Once a child outgrows the rear-facing car seat, he or she is ready to travel in a forward-facing car seat with a harness and tether. After outgrowing the forward-facing car seat, a child should ride in a booster seat until tall enough to fit in a seat belt properly. The safest place for all kids under 13 is in the back seat.

For more information on child car seat safety, as well as how to find other car seat check events, go to www.nhtsa.gov/carseat.

In support of this vitally important public safety event, the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribal Council has passed the following resolution:

EXECUTIVE RESOLUTION NO. 17-09

Child Passenger Safety Week/National Seat Check Saturday

WHEREAS, The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation is organized under a Constitution and By-Laws adopted by the members of the Tribe on August 1-2, 1966 and approved by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs on August 25, 1966, and last amended effective November 15, 2006; and,

WHEREAS, The said Constitution and By-laws ARTICLE VII, Section 1, authorizes the Tribal Council to: (a) represent the Tribe in all negotiations with Federal, State and local governments; (g) to take actions by ordinance, resolution or otherwise which are reasonably necessary through committees, boards, agents, otherwise, to carry into effect the foregoing purposes; and (h) to promote public health, education, charity, and other services as may contribute to the social advancement of the members of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation; and,

WHEREAS, ARTICLE III, Section 1, states that, the Chairman, Vice-Chairman and Secretary of the Council shall be elected at large, which Officers shall constitute an Executive Committee; and,

WHEREAS, The Constitution Article III, Section 2, authorizes the Executive Committee of the Tribe to act on behalf of the Tribal Council in matters arising between sessions of the Tribal Council, subject to review by the Tribal Council; and,

WHEREAS, The By-Laws Article I, Section 1(c)(d), authorizes the Tribal Chairman to see that all ordinances and resolutions of both General Council and the Council are carried into effect and to sign on behalf of the Tribe all official papers when authorized to do so; and,

WHEREAS, Ensuring child safety from harm is everyone's responsibility; however, on average, 2 children under the age of 13 were killed and 319 were injured every day in 2015 while riding in cars, SUVs, pickups, and vans. Unfortunately, these numbers are significantly higher than in 2014, showing a ten (10) percent increase in fatalities and a four (4) percent increase in injuries; and,

WHEREAS, Of the past five years of available data, 2015 was the deadliest for children under the age of 13 riding in cars, SUVs, pickups, and vans. It is important now more than ever that we take action to ensure the safety of our children; and,

 WHEREAS, Today, all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and all Unite States territories require the use of car seats for children traveling in motor vehicles; and,

WHEREAS, In 2015, of the 662 children 12 years of age and younger who were killed in traffic crashes, nearly 1 in 3 were not in a car seat, booster seat, or seat belt. Of the estimated 116,000 children 12 year of age and younger who were injured in crashes, 6,000 of them were unsecured; and,

WHEREAS, Many of the injuries could have been prevented have these children been buckled up in an appropriate car seat or seat belt; and,

WHEREAS, By working together we can work toward eliminating these preventable deaths and injuries; and,

WHEREAS, During Child Passenger Safety Week, car seat safety checks will be held across the country.

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, The Executive Committee of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation is committed to educating parents and caregivers about the best ways to keep kids safe while traveling in cars, no matter how short of long the trip, and hereby proclaim the week of September 17-23, 2017 as National Child Passenger Safety Week, and September 23, 2017 as National Seat Check Saturday, and annually thereafter in our Tribal nation and urge everyone to help reduce injuries and the tragic loss of life by buckling up their children and themselves correctly every trip, every time.

Dated this 11th day of September 2017.

Additional – Personal from Wellness Coordinator Gypsy Wanna

Community Health Education Program

Ever since Shannon White left Injury Prevention a few years ago, the Community Health Education Program and several others on the Community Safety Team felt that seat belt use and car seat safety was still an important topic to educate the community on.

Three of us in the program are Certified Passenger Safety (CPS) Technicians (Liz Anderson, Sandi Bernard, and me). To become a CPS Technician one must go through 3 days of training, pass a test each day, and then be tested on actually installing car seats with 10 different scenarios. This training was one of the hardest I've ever completed.

Once we started educating and holding car seat safety checks we've found that there are so many people that don't know much about car seat safety, let alone how to properly use a car seat or booster seat. We take every opportunity we can get to promote and educate the people.

Over the past year or two, we've had many of our own community members either die or become seriously injured because they weren't buckled up. We've also had success stories; Myrriah Gray-Eagle and her child were unharmed when her vehicle rolled and landed upside down in water, because they were both buckled up CORRECTLY.

