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TZTS Summer 2017 Film Camp videos online on YouTube

 

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Film Camp behind the scenes:

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Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate: Want to re-read the Self-Governance articles from past issues of your Sota Iya Ye Yapi?

Whether or not the Tribe assumes administrative authority over your health services is a BIG DEAL. What do you know about it?

Here they are:

Self-Governance Articles from past Sotas

  Obituaries Editorials Editor's column Education
Legals
Trading post

 

 

Vol. 48 Issue No. 47

Anpetu Iyamni, Wednesday, Nov. 22, 2017

Inside this Edition –

Keystone I pipeline leaks in Marshall County west of Lake Traverse Reservation

Tribal law enforcement announces human trafficking operation

Report to Akicita from VSO Geri Opsal

Veterans Wacipi 2017 results: Photos by John Heminger

Winter 2017 general council Monday-Tuesday, Dec. 18-19; Agenda in this edition

Sisseton-Wahpeton sacred fire is lit; Community joins others in healing

Regional meth conference to be held at Rapid City in December

Early copy requested for next week's Sota; deadline is Wednesday, Nov. 22nd

Chairman's Corner –

Updating the Oyate

My friends and relatives,

I want to send my thoughts and prayers to those that suffered family losses this past week; on behalf of the entire tribe we send our sincerest condolences.

As many of you are aware, there was a very large oil leak about 25 miles west of our Reservation. Some of my comments last Friday have been taking out of context and misconstrued as not caring, and or, giving up. I want to assure all of you SWST members that I am not taking this lightly, I am taking this very seriously, however, there is no need at this time to cause mass hysteria or lose control of emotions.

My main concern at this moment is our water sources. I intend to have our OEP and LTUC test our tribal community water sources more often than usual so that we can monitor the level of quality in our water systems.

I also intend to have our Tribal biologist and Fish and Wildlife program monitor our lakes and streams more often than usual.

It is my intention, with Council support, to be pro-active and positive than to be reactive and negative; now is not the time to criticize political dislikes, or personal dislikes of each other.

The Creator has put a challenge in front of us and we need to display our ability to be strong and prayerful.

I was invited to Lower Brule by Faith Spotted Eagle and Paula Horn, to take part in events that are related to the pipelines and the recent massive leak.

Therefore, I will be partaking in meetings with some of our sister tribes that are also concerned with this leak and what our next steps will be regarding these pipe lines.

This Chairman's report is short this week, but this leak is our main concern at this time and will require my attention until we have enough information that I can be assured our water sources and cultural resources are unharmed. I plan on sharing updates on KXSW and other media sites.

In closing, I want everyone to enjoy Thanksgiving, although this is not a traditional event of our Dakota people, still it is a time to share a big meal with family and friends and bring people together.

Be mindful of those that are less fortunate and I humbly ask that you say a prayer for our leaders so that we remain strong to make the best decisions during this time of concern, and most importantly our grandmother earth, Unci Maka.

Unci Maka provides us everything so that we may survive on this earth. This massive oil leak is not good and she needs our prayers more than anything. tohan wocekiye kagapikte he wastekte! Hau, henana epekte'do. Owe-tanka hoksina de miye edo.

Keystone I leaks west of Lake Traverse Reservation

SWST Chairman Flute issues statements on Keystone I pipeline leak

SWST Chairman Dave Flute Statement

Agency Village, SD – Nov. 16, 2017 – 2:12  p.m. – Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribal Chairman Dave Flute has issued the following statement:

"Our Emergency Management team contacted me two hours ago. There is a substantial leak in the Keystone TransCanada pipeline. At this time, we are monitoring the situation as this major leak is adjacent to our Reservation."

"The SWST EMS and I are keeping a close eye on the leak, and open communication with other local and state EMS teams."

"We do not know the impact this has on our environment at this time but we are aware of the leak and will give an update as reports come our way."

From KSFY-TV:

Marshall County, SD – Oct. 16, 2017 – Crews are working to clean up a pipeline leak that has spilled at least 210,000 gallons of oil in South Dakota.

Brian Walsh with the Department of Environment and Natural Resources tells KSFY News they were alerted to the leak at 10:30 a.m. Thursday morning by TransCanada.

The leak was in the Keystone Pipeline located in an agricultural area in Marshall County. There have been no reports of the oil entering any waterways or water systems at this time.

Walsh said 5,000 barrels of oil have leaked, and at 42 gallons a barrel, that totals 210,000 gallons of oil.

The pipeline has been shut off and the leak has been covered. An emergency response plan has been activated to get more staff and contractors to the site for clean up.

Walsh anticipates the clean up will take some time.

(Editor's note: The SWST was one of several tribes that fought a losing legal battle in court against TransCanada's Keystone I pipeline.)

SWST Chairman Dave Flute Statement

Agency Village, SD – 9:00 a.m. – Nov. 17, 2017 – At this time, the only update I have is that there was a leak in the pipeline. Emergency Response Teams contained the leak and are assessing the situation. I have been in communication with the TransCanada tribal relations officer, and they will keep me updated on the spill and containment. A small Tribal delegation is meeting at the spill site and will gather more information. We will share an update later this afternoon.

Right now, on behalf of the Tribe, our concerns are the environmental impact this spill may have caused. We need to know, unambiguously, there is no contamination to any water source in the area. Surface and subsurface waters are all interconnected in this part of the state and some of those water sources run into and onto our Reservation. We have Tribal communities in the Enemy Swim, Buffalo Lake and Red Iron areas that are tens of miles away from the site, and they are our greatest concern at this time. We have pristine lakes and streams, and underground aquifers that provide water to many Tribal members and we need to know this spill has not and will not contaminate our waters.

Finally, on behalf of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe, we are offering our assistance, if requested, to the local and federal agencies that are working to contain the spill and evaluate the environmental damage it may have caused. Although our Tribe opposed the construction of this pipeline (and other pipelines), we understand it is here, it is what it is, but we are committed to providing help and assistance in any way we can.

Dave Flute, Chairman.

SWST Chairman Dave Flute Statement

Tom Wilson, KXSW-FM announcer, interviewed Chairman Flute from a crossroads near the spill site. The interview was aired live over the internet.

Here is a report of what was aired:

Chairman Flute began by saying that "the spill (site) is located outside of our jurisdiction (the Lake Traverse Reservation), but I was invited by TransCanada … our emergency management team was also invited by the state EMS. And our THPO."

"I know we are out of our jurisdiction, but this land that we are on here is of historical and cultural value to our Dakota people," he said. "And so we are glad they reached out to us and gave us updates."

He said that the size of the oil leak is not really known, and TransCanada and the SD DENR need to "quantify the spillage … what the gallons has been."

But, he emphasized "the section of line that was leaking has been shut off."

And "right now there doesn't seem to be any threat … they have contained the section of pipeline that was leaking."

He recounted a meeting he was invited to attend with the Marshall County Commissioners and representatives of TransCanada and the SD DENR.

"They assured me, as well as the Marshall County Commissioners, that as interested parties, once they find out what caused the leak, they will let us know."

"Once they find out how many gallons of oil has spilled, they will let us know," he added.

Right now, he said, "We don't know what the environmental impact is."

On the video, Chairman Flute to an area behind him, referring to it as a "staging area" and described people wearing hazmat suits.

"They're taking it (the spill) serious."

"We asked to go to the site, but unless you have hazmat training they do not want anybody there," he said.

Someone asked the Chairman about impacts to the environment.

He said that during a visit with the Commissioners, "they had some concerns about the environment, but they are satisfied with the process that's taking place."

He added, "I think their water source is rural water … but they're monitoring their system."

The Chairman pointed out that the source of their drinking water is the same rural water system that many Tribal members of the Reservation depend upon.

He said that they are satisfied that nothing is negatively impacting clean drinking water.

The Chairman also said that there will be ongoing monitoring of rural water not only by the state (DENR) but by the Tribe's OEP and LTUC personnel.

There were questions about the protests at Standing Rock against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Chairman Flute said that he personally and many SWST members supported then-Chairman Dave Archambault.

He also spoke about SWST having opposed the Keystone I when it was proposed.

"But it is what it is," he said.

"The pipeline is here … and wanting to be proactive and wanting to extend our hand in a good way … we want to be told any information that comes."

"And they assured us, our Tribal EMS team, our THPO team, that they would notify us if there were any cultural artifacts … and as soon as they get information on why the pipeline broke, how many gallons were spilled … they will notify us."

"I think that transparency and communication is important," he said.

"I look forward to hearing any information that they have, when they get it."

When asked about what the Tribe will be doing, the Chairman said that the Tribe's Office of Environmental Protection (OEP) and Lake Traverse Utilities Commission (LTUC) will be closely monitoring BDM Rural Water, and all water going to communities and housing areas on the Reservation.

"I'm being optimistic now," he said, "with the information that I've received now."

"I think they're doing a good job of containing this spill."

"And I think they're doing a good job of transparency, communicating with the Tribe."

"Again, I am out of my jurisdiction. Our treaty is for the Lake Traverse Indian Reservation, and I'm about 20-30 miles west of the boundary line."

"But still they're recognizing we have historical and cultural interests in this land."

"And I appreciate that."

Chairman Flute stressed that "I am being fair with my assessment."

"I'm not being a sellout, or a 'good Indian,' to say this … I'm happy they reached out to the Tribe," he said.

"I think they probably did this because they learned, and expanded on the shortcomings they've experienced with other pipelines that weren't looked at in a very favorable way."

"If Tribal members want to come up around the area, I'm not going to stop them, or ask them not to come."

"I just think we can build some good relationships here."

We've all heard "it isn't a matter if it (pipeline) will leak, it's when it will leak."

"And now we've experienced a leak, a pretty substantial leak."

"I was told last night by TransCanada that it was 200,000 (gallons) … news media report 210,000 … but we don't know yet."

"And we don't know what the cause was."

"That's what we want to know," he said.

Ultimately, the Chairman said, "We want to know what the impact is on our environment."

"I let them know the Tribe contributes millions of walleye into the lakes around here; we contribute thousands of pheasants."

"And as people of the land we are concerned about the environmental impact."

"We just have to be patient."

The process he said, is "not going to happen overnight."

He reported that TransCanada said it is probably going to take a month to two months "until this site is completely cleaned and environmental assessments are completed."

Turning again to Tribal members coming to the site, the Chairman said he encourages them "to be peaceful and prayerful."

He would like for those prayers to include workers coming from across the country, coming here to help clean up this spill.

"Please be mindful of them, and stay positive," he said.

"We need to stay positive."

"And if you do come up here, I ask that you be mindful, and respectful."

He mentioned freedom of speech, and said "You can say whatever you want to say, but please do it in a respectful way."

"And pray that they (workers) can clean it up with no environmental impact," he added.

The Chairman thanked Tom Wilson of KXSW, and other news media, for allowing him an opportunity to share this report.

He ended by saying, "I am concerned (about environmental impacts, safety of the water supply), but there is no need at this time to be fearful that our water might be contaminated … it is not."

And with OEP and LTUC monitoring Tribal water sources, if there is a spike in contaminant levels, the Chairman said he will be the first to let people know.

SWST Chairman Dave Flute Statement

Sissetowan Wahpeton Oyate

Ouwetapikte let us unite

From the Office of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribal Chairman

Sunday, Nov. 19, 2017

TransCanada has begun working to contain the leak and assessing the cause in order to begin the cleanup process as of Friday, November 17th. We intend to monitor this incident and process throughout the weeks to come in order to offer updates and information to our Tribal nation as it's available. We will be making an official request for any and all reports relating to the cause of the leak and the environmental impact this may have on our way of life. I am asking that we please be patient and conduct ourselves prayerfully; as the peaceful and respectful Dakota people that we are.