If my child died in a car accident because I didn't know or take the time to learn about car seats, I would feel so guilty. This is why I push so hard to create awareness and educate, so many people are unaware of what they don't' know and a person's excuse of "I didn't know" is no consolation when a death occurs; especially if it could have been prevented.

SWST holds successful blood drive

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe hosted a successful blood derive at the administration building on August 24th.

According to Fern Elofson, Donor Recruitment Representative at United Blood Services, "Oyate had a good turnout. There were 24 people who volunteered to donate and 18 able to give. Three people gave blood on the automated 2RBC machine that collects two units of red blood cells which resulted in 21 total products. There were ten people who volunteered for their first time!"

Community Health Education Coordinator Gypsy Wanna coordinated the drive and assisted with recruiting donors, publicity, providing refreshments, and registering donors.

Space to hold the drive was provided by the SWST in its administration building.

The availability of blood is dependent on the success of blood drives held in many communities.

The members of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe can be assured that their blood drive is a good example of a well-run blood program.

On behalf of the patients who benefited, United Blood Services appreciates all the thoughtful people who volunteered to help others by giving of themselves. To sign up for your next life-saving blood donation appointment, please go to www.unitedbloodservices.org.

Blood is for sharing; you have truly given the "Gift of Life".

Amendment to shield military retirees from costly prescription drug co-pay

Washington, DC – Sept. 13, 2017 – U.S. Senator Mike Rounds (R-S.D.), a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, today delivered remarks on the Senate floor in support of an amendment he introduced to the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) currently being debated on the Senate floor.

"I fully support improving care for beneficiaries of the military health system," said Rounds in his speech. "However, increased TRICARE pharmacy copays must be carefully considered to make certain that they do not disproportionately impact one part of the beneficiary population. Unfortunately that would be the case for South Dakota and other largely rural states with large military retiree populations that live too far from Military Treatment Facilities to draw free prescriptions available there."

Rounds' amendment would change a provision in the current NDAA bill that raises prescription drug copays under the TRICARE program for military retirees and their families who get their prescription drugs from a retail pharmacy or through mail order, while those who obtain them from a Military Treatment Facility continue to get them for free. Under Rounds' amendment, military retirees and their families who live more than 40 miles from a Military Treatment Facility would be exempt from the proposed higher copays.

Rounds' remarks, as prepared for delivery:

Mr. President, as the Senate considers the National Defense Authorization Act, the NDAA, I rise today to discuss a simple amendment in support of my constituents who are military retirees as well as those in many other states.

These retirees may be disproportionately and unfairly impacted by increases in TRICARE prescription drug copay increases in the bill we are considering today.

Specifically, provisions in this bill will increase cost-sharing amounts for the TRICARE pharmacy benefits program for years 2018 through 2026.

The rationale for the increases in the bill we are considering today is that the savings generated from pharmaceutical cost-share increases can be used to improve health outcomes and the experience of care for beneficiaries of the military health system.

I fully support improving care for beneficiaries of the military health system.

However, increased TRICARE pharmacy copays must be carefully considered to make certain that they do not disproportionately impact one part of the beneficiary population.

Unfortunately that would be the case for South Dakota and other largely rural states with large military retiree populations that live too far from Military Treatment Facilities to draw free prescriptions available there.

Instead, these military retirees and their families are compelled to use the TRICARE mail order system or retail pharmacies, and in both cases, they would have to pay higher copays.

For example, the copay for a generic drug ordered through the TRICARE mail order system will increase by 10 dollars in Fiscal Year 2018.

While this does not seem like a lot of money, these costs can add up rapidly if a military retiree and his or her family members are required to make multiple copays for multiple prescriptions.

Simply put – our military retirees who live more than 40 miles away from a Military Treatment Facility should not be unfairly forced to pay higher copays on prescription drugs just because of where they choose to live.

Under my amendment, we would take a step back.

The amendment would freeze copay increases for TRICARE retirees and their families living more than 40 miles from a Military Treatment Facility.

Additionally, the amendment would require the Department of Defense, DOD, to assess the financial impact of the higher copays on these beneficiaries.

The 40 mile figure was chosen carefully.

40 miles is a distance used by both DOD and the Department of Veterans Affairs, the VA, as a boundary for reasonable access to a health care facility.

DOD's TRICARE Prime program, in which care is primarily delivered through a Military Treatment Facility, is available to individuals who reside within Prime Service Areas or PSAs.

PSAs are locations that are within 40 miles of a Military Treatment Facility.

Similarly, the VA Choice program, which allows veterans access to health care in local communities rather than waiting for a VA appointment or traveling to a VA facility, is available to those whose residence is more than 40 miles driving distance from the closest VA medical facility.

My amendment would also set a deadline of 60 days after enactment, for a DOD report on the financial impact of the copay increases on military retirees and their families.

With the information provided by DOD, Congress can then rationally assess the impact of the copay increases on beneficiaries who live distant from Military Treatment Facilities and incorporate appropriate provisions in future legislation.

I appreciate this opportunity to discuss my amendment, which would rectify this unintended effect on military retirees and their families. Thank you, Mr. President, I yield the floor.

Roundtable discussion: Prescribing and Sales practices that lead to Opioid abuse

Six in-state meetings on Opiod epidemic

Washington, DC – Sept. 12, 2017 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today helped convene a roundtable discussion with patients, family members, and doctors to talk about ways to make sure the way opiates are marketed, sold, and prescribed do not lead to addiction and abuse. This discussion continues her efforts to tackle all sides of the opioid abuse crisis that has swept across North Dakota and the nation.

Following a Senate report which studied the cracks in the system when it comes to federal oversight of the way opioids, like prescription painkillers are marketed, sold and prescribed, Heitkamp today joined a roundtable discussion on how to tackle these challenges. Together with a former patient of a doctor who was paid to prescribe him inappropriate amounts of an opioid, a mother whose daughter died of an apparent opioid overdose, and medical experts from the University of Missouri and Georgetown University, Heitkamp and a group of U.S. senators discussed ways to prevent marketing and sales practices that can lead to dangerous prescription practices, opioid abuse, and death.

Today's roundtable follows Heitkamp's efforts both on the ground in North Dakota as well as legislatively in the U.S. Senate toward long-term solutions to tackle the growing crisis. In June, Heitkamp held her sixth meeting on opioid abuse in North Dakota where she brought together prescribers, law enforcement, as well as health care and treatment experts to discuss the tools and tactics needed to combat the growing epidemic across the state.

"All across North Dakota, I've heard from prescribers, families, patients and law enforcement about the challenges they face in effectively tackling a growing crisis that often starts with a real medical need and pills with a doctors' stamp of approval," said Heitkamp. "We need all hands on deck if we're going to fight this complex, and often silent epidemic – and sometimes that begins at the source. That's why I joined my fellow senators in pinpointing and enforcing wrongdoing that is often rooted in a real medical need. Together with a patient whose doctor overprescribed an opioid, a mother who lost a daughter to an apparent overdose, and doctors, we worked to untangle the problems that can lead to sales, marketing, and medical malfeasance when it comes to overprescribing – including how pain treatment needs to change. During my time as North Dakota's Attorney General and in the U.S. Senate, I've been working to secure both strong legislative solutions, and arm in arm with North Dakota communities to make sure our state is armed with the information, strategy, and tools we need to combat opioid abuse. And I'll keep fighting to beat this epidemic so we can keep all of our state's communities strong and safe."

Heitkamp has been working both on the ground in North Dakota and in the U.S. Senate to tackle the nation's opioid addiction and abuse crisis – fatalities from which grew by 125 percent in North Dakota from 2013 to 2014. In March, Heitkamp gathered leaders in Minot to discuss challenges the community is facing in dealing with a major increase in opioid addiction and abuse, where she discussed her Budgeting for Opioid Addiction Treatment Act (LifeBOAT Act) she helped reintroduce to help make sure communities are equipped with the resources and tools they need to fight the growing crisis. It was the fifth meeting Heitkamp held on opioid abuse and addition across North Dakota.

Recently in the U.S. Senate and across North Dakota, Heitkamp has been standing up against cuts in Republican health care bills that would slash Medicaid, which is a critical resource for individuals receiving treatment for opioid abuse and addiction. It pays for over a third of all medication-assisted treatment nationwide and 17.4 percent of opioid treatment payments in North Dakota, according to the U.S. Joint Economic Committee. Republican health plans offered and discussed would also devastate rural hospitals, which Heitkamp has long been working to protect.

Since fighting North Dakota's methamphetamine crisis as the state's attorney general in the 1990s, Heitkamp has been working to stem the tide of addiction, abuse and illegal drug trafficking. On the federal level, Heitkamp has been working to address this issue by:

· Convening statewide community leaders to build a comprehensive approach to tackle opioid addiction and abuse: Since helping announce the LifeBOAT Act in Bismarck in 2016, Heitkamp has been gathering leaders across the state to hear directly from them about the challenges they are seeing in their hometowns. Over the past year, Heitkamp held listening sessions in Bismarck, Grand Forks, Fargo, Jamestown, Minot, and Dickinson to take on the opioid abuse epidemic and discuss the federal support these communities need to recover from and prevent opioid addiction. Heitkamp also joined Fargo's City Commission for a meeting on a strategic response to the growing opioid addiction and abuse in the community.