Our main concerns are the environmental, health and cultural resource impacts caused by this disaster. We need to feel as a community that none of our fresh water sources have been contaminated, we also need to be assured that our resources avoid contamination in the future. Surface and subsurface waters are all interconnected in this part of the region and majority of those water sources run into and on our Reservation as well as the surrounding area. With tribal communities in the Enemy Swim, Buffalo Lake and Red Iron areas that are in immediate proximity to the leak site, their safety is a priority with the greatest concern for the entire region at this time. We have pristine lakes and streams, and underground aquifers that provide water to many members as well as our friends and neighbors; we must ensure that the harm caused by the leak can be minimized and mitigated as soon as possible. Our Tribal Historic Preservation Officer (THPO), on site and ready to assist if any cultural resources are found; TransCanada will begin to dig out the contaminated soil, working 24/7 once they have workers and the equipment they need on site. As we wait to hear why this leak happened and how much environmental damage this leak caused, I am concerned and will remain concerned of any potential effects this leak may have on our fresh water sources. Finally, upon further reflection of this unfortunate incident, ten years ago our Tribe, and two sister tribes, opposed the construction of this pipeline we cannot ignore the guarantees and positive statistics that were promised to the Tribes and our local communities. We were told these pipelines were safe and the possibilities of leaks were highly unlikely. We were all told by TransCanada and their proponents that if a leak were to occur the technology and equipment would sense and identify the leak and immediately shut down the pipeline, unfortunately that may be shown untrue. When these guarantees and precautions were presented, not once was a large scale scenario brought up; and now here we are with a monumental learning experience in our grasp.

This incident is sad, very unfortunate, and I share the same emotions as the public and plan to collectively do what we need to do moving forward. This is a new scenario for us, but because we know this incident in Marshall County has put in over 200,000 gallons into the ground; and that does not seem like a small amount we are dedicated to working with our friends and neighbors that also rely on the Agricultural based lifestyle. As the days come we are committed to providing help and assistance in any way we can. Let us keep our composure and take this time to come together as a community, please take time to talk to your relatives, stay informed and rely on our faith. Updates will be release as they're available.

Nina Wopida Tanka.

Dave Flute, Chairman.

Keystone pipeline spills 210,000 gallons of oil on eve of permitting decision for TransCanada

By Steven Mufson and Chris Mooney

Washington Post – Nov. 16, 2017 – The Keystone pipeline running from Canada across the Great Plains leaked Thursday morning, spilling about 5,000 barrels of oil — or 210,000 gallons — southeast of the small town of Amherst in northeast South Dakota.

The spill comes on the eve of a crucial decision by the Public Service Commission in Nebraska over whether to grant a permit for a new, long-delayed sister pipeline called Keystone XL, which has been mired in controversy for several years. Both are owned by Calgary-based TransCanada.

The spill on the first Keystone pipeline is the latest in a series of incidents that critics of the new pipeline say shows that TransCanada should not receive another permit.

"TransCanada cannot be trusted," said Jane Kleeb, head of the Nebraska Democratic Party and a longtime activist opposed to Keystone XL. "I have full confidence that the Nebraska Public Service Commission is going to side with Nebraskans, not a foreign oil company."

TransCanada, which has a vast network of oil and natural gas pipelines, said that the latest leak occurred about 35 miles south of the Ludden pump station in North Dakota, and that it was "completely isolated" within 15 minutes. The company said it obtained permission from the landowner to assess the spill and begin cleanup.

Brian Walsh, an environmental scientist manager at the South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources, said that the leaking pipe was in "either a grass or an agricultural field" and that TransCanada had people at the site. Walsh said the leak was detected about 5:30 a.m.

"Based on what we know now, the spill has not impacted a surface water body," Walsh said. "It has not done that. So that's good news."

The first Keystone pipeline, which runs 1,136 miles from Hardisty in Alberta, carries thick bitumen from the oil sands area to pipeline, refining and storage networks in Steele City, Neb. and Patoka, Ill.

In 2011 and 2016, the pipeline had smaller spills that also took place in South Dakota. The 2011 spill was at the Ludden pump station. Both were smaller, with 400 barrels spilling in 2011 and another 400 in 2016.

TransCanada first applied for a permit for its Keystone XL pipeline in 2008, but it has been delayed by environmental concerns. President Obama approved the southern half of the project in 2012 but ultimately rejected the northern segment.

After his election, President Trump issued an executive order to clear obstacles for the Keystone XL, but TransCanada still needed a permit from the independent, five-person Nebraska PSC. Concerns there have revolved around potential harm to the state's ecologically delicate Sand Hills region and its vast Ogallala aquifer, prompting TransCanada to move the Nebraska segment further east.

TransCanada, by contrast, said the pipeline would be good for the economy and would create jobs.

Activists pounced on the news Thursday to renew their opposition to Keystone XL.

"This disastrous spill from the first Keystone Pipeline makes clear why Keystone XL should never be built," said Jared Margolis, senior attorney with the Center for Biological Diversity. "Trump's issuance of a permit for Keystone XL is a farce that will only lead to more pollution for people and wildlife."

Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal members respond to the Keystone Oil spill

By Sarah Sunshine Manning

Greenpeace – Nov. 18, 2017 – Just days before Nebraska decides whether to approve the Keystone XL pipeline, the Keystone 1 pipeline leaked 210,000 gallons. I talked with other tribal members about their experience visiting the site of the spill.

To say that land matters to Indigenous Peoples would be an understatement. To so many of us, land is not ever viewed as merely a resource, but as a relative we are in constant relationship with. The Dakota people call the land, "Unci Maka," or Grandmother Earth," as she provides all things, and their entire existence is dependent upon her.

When the recent Keystone 1 pipeline oil spill of 210,000 gallons happened near the Lake Traverse Indian Reservation in northeast South Dakota, home of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, tribal members were immediately alarmed. Many were outraged.

After hearing of the news of the spill, a group of tribal members drove directly to the location searching for answers. The tribal radio station, KXSW, reported from on the ground in a Facebook live stream while hundreds of tribal members watched nervously. "I feel sick," one tribal member wrote in the comments of the video livestream.

One year earlier, many of the same tribal members were on the ground in the #NoDAPL resistance camps near the borderlands of the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, standing in protection of land and water, and resisting the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

A common phrase among the water protectors and land defenders in the resistance camps, heard over and over again, was, "It's not a matter of if a pipeline breaks, but when."

And for the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, this recent spill, the largest spill to date in South Dakota, not only validated that, but affirmed the urgent need to protect Unci Maka.

Mike Peters, a Sisseton-Wahpeton Tribal Member, lives in the Enemy Swim district near the western border of the reservation, approximately 20 miles from the site of the oil spill. Like many Tribal members, Peters was incensed to hear of an oil spill so near his home.

"My greatest concern is the safety of my family, my kids, and grandkids, and really all the people in this area no matter what race or color, because we all need clean water to live," Peters said. "The water and the land is important to us because everything has a spirit, and when anyone's spirit is covered in oil it saddens all of us.

As with other tribal nations, the Sissitonwan and Wahpetonwan Dakota have endured centuries of loss and ongoing erosion of land, culture, and their communal wellbeing. Everything that they have left, matters to them immensely, and their survival is tied directly to the land.

In 2008, the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate were plaintiffs in a lawsuit against Trans Canada, along with the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, the Santee Sioux Tribe of Nebraska, and the Yankton Sioux Tribe. Their goal: to protect their homelands and their communities from the devastation of oil spills like the one that just happened. In 2009, the lawsuit was dismissed for "lack of jurisdiction." But this didn't mean the fight was over. During the fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline, the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate extended their support, politically, financially, and with bodies on the ground in Standing Rock.

The Sissitonwan and Wahpetonwan Dakota are survivors. They are descendants of the Dakota Conflict of 1862 which resulted in the mass hanging of 38 Dakota men in Mankato, Minnesota-the largest mass execution in American history — and then the subsequent hanging of two more Dakota leaders who were captured in Canada. As prisoners of war, the remaining Sissitonwan and Wahpetonwan Dakota were exiled from Minnesota and then confined to various reservations throughout South Dakota, the Lake Traverse Reservation being one of them. On the reservation, they were deprived of the spiritual traditions that sustained them for generations. Life took a downturn back then, and one that the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate is still recovering from.

The original reservation was later reduced greatly after homestead acts allowed white settlers to come in and make claim to lands reserved for the Sissitonwan and Wahpetonwan Dakota. This resulted in even greater erosion of their tribal land base. Today, the Lake Traverse Indian Reservation is a patchwork of Native and non-Native-owned lands. And while the reduced resources that remain in their jurisdiction matter incredibly, lands outside of the reservation are still within their traditional territory. The land is still Unci Maka.

On the reservation or off, this oil spill has polluted the land, and the Dakota take this very seriously. While the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate awaits more answers, the questions and fears linger. How long is clean up going to take? Is this going to affect the ground water and the reservation's aquifer? Is TransCanada being honest about the severity of the damage? How is wildlife going to be affected?

In the meantime, tribal members are on alert, praying for the land, praying for their community, and for many, they are ramping up their efforts to stand against further desecration of Unci Maka. They do this not only out of self-preservation, but out of responsibility to their families, their community, to the land, and all life.

*****

Sarah Sunshine Manning is a citizen of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Indian Reservation in Idaho and Nevada, and a descendent of the Chippewa-Cree, and Hopi tribes. She is an independent journalist, and a resident of the Lake Traverse Indian Reservation in South Dakota.

Marshall Co. Commissioner: Oil spill not a threat to water

By Dan Santella

Amherst, SD – KELO – Nov. 17, 2017 – We have an update for you on the Keystone pipeline oil spill.

TransCanada, the company that built the Keystone pipeline, says around 210,000 gallons of oil has leaked out.

"At about six a.m. yesterday morning, our oil control technicians noticed a drop in pressure in that pipeline. They immediately shut the pipeline down" TransCanada spokesperson Mark Cooper said.

Marshall County Commissioner Paul Symens lives a little over two miles from the spill site.

"We've got a terrific emergency management team here in Marshall County. They were there yesterday after they got notice. They came out; our sheriff has been there. Our deputies are patrolling," Symens said.

Federal, state and regulatory agencies have now converged on this area.

"We've got engineering. We've got environmental groups. We've got other first responders. We've got equipment; vacuum trucks. We've got trucks to store the oil, and all that equipment is starting to move and mobilize to our sites," Cooper said.

Symens isn't worried about any threat to water.

"As far as danger to the public, there's nothing where it is that's a water issue. It won't be mixing with any water. It won't be contaminating any wells; it won't be doing of that," Symens said.

"So right now, as it relates to environmental impacts, we don't see any major impacts right now," Cooper said.

"One of my fears, if I had a fear, was if we had people coming in here to protest, to petition, to get in the way, and create other problems for the neighbors here that would be a problem. We haven't had that to this point," Symens said.

The TransCanada spokesperson says that the cause of the leak is under investigation.

(Editor's note: Paul Symens and his family operate a purebred Limousin cattle ranch; Paul is our former District I SD State Senator.)

Excerpt from TransCanada press release

Friday morning, Nov. 18 –

Frequently asked questions:

What progress has been made on site?

Overnight and today TransCanada has continued to make progress in cleaning up the site. Through the work, we have also re-affirmed that the incident has been controlled and that there are no further environmental impacts observed and no threat to public safety. There are currently over 75 people supporting our incident response - specialists in environmental management, metallurgy, engineering, pipeline integrity and emergency response. TransCanada has mobilized a full complement of equipment on site including track hoes, earth movers, hydrovacs, bobcats, safety and emergency response equipment, vacuum trucks and high-powered lighting for around-the-clock operations.

What steps are required for you to be able to locate the source?

The safety and security of the public and workers is our priority. As soon as we detected the first sign of an irregularity, TransCanada's state of the art leak detection shut down the pipeline within minutes, notified state and federal regulatory agencies, local officials and nearby residents. TransCanada personnel also physically confirmed that valves located up and down the pipeline from the incident site have been properly closed.

Crews and equipment were dispatched and the area is being managed to ensure safety and security for personnel and residents. TransCanada workers and nationally recognized, industry leading experts (with proper safety equipment) began developing response plans. We continue to work methodically and around- the-clock on this process.

From TransCanada, shared by Tribal radio station KXSW-FM –

TransCanada update on Amherst oil spill

Latest update – 12:27 p.m. CST, November 18, 2017 – We are continuing to make progress in our investigation to determine the cause of the leak on the Keystone Pipeline right-of-way. Also, additional equipment and personnel continue to be dispatched to the site for the clean-up and remediation work.

On-site specialists in Marshall County, South Dakota confirm the incident is under control and that there is no significant environmental impact observed or threat to public safety. Measures have also been put into place to deter wildlife from entering the area and sophisticated air-monitoring equipment is being used around-the-clock – though there have been no significant concerns.

From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer"

GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov

605-268-0502

Veteran in crisis? Call 1-800-273-8255, press 1

November: National Military Month

*A BIG SHOUT OUT TO DELORES JOHNSON, a resident of Sisseton who so unselfishly knitted a tote full of caps, gloves and scarfs for our coat, cap and glove drive. She is an elderly lady who is undergoing convalescent care and decided to make all of these to help keep our kids warm. A big HUG and thank you, it sure does show you how good, caring and helpful people are.

*MONDAY (NOV. 20) ALL VETERANS MEETING: At the TVSO Office at 6 PM sharp. If you are a veteran please attend. If you are a member of any of the Honor guard and marched or attended functions with then please attend. Commanders, please get your members on your roster to attend this meeting.

*THANKSGIVING WEEK: Thank a Veteran! Veterans that are elderly we will have a couple of Veterans making rounds and delivering pies to you. We will also take the time to talk a few minutes and find out what your plans are for Thanksgiving day, we do not want any of our Veterans to be alone and not have access to a Thanksgiving Day meal - We will talk to you on Wednesday. You can call our office with any questions. 698-3388. Happy Thanksgiving to you all - and remember there is always something to be thankful for, and I am thankful for you and this office as it allows us to do what we do best taking care of Veterans!

*2017-2018 VETERANS PRINCESS CROWNED! Congratulations to Journey Renville, Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate 2017-2018 Veterans Princess . She was crowned at the Veterans weekend Wacipi this past weekend. She is the daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Vernon Renville of Peever, South Dakota. Looking forward to having you represent the SWO Veterans at the events! Great job!

*November is recognized as National Military Month. Let's celebrate not only being a Veteran but what being a Veteran is all about. Don't forget the values that were ingrained in all of our heads- no brother is left behind. I saw the epitome of what this meant by 2 of our Vietnam Veteran families in helping another and they both wished to remain anonymous, as they didn't want anyone to feel they owe anyone or embarrassed, we granted this but they both taught us all a valuable lesson and reminder - Also, if you find it in your hearts we are donating any new or gently worn jackets to Westside- I did find out from the Secretaries Office that Derrick McCauley's program will be offering jackets to tribal member school kids contact Crystal Heminger, Tribal Secretary at 698-3911 for any questions.

*VETERANS: PLEASE CALL OUR OFFICE IF YOU NEED ASSITANCE; WE ARE HERE TO SERVE! We are asking that you get your appointment slips turned in as soon as you get your slip – do not wait the day before or 2 days before. We have other avenues that we can utilize and if we have at least 4-5 days in advance that will give us plenty of time. Thank you.

*WOMEN VETERANS CALL CENTER: 1-855-VA-WOMEN. Crisis Help Line: 1-800-273-8255, available 24/7, and tell them you are a veteran. All calls are confidential.

Contacts: Woodrow W. Keeble Memorial American Legion Post 314 – Delano Renville, Commander Cell # 268-0354 & Clayton Ellingson 1-605-924-1266; Vietnam Veterans Kit Fox Society - Doc Wanna, Commander Phone # 698-3299; Desert Era Veterans - Jesse Chanku, Commander 1-605-956-0197; and Geri Opsal, TVSO 698-3388 or 268-0502.

Have a great and safe week.

Geri Opsal, TVSO.

Tribal law enforcement announces joint human trafficking operation

Sisseton-Wahpeton Tribal Law Enforcement participated in a multi-jurisdictional human trafficking operation in September 2017.

Sisseton-Wahpeton Law Enforcement, the BIA Drug Division, and Codington County Sheriff's office, worked together.

Results:

*During the operation there were 780 incoming calls and text messages regarding human trafficking.

*91 unique suspects were identified.

*1 state drug arrest was made.

*1 potential recovery of a female.

Recent Tribal law enforcement arrests

Here is a list of recent arrests by Sisseton-Wahpeton Tribal Law Enforcement:

*Nov. 3, 2017: S-W Law Enforcement officers and investigators executed a search warrant in the Long Hollow area. Three adults were arrested for drug related charges. Three children were taken into child protection custody.

*Nov. 5, 2017: S-W Law Enforcement officers responded to a domestic assault involving a gun. One male was taken into custody.

*Nov. 9, 2017: S-W Law Enforcement officers responded to an aggravated assault. Investigation is ongoing.

*Nov. 10, 2017: S-W Law Enforcement officers attempted to make a traffic stop. Police Officers pursued the vehicle. One male and one female were arrested from the vehicle.

*Nov. 10, 201: S-W Law Enforcement officers conducted a traffic stop. During the investigation, a crystal substance was found and one person was taken into custody for drug-related charges.

*Nov. 12 2017: S-W Law Enforcement officers responded to an aggravated assault and assisted Roberts County Sheriff's Office with the investigation.

Sacred Fire to be lit at SWO Memorial Park

"This sacred fire movement is happening on a few different rez's, and we want to keep the fire going to help our people who are lost in addiction." Brandi J. DeCoteau.

 "Under the umbrella of drugs and alcohol comes all those social ills. Rape, molestation, codependency, child neglect, PTSD, everything you can think of and is happening. Through this fire, all of those issues can be addressed." - Lori PlentyChief

In cooperation with others lighting sacred fires across Indian country, Sisseton-Wahpeton supporters are lighting theirs at the SWO Memorial Park (former Tekakwitha Orphanage grounds) at Sisseton, this week.

"The fire will help us, help our people," said Brandi J. DeCoteau, one of the principal local organizers.

 "We have tipi's coming."

"And will AA, NA, Talking Circles, Meth support … whatever meetings are needed."

"A medicine man will light the fire, since it is a spirit fire," she said, "on Wednesday about noon."

The fire will burn for four days.

Brandi has posted the following is priority of purposes for having the Sisseton-Wahpeton sacred fire:

1st: Awareness.

2nd: Unity.

3rd: Healing.

The MHA Nation lit its sacred fire last Tuesday, November 14th.

A community dinner was held, with an address by Chairman Mark Fox.

The lighting kicked off a planned 30-day observance.

The Oneida Nation is also participating.

Community members are invited and encouraged to come and join at the memorial park during these four days at Sisseton.

Updates

"The purpose of the fire is enough is enough. Time to raise awareness and start to heal our people. Our ancestors didn't pray for us just to end up this way. Through this fire is where the healing is happening." – Brandi DeCoteau.

"Put all differences aside and unite. All circles come together and have one heart one mind and one prayer. The fire accepts everyone equally; we have to be that way with everyone." – Brandi DeCoteau.

(Note: Organizers are determining whether or not to extend the duration of the sacred fire to 30 days.)

Regional meth conference in Rapid City

Dates are December 12-13, 2017

Sponsored in part by the SWST

A regional meth conference is planned for December 12-13, 2017 in Rapid City. This date coincides with the Lakota Nation Invitational conference.

Many speakers are lined up, including: Kevin Killer, S.D. House of Representatives, of Pine Ridge; and Lori Walking Eagle; a long-time meth prevention advocate of Rosebud, SD; Brandi J. DeCoteau, SWST meth prevention organizer; and Julz Rich, founder and organizer of Mothers Against Meth Alliance (MAMA). And more!

This two-day conference will be a great learning experience, says organizer/consultant Crystal Owen.

The event is a continuation and expansion of the regional meth conferences that Crystal and Lori held across the region in 2015.

Another conference is being planned for spring 2018.

Watch for more information to come.

From the Pow Wow Committee –

Veterans Day 2017 Wacipi results

Here are results from this year's Veterans Day Wacipi, held the weekend of November 10-12, 2017, from the Pow Wow Committee:

Singing Contest:

4th place Standing Horse

3rd place Battel River

2nd place Midnight Express

1st place Mystic River

Mens Chicken:

4th place Claude Friday

3rd place Mike Gabbard

2nd place Dale McKay

1st place Nelson Baker

Golden Age Women:

4th place Melinda Goodwill

3rd place Madelyn Goodwill

2nd place Carmen Clairmont

1st place Denise One Star

Golden Age Men:

4th place Gabe Desrosiers

3rd place Jim Red Eagle

2nd place Terry Fiddler

1st place Donny McKay

Sr Womens Traditional:

4th place Denise Brave Heart

3rd place Marcy Fiddler

2nd place Orrie Little Sky

1st place Tosha Goodwill

Sr. Womens Jingle:

3rd place Winona Tahdooahnippan

2nd place Reva Hayes

1st place Dianne Jacobs

Sr. Womens Fancy:

4th place Delores Gabbard

3rd place Lisa Ewack

2nd place Kellie LeBeau

1st place Nahmi Lasley

Sr Mens Traditional:

3rd place Todd Brown

2nd place Tony Wahweotten

1st place Chaske LaBlanc

Sr. Mens Grass:

4th place Talbert Cutt

3rd place William Stewart

2nd place Travis Fire Cloud

1st place Jeff Downing

Sr Mens Fancy:

3rd place Clay Crawford

2nd place Tyler Lasley

1st place Amos Yazzie III

Jr Womens Traditional:

4th place Paige Brown

3rd place Wamblie Little Sky

2nd place Randi Bird

1st place Alva Fiddler

Jr Womens Jingle:

4th place Dionne Bull Bear

3rd place Maya Rojos

2nd place Mikah Whitecloud

1st place Makayla Brave Heart

Jr Womens Fancy Shawl:

4th place Shaylynn Bird

3rd place Mimi Souksavath

2nd place Laryn Oakes

1st place Bobbie Lynn Fredricks

Jr Mens Traditional:

4th place Sam Slickpoo

3rd place Triston Lasley

2nd place Shane Mitchell

1st place Lakota Little Sky

Jr Mens Grass:

4th place CJ Lasley

3rd place Terence Friday

2nd place Luke Cloud

1st place David Baker

Jr Mens Fancy:

4th place Clay Crawford Jr.

3rd place Kenny Pratt Jr.

2nd place White Coyote Holy Bull

1st place Canku One Star

Jr Girls Traditional:

4th place Jayda Cavanaugh

3rd place Georgia Alex

2nd place Kaliah Eagle

1st place Shawntay Iron Horse

Jr Girls Jingle:

4th place Andi Rojos

3rd place Carlynne Walking Eagle

2nd place Naomi Lieb

1st place Jaia Bursheim

Jr Girls Fancy Shawl:

4th place Seneca Stanley

3rd place Violet Chavez

2nd place Rayanna Bird

1st place Red Star Cavanaugh

Jr Boys Traditional:

4th place Jaxon End of Horn

3rd place Lawrence Ducheneax

2nd place Misun Clairmont

1st place Wanbdi Chaske

Jr Boys Grass:

4th place Jaryus Goodsell

3rd place Tristo Street

2nd place Teyton Backward

1st place Reondre Greeley

Jr Boys Fancy:

4th place Timothy Gabbard

3rd place Luke Cloud II

2nd place Adlai Cleveland

1st place Cole Patrick

Teen Girls Traditional:

4th place Alexa Gabbard

3rd place Sparrow Little Sky

2nd place Daevanna Bull Bear

1st place Nelenah Grey Eyes

Teen Girls Jingle

4th place Lily Smith

3rd place Uriah Little Hoop

2nd place Tianna Wright

1st place Stormy Hayes

Teen Girls Fancy Shawl

4th place Verna Max

3rd place Micayla Silas

2nd place Lori Kingbird

1st place Emaree Jayne LeBeau

Teen Boys Traditional:

4th place Lennox Lasley

3rd place Travis Brave Heart

2nd place Ira High Elk

1st place Jonah Jackson

Teen Boys Grass:

4th place Mervel LaRose

3rd place Dawnson Yellow Fat

2nd place Sedrick Hensley

1st  place Wakinyan Fiddler

Teen Boys Fancy:

3rd place David Cleveland

2nd place Buster Cleveland

1st place Brenden Patrick          

Rural areas at risk as water levels drop in massive aquifer

Denver, CO – AP – The draining of a massive aquifer that underlies portions of eight states in the central U.S. is drying up streams, causing fish to disappear and threatening the livelihood of farmers who rely on it for their crops.

Water levels in the Ogallala aquifer have been dropping for decades as irrigators pump water faster than rainfall can recharge it.

An analysis of federal data found the Ogallala aquifer shrank twice as fast over the past six years compared with the previous 60, The Denver Post reports.

The drawdown has become so severe that streams are drying at a rate of 6 miles per year and some highly resilient fish are disappearing. In rural areas, farmers and ranchers worry they will no longer have enough water for their livestock and crops as the aquifer is depleted.