· Bringing federal anti-drug crime leaders and resources to North Dakota: Heitkamp brought both and former White House Office of National Drug Control Policy's (ONDCP) directors to North Dakota – securing a national focus and strong resources to the state to help fight drug crime as a result.

· Convening statewide leaders to comprehensively battle drug crime and abuse: Heitkamp convened statewide experts and leaders to combat drug crime and abuse to serve on the growing task force of her Strong & Safe Communities initiative, which she initially launched in September 2014 in response to the state's energy boom.

· Engaging statewide leaders on the front lines of North Dakota's opioid addiction crisis: Heitkamp met with facility leaders, medical staff, and tribal leaders during her visits to MHA Nation's Circle of Life Drug Treatment Center in May 2016 and Mercy Hospital in Devils Lake in March 2016 where she heard about the unique challenges they face in treating skyrocketing cases of heroin, methamphetamine, and opioid abuse on rural and tribal lands – often due to a lack of recovery resources her bill works to provide.

The Sad Truth about Sadness

By Richard P. Holm, MD

In my many years of caring for the sick, I have encountered several individuals caught in the joy starvation of depression. I have seen the resulting devastation affect not only the afflicted, but also those around them. For those 18 to 45 years of age, depression is the number one cause of disability, resulting in an estimated 200 billion dollars of lost earnings per year. I stand aghast when the condition results in such helplessness that the patient choses to escape life with suicide. There are about 40,000 deaths per year to suicide, which is approximately equal to the number of deaths caused by breast cancer. Despite a similar mortality rate, the money invested in depression research is about 1% of that spent studying breast cancer.

It remains unclear as to the exact causes of depression are, as they can vary from one case to another. There are many factors which can contribute to depression, including genetic predisposition, a troubled childhood and adolescence, stressful environments, sad situations, addiction, traumatic experiences, or even not getting enough sun. Most of us periodically have what is called "situational depression," such as the appropriate sadness that follows severe loss or death of a loved one. This type of depression is normal and will usually fade with time as we heal emotionally. The time to be concerned is when there is depression without a "situation"-no apparent reason for it to happen, no sad story to explain why one is filled with sadness. When the patient says, "I don't know why I feel this way", then the clinician knows there is a problem.

Diagnosing clinical depression is not always easy. However, there are often associated symptoms that point us physicians in the direction of an accurate diagnosis. We suspect depression when people experience chronic pain, find it hard to concentrate, are without energy, have flares of temper, sleep too much or too little, have a loss of appetite or have over-eating binges, have unexplained crying spells, or become filled with anxiety for minimal reasons. People can often make things worse by covering up depression with alcohol, sleeping pills, anti-anxiety medications, or substance abuse, making the diagnosis even more difficult.

Sadly, two-thirds of people with depression do not seek or receive help, often because they are ashamed or feel without hope. This is unfortunate, as 80% of those who do get help will begin to see improvement in as little as four to six weeks. There is help and hope for those with this miserable condition, but people need to be open to the possibility of such a problem (men are usually the worst deniers). There are several low-cost, highly effective treatments available for depression. They typically involve either meeting regularly with a behavioral specialist, taking a minimal side-effect medication, or a combination of the two. There are several other things that can aid in fighting depression as well, like getting adequate sleep and exercising regularly-even if it's only walking for 30 minutes each day.

If you are possibly struggling with depression, please get help. The treatments can be very effective and drastically improve your quality of life. It is not a condition to be ashamed of. If you can't do it for yourself, at least do it for those around you.

*****

Dr. Rick Holms wrote this Prairie Doc Perspective forn "OnCall®," a weekly program where medical professionals discuss health concerns for the general public. "OnCall®*is produced by the Healing Words Foundation in association with the South Dakota State University Journalism Department. "OnCall®*airs Thursdays on South Dakota Public Broadcasting-Television at 7 p.m. Central, 6 p.m. Mountain. Visit www.oncalltelevision.com

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

Tiospa Zina Tribal School holds Homecoming 2017 this week!

Wambdi Homecoming 2017 is this week!

Theme:  Movies.

Monday, Sept. 18-Cross Country Meet at Deuel-4 pm

Tuesday, Sept. 19-VB game vs. Aberdeen-Roncalli at 5 pm

Wednesday, Sept. 20-Coronation at 7:00 pm

Thursday, Sept. 21-VB Game at Flandreau-5 pm

Friday, Sept. 22-Homecoming Football game at 7 pm (Wambdi vs. Hitchcock Tulare Patriots)

Dress Up Days

Monday: Dress Like a Baby

Tuesday: College Gear Day

Wednesday: Dress Like Your Parent 7 6

Thursday: Grandparents Day

Friday: Spirit Day! Pep Rally at 9 am; parade at 1:00 pm.