The aquifer lost 10.7 million acre-feet of storage between 2013 and 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey said in a June report.

"Now I never know, from one minute to the next, when I turn on a faucet or hydrant, whether there will be water or not," said Lois Scott, 75, who lives west of Cope, Colorado, north of the frequently bone-dry bed of the Arikaree River.

A 40-foot well her grandfather dug by hand in 1914 gave water until recently, she said, lamenting the loss of lawns where children once frolicked and green pastures for cows. Scott's now considering a move to Brush, Colorado, and leaving her family's historic homestead farm.

"This will truly become the Great American Desert," she said.

Also known as the High Plains Aquifer, the Ogallala underlies 175,000 square miles (453,000 square kilometers), including parts of Colorado, Wyoming Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota and Texas. That's one of the primary agricultural regions of the U.S., producing $35 billion in crops annually.

Farmers and ranchers have been tapping into the aquifer since the 1930s to boost production and help them get by in times of drought.

However, overpumping has dried up 358 miles of surface rivers and streams across a 200-square-mile area covering eastern Colorado, western Kansas and Nebraska, according to researchers from Colorado State University and Kansas State University.

If farmers keep pumping water at the current pace, another 177 miles of rivers and streams will be lost before 2060, the researchers determined.

"We have almost completely changed the species of fish that can survive in those streams, compared with what was there historically. This is really a catastrophic change," said Kansas State University conservation biologist Keith Gido, one of the authors of a report on the aquifer published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

If all pumping stopped immediately, it would still take hundreds of years for rain-fed streams and rivers to recharge the aquifer, Gido said.

(Editor's note: Common sense observations tell us that water in the aquifers of the Lake Traverse Reservation [including the Veblen Aquifer] are also being depleted, although the South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources [DENR], which has oversight, assures citizens that it conservatively manages water resources so that aquifers are naturally replenished annually. The government wouldn't cover up the facts to protect industry – including the giant dairy CAFOs – would it?)

Shared from Indigenous Environmental Network –

Rights of Nature emerges as alternative to Climate Mitigation and Adaptation

Bonn, Germany – Concluding the first week of UNFCCC COP 23 climate conference in Bonn, it is clear that many civil society groups, scientists and economists believe the general climate framework will not resolve chaotic climate conditions. At the opening of the conference, COP 23 President and Prime Minister of Fiji, Frank Bainimarama remarked, "The need for urgency is obvious. Our world is in distress from the extreme weather events caused by climate change – destructive hurricanes, fires, floods, droughts, melting ice, and changes to agriculture that threaten our food security." These civil society groups argue that while the rhetoric of the negotiators is good, the actions will not serve the needs of climate-impacted communities.

Top climate scientist James Hansen, who spoke in Bonn this week, agrees. "Governments that say climate change is a problem and then propose half-baked solutions that don't solve anything are in some ways a bigger problem than the Trump-type governments. Hansen, a former NASA climate scientist has previously called the Paris Agreement "a fraud," adding, "As long as fossil fuels appear to be the cheapest fuels out there, they will be continued to be burned."

In a new report released in Bonn, Rights of Nature: Rights-Based Law for Systemic Change, the authors point to a fast-growing body of international law that seeks to change how decisions about the climate and ecosystem protection are made. "Climate disruption is the direct result of human activities pushing beyond the limits of Natural Law," the editors note, "Recognizing the Earth as a living system of which humans are a part, rather than as human property to be owned and destroyed is a fundamental shift from the climate capitalism embedded in the DNA of trade deals, environmental policies and treaties around the world—including the Paris Agreement."

Current country commitments of the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) of the UN Paris Agreement add up to a 3+ o C rise in global temperature, an outcome that will dwarf the ravages of recent global record-breaking hurricanes, fires and droughts. "Climate science tell us we need to keep global temperatures to a 1.5 oC rise, something that cannot be accomplished unless we leave 80% or more of fossil fuel reserves in the ground," editors note. "The Paris Agreement lacks a plan to accomplish that and does not protect the communities most-impacted."

The report makes it clear that our current systems of law and corporate power are exacerbating climate change and that carbon, biodiversity and conservation offset schemes further the dangerous financialization processes that enable Nature to be privatized, commodified and traded in financial market systems. The editors asks, does it make any sense to try to protect nature by further subjecting ecosystems to an economic and legal system that caused the damage in the first place?

The report, produced by the groups; Movement Rights, Indigenous Environmental Network, and the Women's Earth and Climate Action Network, explores not just the idea of a shift toward recognizing rights of ecosystems but includes global examples from around the world where these new laws are taking root. In the last year alone, New Zealand and India have recognized rivers as rights-bearing entities that now "own" themselves. They join the fast-growing list of 7 countries and dozens of local U.S. communities including Indigenous Nations that are finding the only way forward to protect human communities is to shift our legal frameworks to align with natural law.

Thousands of scientists issue bleak 'second notice' to humanity

By Sarah Kaplan

Washington Post – Nov. 13, 2017 – In late 1992, 1,700 scientists from around the world issued a dire "warning to humanity." They said humans had pushed Earth's ecosystems to their breaking point and were well on the way to ruining the planet. The letter listed environmental impacts like they were biblical plagues — stratospheric ozone depletion, air and water pollution, the collapse of fisheries and loss of soil productivity, deforestation, species loss and catastrophic global climate change caused by the burning of fossil fuels.

"If not checked," wrote the scientists, led by particle physicist and Union of Concerned Scientists co-founder Henry Kendall, "many of our current practices put at serious risk the future that we wish for human society and the plant and animal kingdoms, and may so alter the living world that it will be unable to sustain life in the manner that we know."

But things were only going to get worse.

To mark the letter's 25th anniversary, researchers have issued a bracing follow-up. In a communique published Monday in the journal BioScience, more than 15,000 scientists from 184 countries assess the world's latest responses to various environmental threats. Once again, they find us sorely wanting.

"Humanity has failed to make sufficient progress in generally solving these foreseen environmental challenges, and alarmingly, most of them are getting far worse," they write.

This letter, spearheaded by Oregon State University ecologist William Ripple, serves as a "second notice," the authors say: "Soon it will be too late to shift course away from our failing trajectory."

Global climate change sits atop the new letter's list of planetary threats. Global average temperatures have risen by more than half a degree Celsius since 1992, and annual carbon dioxide emissions have increased by 62 percent.

But it's far from the only problem people face. Access to fresh water has declined, as has the amount of forestland and the number of wild-caught fish (a marker of the health of global fisheries). The number of ocean dead zones has increased. The human population grew by a whopping 2 billion, while the populations of all other mammals, reptiles, amphibians and fish have declined by nearly 30 percent.

The lone bright spot exists way up in the stratosphere, where the hole in the planet's protective ozone layer has shrunk to its smallest size since 1988. Scientists credit that progress to the phasing out of chlorofluorocarbons — chemicals once used in refrigerators, air conditioners and aerosol cans that trigger reactions in the atmosphere to break down ozone.

"The rapid global decline in ozone depleting substances shows that we can make positive change when we act decisively," the letter says.

The authors offer 13 suggestions for reining in our impact on the planet, including establishing nature reserves, reducing food waste, developing green technologies and establishing economic incentives to shift patterns of consumption.

To this end, Ripple and his colleagues have formed a new organization, the Alliance of World Scientists, aimed at providing a science-based perspective on issues affecting the well-being of people and the planet.

"Scientists are in the business of analyzing data and looking at the long-term consequences," Ripple said in a release. "Those who signed this second warning aren't just raising a false alarm. They are acknowledging the obvious signs that we are heading down an unsustainable path. We are hoping that our paper will ignite a widespread public debate about the global environment and climate."

Editorials –

Sota editorial –

Keystone I leak back story

Last Thursday, TransCanada issued a press release stating that a leak had occurred in its Keystone I crude oil pipeline running through northeast South Dakota.

TransCanada is the international corporation behind the pumping and transporting of Canada's tar sands crude oil to refineries here in the U.S. Much of the oil is exported overseas.

 Nearly a decade ago, when TransCanada and its allies proposed Keystone I, the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe – through the Tribal Historic Preservation Office (THPO) – joined a lawsuit against its permitting.

Behind the court case was a battle to protect the environment from possible – some would say, "likely" or "inevitable" spills – contamination. That contamination, the argument goes, impacts surface water, land, and cultural sites. Of course, we who have been working for several years now with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Mni Wiconi, and No DAPL movement, understand the risks. Risks not only from ill-advised and technologically obsolete fracking shale and pumping crude oil … but from another exponentially expanding of harmful industrial agriculture. How often have readers been informed of the Veblen mega-CAFOs? That the Lake Traverse Reservation is arguably the home of the largest concentration of dairy CAFOs in the Upper Midwest? Many times.

Well, back to Keystone I.

The SWST and the other tribes lost in court, and the Keystone I pipeline was constructed in 2008.

Remember, please, that the water table was high then.

Fields were flooded, and roads closed due to high water.

Pipeline workers fought the water while laying the pipe.

What about that pipe?

Critics claimed that pipe being used was made in India, and substandard – not of the high quality promised by the corporate lobbyists who assured the public everything was highest quality, and leaks were virtually assured to pose minimal risk … oh, and in the event of a leak there were resources to clean it up immediately.

And when workers were laying the pipe in the trenches, sections of the line would float to the surface, making installation difficult.

Did it also degrade the integrity of pipe that was already substandard and would eventually cause problems when the earth – which it always has and always will – shifts?

Perhaps.

This is a big part of this back story.

It is not all.

Initial estimate shows that 5,000 barrels of crude oil – 42 gallons per barrel, that's 210,000 gallons – leaked from the line before it was shut down.

That is an estimate, and TransCanada and the South Dakota DENR will provide updates as more information becomes available.

The site is reported to be about 100 yards in a conservation set-aside field.

A small area for such a great amount of oil.

TransCanada and the DENR report there is no need for the public to be alarmed, and no, or at least, very little risk of negative environmental impact.

If the initial estimate is in the ball park of being correct, that means that nearly a quarter of a million gallons of fluids leaked from the pipeline.

That brings up another point.

The crude oil being pumped is injected with proprietary chemicals to allow it to flow efficiently through the pipe.

We don't know what is in that soup.

It's like the proprietary "secret" formulas used in hydraulic fracturing of the oil shale.

We cannot know what's in that toxic soup because of the so-called Halliburton rule (named for former Vice-President Dick Cheney, who has long had business ties to Halliburton) which keeps these ingredients secret to protect the international corporations that own patent rights.

So we must not deny that yes, risks do exist.

And we argue against permitting the Keystone XL pipeline project.

Denied during the Obama presidency, the Trump administration has put it back on the table.

We encourage readers to ask their Congressional delegates, and state public utilities commissions, to deny permitting another pipeline.

After all, as we know, it isn't a matter of "if" they will leak; it's a matter of "when."

Ask our neighbors over in Marshall County understand quite well.

Notes

Substandard Pipe charged by Plains Justice

*June 2010 - Plains Justice released a report showing that defective steel might have been used in TransCanada's already constructed Keystone pipeline.

"During a recent pipeline building boom, the steel pipe industry rushed to make pipe for a large number of new pipelines. Some manufacturers got sloppy with safety standards," said Paul Blackburn, a Plains Justice attorney who has researched the issue.

Plains Justice also sent a letter asking the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) to fully investigate and to reduce the pipeline's operating pressure until it can be fully tested.

"The Keystone pipeline is one of the largest pipelines in existence and will operate at very high pressure and high temperature, so it must not break," said Blackburn.

Government documents show that Welspun, a pipe manufacturer in India, produced hundreds of substandard pipe joints in 2007 and 2008. Photos taken during construction of the Keystone pipeline show that TransCanada acquired pipe from Welspun during this same time.

"To protect the public, PHMSA should reduce the Keystone pipeline's maximum allowable operating pressure until it can be properly inspected using a high-resolution caliper test. This is a special test that is different than ones that companies typically do before starting to operate pipelines," Blackburn added.

The Plains Justice report, Use of Substandard Steel by the U.S. Pipeline Industry, 2007 to 2009, documents a pattern of production and use of substandard pipe steel in large new pipelines during a major boom in pipeline construction.

The report is based on 3,710 pages of federal safety documents that were released to Plains Justice in response to a Freedom of Information Act request. (https://tarsandspipelines.wordpress.com/2010/06/29/does-the-keystone-pipeline-contain-defective-steel/)

Proprietary/Secret additives

*To reduce pressure drop and increase pipeline capacity, oil industry has utilized drag reducing agents. Drag-reducing agents, or drag-reducing polymers, are additives in pipelines that reduce turbulence in a pipe. Usually used in petroleum pipelines, they increase the pipeline capacity by reducing turbulence and therefore allowing the oil to flow more efficiently [1]. In addition to drag reducing agents, another group of chemicals called "Incorporative Additives", which reduces crude oil viscosity, may be used. (http://www.jmcampbell.com/tip-of-the-month/2015/06/effect-of-chemical-additive-on-crude-oil-pipeline-pressure-drop/)

More

Not part of a "back story," but to show what a world of illusion this is, we share an excerpt from a Nov. 18, 2017 AP article filed in Nebraska:

"Discovery of a 210,000 gallon oil leak in Marshall County, SD from the Keystone pipeline would seem to be poor timing four days before regulators in Nebraska decide whether to allow a major expansion of the system, but officials say state law does not allow pipeline safety to be a factor in their decision."

Don't worry, people, be comfortable knowing you and your children and their children are cradled in the safe hands of your "officials."

-- cdf

Sota guest editorial/first in a series –

"Essays on spirit, culture, tradition"

The following is the first in a series of essays provided in interviews by Joe Williams, SWST elder.

By Sierra Wolcott

Sota Assistant Editor

As a people we have been through a lot, we all know that.

We also know that, because of this traumatic history, we have a lot of healing to do.

The way towards that healing is a matter or debate, and even of contention.

This series of articles featuring interviews with Joe Williams is meant to serve as the beginning of a concerted effort to create a vital conversation.

A conversation about what it means to be Dakota, going forward.

Asking the question, how do we as a nation and a people move forward in this modern world while holding fast to our traditional way of being.

Joe Williams has ideas on how to help close the gap between the modern way we live and our traditional way.

For starters, here is a list of ways of being that, he said, reflects how he remembers being taught growing up:

Ten-ish commandments/Rules for Society:

Knowledge of Language

Sharing

Respect for Others

Cooperation

Love for children

Hard work

Knowledge of family tree

Avoidance of conflict

Respect for nature

Spirituality

Humor

Family roles

Hunter success

Domestic skills

Humility

Responsibility to tribe

(Excerpt from "Fifty Miles from Tomorrow: A Memoir of Alaska and the Real People" by William L. Iggiagruk Hensley.)

Next in this series – from talking points to conversation.

Sota guest editorial –

This November, try something new: Decolonize your mind

I tend to lie low during Native American History Month and dodge the Moon of Explaining Indians to White People. But not this year.

By Mary Annette Pember

Yes Magazine – Nov. 13, 2017 – Traditionally, Ojibwe people observe a lunar calendar. Each moon, or giizis, is often named after activities conducted during those times, weather, harvests, or other notable things in Ojibwe life. November coincides with Gashkadino-Giizis or Freezing Over Moon.

Since beginning my career as a journalist, however, I have come to think of November, National Native American Heritage Month, as the Moon of Explaining Indians to White People.

Inevitably I get requests from editors of mainstream publications to write opinion pieces about the Native perspective on the month and the tie to Thanksgiving.

Similarly, local church, school, and civic organizations approach me to present a generic version of Native dancing, crafts, traditional food preparation, spirituality, and/or provide a comprehensive but extremely brief and benign history of Native peoples in the United States. Most of these requests, unfortunately, frame Native folks firmly in the past tense.

Early in my career, I would take on these requests and assignments with a fire-in-the-belly determination to shatter stereotypes, expose the full history of federal policies toward Native peoples, and most importantly, let my neighbors know we are still here.

Mostly, however, folks didn't want to hear about the diversity of Native cultures, the complexity and history of federal policies affecting us, our sophisticated understanding of our relationship to the earth, or the fact that Native peoples embrace popular culture in addition to their own traditions.

My audience's eyes would glaze over at these talks. They wanted to learn instead about how Native peoples lived before European contact. They wanted to know about how they could participate in ceremonies, dances, drumming, and spirituality. They wanted me to give them Indian names, identify their power animals, and teach them how to be shamans. Mostly they just wanted to play Indian.

During my long tenure as an Ojibwe woman and a journalist, I've witnessed popular culture's interest in Native peoples wax and wane. I've lived through the beginnings of the American Indian Movement, Wounded Knee, Alcatraz, and, most recently, Standing Rock.

Unfortunately, the patterns of public narrative regarding Native peoples show a shocking sameness. We are still regarded as denizens of history, defined by our "plight," or seen as supernatural noble, selfless defenders of the Earth. Our cultures, traditions, and spirituality have been subsumed into the great buffet of American consumerism; we are food for hipster and New Age appropriation, one in the dizzying blur of passing social memes.

All of it has become too tedious and painful, so I tend to lie low in November and hope to dodge the Moon of Explaining Indians to White People.

This year, however, events on the ground in Indian Country and beyond have awakened me from my cranky sleep of ennui. The fallout from climate change, exacerbated by the unbridled greed of the world's current politicians and their supporters, is on track to make our Earth uninhabitable. The events at Standing Rock, and the public attention they garnered regarding the importance of safe water and the environmental dangers posed by expanded reliance on fossil fuels, revealed a growing global awareness that business as usual—the colonial model of ever-growing exploitation—is unsustainable. Although millennials working to forward their own interests and brands and becoming instant experts on Indians were thick on the ground at Standing Rock, there was a flurry of something almost intangible in the camps. People let their guards down and found the sacred, if only for a few fleeting moments.

Therefore, emboldened by this growing awareness, I would like to make a modest proposal for commemorating Native American Heritage Month: Decolonize your mind. Find the sacred.

You can do this easily. You don't need to buy anything. No ceremony; name change, travel; acquisition of a power animal; funding; community outreach; or creation of a committee, program, or agency is required.

Make no mistake, however: Decolonizing the mind is not without risk or discomfort.

To decolonize is not only an act of humility and acceptance; it requires the courage to take responsibility for our role in this great, relentless process that is our life on Earth. In decolonizing our minds, we embrace the notion that we are a part of rather than apart from the Earth. Whether or not we enjoy camping or prefer to dwell in high-rise apartments without our feet ever leaving pavement, we are all subject to the same natural processes. There is no escape; there is only community and responsibility.

The understanding that humans are merely one part of a huge complex of interconnected creatures is the basic tenet of most Native cosmologies. In recognizing this tenet, we can't help but love and hold the Earth and ourselves sacred. So how do we begin?

The first Christian missionaries who proselytized among the Ojibwe in the 17th century found the people willing to listen to priests talk of Jesus and the Bible. In their dispatches home, however, the missionaries complained that the Ojibwe spent far too much time in idle visiting, leaving productive tasks undone.

Although unrecognized and appreciated by the missionaries, the Ojibwe were engaged in important work. These spans of unstructured shared time allowed people to engage spiritually and grow to understand needs and formulate paths forward. Ojibwe know and value the power of visiting. Unencumbered by agenda points and outcomes, we trust that through prayer and community that we can determine how to honor and care for the environment, each other, and ourselves.

So during the month of the Freezing Over Moon, why not spend time visiting with others especially those whose ethnicity and social class differs from your own? Eat, drink coffee, let silence fall, and wait to find out what needs to be done. At first, it might be just about being human together; decolonization needs these roots to begin.

*****

Mary Annette Pember wrote this article for YES! Magazine. Mary, an independent journalist, has been writing about Native American people and issues since 2000 for Indian Country Today Media Network, ReWire News, the Guardian, and others. She has provided in depth coverage of sexual violence against Native women, the impact of historical trauma, and the importance of spirituality, culture, and language for Native peoples. A winner of several media awards and fellowships including the Clarion, Rosalyn Carter Fellowship for Mental Health Journalism, University of S. California Annenberg National Health Fellowship, and others, she is an enrolled member of the Red Cliff Band of Wisconsin Ojibwe. See more of her work at mapember.com

(Editor's note: Find Yes! magazine online at www.yesmagazine.org)

Brief editorial comments from the editor's desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

Our biggest story is that of the Keystone I pipeline leak in nearby Marshall County.

We share several news articles, as well as statements by SWST Chairman Dave Flute.

The Chairman has said repeatedly his main concern is for the safety and well-being of those living on the Lake Traverse Reservation, that they have access to clean water, and that everything possible be done to ensure that the ground and water are clean of contamination.

Please read the Chairman's statements on page one.

Thanks to Tom Wilson, KXSW Tribal radio announcer, who went to the site Thursday evening and interviewed the Marshall County EMS Coordinator and returned on Friday. News of his Friday late morning interview with the Chairman is in our news coverage on the front page.

We'd also like to thank Julian Boucher for providing photos of the staging area, where trucks and heavy equipment were being assembled for the clean-up on Friday; and wambdi-eye photographer John Heminger, who provided an aerial view of the terrain in Marshall County. Thank you to Greenpeace and Sarah Sunshine Manning for getting John up in the air!

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Our thanks to Danielle DeCoteau for submitting the pow wow committee's results for the 2017 Veterans Day Wacipi.

Also thank you to photographer John Heminger.

We are grateful to be able to share some of John's great pictures from the wacipi.

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Winter 2017 general council has been scheduled for Monday and Tuesday, December 18 and 19.

Please read the agenda for each day's reports.

Also, we encourage all Tribal members to attend. If at all possible.

This is your annual meeting. While the June session is about the Tribe's financial condition, the December session is an opportunity to see the inner workings of the Tribal programs.

These are your programs.

Hope to see a good turnout of members in attendance.

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Please read about the lighting of the sacred fire this week at SWO Memorial Park, a regional meth conference partly sponsored by the SWST to be held at Rapid City this December, and several youth events sponsored by the Tribe's Education and Youth departments.

Winter Day camp will be sponsored and staffed by the Tribal Education Department, Wiyukcan ka Enunpi Project, Native Connections, MSPI, Youth Department, and Generation Indigenous. The date and time of the camp will be December 9th 8:00 AM – 6:00 PM and will take place at the Old Agency Community center.

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This week we are publishing the first in a series of interviews our Assistant Editor Sierra Wolcott is conducting with Joe Williams.

Joe wants to introduce ideas to the Oyate, in hopes of creating a new dialogue, or conversation, about the role of Dakota history, culture, language and spirituality can play in healing today and going forward.

Watch for more as shared from Joe.

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We published a picture of SWST Vietnam combat veteran Dennis Isaac Seely last week, with his Indian motorcycle.

He was preparing to attend Rapid City's Veterans Day parade, where he joined a group of fellow veterans on their bikes.

Here's what he said about the event afterwards:

Got this new Vietnam flag, with all the units on the flag: US Marine Corp., US Army, US Navy, US Air Force, US Coast Guard. In the center of the flag is an American Eagle with all the units on the black ends of the eagle feathers. Also in the center is a lack emblem with the words: "All gave some, and some gave all" and also in the circle was KIA – "the Brave and the Free (America Remembers)."

There were about 200 veterans on their Indian and Harley Davidson motorcycles, a lot of people – kids and veterans – standing on the sidewalk.

This was the largest turnout for a Veterans Day parade in Rapid City that I have ever witnessed.

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Elder's Meditation:

A warrior who had more than he needed would make a feast. He went around and invited the old and needy....The man who would thank the food--some worthy old medicine man or warrior--said: "...look to the old, they are worthy of old age; they have seen their days and proven themselves. With the help of the Great Spirit, they have attained a ripe old age. At this age the old can predict or give knowledge or wisdom, whatever it is; it is so. At the end is a cane. You and your family shall get to where the cane is."

- Black Elk, Oglala Sioux Holy Man

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Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

You cannot simultaneously prevent and prepare for war. Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955), (attributed)

The man who insists on seeing with perfect clearness before he decides, never decides. Henri-Frédéric Amiel

An undefined problem has an infinite number of solutions. Robert A. Humphrey

Never fight an inanimate object. P. J. O'Rourke (1947 - )

Nothing is really work unless you would rather be doing something else. James M. Barrie (1860 - 1937)

Sanity is a madness put to good use. George Santayana (1863 - 1952)

Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards. Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

The test for whether or not you can hold a job should not be the arrangement of your chromosomes. Bella Abzug (1920 - )

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The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Services held for Samuel Sine

Samuel Morris Sine July 01, 1982 - November 11, 2017

Funeral Service for Samuel Morris Sine, 35 of Sisseton, SD will be held on Thursday, November 16, 2017 at 1:00 P.M. at the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Community Center. There will be an all night Wake on Wednesday, November 15, 2017 starting at 7:00 P.M. Sam passed away at his home on November 11, 2017.