Congratulations TZTS homecoming candidates

Congratulations to the following seniors for being chosen as Homecoming candidates: Tre Neilan, Brandon Redday, Ronnie Godfrey, Curtis Bird, Wasu Bertsch, Jamie Cook, Jesyna Paul, Maggie Yankton, Kiara MacConnell, and Jaylee Crawford.

Coronation will be held Wednesday, Sept. 20th, at 7:00 p.m. in the TZ gym.

Results from last week's Wambdi games

*Sept. 12 Volleyball TZ 3 Deuel 1 (16-25), (25-15), (25-16), (25-19).

*Sept. 14 Volleyball TZ 1 Britton 3 (22-25), (19-25), (26-24), (12-25).

Mustangs Rodeo team competes in Wisconsin

Report by Coach Valnes

Sisseton Wahpeton College had an outstanding weekend (Sept. 7-9) at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls.

We are proud of everyone on the team.

We had four that made it back to the short round and scored points for the SWC team.

*Morgan Okke:

Placed 4th in the long round in Breakaway.

4th in the short round.

4th in the Average.

She also scored point for the SWC Women's team and Placed 4th out of 13 College teams.

*Delane German:

Place 4th in the short round in Bare backs.

4th in the Average.

*Lane Kvien and Rich Marone:

Tied 5/6 in the long round in Team Roping.

2nd in the short round.

2nd in the average.

The team also scored points for SWC Men's team, placing 4th out of 13 College teams.

This past weekend the Mustangs competed at Mid-Plains Community College, North Platte, Nebraska. Watch for results next week in the Sota.

Reception held for SWC students

Last Friday, September 8th, Dakota Connection and Joe Williams hosted a gathering for SWC students Rena Hopkins, Shantelle Crandall, Tanner Bartunek and Cecelia Wynde to acknowledge their two- week visit to Washington D.C. and New York City in July. The SWST students were there on a program sponsored by Rick West (Founding Director of the National Museum of the American Indian) and the Ford Foundation, on Cultural Preservation and leadership development.

Please see last week's Sota for a full report on the program,

Joe Williams opened the event with prayer and shared a recent experience, in which one of his great granddaughters was singing a traditional Dakota song in the Dakota language – word for word correctly – at three years old!

Joe said how this beautiful little girl taught him a valuable lesson: "That we can still listen, remember and learn – which is how the culture was taught in the Dakota way long before books and the television came along."

"We can still learn this way!" he affirmed.

During the session, three former Tribal Council members and one current Council member listened to what the students had to say about their experiences during the program in Washington D.C.

These elders supported and encouraged the students to follow their dreams and noted the importance of patience and self-discipline in order to reach their educational goals.

In addition to the Council members, two grandmothers and other guests attended and also offered words of support and encouragement.

Allison Conner (Ojibway/Dakota), who also attended the program in July, drove all the way from Bemidji to share the evening with her friends from Sisseton.

The students would like to thank all those who attended, and to thank the staff at the Dakota Connection and the Sota for their support.

From the webwsite of the Rochester Community and Technical College "Yellowjackets"

Dylan DuMarce earns MCAC East Division Special Teams Player of the Week

In a close game where field position was an important commodity, Rochester Community & Technical College punter Dylan DuMarce, showed the value of quality special teams play in his squad's 24-21 win at Dakota College-Bottineau last Saturday.

DuMarce kicked 10 times for the Yellowjackets, placing three inside the 20 of the DCB 'Jacks.

His longest kick of the day went for 54 yards, and the Rosholt, South Dakota native, had a 37.5 average for the outing.

For his efforts in RCTC's first 2017 victory, DuMarce has been named the MCAC Eastern Division Special Teams Player-of-the-Week.

Dylan is the son of Wade DuMarce.

(Editor's note: Thank you to Dave Redthunder for sharing this news with our readers.)

Deadline for nomination applications to U.S. Service Academies

All applications are due by Oct. 1, 2017

Washington, DC – Sept. 7, 2017 – U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) today announced that all nomination applications to our nation's service academies for the fall 2018 semester are due by Oct. 1, 2017.

"Our nation's service academies offer an opportunity to serve our country while receiving a top-notch education," said Rounds. "I encourage interested students to submit their application for a nomination before October 1st to make sure they will be considered for the 2018-2019 school year."

Each year, Rounds is able to nominate a select group of eligible students from South Dakota to attend our nation's four service academies: The U.S. Air Force Academy, U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, U.S. Military Academy at West Point and the U.S. Naval Academy.

Thune, Noem invite South Dakotans to apply to US Service Academies

Washington, DC – U.S. Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.) and U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem (R-S.D.) invite South Dakota students interested in being nominated to one of the four U.S. service academies for the class of 2019 to apply by October 31, 2017.