 

Funeral service for Samuel Sine, 35 of Sisseton, SD was held last Thursday afternoon, November 16, 2017, at the SWST community center, Agency Village, SD, with Bishop Daniel Blank officiating.

Pianist was Kay Bursheim.

Drum group was Mato Ho Tanka.

Pallbearers were John German Jr., Ryan German, Nicholas Schaller, Alec Erdrich, Joseph Erdrich, Will Crawford, Zion Zetina, Chris Schaller, Woody Hawkins, Aaron Erdrich, and Dr. Richard Meyers.

Honorary pallbearers were Charlie Crawford, Caroline Clauson, Bryan Akipa, Ashley German, Russell Hawkins, DelRay German, Peter Warhol, Loren Greeley, Tim White, Stacy Farmer and Kevin Farmer.

Interment is in the Mayasan Presbyterian Cemetery, Sisseton, SD.

Wake service was held Wednesday evening at the community center.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD was in charge of funeral arrangements.

Samuel Morris Sine, "Sam," was born on July 1, 1982, in Sisseton, SD.

His Dakota name was given to him by his Deksi Bryan Akipa and Deksi Guy Canku. They gave him the name Wakanhdi Owanca, which means Lightning All Over.

His mother is Debra Crawford, and fathers are Emerson Joe Mandan and Daniel Sine.

Sam went to elementary and middle school in Wahiawa, Hawaii and Madison, Wisconsin.

As an elementary student living in Hawaii, he learned much of the Hawaiian culture, learning the male hula dance and much of their language.

While in middle school, Sam played the violin for several years.

He was also a member of a Ho-Chunk drum group called Red Sons and they sang at many powwows and family gatherings. This was a very happy and joyful time in Sam's life.

He later attended Sisseton High School after his family moved home in 1996.

He later received his GED, and he took classes at Sisseton Wahpeton College.

Sam was an excellent carpenter; he framed houses and worked for multiple construction companies in Sioux Falls, and was even promoted as a foreman. Sam took a lot of pride in his carpentry skills. He even was chosen to frame a house that was aired on the TV show Extreme Makeover: Home Edition on ABC.

He was a very hands on person, as well as a very talented artist. He sketched intricate portraits and natural landscapes from pencil and pen.

He was an avid reader with a sharp mind and excellent memory, and a love for books about Dakota culture and history.

When he was 14 years old he went to a boot camp in Custer, SD. Out of 90 kids he was awarded two top awards: (1) top athletic abilities, and (2) best academic performance. However, the officials would allow him to choose only one award, and he chose to accept the academic award.

Sam enjoyed sports, both, as a spectator and participant. Sam loved football and was a fanatic for the Green Bay Packers. He enjoyed playing baseball and even dabbled into Mixed Martial Arts (MMA). He had two MMA fights training alongside his cousin, and best friend, John German Jr. Those fights took place in Aberdeen, SD and he took pride in accomplishing his goal.

His love of sports aside, above all, the thing he cherished most in the world was his children and family. He absolutely loved playing with his children, tickling them, throwing them over his shoulder, and having a good wrestling match. His children brought him so much joy!

What people will remember most about Sam is that he greeted everyone with acknowledgment of his relationship to you and a big hug and kiss. If Sam ever teased you, you knew he loved you. Sam's "love language" was the art of teasing, laughter, hugs, kisses on the cheek, and providing service.

As one auntie said, "Anyone who met him, liked him. There was nothing not to like about Sam. He had a beautiful heart."

Although Sam had so many talents and was full of potential, he unfortunately wasn't able to develop those talents on Earth due to his addiction to alcohol. His addiction started very young and sadly has come to an end in a way so many within Indian Country can relate to, via substance abuse and suicide. He was overcome by his addiction having undergone treatment numerous times in hopes of healing, but never quite overcoming the disease of alcoholism.

However, now in the Spirit World, Sam is free of addiction and can now continue to develop all of his talents. Sam was a very special spirit, he had many spiritual gifts.

One of his spiritual gifts was his uncanny ability to receive beautiful and symbolic dreams. He also got promptings and premonitions to help keep him and his family safe. Various family members can relay numerous stories of these unique and mysterious wonders.

He had great faith and love for the Creator. In the last couple years of his life, he wanted to learn more about traditional ways and practices. He really loved the Dakota way of life, culture, and language. He was truly proud to be Dakota.

Sam passed away on November 11, 2017 at his home in Sisseton, SD.

Samuel is survived by his children, Samuel Sine of Sioux Falls, SD, Emerson Sine of Peever, SD, Wiconi Sine of Peever, SD and step son Michael Smith of Peever SD; his mother Debbie Crawford of Sisseton, SD; his father Emerson Mandan of Sisseton, SD and Daniel Sine of Aberdeen, SD; two sisters, Rachel Sine-Meyers of Porcupine, SD and Camille Sine of Sisseton, SD; maternal grandmother Amy Crawford of Sisseton, SD and paternal grandmother, Martha Mandan of Sisseton, SD; and a special friend, Caroline Clauson of Sioux Falls, SD; half siblings, Julia Mandan, Sara Mandan, Martha Mandan and Emerson Mandan of Alaska, and one hunka sister Ashley German.

Sam was preceded in death by his daughter, Aleeyah Cook, paternal grandfather Syril Renville, maternal grandfather, Franklin Crawford, and Auntie Jolene Mandan.

Services for Stephen Hinhan Maza (Iron Owl) Hoksina

Stephen Hoksina, "Hinhan Maza" (Iron Owl), 101, an enrolled member of the Spirit Lake Tribe, passed away at his home in rural Devils Lake, ND surrounded by his loving family and in the care of his niece and Altru Hospice.

Stephen was born, Easter Sunday afternoon, April 9, 1916 to Agnes Red Horse and Jessie Hoksina, at Laillie, rural Fort Totten, near Oberon, ND. He was raised as an only child by his grandfather Mazawanapeya until his death and then lived with his grandparents Bessie and Smiley Smith, and spent time with his Grandma Angeline through-out summer years. He attended the local Catholic mission schools and Fort Totten High School. He was fluent in his Dakota language his entire life. He was raised in the Dakota way. He held strong kinship customs where prayer and singing were a part of everyone's home life. He was also brought up in the Presbyterian Church

Stephen attended and studied at Wahpeton State School of Science and studied Accounting. He enrolled, attended and graduated at Crown Bible College in Minnesota where he studied Theology, voice, singing and piano lessons. To support himself, he worked in packing plants and other plant factories as well as working for a Community Credit Corporation as an accountant.

In 1946, after bible college graduation, he moved to Chillton, Wisconsin to assist in the pastoral leadership of the local Indian community church. While there he began working for the US Department of Health as an Environmental Health worker and later transferred to Pine Ridge, SD to continue in the same field of work.

On March 23, 1956, while in Pine Ridge, Stephen was united in marriage to Mabel Emge of Bellville, Illinois. They both loved each other faithfully, sharing the same values. They studied biblical devotional readings and scripture throughout their married life. While both remained employed with Pine Ridge IHS for a time, they decided to transfer to Fort Belknap, Montana Service Unit and later to Tuba City, Arizona where they both retired after many years of service and moved to Sedona, Arizona.

In retirement they continued to travel the world together; voyaging trips to the Hawaiian Islands, Central and South America, Mexico City, and other places such as the World's Fair in Japan, Hong Kong, China, Alaska, and New Zealand. Stephen always shared the Dakota culture and traditions where ever he traveled. He also exemplified a life of humility, generosity, kindness, love and prayer where ever he traveled. Sad times hit after a time of hospitalizations, his beloved wife, (his sweets) Mabel passed on in 1972.

In 1979, Stephen returned to the Spirit Lake Nation, making his home in Devils Lake, ND. Stephen's motto in life was "keep busy, stay active". While immediately noticing the changes in his Dakota community traditions that involved the down size in speaking the language, he later decided to assist with contributing his time, teachings and wisdoms as he was a lifetime fluent speaker, he joined the Dakota Language Preservation Group at CCCC. He also continued to attend services at Bdecan Presbyterian Church in Wood Lake as he truly loved the Lord Jesus Christ his Savior.

He prayed daily for all of his family, relatives and friends, all others from his community. He spent dedicated hours in daily prayer and up to the time of his passing, he prayed 24 hours day and night and in his sleep.

Iron Owl lived the Dakota life his entire life, for his nation, family, tiospaye relatives, adopted relatives and life-long friends. He leaves behind a fine example of love, prayer, thoughtfulness, gentleness, faithfulness and wisdom.

He was preceded in death by his parents Agnes Redhorse and Jessie Hoksina, grandparents Phillip Cransy Red Horse, Mary Ironroad, Bessie Smith and Unkana Hoksina, Angeline YoungBear and Jim Yankton, Mazawanapeya and Mary Brown. He is survived by all living descendants of his grandparents and siblings of Poplar MT, Sisseton, SD and Ft. Yates, ND: Donald Gill, Helena Brown, Antoine Walking Eagle, Leo Walking Eagle and Theresa Walking Eagle.

A wake service was held for Stephen at the Fort Totten Wellness Center on Thursday, November 16.

Funeral Services for Iron Owl were held last Friday morning, November 17, 2017 at Fort Totten Wellness Center. Reverend Robert Buechler and Spirit Lake Elder Joe Lawrence officiated, and Stephen was laid to rest in the Crow Hill Presbyterian Cemetery at the foot of his father and beside his paternal grandmother. Music was provided by the Lake Region Drum, Bdecan Presbyterian Church and all other drums are welcome.

Services Monday for Michael Weston, Flandreau

Michael S. Weston, "Ta Canku Duta" (His Red Road), 57, passed away Thursday, November 16, 2017 at Select Specialty Hospital, Sioux Falls, SD.

Mike was born December 23, 1959 at Gettysburg, SD, to Andrew and Violet (James) Weston.

He attended Rapid City Central and graduated in 1979 from Santee High School, Santee, NE.

Mike married Lisa Long on August 12, 1986 in Flandreau, SD.

He worked as a CHR, bingo caller, a casino host, and assistant manager at the Mart. Mike was a member of the Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe and served three terms on the council from 1996 – 2002 and from 2014 – 2017.

He loved working with the youth group, the pow-wow committee and coaching softball, but most of all he loved spending time with his grandkids. He just loved being a grandpa and going to all their activities and spending every Saturday spoiling them.

Mike is survived by his daughter Shasta (Megan) Weston, Sioux Falls; five grandchildren, Ashton, Avayah, Aiyana, Amiyah and Arrow Weston; his former wife Lisa, Sioux Falls; siblings, Everett "Sandy" (Belva) Weston, Myrna (Dave) Louis and James "JB" Weston, all of Flandreau; his adoptive mother, Helena Thompson and several nieces and nephews. Mike was preceded in death by his parents and grandparents.

Funeral services were scheduled this Monday, November 20, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. Monday, at Wicoicaga Otipi Community Center, Flandreau, SD, with burial in First Presbyterian Cemetery.

Wake services were held Saturday and Sunday at Wicoicaga Otipi Community Center.

Services Wednesday for Harlyn Christopherson

Harlyn L. Christopherson, 78, of Peever, SD passed away on November 17, 2017 at his home.

Funeral services will be Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 10:30 a.m. at St. Peters Catholic church in Sisseton, SD.

There will be visitation on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 from 4:00 until 7:00 p.m. at St. Peters Hall.

Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, is in charge of arrangements.

Funeral services for Faith Lufkins

Funeral service for Faith Valerie Lufkins will be held on Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 1:00 p.m. at the SWST community center, Agency Village, SD.

Wake services will be held at 7 p.m. Monday, and all night Tuesday, at the community center.

Faith passed away on November 18, 2017 at St. Francis Hospital, Breckenridge, MN.

Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD, is in charge of arrangements.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Open letter to the Oyate

November 19, 2017

Dear Old Agency District members:

I want to let you know that I am sorry for the mismanagement of funds at Old Agency District during my term as Vice-Chair of the District 2011-2013.

I am willing to work for the District to repay my over-compensation at that time.

I apologize for my inappropriate actions.

As a leader, I never intended for this to happen.

Respectfully,

Barbara Kirk.

Open letter to the Oyate

Where the members of this Tribe want to spend their money, is up to the individual. Not to hold a vote and tell or force the member where to buy groceries, where to spend his or her money.

It is not up to the Chairman or Tribal Council or the corrupt districts to force members to spend their money at the Crossings grocery store.

The money from these casinos belongs to every member of this Tribe.

What they do with it is up to them.

All members, you must vote these dictators out of office.

And it's Christmas, the holiday season, these dictators will give themselves bonuses, $1,500 to $5,000 apiece.

Every member of this Tribe deserves a bonus.

This tribal government is corrupt.

Let's impeach and remove the dictators from office.

Don't listen to their bull!

My opinion.

Larry Nerison.

Open letter to the Oyate

One year ago, November 10, 2016, Dr. Staub was abruptly terminated from his position in the clinic, hospital, and emergency room at Coteau des Prairies Hospital System ("CDP"). No cause, oral or written, was presented by CEO Michael Coyle or by the Board of Directors of CDP. Any termination of a physician by a hospital in South Dakota must report such action and the factual reasons to the physician licensing board of South Dakota (SDBMOE) in a timely fashion. This never was done.

I wrote the first of three letters to each board member requesting clarification and possible mediation of the situation (Nov. 29, 2016, and Apr. 6, 2017). There was also a letter to the editor, Sisseton Courier, printed Nov. 21, 2016 and a second letter printed Dec. 19, 2016. CDP held a Public Forum on Dec.6, 2016, on various issues and there were questions about the status of Dr. Staub. Excerpts were printed in the Sisseton Courier the following week.

Because of no response by the CDP Board of Directors, I obtained legal counsel in Sioux Falls. In January and February 2017 an attempt was made to engage and resolve two primary issues. The first was a breach of contract with Dr. Staub to cover emergency room. This required at least 60 days notice if terminated without cause. This has not been done. The second issue was termination of the clinic position without notice and cause. In 2003 the CDP clinic partnership of physicians renting clinic space from the hospital officially joined the hospital under the Rural Health entity, which provided improved payment under Medicare and Medicaid for rural hospitals and physicians. Most of the physicians did not sign offi-cial contract because of "non-compete clauses" which would not allow independent practice in Sisseton. However those same physicians, myself included, worked under the other provisions of the contract for 13 years without problems. Physician contracts are primarily written to define the relationship of professional services to the hospital and are universally the same. Individual physicians may have slightly different financial reimbursements, negotiated individually, based on specific work done. The out-of-court negoti-ations failed because of CDP demand for "settlement agreement and release" conditions, including never to apply to work at CDP hospital and clinic, never to discuss this case in public ....

In late February 2017 three CDP Board of Directors resigned. Further legal action in court was discussed with my counsel who indicated it would become quite expensive. I chose to end the legal consultation in April and represent myself. On May fourth, 2017, I filed a lawsuit (Summons, Complaints, request for Relief, Interrogatories) in the 5th Judicial Circuit, Roberts County Circuit.

CDP filed two motions. First, to dismiss, which is a standard maneuver, but no factual documentation was provided. Second, request an Order to Stay Discovery. This is an attempt to perpetuate the CEO and Board of directors "gag order" to prevent hospital employees from discussing and talking to the public anything related to Dr. Staub's termination. A court hearing was scheduled for eight weeks later on July 24, 2017. About 25 members of the public attended this open hearing. Several parts of the lawsuit were dismissed, but I filed a reply in objection to this. I finally received the required CDP response to my original summons and complaint the end of August. Because of the heavy legal schedule locally as well as across the fifth judicial circuit, I have chosen to file motions for discovery and for Declaratory Judgment, avoiding the expense and excessive time required by the court for another jury trial on the Court calendar. The court hearing originally was scheduled for Dec. 4, 2017, but needed to be delayed on the Court calendar to Thursday, Jan. 4 at 11:00 AM. This is open to the public.

The pursuit of truth and justice is often methodical and prolonged. The primary goal is to regain public trust in the local healthcare facility and help patients see their provider of choice in the clinic. My opinion, and others, is that the CDP Board of Directors needs much greater transparency of their meetings and reports of minutes to the public. After 12 months of requests, I finally received the Bylaws of the Board of Directors. Personnel issues are properly confidential. Hospital employees, administration, and Board of Directors must have absolute confidentiality to our patients. The treatment of and by physicians is outlined in the Medical Staff Bylaws and other working documents. This is the source for true respect.

David Staub, ACD.

Thankful

By U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.)

Nov. 17, 2017

This Thanksgiving, as we get together with family and friends, Jean and I would once again like to send our warmest wishes to all South Dakotans. During this festive time of the year, let's not forget that the first Thanksgiving was a time to thank the good Lord for all of our blessings. I am especially thankful for the opportunity to be able to work on your behalf in the United States Senate. Even when the debates on Capitol Hill get contentious, working for the people of South Dakota is a privilege that I'll never take for granted.

I'm also thankful for the love and support of my family as I do this job. I truly would not be able to do it without them. We're looking forward to spending Thanksgiving together at our house in Fort Pierre with many of our immediate and extended family members, including a few of our eight grandkids—we have to share them with their other grandparents sometimes! With such busy schedules these days, quality time with our family is the biggest blessing Jean and I could ask for.

Earlier this month, we celebrated Veterans Day. It is because of the men and women who serve, and their families who support them, that all of us are able to freely celebrate the holiday season with those we love. I'm incredibly thankful to our military community and our veterans for all they do and have done to protect our freedoms, and I pray for those who will be spending the holidays apart from their families. We can never repay them for their service and sacrifice, but as a member of the Senate Veterans' Affairs Committee and the Senate Armed Services Committee, I'll continue working on legislation to improve the quality of life for South Dakota's veterans and members of the armed forces, along with their family members.

Especially during the holiday season, I encourage South Dakotans to find ways to give back to their communities. There are food pantries and churches in nearly every town collecting donations, so that all of our neighbors are able to put a good meal on their Thanksgiving table. Monetary donations and food donations are both helpful, and as winter in South Dakota sets in, coats and other cold-weather clothing items are needed for kids, teens and adults. A number of volunteer organizations, charities, churches and even many local businesses hold coat drives every year, starting around this time.

As we gather with our loved ones to give thanks and count our blessings, let's also say a prayer for those who are having a hard time this year and for those who are unable to spend the holiday with their families. Jean and I wish all South Dakotans a very happy Thanksgiving and holiday season.

Bill to help address Veterans' Opioid Abuse passes Senate

VA Prescription Data Accountability Act would expand VA's authority to share prescription drug data with state monitoring programs

Washington, DC – Nov. 16, 2017 – U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.), a member of the Senate Veterans' Affairs Committee, today praised the Senate's passage of the bipartisan VA Prescription Drug Accountability Act, which he introduced with Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) earlier this year. The bill now heads to President Trump's desk to be signed into law.

"Opioid abuse is widespread throughout the United States," said Rounds. "Sadly, many of our veterans suffer from addiction to prescription painkillers prescribed to them by doctors to treat pain or injuries stemming from their service to our country. Our bill updates current law to give the VA authority to securely share patient data with state prescription drug monitoring programs. These are crucial systems that reinforce safe prescribing practices to cut down on opioid abuse and protect our veterans. I am pleased to see this bill head to the president's desk to be signed into law."

The bill would clarify current law to allow the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to share data with state Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMPs) for patients who are prescribed opioids by VA providers, including both veterans and their dependents. This legislation, for example, would enable the VA to share data with Indiana's prescription drug monitoring program, INSPECT. VA is currently only sharing prescription data on veterans, not their dependents or others treated by VA providers, due to technical issues related to the VA's health records system. As a result, a significant amount of VA prescription data is not being shared with the state's prescription drug monitoring program.

The VA Prescription Data Accountability Act is supported by the American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Paralyzed Veterans of America, and Association of the United States Navy. The Congressional Budget Office has scored the House companion as having no added cost to taxpayers.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

Introducing the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Youth Council

Submitted by Josh Max and Melissa Huff

Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi Project Staff

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Youth Council was established in August 2017 and has been up and running ever since. The group consists of 9 youth who represent both Tiospa Zina Tribal School and Sisseton High School.

The members range from 9th grade to 12th grade and all bring with them a sense of leadership and responsibility.

The Youth Council was formed with the intention of providing the youth with a voice and to create events with a welcoming atmosphere for their fellow youth members to attend. This council was established to provide guidance and leadership and instill values of one's civic duty to one's very own community. This council has already attended a Student Against Destructive Decisions (S.A.D.D) Training in Watertown, SD at the Lake Area Technical Institute center to further their own intrinsic need to lead others away from rash decisions that have potentially negative and damaging consequences.

They have also started a Teddy's for Tots campaign; The Youth Council is working with local Law Enforcement Agencies and First Responders. The campaign collects stuffed toys for agencies who may have to answer a call when children are involved or are present. The agency will use them to help provide a sense of comfort for a child during these traumatic events.

The Youth Council also took part in red ribbon week at Enemy Swim Day School's "Lights on After School" where they had students pledge to be drug free.

This group meets monthly with staff from the Tribal Education Department's Wiyukcan Ka Ecunpi project and are currently planning community events.

Please continue reading our updates to see what your Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Youth Council is up to!

Enemy Swim Day School holds Veterans Day program

By Rebecca Dargatz

School Community Director

Tokan Nuwan Wayawapi took time out of the day last Thursday, Nov. 9th, to honor the Veterans.

The 4th grade class led the assembly in the Pledge of Allegiance.

The Woodrow W. Keeble Memorial American Legion Post #314 came to spend time with the students, and to judge the annual Veterans Day Essay Contest.

This year's winners were in 6th Grade - Jourdes Chanku, 7th Grade - Jillian Lotzer, and 8th Grade - Jade White.

Guest speaker Tribal Veterans Service Officer Geri Opsal shared information with the students about going into the service, and also informed students of the many Veterans out in their community.

Students in grades kindergarten - 3rd grade took part in a coloring contest.

The coloring contest winners were kindergarten - Aubrey Grant, 1st grade - Kirwin Roberts, 2nd grade - Melody Bernard, and 3rd grade - Lorenzo LaCroix.

ESDS Drum Group sang the Honor Song.

After the assembly there was coffee, cider, and cookies.

Wopida tanka to all of our Veterans!

Cansayapi Language Bowl recap

By Jess Tiger

Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi Project's Culture and Language specialist

Two teams from Enemy Swim Day school participated in the Kawitaya Dakota Unkiapi Kte Cansayapi Iapi 2017, in Morton MN on November 11th.

There were 7 youth teams competing overall.

Congratulations to everyone!

November Dakota Language Challenge

Submitted by Jess Tiger

Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi Project's Culture and Language specialist

Our November 2017 Dakota Language Challenge was held at Enemy Swim Day School. The students competed in by playing Dakota Jeopardy.

There were a total of 8 teams participating from both Enemy Swim and Tiospa Zina. The competition was tough, the teams points were pretty close. It was exciting and fun for all the participants! The next competition will be held at Tiospa Zina.

Annual Lights on Afterschool event

By Rebecca Dargatz

School Community Director

The Toka Nuwan Wayawapi Community Education Department hosted its annual Lights On Afterschool event.

Lights On Afterschool is an annual nationwide event promoting the importance of after school programs for the youth.

Community partners attending were the SD Highway Patrol & Tribal Police, IHS Dental, SWO Youth Council, Tribal Education Department, and the Extension Office.

The ESDS FACE program ran a country bingo night, and many enjoyed the Salsa Walk.

The ESDS Culture Club served a spaghetti supper for the community.

Wopida tanka to everyone who came out to support the ESDS Afterschool Program!

ESDS honors students of the month

By Rebecca Dargatz

School Community Director

Enemy Swim Day School honors one student from each grade for each full month that school is in session.

The students of the month are chosen because they demonstrate the four school wide expectations consistently or have shown great progress toward them.

The school wide expectations are:

*Awanicihdka: Be Safe.

*Waokihi: Be Responsible.

Waunsida: Be Caring.

*Woohoda: Be Respectful.

Home room teachers choose the students of the month in collaboration with the paras and other teachers who serve a particular candidate.