South Dakotans between the ages of 17 and 23 may apply to any of the four service academies if they meet eligibility requirements in leadership, physical aptitude, scholarship, and character. The four service academies are the Military Academy at West Point, New York; the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland; the Air Force Academy at Colorado Springs, Colorado; and the Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point, New York.

"The men and women who attend our nation's military academies are some of the very best our country has to offer," said Thune. "Their leadership and commitment protect our nation and keep our freedoms secure. It is an honor to nominate South Dakotan each year to our nation's service academies."

"Year after year, I'm amazed by the integrity, grit, and determination of the South Dakota students who apply to our nation's service academies," said Noem. "I'm honored to be able to nominate some of these incredible young people to serve and I look forward to seeing all they will accomplish." Thune and Noem will each compile separate lists and make nominations to the academies of the most qualified candidates by January 31, 2018. Applicants are encouraged to submit applications to both congressional offices in order to better their chances of receiving a nomination. The academies will make the final decision on acceptance and announce appointments next spring. Interested applicants should contact Thune's office at (605) 334-9596 or Noem's office at (605) 275-2868.

Service academies offer students unique opportunity to serve

By Sen. John Thune

President Reagan once said, "Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn't pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same." For nearly 250 years, America has been blessed because from each new generation of Americans have come leaders and warfighters who have not only protected freedom and liberty on their watch, but have helped ensure those pillars of American democracy are preserved and strengthened for those to whom they've passed the torch of freedom.

South Dakota has been home to many of these leaders over the years – it still is today – and I'm humbled to play a small role each year in helping South Dakota's future leaders take the next step in life by nominating them to one of the service academies throughout the country, including the Military Academy, Naval Academy, Air Force Academy, and Merchant Marine Academy. Any South Dakotan who meets the requirements (age, marital status, etc.) can apply for a nomination through my office.

There are many well-known leaders and pioneers in their field who graduated from one of America's service academies. Astronauts like Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins, who both flew to the moon, graduated from the Military Academy, as did U.S. Presidents Ulysses S. Grant and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), who I'm fortunate to serve with in the U.S. Senate, graduated from the Naval Academy. Generations of other Americans who went on to serve in countless other fields, including business, academia, and athletics, have all gone through the ranks of one academy or another.

If you're interested in beginning your career at a service academy, now is the time to act. You can find more information on my website, www.thune.senate.gov, under the "services" tab. Once there, you'll be able to determine if you're eligible to apply. You can also write, email, or call any of my offices for more information or to discuss this opportunity with a member of my staff.

The class of 2018 has already been selected, but the deadline to apply for the class of 2019 is on October 31, 2017, which is right around on the corner. I'll review all of the applicants and will announce my selections early next year.

The men and women who choose to pursue this path deserve our respect and gratitude, and those who are selected will have their names etched among some of the most prominent leaders our nation has known. I want to thank all of the young South Dakotans in advance who will consider this opportunity, and I look forward to hearing from you soon.

Legals

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 07-049

SWOCSE/ Debra DuMarce, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ELROY WHITE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of September, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of August, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 17-069

SWOCSE/ Sophia Bissonette, PLAINTIFF

VS.

EUGENE BISSONETTE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of September, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of August, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-004

SWOCSE/ Marlys Bluedog, PLAINTIFF

VS.

EUGENE BISSONETTE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of September, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of August, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 00-269

SWOCSE/ Patricia Bernard, PLAINTIFF

VS.

EUGENE BISSONETTE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of September, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 17-140

SWOCSE/ Ruth Hill, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LACASSA DUMARCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of September, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of August, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 09-065

SWOCSE/ Nolita Hill, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LACASSA DUMARCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of September, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of August, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 16-196

SWOCSE/ Samantha DuMarce, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LACASSA DUMARCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of September, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of August, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-136

SWOCSE/ Valerie Cloud, PLAINTIFF

VS.

VICTORIA LABELLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of September, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

 

Dated this 30th day of August, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 16-057

SWOCSE/ Colleen Cloud, PLAINTIFF

VS.

VICTORIA LABELLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of September, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of August, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 17-095

SWOCSE/ Cyprian LaCroix, PLAINTIFF

VS.

HARRIETTE LACROIX, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Recognize a Foreign Order and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of September, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of August, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-138

SWOCSE/ Valerie Cloud, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MICHAEL SIERRA, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of September, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of August, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 17-123

SWOCSE/ Erica Lewno, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MIKA RONDELL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Recognize a Foreign Order and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of September, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 31st day of August, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-170

SWOCSE/ Shanice Simon, PLAINTIFF

VS.