Students of the month are honored during opening ceremony on the first Monday following each full month of school.

They each receive a jacket embroidered with their name and the month.

The October 2017 Students of the Month are: Kindergarten - Justice Anderson, 1st Grade - Lexi Anderson, 2nd Grade - LaShay DuMarce, 3rd Grade - Evan Davies, 4th Grade - Keandre Grant-Campbell, 5th Grade - VyDalia Redday, 6th Grade - Leticia DeLoera, 7th Grade - Solace Owen (not pictured), and 8th Grade - Tawnie Davies.

Dakota-iyapi at Enemy Swim Day School

By Barb Donley

Business Assistant

Enemy Swim Day School

These are 1st grade students at ESDS, learning and practicing the Dakotah Language.

The following Dakota sentence says "I brought my grandmother to read to us."

Kuns´i waye ki? u?ki?yawapi kta c´a awahi.

Community members are invited to stop in for a classroom visit and to read a book or tell a story.

Anyone interested is asked to call me at Toka Nuwan Wayawapi at 605-947-4605 ext. 3006 to set up a day and time. 605 947-4605 ext. 3006.

Legals

SEEKING BIDS

 The Enemy Swim Day School Board will accept sealed bids for the sale of the following surplus equipment.  1994 GMC Truck, Sierra C150, 4 x 4, with plow undercarriage with complete harness, but no plow. New 10 ply tires with less than 10,000 miles on them. Some body work needed. Some mechanical work required.  Sealed bids will be accepted until 4:00 p.m., Tuesday, December 5, 2017. Equipment can be viewed beginning November 27, 2017. Contact Ed Johnson (605-947-4605, ext. 3030) to schedule an appointment.

 The Enemy Swim Day School Board reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids, to waive any defects or technicalities in the bidding, and determine whether a bid is responsive or non-responsive.

 All items sold "as is, where is" to the highest bidder, no warranties expressed or implied.

In the event the highest bidder is unable to accept the bid award, then the next highest bidder will be granted the bid providing the bid amount is immediately available. This process will continue until a successful bid is found and is acceptable.

 Payment may be made by cash, money order, certified or cashier's check and for the full amount prior to removal of the equipment. All equipment must be paid for and removed from the premises by 3:00 p.m., Friday, December 22, 2017 or the winning bid will be rejected as non-responsive.

 Sealed bids may dropped off at the Enemy Swim Day School or mailed to:  Sealed Bid, Enemy Swim Day School, 13525 446th Avenue, Waubay, SD 57273.

 Bids should include the following information.

1. Item

2. Amount of bid

3. Name of bidder

4. Address of bidder

5. Phone number of bidder.

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REQUEST FOR BIDS/PROPOSALS (RFB/RFP)

Project: Enemy Swim Head Start

RFB#: 11-06-2017

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Head Start on this 17th day of November, 2017 herein provides notification that bids will be received for the Enemy Swim Head Start Roof Replacement Project located in Enemy Swim, South Dakota on the west side of the Enemy Swim Community Center.

Work performed will include equipment, transportation, permits, materials and labor to complete the following per specifications and any manufacturer's warranty specifications and will include a contractor's warranty of work for one-year commencing from completion and acceptance of the project.

*Removal & disposal of the existing shingles

*Removal and replacement of the existing underlayment and decking/sheathing

*Removal and replacement of existing roof insulation

*Removal and disposal of the existing soffit, fascia, gutters, downspouts and splashguards

*Inspection, removal and disposal of all existing vents

*Removal and resetting of any existing antennas or satellites

*Materials and installation of underlayment, felt material, decking/sheathing

*Materials and installation of D rib steel, insulation, foam, lumber, versa vents and all other materials and hardware

*Materials and installation of .032" thickness seamless rain gutters, downspouts, splash blocks or approved equal

*Materials and installation of soffit, fascia and drip edge

*Materials and installation of all new furnace, sewer and other vents

*Site cleanup and removal of all debris and materials

Bidder shall be responsible for conducting site review, inspection of project area and recording and taking all measurements associated with furnishing materials and completing the tasks listed above. 

Sealed bids must have bid schedule sheet completed in full with quantities, unit cost per bid item, total cost per bid item and total cost for project.  Failure to complete the bid schedule completely will result in an incomplete bid and will not be considered.

All bidders are required to provide a copy of the following with their bid:

*Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Business License

*Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate TERO Certification

*Workmen's Compensation Coverage

*Liability Insurance

Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate TERO and Tribal Tax requirements:

*TERO Tax - 3.00 %

*SWO Tribal Use Tax - 5.50 %

*SWO Tribal Excise Tax - 2.00 %

Any questions regarding TERO and SWO Tribal Tax please contact the SWO TERO Office or the SWO Tribal Tax Office at (605) 698-3911.

Sealed bids will be received by the SWHA Contract Specialist beginning on November 20, 2017 and closing on December 5, 2017 at 3:00 pm.  Any bids received after this time and date will not be opened and sent back to the bidder.  Acceptable sealed bids will be opened by the SWO Head Start Director and SWHA Contracting Specialist on December 5, 2017 at 3:30 pm at the SWO Head Start Conference Room located in Agency Village, South Dakota.

Notice of this Request for Bids herein is posted on the bulletin boards of Sisseton Wahpeton Housing Authority, Sisseton; SD; SWO TERO, Agency Village, SD; SWO Head Start, Agency Village, SD; Enemy Swim Head Start, Enemy Swim, SD; and copies of the same supplied to all building suppliers and builders exchanges located on or near the Lake Traverse Reservation, SD. The SWO Head Start reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids received for this project.

For further information and copies of bid schedule, specifications and copies of any other forms and/or project documents please contact:

David Spider, SWHA Contracting Specialist

Sisseton Wahpeton Housing Authority

605 Lydia Goodsell St.  Sisseton, SD 57262

Office: 605-698-3901

Cell: 605-237-1748

Email: dspider@venturecomm.net

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SISSETON WAHPETON OYATE

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

IN TRIBAL COURT

CASE NO. D-18-100-797

IN THE MATTER OF:

GABRIELLA LOPEZAKA

GABRIELLA JEAN LOPEZ GABRIEL

Minor Child(ren)

And Concerning:

CHERELL KEEBLE and HERMINIO LOPEZ GABRIEL, Parents.

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION

THE COURT being satisfied by Affidavit duly filed herein that personal service cannot well be made, it is Ordered that Cherell Keeble and Herminio Lopez Garbriel, who is/are the respondent(s) in the above entitled matter, be notified by three (3) weeks publication in full of the Notice of these proceedings in the regular issue of a qualified newspaper.

Dated this 6th day of November, 2017.

Signed/Tribal Court Judge.

SISSETON WAHPETON OYATE

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

IN TRIBAL COURT

CASE NO. D-18-100-797

IN THE MATTER OF:

GABRIELLA LOPEZAKA

GABRIELLA JEAN LOPEZ GABRIEL

Minor Child(ren)

And Concerning:

CHERELL KEEBLE and HERMINIO LOPEZ GABRIEL, Parents.

Take notice that Petition for Termination of Parental Rights of the above named child has been filed and a hearing will be held at the above named Court, Agency Village, outside the city of Sisseton, Roberts County. South Dakota on the 20th day of December 2017, at the hour of 2:00 o'clock PM. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 6th day of November, 2017.

By order of the court:

Signed/Tribal Court Judge.

Attest: Eileen Pfieffer, Clerk of Court.

46-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 16-058

SWOCSE/ Susan Peters, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ELSIE CAMPBELL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of November, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of October, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

47-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 15-092

SWOCSE/ Tessa Campbell, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ELSIE CAMPBELL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of November, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of October, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

47-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 16-105

SWOCSE/ SD/ David Potts, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ELSIE CAMPBELL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of November, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of October, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

47-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 13-096

SWOCSE/ Susan Peters, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ERIN CAMPBELL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of November, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of October, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

47-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-052

SWOCSE/ Elsie Campbell, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ERIN CAMPBELL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of November, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of October, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

47-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 13-182

SWOCSE/ Tessa Campbell, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ERIN CAMPBELL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of November, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of October, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

47-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 15-126

SWOCSE/ Erin Keoke, PLAINTIFF

VS.

GABRIELLE WANNA, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of November, 2017 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 31st day of October, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

47-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 00-010

SWOCSE/ Donna German, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LAWREN BARSE, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of November, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 1st day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

47-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 06-240

SWOCSE/ Amber Cadotte, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MARCUS HAYES, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of November, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 1st day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

47-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 15-038

SWOCSE/ Miranda Rodlund, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MATT NINHAM, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of November, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 1st day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

47-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 09-113

SWOCSE/ Amanda Iyarpeya, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JOHN PILCHER, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of November, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 1st day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

47-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 09-037

SWOCSE/ Jacqueline Spider, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ALEX WANNA, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of November, 2017 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 1st day of November, 2017

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

47-3tc

Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Youth Development Specialist, Veterans Memorial Youth Center

Resident Assistant (part-time), Wacinyan Tipi

Closing Date: November 27th, 2017 @ 04:30PM

CWA Section 106/319 Coordinator, Office of Environmental Protection

Planning Director, Planning Department

Closing Date: December 1st, 2017 @ 04:30PM

Application and job description information can be seen at SWO Human Resources Office or http://www.swo-nsn.gov/contact/employment. Application can be downloaded from "Apply Now" and emailed to ArnoldW@SWO-NSN.GOV or DeniseH@SWO-NSN.GOV. Contact can also be at Arnold Williams 698-8238 or Denise Hill 698-8251 with questions. (Tribal preference will apply).

 

Sisseton Wahpeton College

…has the following vacancies:

Administrative Assistant

There is an opening for a temporary part-time Administrative Assistant in our Dakota Studies Program at SWC. This position is a grant-funded position. Requirements are: High School Diploma or GED. Two years of office work experience required. Proficient with Microsoft Office, office machinery, and social media. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118. Positions close at 4:30 p.m. on Monday, November 27, 2017.

Adjunct Faculty - Dakota Studies

There is an opening for an Adjunct Faculty for the Dakota Studies Program at SWC. This position will teach American Indian Sovereignty, Intro to Tribal Government, and Intro to Indian Law. This position will teach the Spring semester. Requirements: Master's degree in Dakota Studies or related area. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118. Positions close at 4:30 p.m. on Monday, November 27, 2017.

 

Enemy Swim Day School

Executive Assistant

The Enemy Swim Day School has an opening for an Executive Assistant. Primary duties include assisting with report writing, planning, data analysis, communications, and other general clerical duties. Coordinates Wellness policy implementation, maintains Health and Wellness Grants. Qualifications: A.A. or equivalent. Grant writing experience is necessary and proficient computer skills in Microsoft Office software. For more information about the position call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 and ask for Mrs. Dolney. Indian Preference policies apply. This position is open until filled. Send application, resume, 3 letters of recommendation, and copy of education to: Enemy Swim Day School, 13525 446th Avenue, Waubay, SD 57273

Para Educators

Enemy Swim Day School has an opening for a Para Educator for the 2017-2018 school year. Must have post-secondary education, an AA degree or equivalent or successfully pass the ParaPro Assessment. ESDS can assist ParaPro Assessment preparation, if needed. Wage is dependent upon experience. This position includes benefits. Call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 and ask for Mrs. Dolney to inquire about the position. Applications may also be picked up in the administration office or online at www.esds.us. Indian Preference policies apply. Open until filled.

47-2tc

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Count Department:

Team Member (2 Full-Time) 3:00 am to finish

Hotel Department:

Laundry/Room Attendant (4 Full-Time) 8:00 am to finish

Closing Date: November 24, 2017 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions

Two identifications documents required upon hire

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department 16849 102nd Street SE Hankinson ND 58041 For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment) Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

FACILITIES: MAINTENANCE ( 1 FULL TIME) GENERAL FUNCTION: Maintain the Casino building and grounds to provide a neat, safe, and clean environment. REQUIREMENTS: Must have a high school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. Possess carpenter, electrical, or plumbing abilities. Knowledge in general maintenance repair. Must have necessary tools to complete work orders. Must have valid driver's license. Ability to work any or all shifts. Must be able to do moderate amounts of lifting and climbing. Will be required to obtain a Non Gaming license upon hire. Must be 21 years of age.

This position will close on November 22, 2017 at 4 pm.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 
 

 

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