KENDALL DECOTEAU, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of September, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 31st day of August, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 07-079

SWOCSE/ Morningstar Owen, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CHAD KEOKE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of September, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 31st day of August, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-150

SWOCSE/ Emily Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JOYCE WHITE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of September, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 31st day of August, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-128

SWOCSE/ Ethan Dumarce, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TRICIA AMOS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of September, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 1st day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-162

SWOCSE/ Maria Owen, PLAINTIFF

VS.

WICANHPI BRANT, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of September, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 1st day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-160

SWOCSE/ Maria Owen, PLAINTIFF

VS.

AMBER FROST, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of September, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 1st day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 17-056

SWOCSE/ Laura Small, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JERWYN RODLUND, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Paternity & Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of September, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 1st day of September, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

37-3tc

Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Attorney, Legal Department

Bus Driver (part-time), Head Start

Bus Driver/Custodian (2-positions), Head Start

Accounts Payable Supervisor, Finance

Payroll Manager, Payroll

Closing Date: September 15th, 2017 @ 04:30 PM

Dispatcher, Law Enforcement

Teacher Aide, Head Start

Closing Date: September 22nd, 2017 @ 04:30 PM

Application and job description information can be seen at SWO Human Resources Office or http://www.swo-nsn.gov/contact/employment. Application can be downloaded from "Apply Now" and emailed to ArnoldW@SWO-NSN.GOV or DeniseH@SWO-NSN.GOV. Contact can also be at Arnold Williams 698-8238 or Denise Hill 698-8251 with questions. (Tribal preference will apply).

 

Sisseton Wahpeton College

Has the following vacancy:

Facilities/Shuttle Drivers

There is an opening for a part-time Shuttle Driver in our Facilities Department. Requirements are: High School Diploma or GED. Must be at least 25 years of age, have a valid driver's license and a clean driving record. Position closes at 4:30 p.m. on Friday, September 29, 2017. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118.

38-2tc

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Substitute Positions:

Substitutes needed for the following: *Teaching, Paraprofessional, *Bus Driver, Custodian, Cook, Receptionist, and Bus Monitor. Qualifications: High School Diploma or GED and *specific certification requirements for Teaching and Bus Driving. Applications accepted on an on-going basis. Please call or stop in the office for more information.

Administration Positions:

Position: Secondary Principal. Qualifications: Master's Degree (M.A.) or equivalent in Education Administration; four or more years of experience as a school administrator. Certification as a Secondary Principal and/or Superintendent from any state. Opening Date: September 13, 2017. Closing Date: September 27, 2017.

High School Positions:

Position: High School Science Teacher. Qualifications: Current Teaching Certification in any state meeting the requirements for the position in which applying. Opening date: June 29, 2017. Closing date: Open Until Filled.

Position: Art Teacher. Qualifications: Current Teaching Certification in any state meeting the requirements for the position in which applying. Opening date: June 29, 2017. Closing date: Open Until Filled.

Position: Special Education Teacher. Qualifications: Current Teaching Certification in any state meeting the requirements for the position in which applying. Opening date: Aug 3, 2017. Closing date: Open Until Filled.

Middle School Positions:

Position: Middle School Teacher. Qualifications: Current Teaching Certification in any state meeting the requirements for the position in which applying. Opening date: May 1, 2017. Closing date: Open Until Filled.

Support Staff Positions:

Position: Bus Monitor (Route: E. Sisseton, W. Sisseton/Long Hollow, Dakota Magic/New Effington). Qualifications: GED/HS Diploma and willing to obtain CPR/First Aid Certifications. Opening date: June 13, 2017. Closing date: Open Until Filled.

Position: Bus Driver/Custodian. Qualifications: High School Diploma/GED and current Commercial Drivers License with both air brakes and passenger endorsements and 1 year experience. Opening Date: Aug 21, 2017

Closing Date: Open until filled.

Position: Bus Driver. Qualifications: High School Diploma/GED and current Commercial Drivers License with both air brakes and passenger endorsements and 1 year experience. Opening Date: September 13, 2017. Closing Date: September 27, 2017

Coaching/Extra Curricular Positions:

Athletic Vacancies:

Jr. High Boys Basketball Coach

Jr. High Girls Basketball Coach

Jr. High Volleyball Coach

Winter Cheer Coach

Wrestling Coach

Assistant Boys Varsity Basketball Coach

Assistant Girls Varsity Basketball Coach

Assistant Track Coach

Assistant Volleyball Coach

Assistant Wrestling Coach

Extra-Curricular Activity Adviser Vacancies:

Debate/Individual Events

Drum Adviser

Junior Class Adviser

National Honors Society Adviser

Oral Interpretation Adviser

Speech Adviser

Senior Class Adviser

Weight Room Monitor

If you would like to apply to be a part of the TZ tiwahe you may pick up an application and background check form from the TZTS HR office located at #2 Tiospa Zina Dr. Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications may also be printed off the HR web page. Completed applications may be sent to PO Box 719, Agency Village, SD 57262. Faxed to: 605-698-7686. For further information call 605-698-3953 ext. 208. Indian Preference employer. At will employer. All applicants are subject to a Background Check and Pre-Employment Drug Test, pursuant to SWSB policy and United States Code Title 25 Chapter 34 - Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention.

 

Early Childhood Teacher

Job Opening

The Enemy Swim Day School has an opening for an Early Childhood Teacher for the 2017-2018 School Year. The Early Childhood teacher provides a strong learning environment in the FACE center-based preschool classroom where children can develop and thrive. Work cooperatively with parents and other staff as a part of the FACE team. Qualifications: Bachelor's degree in Elementary Education, Early Childhood endorsement, SD State Teaching License. For more information about the position call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 and ask for Mrs. Dolney. This position is open until filled. Send application, resume, 3 letters of recommendation, and teaching license and other credentials to: Enemy Swim Day School, 13525 446th Avenue, Waubay, SD 57273.

37-2tc

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Cage Department:

Cashier (Full-Time) Graveyard

Supervisor (Full-Time) Graveyard

Count Department:

Team Member (Full-Time) 3:00am to Finish

Foods Department:

Bus Persons (Full-Time) as needed

Cashiers (Full-Time) as needed

Dishwashers (Full-Time) as needed

Wait Staffs (Full-Time) as needed

Housekeeping Department:

Porter (Full-Time) as needed

Marketing Department:

Promotions Coordinator (Full-Time) Rotating

Security Department:

Officer (Full-Time) as needed

Slots Department

Technician (Full-Time) as needed

Support Services Department:

Electrician (Full-Time) Rotating

Surveillance Department:

Observer (Full-Time) as needed

Table Games Department:

Pit Boss (Full-Time) Rotating

Closing Date: September 22, 2017 at 4:00 p.m.

Two identifications documents required upon hire.

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE, Hankinson ND 58041.For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO. (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment). Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

The Food & Beverage Department Is Now Accepting Applications For:

Position: Director of Food & Beverage

Job Description: Responsible for overall operational success of all Food and Beverage outlets in accordance with DNGE and casino property's Vision, Mission, and Core Values. Starting Wage: Negotiable Required: Bachelors Degree in Culinary or related field and 10 years of experience in the successful operations of food and beverage outlets Or Associates Degree in Culinary and 12 years of experience in the operations of food and beverage outlets Knowledge and experience in managing multiple-outlets facilities to include buffets, restaurants, lounges, delis, and bars. ServSafe or equivalent certification in food safety (90 days to complete)

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department 16849 102nd Street SE Hankinson ND 58041 For complete Job Description contact James Neconish @ 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment)

Two identifications documents required upon hire.

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE, Hankinson ND 58041.For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO. (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment). Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

HUMAN RESOURCES: HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER (1 FULL- TIME). GENERAL FUNCTION: Coordinates Human Resources policies and programs with an emphasis on the benefits and payroll areas ensuring that all personnel activities and related functions are in compliance with DNGE and Dakota Sioux Casino policies and procedures. REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. Bachelor's degree, Preferred, in business administration; four to six years related experience; or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Must be familiar with federal, state, and tribal agencies that deal with employment. Good working knowledge of legal documents. Must Maintain Confidentiality. Excellent communication skills, both verbal and written. Computer experience is required. Supervisory experience and/or training. Must obtain a Key Gaming License upon hire. Minimal bending and lifting. Repetitious computer work.

This position will close on September 20, 20107 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Restaurant Department:

Prep cook/cook (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, and swing, includes weekends & holidays.  Previous experience is preferred.  Must be able to multi-task; have the ability to work under pressure; the ability to operate necessary equipment; knowledge of food preparation safety requirements and ability obtain a "Food Handlers" certification; physical ability to clean, lift heavy object up to 20 lbs. or more and restock inventory.  Have the physical ability to stand for prolonged periods of time.  Appropriate dress code.  Must be very dependable.  Must be at least 18 years old & must have a High School Diploma or GED.

Wait staff (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, and swing, includes weekends & holidays.  Customer service skills, prior experience with waiting on tables and working with a cash register is preferred.  Must be able to multi-task.  Appropriate dress code.  Have the physical ability to stand for prolonged periods of time.   Must have a High school diploma or GED & be at least 18 years old.

Opening date: Thursday, September 14, 2017

Closing date: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 
 

 

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